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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 1, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning and welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. scotland yard moves to regain public confidence, as former met police officer wayne couzens begins a life sentence for the murderer of sarah everard. higher energy bills for 15 million households as a new price cap kicks in. so how much more will you pay, and what can you do to keep the costs down? i'll have all the details. scotland's vaccine passport scheme begins operation — affecting anyone wanting to go to a nightclub or a big event like a football match. a hat—trick for harry in just 20
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minutes. harry kane finally found his scoring touch again after his recent drought to help tottenham to a big win in the end in the europa conference league. a wet start to friday, skies will brighten later to sunshine and showers but some wild weather over the next few days. the full forecast here on breakfast. it's friday 1st october. our top story. the metropolitan police will deploy 650 new officers across london the met police has outlined how it intends to protect women and girls better in the wake of sarah everard's murder. scotland yard is promising more patrols across london and advising anyone stop by at loan plainclothes police officer to challenge their legitimacy. it comes after wayne couzens was handed a whole life sentence for killing sarah everard whilst still working as a metropolitan officer. sarah everard, described in court as intelligent, talented, much loved. but the question now facing the met
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is, could and should her killer wayne couzens have been stopped earlier? i recognise that for some people a precious bond of trust has been damaged. there are no words that can fully express the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry. so resign, then! she didn't respond to questions about whether she should resign. this was the moment wayne couzens falsely arrested sarah everard in south london in march. his arm outstretched, holding his warrant card. he'd go on to rape and murder her, her body dumped in woodland in kent. but back in 2015 a car owned by wayne couzens was linked to an allegation of indecent exposure. this was not picked up by police vetting. and 72 hours before the kidnap,
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there was another allegation of indecent exposure. we'll be pushing ministers and the home secretary to have a look at exactly what is going wrong in the vetting processes, in the reporting processes, in the scrutiny of police officers, and how that gets done. the met says it will shortly publish a new strategy for tackling violence against women and girls. it will be deploying 650 new officers into busy public places where people often feel unsafe. it insists it's focused on improving detections for indecent exposure. the home secretary actually, in response to this case, started off a whole piece of work around a new strategy on violence against women and girls — so looking at making our streets safer, looking at, you know, designing out some of the risks, getting more cctv, supporting more helplines. sarah everard's death prompted an outpouring of public grief. in new safety guidance the met says people should ask questions if they're concerned an officer
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is a threat — advice backed by a police watchdog. call the control, and call 999 and say, "look, i'm being asked to cooperate with someone who says he's a police officer — i want to know, is this person a police officer?" and if there are any real concerns that the person in question is going to be assaulted or abducted, then that 999 call will be treated as priority. couzens told lie after lie after his arrest. do you know sarah? i don't, no. the metropolitan police is now investigating whether he may have committed more crimes. sarah everard's family say the world is a safer place now he'll never be let out of prison. simon jones, bbc news. 0ur reporter simonjones is outside new scotland yard this morning. very good morning to you. there is, as we know, the conversation going on particularly amongst women about their safety and how they would react if a police officer were trying to arrest them, and then that
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is trying to put out some information that might go some way to reassuring people —— the met. yes, the met has described as a dreadful murder of sarah everard, most of the general incidence in its 190 year history but i think it is now facing one of its biggest challenges in that 190 year history and that is restoring confidence in the police. the met has written to mps outlining what it is going to do. it says it will send in more offices to known hotspots for violence and intimidation against women and it says members of the public can challenge officers about what they are doing and why and it hasissued what they are doing and why and it has issued some pretty extraordinary safety advice. it says it is very rare for an individual officer in plainclothes to approach someone on their own, then other officers will be centred but police say that if
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someone feels they are not safe, if they feel they are in danger, they should dial 999 or until the house and knock and ask for help. that is the advice. it shows the situation we are in this morning.— the advice. it shows the situation we are in this morning. simon, thank ou ve we are in this morning. simon, thank you very much- _ more than 15 million households across england, scotland and wales are to face higher energy bills, as the increased price cap comes into effect from today. the change will see those on standard variable tariffs pay around £140 a year more. it follows a jump in wholesale gas prices which led to the collapse of several energy firms. it is what it is, we're
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doing our best to get customers through it, we're trying to support relevant businesses through this period, and otherwise, if we need to do anything else, we are talking to government. people have reported issues trying to register for scotland's new covid passport app, just a few hours after it was launched. from today, anyone entering nightclubs and most large—scale events in scotland will need to prove they've had two doses of a coronavirus vaccine. 0fficials officials say overwhelming demand could be to blame for the problems. 0ur correspondent james shaw reports. scotland's vaccine passport scheme will have an impact across a range of live events. n ig htclu bs face particular challenges. everyone going in will have to be checked. they'll have to show a qr code on a smartphone or have a printout of their certificate. all my friends are so angry because they are waiting on this letter form of a vaccine passport, it's just ridiculous. i think they are a good idea. i think. there nothing, like, wrong with it. so i mean if people are getting vaccinated then there is nothing wrong with showing you are vaccinated, do you know what i mean? seems like an imposition, i seems unreasonable, seems like another nail in the coffin for the hospitality sector. . it's not yet clear what the impact will be for the big football clubs,
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but they will be relieved that enforcement is being delayed. rangers will play hibernian here at ibrox on saturday, and the club has told fans they must turn up with proof of vaccination. but how many will be checked, and will any fans be turned away from these gates? the scottish government insists the scheme is essential to manage the pandemic, and they say the delay will make it easier for businesses. there will be a period ofjust over two weeks when businesses get the opportunity to make sure the arrangements they have in place to do this are tested, can be adapted if necessary, and businesses get the confidence in those arrangements. no other part of the uk is bringing in a scheme quite like scotland's. as before, during the pandemic, the scottish approach is different and more cautious than elsewhere. james shaw, bbc news, glasgow. a new law, named after a teenager
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who died from an allergic reaction comes into effect across the uk today. natasha's law requires all food retailers to display full ingredient and allergen labelling on every food item made on the premises, and pre—packed for direct sale. natasha ednan—laperouse was 15 when she died — she wasn't aware the sandwich she had ate contained sesame seeds. it's a bittersweet moment because, of course, for this to happen we have lost our child — you know, we have buried our child — and it's really painful, a very painful and poignant thing to have happened to any family, but it happened to us and, in many ways, while we dedicate natasha's law to natasha, in fact it is for the people — all those two million people — that they may live a long and fruitful life. australia will reopen its international borders from november letting people into the country for the first time in 18 months. currently only people with
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exemptions and citizens can enter the country. 0ur correspondent shaimaa khalil is in sydney for us this morning. good to see it. lots of people will be breathing a sigh of relief because it has been pretty strict in australia, especially compared to the uk and we thought it was tapia. no, i mean, much of it this side. good morning. a highly anticipated announcement and really an emotional moment for thousands of australians here and overseas after nearly two years of isolation. essentially this is australia saying, we are just going to have to live with covid, we are selecting from elimination, zero covid committee vaccination. the prime minister today announced that the states with 80% vaccination rates and higher will be able to open their international borders. for now it includes only australian citizens and permanent residents. new south wales, where i am, the country's most populous state...
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0pen its international borders with a seven—day home quarantine. still a lot to iron out in terms of vaccination passports, qr codes. queensland and western australia are still going for a zero covid, they are very strict when it comes to internal borders, still don't know where it stands on the international borders, but if new south wales opens at those two other states don't, you could get an interesting scenario where an australian citizen can travel to london or paris, for example, but they still won't be able to travel to brisbane and perth are a really interesting but generally people are quite excited about the thought of getting on a plane and travelling overseas again. i imagine so. very neat pile of books behind you has caught my eye. shaimaa khalil there. 50 diagnostic sites providing tests and scans are being opened around england in local communities including shopping centres and a football stadium. it is hoped they will help reduce
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waiting times for routine operations and ease pressure on hospitals. 0ur health editor hugh pym reports. a report for nhs england last year recommended that diagnostic hubs or one—stop shops should be set up away from major hospitals so patients could get check—ups close to their homes. pilot schemes were launched and now the initiative is being extended with a0 centres open seven days a week, due to be set up in england by march next year. the £350 million plan is being funded from nhs england's existing budget. the idea is to get earlier diagnoses for patients and in different locations to allow hospitals to focus on more urgent work. gps will refer people to the most appropriate local centre for tests and scans to be carried out. the hope is that waiting times and the backlog of operations can be reduced. there will be a one—stop shop, let's call it, where people can get the scans they need — the mri scans, the ct scans
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and others — and the tests all in one place in a convenient location like a shopping centre or a localfootball club. they'll be open seven days a week and we believe that the a0 of them in their first year of operation can get through another 2.8 million scans and checks and it's going to make a huge difference. locations will be in town centres, retail developments and even a sporting site — brighton's amex football stadium. some doctors, though, are asking whether the priorities are right. it's a new version of an old idea and those of us who have been around for a little while remember when we used to have community hospitals and you could send your patients up there to have their x—rays and their ultrasound scans done and their blood taken. so there's a sense of deja vu and we've got lots of empty community hospitals around the country. seems a bit strange that we are not using those for this to get them going immediately, and instead we are building shiny new buildings or repurposing space. macmillan cancer support welcomed
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the new investment but said the government must commit to providing long—term funding to grow the specialist workforce so the nhs was equipped to recover from the impact of covid—19. hugh pym, bbc news. here at�*s first mission to make it is expected to reach its destination this weekend. the spacecraft will carry out six flybys around the planet and, if successful, the probe will start sending images back to earth. it is moving too fast to go into orbit but will give more detailed observations in four years. i like its name. and some very lucky residents in parts of northern scotland were treated to a pretty spectacular sight last night. the aurora borealis lit up the skies over the highlands and islands. this gorgeous picture was taken in 0rkney — just before the rain arrived that doesn't look real, it doesn't look real. it looks like something
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out of... while! 0ut look real. it looks like something out of... while! out of his dark materials. out of... while! out of his dark materials-— materials. have you seen this before? have _ materials. have you seen this before? have we _ materials. have you seen this before? have we had - materials. have you seen this before? have we had this - before? have we had this conversation _ before? have we had this conversation before? - before? have we had this conversation before? i'm| before? have we had this - conversation before? i'm desperate you and i don't think you have. i have always wanted to since i was a child. ., have always wanted to since i was a child. . , ., have always wanted to since i was a child. . i. , have always wanted to since i was a child. . , ., , ., child. have you seen it, charlie? ever when _ child. have you seen it, charlie? ever when it _ child. have you seen it, charlie? ever when it is _ child. have you seen it, charlie? ever when it is happening, - child. have you seen it, charlie? ever when it is happening, only. child. have you seen it, charlie? | ever when it is happening, only in pictures — ever when it is happening, only in pictures 50 — ever when it is happening, only in ictures. , , . ever when it is happening, only in ictures. ., , , . i” pictures. so it has been since you are even more — pictures. so it has been since you are even more little, _ pictures. so it has been since you are even more little, matt? - are even more little, matt? laughter even before i grew up, before i could reach the window to look out and see if i could see them. stunning shots from our weather watcher. lots of them around. hopefully more over the next few days and we are getting into the aurora season at the moment but it means it is 0rton aurora season at the moment but it means it is orton and also means we can see some pretty wild weather at times and that will be the case over the next few days, keep a close eye on the weather. some potentially
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destructive winds which could have an impact on any travel plans. 0ut there this morning, rain is the main story across the country, particularly across england and wales. this huge batch of fairly persistent rain working south was and eastwards. rates up into showers as it goes through. they could be heavy and thundery but if you are heading out, make sure you have something waterproof with you across parts of central and southern england, the midlands, east anglia, south they stay dry for some in the very far south—east but the rain will be on its way. on the overnight rain clears and it is a mixture of sunshine and some lively showers, the odd rumble of thunder. blustery conditions, driest conditions across the north—east of scotland but even here the showers were gradually developed. the rain reaches east anglia and the southeast with gusty winds through the later stages of the morning and the wind gets stronger across western areas, bringing a mixture of sunshine and showers later in the day. temperatures around 11 to 18 degrees, where we should be for the time of year. a little bit on the
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cool side across the north and the showers keep going here through the night, fairly blustery. driest and clearest would southern and eastern areas, small chance of a shower but will be cooler tonight particularly across eastern areas and things could get will be cooler tonight particularly across eastern areas and things could get lively will be cooler tonight particularly across eastern areas and things could get lively tomorrow. will be cooler tonight particularly across eastern areas and things could get lively tomorrow. more details in around half an hour. thank you, see you later on. as we've been hearing this morning, millions of us face higher energy costs from today. now it is crunch point. what about these prices?— these prices? good morning. the timin: is these prices? good morning. the timing is bad. — these prices? good morning. the timing is bad, lots _ these prices? good morning. the timing is bad, lots of _ these prices? good morning. the timing is bad, lots of people - timing is bad, lots of people yesterday talking about whacking the heating on for the first time this year. it feels like everything is costing more at the moment and your energy bill could be about to go up, as well. this is to do with the price cap, by the energy regulator 0fgem. it is designed to stop companies overcharging for gas or electricity from today that limit is going up. who for? at the 15 million households on standard variable rates. they are about to go up by
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12%, and for the average household, about £139 a year. if you are on a prepayment metre it is likely to be a bit more and of course if you use more energy above the average it will be even more. why is this happening? at the price cap is reviewed twice a year and it is based on the latest wholesale cost of energy, so that is what your supplier is buying it in for, and that has been soaring. it has been up that has been soaring. it has been up by that has been soaring. it has been up by about 250% since january. so far the cat has stopped firms from passing that expense onto us and it is partly why some of the smaller suppliers have gone bust, affecting more than 1.5 million customers. if your energy firm has collapsed your account will be transferred to another supplier but you will probably find the tariff you are put on is more expensive than your old deal or your current one. if you are currently on a fixed deal the good news is that the price cap today
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will not affect you, the rising prices won't yet. but if you are coming to the end of a contract you probably will not be able to find a cheap deal to replace it. you might be going on one of the comparison sites normally for a better quote but some of the biggest sites have stopped advertising deals at all because they just aren't any at the moment! with that in mind, what can you do to save yourself some money on the bills this winter? we sent coletta smith to find out. global gas prices, companies going bust, rising bills. it's all a bit much right now. but there are a few things you could do that will save you more than the amount your bills are going up by. i've come round tojenny�*s house to have a look around. hi, jenny. hi. and just see how much money we can save. this is culprit number one. yeah, my thermostat. 0k, and do you like it nice and warm in the house? i do, i always have the heating on a lot. well, turning your heating down by one degree — so most of us have it about 22,
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21 — if you turn it down to 20, do you reckon anyone would notice? no. well, it could save you as much as 55 quid through the year. do you ever put the telly on standby? no, ijust use the remote, it's easier to press the button and throw the remote and off you go. well, turning off the telly either at the button or at the wall could save you 35 quid a year. the dishwasher and the washing machine. yeah. if... i guess they're always on, right? they are always on. if you do one less wash a week — whether that's on the washing machine or dishwasher — that's going to clock up some savings through the year. 0k. behind you here, we've got an led light. this is pretty expensive to get in the first place so it's a bit of an outlay to begin with, but once you've bought them, led lights to save a good lot of money each year. i've got you a draft excluder — cost me all of £2.50. i didn't splash out much but the point is this would save you ten times that
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in a year if you're sticking that at the bottom of your doors, and save a load of money through the year. were you trying to hide this from me? my favourite appliance! my tumble dryer. 0k, is this on a lot? it's on an awful lot. it uses a load of energy. if you were to use it a little bit less you could save a lot on your energy bill through the year. jenny, i think we're there, i think we've done it. yeah. i think between us... i think you have! ..we have maybe beaten the price—cap rise. easy things that maybe we could all do, do you think, jenny? yeah, little changes make big savings. lots of anger and confusion about the price rises and the number of smaller companies going bust. we spoke to 0fgem, who defended raising the cap, saying nobody could have predicted a huge rise in the cost of wholesale gas. so what we've seen recently is these sort of record global gas prices, you know, this spike is happening all over the world and affecting
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a wide range of industries. 0fgem's price cap, you know, ensures that customers are paying a fair price, but it needs to reflect the cost that suppliers are actually facing. i think the thing is — totally recognise, going into winter, this is a hard time for a lot of consumers and, you know, if they are struggling to pay their bills they should contact their supplier because there is a range of help out there, and the supplier can sort of point them in the direction of what help they can get. i'm afraid the bad news is she also said we should brace ourselves for prices potentially going up again when the price cap is reviewed in the spring. after that it is possible that they could come down again as energy demand stabilises, but that is not guaranteed. in the meantime, some of those small changes at home can help you to be more aware and reduce your energy usage is that we would love to hear from you about this one, perhaps you are worried about bills going up at the moment. maybe you will have to
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make sacrifices in other areas. please get in touch, we would love to hear from you. please get in touch, we would love to hearfrom you. if please get in touch, we would love to hear from you. if you please get in touch, we would love to hearfrom you. if you have please get in touch, we would love to hear from you. if you have any questions send them in and we will try to help out after 8am. i imagine there will be _ try to help out after 8am. i imagine there will be lots _ try to help out after 8am. i imagine there will be lots of _ try to help out after 8am. i imagine there will be lots of questions. - there will be lots of questions. thank you. let's take a look at today's papers. many of the front pages dominated by one story, the sentencing of the killer of sarah everard, who was jailed for life, a whole term, yesterday. the guardian calls it the "shaming of the met" police, the daily mail focuses on calls for the head of scotland yard, dame cressida dick, to resign. the paper says a career is now under serious threat. the times assay at the met is struggling to restore its reputation as it says wayne couzens exchanged misogynistic material with colleagues months before and what's at attack. the express says priti
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patel wants to fundamentally change how police approach crimes against women. we will be speaking to the crime and policing minister, kit malthouse at 7:30am. over the last 25 years, the cancer charity maggie's has offered support, advice and comfort to thousands of patients and their families. to mark its anniversary, the organisation's president, the duchess of cornwall, has been telling our royal correspondent sarah campbell why it matters. can i ask, how long have you two been together? eight and a half years. i guess... he is trying to work it out. eight and a half years. i don't know how i would have coped mentally if maggie's wasn't here. maggie's has been an absolute lifeline for us. unfortunately, it'sjust, you know, the luck of the draw. i'm on treatment for life —
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however long that may be. it's so lovely out here, isn't it? it's really nice. diagnosed lastjuly with stage iv bowel cancer, hannah and her husband charlie are among the thousands of people who found comfort, help and support within the walls of the maggie's centre. of a maggie's centre. i have used counselling, i have seen psychologists here, i come in and everybody isjust really friendly and they understand how you're feeling and that's the biggest part of it because, actually, until you're hit by cancer i don't think you have any idea how it feels. it's obviously been a very difficult few months for both of you, but how has it helped having a site here at maggie's, and how have they helped you? if you want to come and talk to people, they're happy to talk to you. if you want to come and sit quietly and cry in the corner, that's all right, as well, and know there's nojudgement,
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everybody understands because everybody in here is in the same boat. there are 2a centres, all of which are free to use. people are encouraged to pop in and treat them like a home from home. the ethos that the mind needs help as well as the body came from maggie keswickjencks. she lost her battle with breast cancer back in 1995, leaving behind two children and the blueprint for the first centre. her cancer nurse, laura lee, has spent the years since realising maggie's vision, and no—one could have predicted the extra challenges brought by covid. when we look at the last 18 months and how cancer has been affected through covid, we know that people have been late to present, have experienced a late diagnosis. their treatment plans have been altered or slow to start, and so covid has had a huge impact on people's mental health, theirfears, their worries and anxieties. 25 years after the first centre opened, dame laura lee has formed a formidable partnership with maggie's president, the duchess of cornwall.
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she addressed donors and supporters at clarence house, setting out why she believes every nhs cancer hospital needs a maggie's on site. i've been told that almost a million mammograms were missed during the pandemic. the work that maggie's begun 25 years ago is not yet done. committed both publicly and privately to maggie's since 2008, the duchess told me why she has championed this particular cause. to be able to, you know, just cross the road and go to this quiet, cosy, warm centre and talk to people who really know everything there is to know about cancer, it's... i think it's the greatest thing. celebrating the story so far, but the ambition is to double the number of centres in just ten years. ensuring everyone, no matter where they live, has free and easy access to the care
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that maggie's has to offer. sarah campbell, bbc news, clarence house. definitely a worthwhile cause. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. residents in an east london tower block are being moved out after inspections revealed it could not be kept safe without major refurbishment or demolition and rebuilding. housing association, clarion, told 120 households in clare house in bow that they'll have to move into temporary accomodation before they are found new permanent housing. box built in this way have to go through new assessments since the grenfell disaster. clarion told us there will be a round—the—clock waking watch in the building, as it helps people move out of the building. barking & dagenham has emerged
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as one of the worst places in england for fuel poverty, according to data from the end fuel poverty coalition. it says the ongoing energy crisis could see fuel poverty become endemic in society, particularly for pensioners who they say find it more difficult to change provider and who may be using pay as you go rather than fixed rate tarrifs. statues of two politicians linked to the slave trade are set to remain on display at the guildhall in the city of london. the city of london corporation had previously agreed to move the statues of william beckford and sirjohn cass elsewhere, after reviewing its past links to slavery following the killing of george floyd last year. every week in the uk, 12 young people between the ages of 1a and 35 die of an undiagnosed heart condition. the charity, cardiac risk in the young, now wants to change that by screening every young person in the uk for heart problems. it says early screening and treatment can help bring down the numbers of those dying. we have never accepted that as a society, we should just sit back and see fit and healthy young people
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dying suddenly from undiagnosed conditions, and to do nothing about that. and we know that screening can prevent up to 89% of these sudden deaths, that's what the research has shown. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. good are looking right now. service and all the tubes thir morning. now on to the weather. good morning, i'll start, we start the mid teens celsius, the low pressure is in charge which means icy is going to rather wet and windy morning. we have a cold front moving through and that will bring a spell of heavy and persistent rain but icy clears away south eastwards, pushed through on gusty south—westerly winds, showers to follow but largely drive with some sunshine through this afternoon. temperatures today despite the wind and rain up to 18 celsius. into this evening and overnight, icy remains dry and clear. temperatures quite chilly,
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but we will see towards the early hours the cloud feeding in as the next front approaches as we head into saturday. minimum temperature of six celsius. saturday, low pressure still in charge across the weekend, isobars squeezing together and a big spell of rain on saturday. staying wet and windy tomorrow, perhaps on sunday a drier day was sunny spells but also a risk of shower on sunday. the breeze will stay strong and the conditions staying unsettled into next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now at the usual address. it is back to charlie and naga hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up on breakfast this morning: we'll be speaking to the widower of dame barbara windsor, scott mitchell. he's running the london marathon this weekend in her memory.
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europe's first mission to mercury is set to reach its destination this weekend. one of the scientists behind the project will tell us about the incredible moment — 20 years in the making. and after being diagnosed with stage four bowel cancer, deborahjames thought she'd never see her 40th birthday — she'll chat to us about celebrating the milestone while also remembering those who weren't as fortunate. let's go back to one of our main stories — nhs scans and tests will be offered at shopping centres and football stadiums in england to help deal with the backlog caused by the pandemic. it's hoped the new, local community sites will ease pressures on hospitals and reduce waiting times. let's talk more about this with one of our regular gps, dr ellie cannon. good morning. how will this work? well, people may be familiar with centres like this rather than going to hospital, for example, foreign
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and —— ultrasound scan. people have nay had an ultrasound more locally, perhaps in the gp or health centre or in a diagnostic centre. that's really the idea of these centres on a larger scale, that we have big centres where you can have a ct scan, or an centres where you can have a ct scan, oran mri centres where you can have a ct scan, or an mri or x—ray, centres where you can have a ct scan, oran mri orx—ray, all centres where you can have a ct scan, or an mri or x—ray, all that type of imaging that is normally within a hospital. but actually within a hospital. but actually within your community. which means it is easier to get there, quicker all round, you're not going into hospital, and it'sjust a much smoother, much quickerjourney for smoother, much quicker journey for people. smoother, much quicker “ourney for --eole. , ., smoother, much quicker “ourney for ..eole, 4' ., smoother, much quicker “ourney for --eole. i. ~ ., ., smoother, much quicker “ourney for --eole. ~ ., ., people. indeed, you know, what can --eole people. indeed, you know, what can peeple expect _ people. indeed, you know, what can peeple expect for — people. indeed, you know, what can people expect for the _ people. indeed, you know, what can people expect for the kind _ people. indeed, you know, what can people expect for the kind of - people expect for the kind of treatment? or will they see when they go there and what kind of will be there? , ., .,. ., , , be there? they would actually see an bod , be there? they would actually see anybody. so _ be there? they would actually see anybody. so for — be there? they would actually see anybody, so for example, - be there? they would actually see anybody, so for example, at - be there? they would actually see anybody, so for example, at the l anybody, so for example, at the moment if i want a patient to have a scan, there are some scans that are very easy for a gp to order, for example, a chest x—ray, but when things become a bit more
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complicated, for example a ct scan, then usually i will have to arrange for a patient to be seen in hospital, possibly even by a doctor first. the idea of these centres is actually that every gp, i have direct access to those scans, and the beauty of that really is that if i am concerned that a patient has cancer such as pancreatic cancer, that can only be diagnosed in a ct scan and it means that i have access to my patient for those type of scans much faster.— to my patient for those type of scans much faster. what kind of professionals — scans much faster. what kind of professionals or _ scans much faster. what kind of professionals or at _ scans much faster. what kind of professionals or at these - scans much faster. what kind of. professionals or at these diagnostic centres which are what you would have radiographers, specialist health care professionals. there would be imaging _ health care professionals. there would be imaging centres, - health care professionals. there would be imaging centres, it - would be imaging centres, it wouldn't be any sort of doctors or teams who would then treat you, the idea is that they are diagnostic centres, to give us those tools to diagnose cancer quicker, to get
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people the treatment they need quicker, because we have the evidence from the scans. what is the issue, is it space _ evidence from the scans. what is the issue, is it space in _ evidence from the scans. what is the issue, is it space in hospitals, - evidence from the scans. what is the issue, is it space in hospitals, or- issue, is it space in hospitals, or footfall in hospitals in the sense that the equipment is there in hospital, what's the problem with going to hospital and getting the scan? it’s going to hospital and getting the scan? �* , ., ., , going to hospital and getting the scan? 2 ., ., , going to hospital and getting the scan? ., , , ., scan? it's a really good question and something _ scan? it's a really good question and something that _ scan? it's a really good question and something that we've - scan? it's a really good question and something that we've seen l scan? it's a really good question - and something that we've seen over the last ten to 20 years, between primary and secondary care. what we find is that when people are trudging to hospital for their appointment orfor their trudging to hospital for their appointment or for their scan, trudging to hospital for their appointment orfortheirscan, in appointment or for their scan, in fact appointment orfortheirscan, in fact that's a very clunky process. 0bviously fact that's a very clunky process. obviously are places, administrative issues, as you say the footfall now since the last year, when we think about infection risk, and what we have found in the past few years is actually, bringing people out of hospitals into community settings, whether that is for their diabetes
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care or their physiotherapy, is actually much smoother, much more efficient, the centres are smaller, often as a gp i would know the personnel in those smaller centres and would be able to communicate easily with them and it makes everything faster and more efficient both for the patient but also for the health care professionals. so would you say, if i want one of these diagnostic centres, which opened, say one opened tomorrow, i would get the results and treatment quicker than i would if i went to a hospital? quicker than i would if i went to a hosital? ., ., . ., , hospital? you would certainly get our hospital? you would certainly get your results _ hospital? you would certainly get your results quicker, _ hospital? you would certainly get your results quicker, and - hospital? you would certainly get your results quicker, and that - hospital? you would certainly get i your results quicker, and that would mean your gp, if it was something serious, would be able to refer you very quickly straightaway. my patient has this issue on a scan and she needs to be seen quickly. and really, that means that referrals are prioritised and targeted, and yes, it would make the whole process is a patient quicker. qm.
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yes, it would make the whole process is a patient quicker.— is a patient quicker. 0k, good to know. is a patient quicker. 0k, good to know- thank _ is a patient quicker. 0k, good to know. thank you _ is a patient quicker. 0k, good to know. thank you for _ is a patient quicker. 0k, good to know. thank you for taking - is a patient quicker. 0k, good to know. thank you for taking us i know. thank you for taking us through that. some furious scribbling going on! thursday morning on friday night is always a bit of a geography lesson in football. warsaw, leverkusen, vienna, nura, where's that in slovenia. it is hard to keep up with at times! five british teams last night. what is going on with celtic? 0ff night. what is going on with celtic? off the pace in the league. now bottom of the europa league group as well. another disappointing night for celtic in the europa league. their bad run of form continues after they were thumped 4—0 at home to bayer leverkusen. they now face a huge challenge if they're to qualify out of their
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chris sutton has tweeted that the manager needs patience and time and will stick with his style of play. and rangers are rooted to the bottom of their group after they were beaten 1—0 by sparta prague. david hancko's headerjust about crossed the line in the first half despite allan mcgregor�*s best efforts. west ham united are top their group after a 2—0 win over rapid vienna at the london stadium. the hammers opened the scoring on the half hour mark michail antonio laying it on a plate for declan rice to tap in, that one his second goal in as many games in europe this season. they had to grind it out though, the visitors had a penalty decision overturned before said benrama wrapped up the points for david moyes's side deep in injury time. leicester were beaten by legia warsaw to continue their poor start to the season. mahir emreli scored the only goal of the game in the first half. a hattrick from harry kane helped
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tottenham hospur to a win over ns mura in the europa conference league. kane was only introduced to the game with half an hour remaining but he didn't take long to make an impact as he scored three goals injust 20 minutes. admittedly not against the most difficult opposition in the league. it was a morale boosting win for the side after they were humbled by neighbours arsenal last weekend. i think it was a good performance, i think— i think it was a good performance, i think we _ i think it was a good performance, i think we started very well and the boys were... it is important, always important _ boys were... it is important, always important to — boys were... it is important, always important to start the way we did, we score, — important to start the way we did, we score, we score again, we dominate _ we score, we score again, we dominate. the only period was the beginning — dominate. the only period was the beginning of the second half where we lost _ beginning of the second half where we lost a _ beginning of the second half where we lost a bit of control. but the reaction — we lost a bit of control. but the reaction was good. and overall i think— reaction was good. and overall i think a — reaction was good. and overall i think a very— reaction was good. and overall i think a very good performance. harry— think a very good performance. harry kane's rediscovered form will
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be a welcome sight for the england manager, gareth southgate. phil foden and ollie watkins have been named in gareth southgate's england squad for the up coming world cup qualifiers against andorra and hungary next month. foden returns having missed the last matches in september because of injury — the same applies for the aston villa forward 0llie watkins. ac milan defender fikayio tomoroi is also included along with arsenal goalkeeper aaron ramsdale in place of nick pope. manchester united defender harry maguire misses out through injury along with liverpool defender trent alexandor—arnold. we have got to now push each time we are together, we have to push performance every day on the training pitch. and so, yes, we have kept some stability, which i think is right. but every player in that team and in that squad now is that there is huge competition for places, and i think that's driving some of the performances that we have. andy murray has been knocked out of the second round of the san diego 0pen. he lost in straight sets to
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the norwegian player who described murray as a legend and said his fightback had been an inspiration. murray was in the event as a world cup and has been given another into next week's indian wells masters starting next wednesday. and cameron norrie came out on top in the all british affair against dan evans. he won in straight sets to book his place in the quarterfinals. catalans dragons are through to their first grand final after beating hull kr in the play—off semifinal. the dragons were always in control in perpignan, and when fouad yaha went over in the second half the game was beyond doubt. they'll now face the winners of leeds rhinos and st helens in the grand final on the 9th of october. and finally, it's only been a few days since the american team regained the ryder cup by a record margin, at whistling straights at wisconsin, but the big—hitting bryson dechambeau is already back booming drives — but not on the course. he's been competiting in the professional long drivers
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of america world championships in nevada. he's been competing in the professional long drivers and bryson managed to win three of his five sets to make his way through to the round of 32. he hit 420 yards, but here was into a headwind. 328 one of his longer efforts. not a spectacular competition to watch, but it is starting her for — and how far they can hit the ball. lovely weather! although with a headwind, you can't really see the wind. but he still managed. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. look at that picture, none of us will experience that! some well. lots of very disrupted — my disruptive weather potentially at the weekend and into next week, some
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heavy rain at times. winds could be the biggest features for some, not for all but icy could add up to some travel problems. if you are on the move. today at the moment, certainly rain on the story particularly across parts of england and wales. within that band there are some nasty downpours, especially south and east. for the next few hours, the far south—east and parts of east anglia may stay dry but you will need something waterproof in central and southern england, the midlands and southern england, the midlands and the northern portion of east anglia. west of that things will brighten up quickly this morning, a scattering of showers, some heavy infantry. even if icy is sunny, you can't guarantee you will be out of the woods as far as downpours skin surface of the lightest of the winds to the north of scotland where we start dry but the showers will push through. most thesis seeing some sunshine at times, windiest the next ers in east anglia and the south—east and in the afternoon across some western parts, driving in heavy and thundery showers stop but for much of central, eastern
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wales, much of england, east of scotland, the afternoon looking much better than icy is at the moment. many will be dry. a bit cool in the breeze. forthe many will be dry. a bit cool in the breeze. for the showers tonight, more persistent rain down towards the south—west later, a more chilly night, temperatures in single figures for many but the rain will push east, bringing strong winds and over the next few days, saturday, strongest winds likely to be across the south—east, sunday the far north of scotland could see some damaging wind and keep an eye out on tuesday, a repeated cycle of low pressure system is heading our way. more throughout the morning. do you know what the weather is like mercury? i know what the weather is like mercu ? ,., . ,, ., know what the weather is like mercu ? . ,, ., i. mercury? i will get back to you! thank you- _ mercury? i will get back to you! thank you- i — mercury? i will get back to you! thank you. i don't _ mercury? i will get back to you! thank you. i don't know! - mercury? i will get back to you! thank you. i don't know! don'tl mercury? i will get back to you! - thank you. i don't know! don't leave me hanging! um? thank you. i don't know! don't leave me hanging!— it's a journey that's been 20 years in the making, but this weekend europe's first mission to mercury will reach its destination. the bepicolombo probe will fly over the planet's surface and send photos
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back to scientists on earth. joining us now is dr suzie imber, who's associate professor in space physics at the university of leicester — and part of the mission team. so, you helped build it, basically, or developed parts of the probe? yes, our group at the university built one of the instruments on board that is currently on its way to mercury. 50 board that is currently on its way to mercury-— to mercury. so where is it now, what's happening? _ to mercury. so where is it now, what's happening? it _ to mercury. so where is it now, what's happening? it launchedl to mercury. so where is it now, | what's happening? it launched in 2018 and it _ what's happening? it launched in 2018 and it has _ what's happening? it launched in 2018 and it hasjust _ what's happening? it launched in 2018 and it hasjust reached - what's happening? it launched in 2018 and it hasjust reached the l 2018 and it has just reached the orbit of mercury, it will fly past mercury tomorrow morning. we are seeinr the mercury tomorrow morning. we are seeing the take — mercury tomorrow morning. we are seeing the take of— mercury tomorrow morning. we are seeing the take of pictures - mercury tomorrow morning. we are seeing the take of pictures here. i l seeing the take of pictures here. i watched it launch, i wasn't that close, sadly. everything went according to plan, that was in 2018, october. it's a seven yearjourney 0ctober. it's a seven yearjourney to mercury, you can't go straight there. if you went on a straight line, you would end up going through the sun. so we do laps of the solar
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system, gradually getting closer and closer to the orbit of mercury. 50. closer to the orbit of mercury. so, exlain closer to the orbit of mercury. so, exolain that? _ closer to the orbit of mercury. so, explain that? here _ closer to the orbit of mercury. so, explain that? here we _ closer to the orbit of mercury. so, explain that? here we are - closer to the orbit of mercury. so, explain that? here we are going i explain that? here we are going around in a _ explain that? here we are going around in a circle, _ explain that? here we are going around in a circle, we _ explain that? here we are going around in a circle, we launch i explain that? here we are going i around in a circle, we launch from the earth, we flew past the earth. the x is the spacecraft. they are flying past venus, we do two flybys of venus. we fly past venus twice, that's already happened. this is the flyby of the earth. 50 it that's already happened. this is the flyby of the earth.— flyby of the earth. so it gets closer, flyby of the earth. so it gets closer. so — flyby of the earth. so it gets closer, so it _ flyby of the earth. so it gets closer, so it is _ flyby of the earth. so it gets closer, so it is like - flyby of the earth. so it gets| closer, so it is like concentric circles? . , closer, so it is like concentric circles? ., , ., ., ., , circles? gradually heading towards mercury man _ circles? gradually heading towards mercury man with _ circles? gradually heading towards mercury man with fly _ circles? gradually heading towards mercury man with fly past - circles? gradually heading towards mercury man with fly past mercuryj mercury man with fly past mercury six times. every time we fly past the planet, we use it to help us slow down and change the direction slightly so we don't have to use fuel... �* , ., ., ., ., fuel... because the gravitational ull? fuel... because the gravitational pull? yes- _ fuel. .. because the gravitational pull? yes- it— fuel... because the gravitational pull? yes. it was _ fuel... because the gravitational pull? yes. it was named - fuel... because the gravitational pull? yes. it was named after i fuel... because the gravitational. pull? yes. it was named after the scientist to _ pull? yes. it was named after the scientist to figure _ pull? yes. it was named after the scientist to figure out _ pull? yes. it was named after the scientist to figure out how- pull? yes. it was named after the scientist to figure out how to i pull? yes. it was named after the | scientist to figure out how to send a spacecraft to mercury. fine scientist to figure out how to send a spacecraft to mercury.— scientist to figure out how to send a spacecraft to mercury. one of the thins a spacecraft to mercury. one of the thin . s as a spacecraft to mercury. one of the things as to — a spacecraft to mercury. one of the things as to when _ a spacecraft to mercury. one of the things as to when we _ a spacecraft to mercury. one of the things as to when we were - a spacecraft to mercury. one of the things as to when we were sitting l things as to when we were sitting down is, why can't the craft landed
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on mercury? i down is, why can't the craft landed on mercury?— on mercury? i think we will eventually _ on mercury? i think we will eventually land _ on mercury? i think we will eventually land on - on mercury? i think we will eventually land on it i on mercury? i think we will eventually land on it but i on mercury? i think we willl eventually land on it but the on mercury? i think we will- eventually land on it but the way that planetary missions normally work is you might fly past and get a sense of the environment, then launch another mission which is a larger mission to go to orbit around the planetary body, then you gain a lot more insights into the surface and the dynamics, then later on, you might send a land are, as happened on mars, when you know where you want to land it and you understand the environment better. that takes ares! isn't the environment better. that takes ages! isn't it _ the environment better. that takes ages! isn't it frustrating? _ the environment better. that takes ages! isn't it frustrating? if- the environment better. that takes ages! isn't it frustrating? if we i ages! isn't it frustrating? if we were to land the crafter mercury, when would it happen realistically, and why? 50 when would it happen realistically, and wh ? ., , ., when would it happen realistically, andwh ? ., , ., ~ . , and why? so the “ourney to mercury is unusual in — and why? so the journey to mercury is unusual in that _ and why? so the journey to mercury is unusual in that it _ and why? so the journey to mercury is unusual in that it takes _ and why? so the journey to mercury is unusual in that it takes seven i is unusual in that it takes seven years to get there so this mission was, it started planning around 2000, launched in 2018, it will get there in 2025. we havejust 2000, launched in 2018, it will get there in 2025. we have just started to think about land is now, and if you think about a similar time frame, we are talking about probably 2040 before we finally land. truths; frame, we are talking about probably 2040 before we finally land.- 2040 before we finally land. why is that? it depends _ 2040 before we finally land. why is that? it depends on _
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2040 before we finally land. why is that? it depends on where - 2040 before we finally land. why is that? it depends on where you i that? it depends on where you are auoin back that? it depends on where you are going backfor— that? it depends on where you are going back for mercury _ that? it depends on where you are going back for mercury there i that? it depends on where you are going back for mercury there are l going back for mercury there are lots of uncertainties to do with the surface, what it is made of, how it has changed since it formed, but we need to know where we want to land. if you send a lander, if you think about it, you will have to be able to find out the pressure wherever you end up. we need to go a lot about the surface before you pick the landing site, so our mission will orbit the planet for a year, taking a lot of data to help us up really understand a lot more about the surface. the other thing about this mission which makes it special is that there are two spacecraft going to mercury, notjust one. and that means that we can have one spacecraft close to the planet looking at the surface features and understanding the geology, what's happened in its and one further away looking at the magnetic field, the interaction with the sun. so we can do both things at once which is unusual. , ., ., �* , ., ., unusual. given how long bepicolombo is travellin: unusual. given how long bepicolombo is travelling for, _ unusual. given how long bepicolombo is travelling for, how _ unusual. given how long bepicolombo is travelling for, how is _ unusual. given how long bepicolombo is travelling for, how is it _ is travelling for, how is it
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powered?— is travelling for, how is it owered? . ., ., , ., powered? we have iron engines. you are throwing — powered? we have iron engines. you are throwing particles _ powered? we have iron engines. you are throwing particles at _ powered? we have iron engines. you are throwing particles at one - powered? we have iron engines. you are throwing particles at one side i are throwing particles at one side and it accelerates you in the other direction —— we have ion engines. it is firing particles out of one side. think about a rocket engine. the fire particles out one way and you accelerate the other way. the acceleration is about the equivalent of a couple of £1 coins in the end of a couple of £1 coins in the end of my finger. the advantage of an ion, it's a very slow burning, long duration engine. i ion, it's a very slow burning, long duration engine.— ion, it's a very slow burning, long duration engine. i don't understand, ion? how are _ duration engine. i don't understand, ion? how are they _ duration engine. i don't understand, ion? how are they created? - duration engine. i don't understand, ion? how are they created? we i duration engine. i don't understand, | ion? how are they created? we have the ion engine _ ion? how are they created? we have the ion engine that _ ion? how are they created? we have the ion engine that generates - ion? how are they created? we have the ion engine that generates the i the ion engine that generates the irons we need and we accelerate them out of the front. so as you fall towards mercury, you get faster and faster as you are heading towards the centre will be slow the spacecraft down.—
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the centre will be slow the sacecraft down. . ., , ,., spacecraft down. what is powering ion engine? _ spacecraft down. what is powering ion engine? we — spacecraft down. what is powering ion engine? we have _ spacecraft down. what is powering ion engine? we have a _ spacecraft down. what is powering ion engine? we have a fuel- spacecraft down. what is powering ion engine? we have a fuel source| spacecraft down. what is powering i ion engine? we have a fuel source on board. ion engine? we have a fuel source on board- along — ion engine? we have a fuel source on board. along with _ ion engine? we have a fuel source on board. along with last? _ ion engine? we have a fuel source on board. along with last? it _ ion engine? we have a fuel source on board. along with last? it flies i ion engine? we have a fuel source on board. along with last? it flies for i board. along with last? it flies for months at a _ board. along with last? it flies for months at a time, _ board. along with last? it flies for months at a time, we _ board. along with last? it flies for months at a time, we don't i board. along with last? it flies for months at a time, we don't fire i board. along with last? it flies for months at a time, we don't fire it| months at a time, we don't fire it continually but in bursts. the thing about the flyby is that they really help us use less fuel to get there because as we go past the planet we are using the planet to slow us down on ourjourney, so flying past mercury is really important, as we flyby we get data, some of the instruments will be switched on, we will see images of the surface, taking data at looking at the magnetic field in the particles, flying past very close to the planet, we get to 200 kilometres from the surface, which is extremely close. so we will get data back but the purpose of the flyby and the six flybys in total of mercury is to help us change the trajectory and slow down so that eventually in a few years from now, our spacecraft at mckrae be in the same place going
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same direction canned so finally, we can separate the spacecraft out and they will go into orbit. mei]! can separate the spacecraft out and they will go into orbit.— they will go into orbit. well done for exolaining — they will go into orbit. well done for explaining all— they will go into orbit. well done for explaining all that _ they will go into orbit. well done for explaining all that and - they will go into orbit. well done for explaining all that and thank| for explaining all that and thank you for tolerating probably but were quite stupid questions! but good, thank you. when you say data, do pictures? thank you. when ou sa data, do ictures? , when you say data, do pictures? yes, but also magnetic _ when you say data, do pictures? ya: but also magnetic field data, when you say data, do pictures? 123 but also magnetic field data, data about the... but also magnetic field data, data about the- - -_ but also magnetic field data, data about the. . ._ we i about the... scientific stuff. we will send you — about the... scientific stuff. we will send you a _ about the... scientific stuff. we will send you a photo. - after dame barbara windsor was diagnosed with dementia, she used her profile to raise awareness — and help others living with the disease. nine months after her death, her husband scott mitchell is continuing that campaign. on sunday, he'lljoin thousands of runners taking part in the london marathon and he's raising money for alzheimer's research uk. david sillito went to meet him. # ain't it a shame sparrows can't sing?
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barbara windsor. from carry on to peggy in eastenders, she was a part of british life for more than 50 years. and 27 of them she shared with her husband scott, and he was there by her side on one of her last public appearances — a trip to downing street to raise awareness about alzheimer's. and now, nine months after her death, that commitment they had to be open, to campaign, to raise awareness, continues. you lived here a long time together and it's a place full of memories, isn't it? yeah. we're talking nine months since barbara passed, and me more than anyone is aware that that's very early in stages of grieving. you know, we spent 27 years of our life together, and we really were together a lot as a couple. i think it's no secret that caring for someone with alzheimer's is a very challenging thing — i'd certainly say the most
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challenging thing i've ever been through in my life. the barbara the public met was funny and sharp and always open and gregarious. um... it must have been very difficult when you began to see changes in her. yeah. it seemed that barbara — once we got the diagnosis, it seemed that there in the room at the time she... i'v e. i've always recalled this story. she looked at me and she put her hand out and said "i'm sorry" to me. that was her initial reaction. and i said, "don't worry, bar," i said, "it'll be ok. it'll be ok." then she went into a completely different mode, which was, "ok, let's get on with life, let's, you know, i've got my work to get on with," and that's what she did and,
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you know, the advice given to me at the time was...let her continue as long as she can. the decision to go public — 2018, wasn't it? mm. what sort of impact did that have? what i didn't want was i didn't want barbara — and it's the same with people living with alzheimer's and dementia and theirfamilies — you don't want to have to hide that person away. you know, you don't want to have to feel that there's a shame to it, and i think for many years there has been a great shame attached to dementia, and how people feel they can talk about it and be open about it. and, of course, barbara being a public figure made it even more difficult because people constantly would be drawn to her the minute they saw her. and we spoke to her about it and explained to her what was happening — which she understood — and the other big thing that meant a lot to her was,
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isaid, "you know, barbara, by talking about this, you're going to be helping so many other people." you're about to do the marathon on sunday. you're going to have many thoughts nine months on, i'm guessing. when i go around this time it's going to be a completely different run for me. 0f course...| was supposed to do it last year, barbara was still here with us. i'm going to be reflecting on a lot. i'm going to be reflecting on that lady i spent 27 of my life with. she will be with me the whole way, like she's been on every training run. you know, i talk to her so much in my head when i'm running. the thing that will be missing for me is, when i finished in 2019, i got to the finish line and i phoned barbara — she was here with her carer and i phoned her and i wasjust, like, elated and euphoric and i said, "barbara, i'vejust run a marathon!"
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and she said, "oh, very good, dear, what time will you be home?" he laughs. totally not grasping the enormity of what i felt i'd done on my 56th birthday. and i went, "well, i'll be home soon, love, there'sjust a little celebration that i'm just going to stop off at." she said, "but you've been out all day!" which is wonderful and, oh, goodness, barbara, how i wish i could make that call again. but, you know... not to be this year. was really lovely is to see scott smiling with those memories, which clearly are so fresh in his mind, and we wish you all the best at the weekend, i hope it goes well for you. i can you. ican imagine you. i can imagine barbara windsor saying, what time will you be home? you can watch live coverage of the london marathon this sunday on bbc two from 08:00 and bbc one from 10:00. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. people living in a tower block in east london are being moved out after inspections revealed it isn't safe unless its after inspections revealed it isn't safe unless it's refurbished or rebuilt. 120 households in clare house in bow will go into temporary accomodation until a permanent solution is found. blocks built in this way now have go through new assesments since the grenfell disaster. clarion housing association said there will be round the clock safety patrols as people move out. statues of two british figures linked to the slave trade barking & dagenham has emerged as one of the worst places in england for fuel poverty. that's according to data from the end fuel poverty coalition. it's from the end fuel poverty coalition. a new and is a ha rd est it's a new and is also likely to be hardest hit. campaigners are warning it could become commonplace in certain areas. statues of two british figures linked to the slave trade will remain on display
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at the guildhall despite a decision to remove them. the city of london corporation had agreed monuments of william beckford and sirjohn cass would go, after reviewing its links to slavery. but a working group has now recommended they be kept, with the addition of plaques giving historical context. there are calls for more screening in young people to detect those who may be unaware they have a heart problem. every week in the uk, 12 people between the ages of 14 and 35 die of an undiagnosed heart condition. the charity cardiac risk in the young says early treatment is key. we've never accepted that, as a society, we should just sit back and see fit and healthy young people dying suddenly from undiagnosed conditions, and to do nothing about that. and we know that screening can prevent up to 89% of these sudden deaths — that's what the research has shown.
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this is how public transport is looking right now. on to the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a mild start this morning. we start the day in mid teens celsius but low pressure — it is in charge, which means it is going to be a rather wet and windy at least morning today. we've got this cold front moving through and that's going to bring a spell of heavy and persistent rain but it does clear away south and eastwards, pushed through on a very gusty south—westerly wind. some showers to follow but largely dry with some sunshine through this afternoonand temperatures today — despite the wind and this morning's rain — getting up to 18 celsius. now into this evening, overnight, it remains dry and it remains clear. temperatures quite chilly overnight — certainly chillier than last night — but we'll see towards the early hours a bit more cloud feeding in as our next front approaches as we head into saturday. the minimum temperature dropping to six celsius. now for saturday itself, low pressure still in charge, as it is across the weekend. we see the isobars squeezing together and a big spell of rain for saturday. it's going to stay wet and windy
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tomorrow, perhaps sunday a drier day on the whole with some sunny spells, but there's also the risk of a shower on sunday. now the breeze is going to stay strong and conditions, as you can see, staying unsettled into next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to charlie and naga. good morning and welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today. in the wake of the murder of sarah everard scotland yard moves to regain public confidence, as former met police officer wayne couzens begins a whole—life sentence. the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened to sarah.
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i am so sorry. higher energy bills for 15 million households as a new price cap kicks in. australia says it will re—open its borders to travellers in november — after 18 months of tight restricitons. a hat—trick for harry in just 20 minutes. england captain harry kane finally finds his scoring touch again after his recent drought to help tottenham to a big win in the europa conference league. lots of heavy rain around this morning, turning to sunshine and showers later so an improving day but don't drop your guard, there is wet and windy weather to come through this weekend. i will have the details later. good morning. it is friday the 1st of october. 0ur good morning. it is friday the 1st of october. our top stories at the metropolitan police has outlined how it intends to reassure the public in
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the wake of sarah everard's murder. scotland yard is promising more patrols across london and advising anyone stop by a lone plainclothes officer to challenge their legitimacy. it comes after wayne couzens was handed a whole life sentence for abducting and killing the 33—year—old while he was still working as a metropolitan officer. simon jones working as a metropolitan officer. simonjones has more. sarah everard, described in court as intelligent, talented, much loved. but the question now facing the met is, could and should her killer wayne couzens have been stopped earlier? i recognise that for some people a precious bond of trust has been damaged. there are no words that can fully express the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry. so resign, then!
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she didn't respond to questions about whether she should resign. this was the moment couzens falsely arrested sarah everard in south london in march. his arm outstretched, holding his warrant card. he'd go on to rape and murder her, her body dumped in woodland in kent. but back in 2015 a car owned by couzens was linked to an allegation of indecent exposure. this wasn't picked up by police vetting. and 72 hours before the kidnap, there was another allegation of indecent exposure. we'll be pushing ministers and the home secretary to have a look at exactly what is going wrong in the vetting processes, in the reporting processes, in the scrutiny of police officers, and how that gets done. the met says it will shortly publish a new strategy for tackling violence against women and girls. it will be deploying 650 new officers into busy public places where people often feel unsafe. it insists it's focused on improving detections for indecent exposure. the home secretary actually, in response to this case,
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started off a whole piece of work around a new strategy on violence against women and girls — so looking at making our streets safer, looking at, you know, designing out some of the risks, getting more cctv, supporting more helplines. sarah everard's death prompted an outpouring of public grief. in new safety guidance the met says people should ask questions if they're concerned an officer is a threat — advice backed by a police watchdog. couzens told lie after lie after his arrest. do you know sarah? i don't, no. the metropolitan police is now investigating whether he may have committed more crimes. sarah everard's family say the world is a safer place now he'll never be let out of prison. simon jones, bbc news. let's talk to simonjones outside new scotland yard this morning. there has been advice issued by the
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metropolitan police for what women should do, what people should do if they are stopped. yes. should do, what people should do if they are stopped-— they are stopped. yes, the police have described _ they are stopped. yes, the police have described the _ they are stopped. yes, the police have described the murder- they are stopped. yes, the police have described the murder of- they are stopped. yes, the police l have described the murder of sarah everard as one of the most dreadful incidents in their 190 year history here at met and i think they are now facing a new challenge for that 190 year history, one of the biggest challenges, to try to restore confidence in policing, particularly amongst women and girls. the police have written to mps saying they will put more officers on the street and new safety advice which sounds pretty extraordinary. the police say it is actually very rare for an undercover officer on their own to approach someone on the street and the police say that if that happens and an officer tries to arrest someone, then other offices will quickly be on the scene. but if that doesn't happen police are saying it is perfectly legitimate for the person being approached by officers
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to try to ask for reassurance, perhaps using the police radio to get through to the control centre, or if they fear for their own safety perhaps flagging down a bus, shouting out to passers—by or even dialling 999. shouting out to passers-by or even dialling 999-— dialling 999. really good to talk to ou, thank dialling 999. really good to talk to you. thank you _ dialling 999. really good to talk to you. thank you very _ dialling 999. really good to talk to you, thank you very much, - dialling 999. really good to talk to you, thank you very much, simon | you, thank you very much, simon jones outside new scotland ui. we will be speaking to kit malthouse at 7:30am and will put issues to him. more than 50 million households across england, scotland and wales are to face higher energy bills as increased price cap comes into effect from today —— one 5 million households. a typical bill will rise more than £140 per year. —— at more than 15 million households.
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as the temperature dips, so our energy bills rise. the cost of heating and lighting our homes is limited by the price cap, but this is the biggest ever increase at a time when many household budgets are being squeezed. it affects people on standard tariffs in england, wales and scotland — generally those who haven't switched supplier for a long time or whose time—limited tariffs have expired. the new cap means they will now pay £1,277 a year if they use an average amount of gas and electricity. that's £139 a year more on their bill than under the previous cap. prepayment—meter customers face a higher typical bill of £1,309 a year. that's an increase of £153 on the previous time. those who use more than the average amount of energy in their homes will face bigger bills because the policy caps price, not the total bill. those affected are normally encouraged to switch suppliers for a cheaper deal. this time of the massive rise in the cost of wholesale gas in recent weeks has stripped
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the market of better offers. it's also led to the collapse of nine suppliers. their customers will now pay a more expensive tariff in line with the price cap. surviving firms say they are having to buy wholesale energy at a much higher price than the retail cap allows them to sell it for it. we are we a re really we are really worried about making sure customers get through this period so i don't think anyone is asking for the price cap to be increased again, and so it is what it is, we're doing our best to get customers through it, we're trying to support relevant businesses through this period, and otherwise, if we need to do anything else, we are talking to government. analysts say companies' extra costs will be reflected when the cap is revised in the spring, at a level likely to be significantly more expensive for bill payers. kevin peachey, bbc news. people have reported issues trying to register for scotland's new covid passport at just a few hours after it was launched. passport atjust a few hours after it was launched.—
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passport atjust a few hours after it was launched. from today anyone enterin: it was launched. from today anyone entering night _ it was launched. from today anyone entering night clubs _ it was launched. from today anyone entering night clubs and _ it was launched. from today anyone entering night clubs and most i entering night clubs and most large—scale events will need to prove they have had two macro doses of a corona virus vaccine. 0fficials of a corona virus vaccine. officials say overwhelming demand could be to blame for the problems. a new law named after a teenager who died from a severe allergic reaction comes into action today. it requires all ingredients to be printed on food. she died after eating get containing sesame. it's a bittersweet moment because, of course, for this to happen we have lost our child — you know, we have buried our child — and it's really painful, a very painful and poignant thing to have happened to any family, but it happened to us and, in many ways, while we dedicate natasha's law to natasha, in fact it is for the people — all those two million people — that they may live a long
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and fruitful life. australia is going to reopen its international borders from november, allowing vaccinated travellers into the country for the first time in 18 months right currently only citizens and people with exemptions can enter the country. the policy has been in place to try to suppress the spread of covid. very good morning to you. this has been a long time coming. tell us about how this will work in practice. b. about how this will work in practice-— about how this will work in ractice. : , ., ., ., ., practice. a very emotional moment and hiuhl practice. a very emotional moment and highly anticipated _ practice. a very emotional moment i and highly anticipated announcement from the prime ministerfor thousands and thousands of australians here and abroad. essentially it means the end of hotel quarantine here and the opening of international borders for a fully vaccinated citizens and residents. permanent residents. it means it will make it much easier for all those australians are stranded overseas for example to travel and for australians here to travel and for australians here to travel abroad and come back with a
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seven date home quarantine. the prime minister said that what hinges on that is the vaccination rate. any state with an 80% vaccination and above will be able to open their international borders and as it stands new south wales will be the first to open its borders or international travel. there is a lot of detail still yet to be ironed out, especially when it comes to proof of vaccination. vaccination passports, qr codes, but also the fact that other states are approaching this differently. queensland and is not australia are still going with zero covid, meaning they are always quick to close their borders and reluctant to open them. you may get a scenario where new south wales opens, citizens here are able to travel to london or paris or elsewhere in the world, but still won't be able to travel to brisbane and perth because these states are still closed, but generally i think there is a great deal of excitement at the notion that international
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travel will be an option for so many people soon. travel will be an option for so many people soon-— travel will be an option for so many people soon. shaimaa khalil, thank ou ve people soon. shaimaa khalil, thank you very much- _ you very much. 40 diagnostic sites offering nhs tests and scans are being opened around england in local communities including shopping centres. it is hoped they will help reduce waiting times for routine operations and ease pressures on hospitals. the health secretary at sajid javid he was determined to do everything he could to cut nhs waiting lists and the new diagnostic helps would play a key part. there will be a one—stop shop, let's call it, where people can get the scans they need — the mri scans, the ct scans and others — and the tests all in one place, in a convenient location like a shopping centre or a local football club. they'll be open seven days a week and we believe that the 40 of them in their first year of operation can get through another 2.8 million scans and checks and it's going to make a huge difference. the time is 7:12am. we need to show you some pictures this morning. lucky residents in parts of northern
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scotland were treated to this spectacular site last night. it 'ust doesnt seem fl spectacular site last night. it 'ust doesn't seem real. i spectacular site last night. it 'ust doesn't seem real. these i spectacular site last night. iiiijigii doesn't seem real. these photographs are real and this happened last night. the aurora borealis lit up the skies over the highlands and the islands. these pictures were sent in by bbc weather watchers. very lucky ones who manage to capture the display before the rain arrived and i think we are all sitting here rather envious because none of us have seen it. rather envious because none of us have seen it-_ rather envious because none of us have seen it. , ., have seen it. map, can we say on the imaaes have seen it. map, can we say on the images for — have seen it. map, can we say on the images for a — have seen it. map, can we say on the images for a second? _ have seen it. map, can we say on the images for a second? matt, - have seen it. map, can we say on the images for a second? matt, how i have seen it. map, can we say on the images for a second? matt, how is i images for a second? matt, how is that happening? what is going on? it is all done by charged particles being _ is all done by charged particles being shut out by the sun, various eruptions. — being shut out by the sun, various eruptions, those charged particles come _ eruptions, those charged particles come to— eruptions, those charged particles come to earth and the different colours — come to earth and the different colours you see, how those charged particles _ colours you see, how those charged particles interact with various gases — particles interact with various gases in _ particles interact with various gases in the atmosphere. the red, oxygen— gases in the atmosphere. the red, oxygen in— gases in the atmosphere. the red, oxygen in the upper atmosphere, the
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green _ oxygen in the upper atmosphere, the green is _ oxygen in the upper atmosphere, the green is oxygen in the lower atmosphere, green is my coming here and if— atmosphere, green is my coming here and if you _ atmosphere, green is my coming here and if you see a blue, purple colours, _ and if you see a blue, purple colours, that is nitrogen —— green is more _ colours, that is nitrogen —— green is more common here. it is all to do with how— is more common here. it is all to do with how the — is more common here. it is all to do with how the charged particles interact— with how the charged particles interact with the gases that are all around _ interact with the gases that are all around us — interact with the gases that are all around us and a truly stunning site. i around us and a truly stunning site. i would _ around us and a truly stunning site. i would love — around us and a truly stunning site. i would love to see them for myself and i'm _ i would love to see them for myself and i'm very— i would love to see them for myself and i'm very envious of those who saw them — and i'm very envious of those who saw them last night. only and i'm very envious of those who saw them last night. 0nlyjust started — saw them last night. 0nlyjust started the season, as well. you tend _ started the season, as well. you tend to — started the season, as well. you tend to get — started the season, as well. you tend to get quite a bit through autumn— tend to get quite a bit through autumn so probably more shots like that _ autumn so probably more shots like that. ~ ., autumn so probably more shots like that. a, ~' , autumn so probably more shots like that. ~ , ., autumn so probably more shots like that. ,, , : the that. more likely in scotland? the further north. _ that. more likely in scotland? the further north, the _ that. more likely in scotland? the further north, the more _ that. more likely in scotland? the further north, the more likely i that. more likely in scotland? the | further north, the more likely want to see _ further north, the more likely want to see it— further north, the more likely want to see it but sometimes you can see them _ to see it but sometimes you can see them as— to see it but sometimes you can see them as far— to see it but sometimes you can see them as far south as the midlands, east anglia, parts of wales but they need to— east anglia, parts of wales but they need to be — east anglia, parts of wales but they need to be pretty strong when that happens _ need to be pretty strong when that happens i— need to be pretty strong when that happens. i will keep you updated with the — happens. i will keep you updated with the best of those possibilities if i with the best of those possibilities if i can't _ with the best of those possibilities if i can't i— with the best of those possibilities if i can't. :, �* with the best of those possibilities ifi can't. :, �* ~' , if i can't. i don't think it will be as dramatic— if i can't. i don't think it will be as dramatic and _ if i can't. i don't think it will be as dramatic and gorgeous i if i can't. i don't think it will be as dramatic and gorgeous in i if i can't. i don't think it will be i as dramatic and gorgeous in terms of what you are going to show us now. only if you like big waves and leaves — only if you like big waves and leaves blowing around. good morning once again _ leaves blowing around. good morning once again. autumn is here. you get the aurora _ once again. autumn is here. you get
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the aurora but with it we will see spells _ the aurora but with it we will see spells of— the aurora but with it we will see spells of strong winds, heavy rain at times — spells of strong winds, heavy rain at times if— spells of strong winds, heavy rain at times. if you are on the move keep— at times. if you are on the move keep a _ at times. if you are on the move keep a close eye on the forecast. i will be _ keep a close eye on the forecast. i will be with— keep a close eye on the forecast. i will be with you through the weekend to keep _ will be with you through the weekend to keep you up to date. this morning it is all— to keep you up to date. this morning it is all about — to keep you up to date. this morning it is all about the rain. a scattering of showers to the north and west — scattering of showers to the north and west but the more persistent rain band — and west but the more persistent rain band is here from the south—west of england through to lincolnshire. within that you see the brighter colours on the forecast charts, _ the brighter colours on the forecast charts, where we will see some pretty— charts, where we will see some pretty intense downpours. heading towards _ pretty intense downpours. heading towards east anglia and the saudis, some _ towards east anglia and the saudis, some start — towards east anglia and the saudis, some start dry, don't leave without something — some start dry, don't leave without something waterproof because it will change _ something waterproof because it will change. skies will brighten quickly across— change. skies will brighten quickly across northern and western areas but be _ across northern and western areas but be on — across northern and western areas but be on guard for heavy showers, most _ but be on guard for heavy showers, most frequent across scotland and northern _ most frequent across scotland and northern ireland. his frequent across— northern ireland. his frequent across the far north—east of scotland. _ across the far north—east of scotland, better of staying dry, lightest — scotland, better of staying dry, lightest winds but even here the breeze _ lightest winds but even here the breeze will pick up. strongest winds to begin _ breeze will pick up. strongest winds to begin with across east anglia and the south—east and becoming very blustery— the south—east and becoming very blustery across the west during the day, especially western scotland, northern — day, especially western scotland, northern ireland. showers will be frequent. — northern ireland. showers will be frequent, heavy with hail and thunder. _ frequent, heavy with hail and thunder, a few showers across western — thunder, a few showers across western price of england and wales, one or— western price of england and wales, one or two _ western price of england and wales, one or two towards east anglia and the south—east but a lot of england
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and wales, — the south—east but a lot of england and wales, eastern scotland dry this afternoon. _ and wales, eastern scotland dry this afternoon, sunny spells, feeling cool in _ afternoon, sunny spells, feeling cool in the — afternoon, sunny spells, feeling cool in the breeze in the north. nice _ cool in the breeze in the north. nice in— cool in the breeze in the north. nice in the _ cool in the breeze in the north. nice in the sunshine where we have it fed _ nice in the sunshine where we have it fed south — nice in the sunshine where we have it fed south but breeze remains in place _ it fed south but breeze remains in place overnight, more outbreaks of rain in _ place overnight, more outbreaks of rain in the — place overnight, more outbreaks of rain in the west and through this weekend, — rain in the west and through this weekend, my wet and windy weather to come. _ weekend, my wet and windy weather to come. more _ weekend, my wet and windy weather to come, more in half an hour. thank ou ve come, more in half an hour. thank you very much- — "devastating, tragic and wholly brutal" — those were the words a judge used to describe the murder of sarah everard, before he handed a whole—life sentence to wayne couzens, who was a serving police officer when he raped and killed the 33—year old in march. miss everard's family welcomed the full—life term, and said they were relieved her killer will die in prison. in a statement they went on to praise their daughter.
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those were some of the family's tribute. we can speak to two people who have may be some idea of what the family is going through. joining us now is baroness newlove, whose husband garry was attacked outside their home in warrington in 2007, later dying from his injuries. we can also speak to nick gazzard whose 20—year—old daughter hollie was stabbed to death by her ex—boyfriend at the hairdressers where she worked in 2014. helen and nick, thank you for speaking to us today. my starting point to say to you both first, is that i never think you should not say i'm sorry for your loss, and then the circumstances of both of your losses, it is never a wrong thing to say that. and i think, nick, ifi thing to say that. and i think, nick, if i can start with you, one of the things that people have been amazed by, and we were hearing the
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tributes there, the family's a tributes there, the family's a tribute to sarah everard, but they have been amazed, nick, that in court, herfamily were have been amazed, nick, that in court, her family were able to stand up court, her family were able to stand up and say directly to her killer, words and literally in that place and time and i know that you are someone who knows what that is like. can you tell us a bit about that experience and possibly how, over time, that dreadful moment in time, maybe has helped you a little. yes. maybe has helped you a little. yes, when we had _ maybe has helped you a little. yes, when we had the _ maybe has helped you a little. 123 when we had the sentencing maybe has helped you a little. 12: when we had the sentencing of hollie's killer, part of that sentencing is about us delivering witness impact statements. and you have to drum up enough courage to be able to stand in that witness stand, look at the person who has just murdered your daughter, and deliver
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words that describe how you feel about your daughter. you have to drum up immense courage to do that and i still remember the day that i did that and how i was shaking when i walked down to the witness stand to deliver, as did my other daughter, chloe, who i am really proud of to be able to do that. you have to drum up that courage and it never leaves you, but what it does do is put you in good stead to move forward. we owed it to our hollie to deliver that to the court about what she was like as a daughter and as a sister and that is something which will stay in my memory for the rest of my life. will stay in my memory for the rest of m life. , , , of my life. very powerfully put, nick, thank _ of my life. very powerfully put, nick, thank you. _ of my life. very powerfully put, nick, thank you. helen, - of my life. very powerfully put, nick, thank you. helen, you i of my life. very powerfully put, i nick, thank you. helen, you know what it is like when you are waiting sentencing, when you are already going through the trauma, in your case, of witnessing what happened to your loved one and waiting for some punishment. not that it makes the loss any easier but the fact that
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the law, justice has taken place. good morning, yes, first can i say good morning to nick, as well. i remember meeting him and the wonderful work he is doing with regards to the loss of his daughter. yes, it is having no control and it is all the emotions cut one —— waiting for an answer. i remember waiting for an answer. i remember waiting for an answer. i remember waiting for the sentencing, it is notjust waiting for the sentencing, it is not just a waiting for the sentencing, it is notjust a case of waiting for the sentencing, it is not just a case of you waiting for the sentencing, it is notjust a case of you are called backin notjust a case of you are called back in court and the jury has reached a decision or in this case yesterday that we were waiting for the judge to read yesterday that we were waiting for thejudge to read out yesterday that we were waiting for the judge to read out the sentence. there is also in other cases where there is a trial, there may be questions the defence want to ask and so you are up and down, up and down, so it is very traumatic waiting for the sentence and i still remember that to this day, it never leaves you, and i have to agree with nick, i have had a lot of questions about the victim statements and it is so important. you sit there listening about your loved one is a piece of evidence and the victim statements if you are voice,
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speaking about your loved one as they were, what you remember, their laughter, the smile, which sarah everard's family said, and it is so important you do that for your loved one. , ., , ., . one. ellen, when you did your victim statement. — one. ellen, when you did your victim statement. -- _ one. ellen, when you did your victim statement, -- helen, _ one. ellen, when you did your victim statement, -- helen, you _ one. ellen, when you did your victim statement, -- helen, you hear- one. ellen, when you did your victim| statement, -- helen, you hear about statement, —— helen, you hear about victim statement and you hear it as how the person is being accused recognise what they have done. is that what is important or is it almost, for you, to be able to say out loud in a public court, this is the effect it has had on my life? i think it is both, to be perfectly honest. this is the person that you have taken away from the family. in our case from our three young daughters who witness every kick and punch. also the fact that, as i say, it is very clinical in a trial, although it matter of fact. but actually your loved one is full of love, laughter stopped i used to say garry was not the pope and i was not
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mother teresa but it is absolutely important and you feel inside that you have sat silent, even in the sarah everard case, for two days, you can't say anything. it is very important to get all of those emotions out to say this is a huge impact that actually doesn't finish when the trial ends. this begins when the trial ends. this begins when the trial goes away and as i keep saying when you go home the loneliest place for everybody is when you shut that door because the loss of their loved one ben, actually, reality sets in and it is the loneliest and saddest place to begin another gen you thought you would never ever have to do. idick. would never ever have to do. nick, can i ask would never ever have to do. nick, can i ask you--- — would never ever have to do. nick, can i askyou... i _ would never ever have to do. nick, can i ask you... i know— would never ever have to do. nick, can i ask you... i know people i would never ever have to do. nick, can i ask you... i know people who | can i ask you... i know people who have been through not what you have been free, can understand that part of it, what people can understand it's feelings many people are having at the moment about trust in the police, for example, but how to stay safe. it may be completely wrong
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that women have to think sulphide about how to stay safe and in a way thatis about how to stay safe and in a way that is a slightly different argument. i know that that is something you have invested a lot in as a family and may be part of your cathartic process.— as a family and may be part of your cathartic process. absolutely. a few weeks after — cathartic process. absolutely. a few weeks after hollie _ cathartic process. absolutely. a few weeks after hollie was _ cathartic process. absolutely. a few weeks after hollie was murdered i l weeks after hollie was murdered i thought, how can i turn this into something really positive? we set up the trust and part of that trust is to help prevent these things happening to other individuals, other hollies and stop parents going through what we go through on a daily basis. in setting up the hollie gazzard trust, that was venture. we have an app that you can download to any smartphone with a lot of functionality that enables you to send an alert to someone who you to send an alert to someone who you want to know if you are potentially in trouble. we shouldn't need to do this, but we have to because many people fear walking
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outside their front door, particularly women and girls, and it is something you don't occur we will continue to campaign for and provide because we want to keep people safe —— that is something we will continue to campaign for a. -- that is something we will continue to campaign for a. helen, there is a lot _ continue to campaign for a. helen, there is a lot of _ continue to campaign for a. helen, there is a lot of discussion - continue to campaign for a. helen, there is a lot of discussion about . there is a lot of discussion about victims and how they are treated and we will be speaking shortly to a government minister in a few minutes about this and other things. is progress being made? there are times when things like this happen now, and there have been a number of incidents involving women particularly. it is as if no progress has been made in many, many years. how do you see that? i progress has been made in many, many years. how do you see that?— years. how do you see that? i think that we are — years. how do you see that? i think that we are talking _ years. how do you see that? i think that we are talking about _ years. how do you see that? i think that we are talking about victims i that we are talking about victims but the progress is, ifeel, the criminaljustice but the progress is, ifeel, the criminal justice system but the progress is, ifeel, the criminaljustice system is definitely not fit for purpose. we have seen the high rate of rape cases, 94% not being charged, prosecuted, and if we look at the trial waiting list it is two years.
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now is the time, no more consultations. we need a victim law, legal rights so that victims are respected, victims are treated from the very beginning like offenders, with rights, legal rights, and treated with humanity, decency and respect and i would say to the government that we need a law now, not mashed into the police, crime and sentencing bill but the law on its own that gives a level playing field for offenders and victims are so at least their voice is heard right through the system and protected with a legal rights. hagar protected with a legal rights. how would that have _ protected with a legal rights. how would that have changed your experience is that were in place when garry died?— when garry died? well, i had fantastic family _ when garry died? well, i had fantastic family liaison i when garry died? well, i had l fantastic family liaison officers. they did a lot. above and beyond their role. but if they had information... you have nobody to speak for you because unfortunately even today victims think the prosecutor is for them, and the prosecutor is for them, and the prosecutor is for them, and the prosecutor is for the crown. there is nobody for the victims so you are
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grabbing information, hoping the information is correct. you are the last to hear. if you are not a national case... there are many cases we don't hear of who i have met over the years as a victims commission and still do the work, but unfortunately there is no right. it is persuasive guidance. victims i have worked hard on and fought to champion for legal rights, they will say it is the right is that if you look at the code, they highlight "right to" but it is not a legal right and law professionals will not look at that in a lawful form, they will look at it as a persuasive guidance. i have spoken to the law society, the bar council. time has now come to stop it. mean what you say on that tin, stop windowdressing and give legal rights to victims. they deserve the respect and dignity and feel part of the system. idick. and feel part of the system. nick, can ou and feel part of the system. nick, can you pick _ and feel part of the system. nick, can you pick up — and feel part of the system. nick, can you pick up on _ and feel part of the system. nick, can you pick up on some - and feel part of the system. nick, can you pick up on some of- and feel part of the system. nick, can you pick up on some of those| can you pick up on some of those thoughts for us? clearly people will
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have understood from what you have already said is that she wanted to do something practical, which you have with the app, about safety. do you want to pick on those beams about victims? vibe yet for me to put words into government ministers but we are talking to kit malthouse in a few minutes and sometimes what happens is, yes, we will review, we will look at, we will start an enquiry to decide whether or not... those are the phrases that often come out in the circumstances. do you have a direct message for government, for those in charge of crime and policing today, given what you know and what other people have witnessed? , .., .., , ., witnessed? yes. i can cope with what helen sa s witnessed? yes. i can cope with what helen says around _ witnessed? yes. i can cope with what helen says around the _ witnessed? yes. i can cope with what helen says around the offices -- i i helen says around the offices —— i concur. the family liaison officers were fantastic and they really brought us through the early part of after hollie's death and they were
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our communication link with the outside world. if we didn't have those we would be swimming in a sea. but they only have their own experience to go on. we were getting told at court hearings through the media, not through the right channels. there was not that support there, apart from those two offices and i think something needs to be done to make that support available to their victims and families of following a homicide. i think helen is absolutely right, we need to look at this and it needs to be top of the government's list. violence against women and girls needs to be top of that agenda of those left behind need that support to be able to carry on with their lives. idick. to carry on with their lives. nick, thank you _ to carry on with their lives. nick, thank you so _ to carry on with their lives. nick, thank you so much _ to carry on with their lives. nick, thank you so much for— to carry on with their lives. nick, thank you so much for speaking l to carry on with their lives. nick, thank you so much for speaking to us today, father of hollie gazzard and baroness newlove, thank you both for your time this morning. much appreciated. your time this morning. much appreciated-— your time this morning. much | appreciated._ thank your time this morning. much i appreciated._ thank you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london. people living in a tower block in east london are being moved out after inspections revealed it isn't safe unless its refurbished or rebuilt. 120 families in clare house in bow will go into temporary accomodation until a permanent solution is found. blocks built in this way now have to go through new assesments since the grenfell disaster. clarion housing association said there will be round the clock safety patrols as people move out. barking & dagenham has emerged as one of the worst places in england for fuel poverty. that's according to the end fuel poverty coalition, which has produced a map and said newham is also likely to be hardest hit. campaigners are warning it could become commonplace in certain areas. statues of two british figures linked to the slave trade there are calls for more screening in young people to detect those who may be unaware they have a heart problem. every week in the uk, 12 people between the ages of 14 and 35 die
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of an undiagnosed heart condition. the charity, cardiac risk in the young, says early treatment is key. we've never accepted that, as a society, we should just sit back and see fit and healthy young people dying suddenly from undiagnosed conditions, and to do nothing about that. and we know that screening can prevent up to 89% of these sudden deaths — that's what the research has shown. two key workers from govia thameslink are having the story told by actors. it is to pay tribute to some of those who kept things going during the pandemic. their expenses will be shared by downton abbey star hugh bonneville and kieran griffiths. if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. on to the weather now
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with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a mild start this morning. we start the day in mid teens celsius but low pressure — it is in charge, which means it is going to be a rather wet and windy at least morning today. we've got this cold front moving through and that's going to bring a spell of heavy and persistent rain but it does clear away south and eastwards, pushed through on a very gusty south—westerly wind. some showers to follow but largely dry with some sunshine through this afternoon and temperatures today — despite the wind and this morning's rain — getting up to 18 celsius. now into this evening, overnight, it remains dry and it remains clear. temperatures quite chilly overnight — certainly chillier than last night — but we'll see towards the early hours a bit more cloud feeding in as our next front approaches as we head into saturday. the minimum temperature dropping to six celsius. now for saturday itself, low pressure still in charge, as it is across the weekend. we see the isobars squeezing together and a big spell of rain for saturday. it's going to stay wet and windy tomorrow, perhaps sunday a drier day on the whole with some sunny spells, but there's also the risk
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of a shower on sunday. now the breeze is going to stay strong and conditions, as you can see, staying unsettled into next week. that's it for the moment. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the metropolitan police are working to restore public confidence in the wake of sarah everard's murder but questions remain over whether chances were missed to prevent a serving officer from killing her. we're joined now by the crime and policing minister, kit malthouse. good morning to you. can i start with the obvious question, i think, that money gone —— women will be thinking about today? if a is walking around and is stopped by a
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police officer and a marked or unmarked car and told to stop, he is going to arrest and put it in the car, should she get the car? it depends on the circumstances. what i would say is that of isa, we recognise, as the police recognise that this appalling crime committed by this dreadful monster has raised a question in people's minds about exactly the circumstances, the fact he used the cover of being a police officer to perpetrate this horrible crime is devastating, really. it is worth remembering that police officers are duty—bound even if they are off duty and they see crime being committed to intervene. so very much depends on the circumstances but if people have doubts about the conduct of plainclothes police officers, and rarely are they deployed singly, they may be off duty but rarely are they may be off duty but rarely are the deployed singly on duty. if they
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have doubts they should ask the police officer to identify themselves, they should if possible, if they are really in doubt, ask to speak to the control room using either the police officer because my phone or radio and if they are really concerned they should ring 999. ,, ., ., ., 999. should the women get into the car under this _ 999. should the women get into the car under this scenario? _ 999. should the women get into the car under this scenario? if— 999. should the women get into the car under this scenario? if she i 999. should the women get into the car under this scenario? if she has l car under this scenario? if she has doubts about _ car under this scenario? if she has doubts about the _ car under this scenario? if she has doubts about the police _ car under this scenario? if she has doubts about the police officer's . doubts about the police officer's conduct, she should make enquiries along the lines that i've outlined, that would be perfectly natural to do before complying. 50. that would be perfectly natural to do before complying.— do before complying. so, 'ust to make it very fl do before complying. so, 'ust to make it very clear i do before complying. so, just to make it very clear because i do before complying. so, just to make it very clear because you | do before complying. so, just to i make it very clear because you know that there are now concerns amongst women, amongst men, amongst people in this country now who are concerned that if they are approached by a police officer and asked to get into a car and handcuffed or restrained, is it safe? you say it is very unusual to see an officer on their own, so this should assume first of all this is
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unusual and really, just ask questions straightaway? it depends, as i sa , in questions straightaway? it depends, as i say. in the _ questions straightaway? it depends, as i say, in the circumstances. i as i say, in the circumstances. normally when an arrest would be made, the police officer would call in for back—up or radio in what's happened. and obviously, that itself produces elements of third—party verification. officers up and down the land recognise the devastating consequences of this event. there is a job to be done to rebuild trust by the police particularly in london, if the circumstances arise, it's perfectly reasonable for an individual to make those lines of enquiry about what the police officer is doing. to satisfy themselves about that. that wouldn't be appropriate in every circumstance and have a say there are thousands of police officers who are apprehending criminals and seeking to keep us all safe every day, they need to be able to go about their business. but we do recognise the implications of this particular incident, and the blue it has struck
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towards trust particularly in metropolitan police. just towards trust particularly in metropolitan police.- towards trust particularly in metropolitan police. just to bring u . metropolitan police. just to bring u- the metropolitan police. just to bring up the advice _ metropolitan police. just to bring up the advice that _ metropolitan police. just to bring up the advice that the _ metropolitan police. just to bring l up the advice that the metropolitan police has issued on this. if you have concerns with an officer, that an officer is threat, ask searching questions of them, such as, where are your colleagues, where have you come from, why are you here, why are you stopping or talking to me? if it is a person who is intending to do wrong they can answer those questions quite easily, can't they? i don't see how that helps. try to seek some independent verification of what they say. if you have a radio, ask to hear the voice of the operator or speak to them to verify you are with a genuine officer acting legitimately. i assume you would have to get near to the car in that sense. so that doesn't seem as if that would be safe. if you don't believe who the officer is or that they are who they say they are, seek assistance, shouting out to a passer—by, run into a house, knocking on the door, or colin 99.
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if you are in the presence of a police officer who says you're under arrest, are you allowed to use your phone? it arrest, are you allowed to use your -hone? , , arrest, are you allowed to use your hone? , , ., phone? it depends on the circumstances _ phone? it depends on the circumstances and - phone? it depends on the circumstances and i i phone? it depends on the circumstances and i think| phone? it depends on the - circumstances and i think you are underlining the difficult situation the police find themselves in because of this dreadful event. as i say, the fact this awful man used the cover of being a police officer to commit his crime does have devastating implications for trust, and i know that has caused distress throughout the ranks in british policing and the thousands of police officers up and down the land. but what we hope is that over time the police can rebuild the trust... how do ou police can rebuild the trust... how do you do — police can rebuild the trust... how do you do it? _ police can rebuild the trust... how do you do it? you _ police can rebuild the trust... how do you do it? you have _ police can rebuild the trust... how do you do it? you have told people what to do if they are approached, so a potential victim what they should do, how will you rebuild trust? ~ . , should do, how will you rebuild trust? ~ ., , should do, how will you rebuild trust? ~ .,, . trust? well, as i say, the police need to make _ trust? well, as i say, the police need to make sure _ trust? well, as i say, the police need to make sure they - trust? well, as i say, the police need to make sure they are - trust? well, as i say, the police. need to make sure they are open trust? well, as i say, the police - need to make sure they are open and transparent, that they are willing to change, that they demonstrate to the public they have rigorous
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processes internally both vetting to make sure this guy can't get through the net again to join the police, but also that they are promoting a culture of trust and empathy and understanding in all their interactions with people out there interactions with people out there in the public realm. you and i both know that there are thousands and thousands of police officers out there today, now, running towards incidents from which you and i would run away. they are doing incredible work, and the fact there is a question mark over the head is devastating to them. i know particularly in london that the police recognise there is a need to rebuild that trust and i hope that's what we will see in the months to come. ., ., ., , , , ., come. harriet harman suggests that there is an immediate _ come. harriet harman suggests that there is an immediate suspension i come. harriet harman suggests that there is an immediate suspension ofl there is an immediate suspension of any officer against whom an allegation of violence against women is made an immediate dismissal on admission of her conviction for such an offence. do you agree?-
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admission of her conviction for such an offence. do you agree? well, i do in certain circumstances, _ an offence. do you agree? well, i do in certain circumstances, yes, - an offence. do you agree? well, i do in certain circumstances, yes, but. in certain circumstances, yes, but it depends on the investigation. obviously we have a robust independent police investigation process to which the public can make complaints. similarly, all forces internally have their own... but there were _ internally have their own... but there were two _ internally have their own... but there were two allegations against wayne couzens. how is it robust? fine wayne couzens. how is it robust? one ofthe wayne couzens. how is it robust? one of the lessons — wayne couzens. how is it robust? one of the lessons we _ wayne couzens. how is it robust? que: of the lessons we will need wayne couzens. how is it robust? ©“i2 of the lessons we will need to learn is about how the allegations that were made against him, where those investigations led to and why they did not pop up on his vetting or have any impact on his employment with the metropolitan police. that is currently under investigation, we will have a look at the lessons that are learned from that. but i think the public hopefully can have confidence that if they feel the need to make a complaint against a police officer, that that complaint is taken seriously by the force, that they have an independent organisation that they can go to if they don't get a satisfactory answer
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from the first about that complaint. but it's worth remembering that while this is a dreadful event and obviously has devastating applications, all those thousands of police officers out there need to be able to rely on a proportionate and fair system of complaints, given that we asked them to put themselves in confrontational and difficult situations on a daily basis, from which complaints often emanate... i think... iagree, we which complaints often emanate... i think... i agree, we are which complaints often emanate... i think... iagree, we are not think... i agree, we are not criticising what police officers do and the work that they do, but we are examining the system. at the head of this system is dame cressida dick who has ever seen quite a few failures, why is she still in post? you know, being the metropolitan police commissioner i think is one of the top three most difficultjobs in the country. you are handling enormous risk with a big organisation that has been very difficult and challenging, confrontational things. while thousands and thousands of wings go well every day and hundreds of
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thousands of people are protected from crime every year, these kind of events, and this particularly devastating one, probably the most difficult moment for the metropolitan police in nearly 200 years, what i want from the police in those circumstances is somebody who is transparent and open and non—defensive and willing to change, and examine the processes... find and examine the processes... and effective? that _ and examine the processes... and effective? that is _ and examine the processes... and effective? that is certainly - and examine the processes... and effective? that is certainly what i l effective? that is certainly what i see with cressida _ effective? that is certainly what i see with cressida dick. _ effective? that is certainly what i see with cressida dick. do - effective? that is certainly what i see with cressida dick. do you i effective? that is certainly what i i see with cressida dick. do you think she is effective _ see with cressida dick. do you think she is effective in _ see with cressida dick. do you think she is effective in this _ see with cressida dick. do you think she is effective in this job? - see with cressida dick. do you think she is effective in this job? i - see with cressida dick. do you think she is effective in this job? i have i she is effective in this 'ob? i have worked with t she is effective in this 'ob? i have worked with heri she is effective in this 'ob? i have worked with her over i she is effective in this job? i have worked with her over the - she is effective in this job? i have worked with her over the last i she is effective in this job? i have i worked with her over the last decade orso worked with her over the last decade or so and i know how to be a talented detective and a committed police officer who has worked very hard for her entire career to improve the culture and practices, particularly for the metropolitan police, to make it a much better force. she is very committed to the fight against violence in london but we are seeing some good progress, and in particular committed to the fight against violence against women and girls, sol fight against violence against women and girls, so i do think given her
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capacity that she has shown to take on the problems... fist capacity that she has shown to take on the problems. . .— on the problems... at the moment there are police _ on the problems... at the moment there are police officers _ on the problems... at the moment there are police officers who i on the problems... at the moment there are police officers who share | there are police officers who share a whatsapp group, for example, as you will well know in the case of wayne couzens. the chief inspector of constabulary sir tom winsor has warned that police officers are failing to raise concerns about colleagues who exhibit damaging a worrying characteristics. cressida dick is overseeing a metropolitan police that doesn't whistle—blower, but doesn't dob in people who have misogynistic, sexist, violent tendencies. why is that? well, obviously that _ tendencies. why is that? well, obviously that is _ tendencies. why is that? well, obviously that is a _ tendencies. why is that? well, obviously that is a current i obviously that is a current investigation with the independent office for police complaints and i can't comment on that specific investigation. we have seen incidents in the past of this kind of activity, and it is something about which we are concerned. there is a working group now with the police nationally to look at the
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police nationally to look at the police use of these groups. i would just say this, we have seen some recent changes particularly at the metropolitan police to look at some of these issues. for example earlier this year as part of the vetting processes, the met started looking at the social media output of officers, connecting that with their conduct and making sure that everything was on the straight and narrow in that aspect of the lives. are you planning or funding? narrow in that aspect of the lives. are you planning orfunding? sir tom windsor also criticised the funding of the counter corruption unit. this is a matter— of the counter corruption unit. this is a matter for— of the counter corruption unit. this is a matter for the _ of the counter corruption unit. ti 3 is a matter for the chief constable and the police and crime commissionerfoot over and the police and crime commissioner foot over the last couple of years we have pumped significant extra resources into british policing. focusing on enhancing recruitment and building those numbers, and that should give police constables, sorry chief constables greater capacity if they wanted dedicate more resource but we think there is a good and rigorous system for routing these people out,
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it has officially failed in this circumstance. we need to learn what lessons we can from that and try and make provisions for the future. so in a police officer is nicknamed the rapist, as is reported about wayne couzens, brings up the question how much a party and why isn't it top priority for police to tackle violence against women and girls? well, as i understand it, that allegation, the met are saying they didn't know about that. but allegation, the met are saying they didn't know about that.— allegation, the met are saying they didn't know about that. but how has it come out. — didn't know about that. but how has it come out, then? _ didn't know about that. but how has it come out, then? i _ didn't know about that. but how has it come out, then? ithink— didn't know about that. but how has it come out, then? i think that i didn't know about that. but how has it come out, then? i think that is i it come out, then? i think that is something _ it come out, then? i think that is something we — it come out, then? i think that is something we will— it come out, then? i think that is something we will need - it come out, then? i think that is something we will need to i it come out, then? i think that is something we will need to be i something we will need to be investigated and understood as part of our learning lessons around this awful incident. i completely agree with you. on violence against women and girls, you know, the evidence as far as i can say is that the metropolitan police and indeed all police forces are dedicated to implementing the measures that we've outlined in our... ls implementing the measures that we've outlined in our... is it implementing the measures that we've outlined in our. . .— outlined in our... is it a top priority? — outlined in our... is it a top priority? we _ outlined in our... is it a top priority? we have - outlined in our... is it a top priority? we have just i outlined in our... is it a top i priority? we have just appointed a
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priority? we have 'ust appointed a national police i priority? we have just appointed a national police lead _ priority? we have just appointed a national police lead for _ priority? we have just appointed a national police lead for violence i national police lead for violence against women and girls and personally, i'm leading a task force thatis personally, i'm leading a task force that is looking at rape and rape convictions. we have also landed the domestic abuse and part my work at the moment is touring the large metropolitan police forces, looking at the murder prevention strategies particularly with domestic murder and how we can drive those numbers down, and ifeel very strongly and how we can drive those numbers down, and i feel very strongly about theseissues down, and i feel very strongly about these issues from policing at the moment foot of the current leadership of policing is very different to what it was ten years ago, about a third of police chiefs are female, the force as a whole now as the third female, are from a quarter to ten years ago, and a recruitment programme, we are seeing some forces putting in more than 50% female police officers. so there are — but there is big progress and change around these issues, notjust what we are seeing on the front line, like the crunchy stuff we're doing to women, but also in the nature and culture of the force itself. a, ., , ., ~ , .,
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nature and culture of the force itself. ., , ., ~ , ., ., itself. kit malthouse, thank you for our time. 7:45am. earlier on this morning we were talking about football, as in goals. but something else... it is re goals. but something else... it is pretty shocking- _ goals. but something else... it 3 pretty shocking. glen kamara, rangers play, last season was racially abused during a match. a play was banned as a result and also as a result of other incidents at matches in the czech republic they were told by uefa to play a game behind closed doors. uefa said they could let into last nights match against rangers 10,000 schoolchildren under the age of 1a and every time glen kamara touched the ball he was booed and jeered. these are youngsters under the age of 1a. absolutely open—mouthed at this. steven gerrard has said more
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extreme punishments are now needed to tackle racism after glen kamara was booed and jeered in their 1—0 defeat. rangers lost by the one goal but it is irrelevant when you consider the other issues. the headerjust about consider the other issues. the header just about crossed consider the other issues. the headerjust about crossed the line despite allan mcgregor�*s best efforts. the game was initially supposed to be close behind closed doors after sparta's players racially abused. the jeering at glen kamara reached a peak in the second half when he was sent off. and rangers are rooted to the bottom of their group after they were beaten 1—0 by sparta prague. the former celtic striker chris sutton says the manager needs patience and time and will stick with the style of play. in contrast west ham are loving their european return.
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they're top their group after a 2—0 win over rapid vienna at the london stadium. a number of members of the crowd jumped over the barriers. benrama wrapped up the points for david moyes's side deep in injury time. leicester were beaten by legia warsaw to continue their poor start to the season. mahir emreli scored the only goal of the game in the first half. huge relief as harry kane came off the bench for tottenham and scored a hat—trick in 20 minutes in 51 win over —— 5—1win over ns mura in the europa conference league. kane was only introduced to the game with half an hour remaining but he didn't take long to make an impact as he scored three goals injust 20 minutes. admittedly not against the most difficult opposition in the league. it was a morale boosting win for the side after they were humbled by neighbours arsenal last weekend. gareth southgate will have been pleased to see that with world cup qualifiers against andorra and
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hungary coming up. to see his captain is going to get. phil foden is back in the fold after missing last month's a triple—header with that foot injury, the same goes for the aston villa player ollie watkins. and the ac milan defender is also included. gareth southgate says his move has put him back in contention internationally. he is playing at the club where there _ he is playing at the club where there is— he is playing at the club where there is an expectation to win every week— there is an expectation to win every week so— there is an expectation to win every week so he — there is an expectation to win every week so he is performing under pressure — week so he is performing under pressure i_ week so he is performing under pressure. i thought he did very well at liverpool— pressure. i thought he did very well at liverpool in the champions league game _ at liverpool in the champions league game and _ at liverpool in the champions league game and his next game wasjuventus so he _ game and his next game wasjuventus so he has _ game and his next game wasjuventus so he has had big matches, as well as the _ so he has had big matches, as well as the general league games and obviously— as the general league games and obviously milan have been delighted with him _ obviously milan have been delighted with him. they have ended up buying him and _ with him. they have ended up buying him and it— with him. they have ended up buying him and it has been a really good experience — him and it has been a really good experience for him. how him and it has been a really good experience for him.— him and it has been a really good experience for him. how far can you cle in experience for him. how far can you cycle in an — experience for him. how far can you cycle in an hour? _ experience for him. how far can you cycle in an hour? joss _ experience for him. how far can you cycle in an hour? joss lowden i experience for him. how far can you cycle in an hour? joss lowden said i cycle in an hour? joss lowden said she should have tried harder despite breaking that record. she covered 48.05 breaking that record. she covered a8.05 colleges, 30 miles, at the
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velodrome in switzerland but said afterward she was very nervous, possibly could have gone even further. i definitely played itself don't los pumas _ i definitely played itself don't los pumas were uncomfortable but i would say it was _ pumas were uncomfortable but i would say it was definitely a controlled effort _ say it was definitely a controlled effort and maybe i would look back and say _ effort and maybe i would look back and say i _ effort and maybe i would look back and say i should have tried harder but given— and say i should have tried harder but given the preparation, they run into it. _ but given the preparation, they run into it. the — but given the preparation, they run into it, the world championships, the women's tour next week, i wrote how i_ the women's tour next week, i wrote how i wanted to write and so i can't be unhappy— how i wanted to write and so i can't be unhappy with how it went, really. she smashed the record! better than anyone else in an hour, amazing. 25nd anyone else in an hour, amazing. and en'o the anyone else in an hour, amazing. and enjoy the moment, go for it. thank you very much. we will see later on. we will show you some glorious pictures of the aurora borealis later on. it has got all of us a bit jealous of those who manage to see it because we won't see much at least in the south. good morning. good morning. you see them further north and will be clear skies by night but by day we have turned the month and the weather is autumnal
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over the next few days, the potential for destructive damage a gust of wind. let me give you the highlights. this could change the exact details but later tomorrow south—east in east anglia will see some of the strongest winds. sunday, the final of the scotland could see damaging gusts of wind and even into next week's southern parts of the uk once again could see some pretty strong winds go through and that is altogether with some pretty heavy rain. rain the main focus and so far we have seen this band of lively rain pushing south was it was, reaching east anglia, the south—east, but sky is time and batches of showers out there in the north and west, some heavy infantry, particularly across scotland, scotland, pushing authors and his wits. we cease and shake about in most areas, another batch of showers following the morning rain across east anglia, the south—east, central and eastern areas, the afternoon should be largely dry with sunny spells. shows keep going in the west, strongest winds this afternoon will be towards the west of scotland, northern ireland, with the show is less frequent. feeling radical at around 11 to 30 degrees.
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up radical at around 11 to 30 degrees. up to around 18 degrees in the south and east after a humid start. a fresh feel even with the sunshine later. it will feel kill through the evening and overnight, the show was keep packing into scotland and northern ireland and later in the night cast your down to the south—west, an area of more persistent rain looming for the start of the weekend. these are the temperatures to start tomorrow, temperatures to start tomorrow, temperatures in the mid—single figures across many eastern areas, a chilly start, a bright start, that is what is heading our way. next low pressure system bringing lots of rain, strongest points in this area and that will push to inwards east anglia and south—east, with the strongest during the afternoon, potential for damage and disruption. starting dry right across much of england and scotland, but heavy rain quickly pushes in, a sunny saturday for much of england and wales and into the afternoon across eastern scotland. west of scotland and northern ireland brighton tomorrow afternoon after some morning rain with gusty winds across the board, strongest 50 mph possible across east anglia and the south—east and it is a day for the one jacket and
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jumper. it the area of low pressure which is not a history saturday night into sunday so if we going to sunday, watch out, it's time to develop quite explosively to the north of scotland with a focus on strongest winds. heavy rain wrapped around that, as well, elsewhere a scattering of showers, heavy and thundery developing mobile into the afternoon but he could see 60 to 70 mph gust across northern scotland through the greater chance of damage here and it will be another cool day so a cool chance of showers for the london marathon.— london marathon. thank you very much. 16 degrees _ london marathon. thank you very much. 16 degrees stocking - london marathon. thank you very much. 16 degrees stocking not i london marathon. thank you very l much. 16 degrees stocking not bad, it is autumn- _ when deborahjames was diagnosed with incurable bowel cancer five years ago, doctors predicted she only had months to live. since then, she has shared her experience of life with the disease, raising awareness and encouraging others to get symptoms checked
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and today deborah is celebrating a milestone she admits she never thought she'd see her 40th birthday. shejoins us now. hgppy happy birthday. i am seeing balloons and all kinds of things. happy birthday. and all kinds of things. happy birthda . ., ~ ., and all kinds of things. happy birthda. ., ., ., , birthday. thank you! i have actually woken u- birthday. thank you! i have actually woken up thinking _ birthday. thank you! i have actually woken up thinking i _ birthday. thank you! i have actually woken up thinking i have _ birthday. thank you! i have actually woken up thinking i have made i birthday. thank you! i have actually woken up thinking i have made it i birthday. thank you! i have actuallyj woken up thinking i have made it to 40. woken up thinking i have made it to a0. when i woke up this morning it was that pinch me moments. it is a milestone that i never saw myself at, a0, ithink milestone that i never saw myself at, a0, i think it has always been one step at a time, one step at a time and it has got me to hear which is amazing. the reason it is so significant is it is the best they never thought i would be celebrating, so i'm actually happy today, i didn't know if i would be crying, really emotional, but i have a big smile which is good. you crying, really emotional, but i have a big smile which is good.— a big smile which is good. you are allowed to — a big smile which is good. you are allowed to cry _ a big smile which is good. you are allowed to cry on _ a big smile which is good. you are allowed to cry on your— a big smile which is good. you are allowed to cry on your birthday, i a big smile which is good. you are allowed to cry on your birthday, it| allowed to cry on your birthday, it is absolutely allowed. aos
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allowed to cry on your birthday, it is absolutely allowed. 40s are fabulous _ is absolutely allowed. 40s are fabulous. i is absolutely allowed. 40s are fabulous. ., ., , ~, is absolutely allowed. 40s are fabulous. ., ., , .y ., fabulous. i will no doubt cry later. have ou fabulous. i will no doubt cry later. have you got _ fabulous. i will no doubt cry later. have you got your _ fabulous. i will no doubt cry later. have you got your presence, i fabulous. i will no doubt cry later. i have you got your presence, woken up, glass— have you got your presence, woken up, glass of— have you got your presence, woken up, glass of fizz, how's it been? honestly, — up, glass of fizz, how's it been? honestly, i— up, glass of fizz, how's it been? honestly, i woke up to the lovely cameraman who was here at the 6am. you can tell i am having one of those days. i haven't looked at any presence presents, my daughter make the blames behind me over the weekend i will have the celebrations, low—key but in my life nothing is ever low—key but something with family and close friends are lots more balloon blowing up over the weekend. llighten friends are lots more balloon blowing up over the weekend. when we were tellin: blowing up over the weekend. when we were telling everyone _ blowing up over the weekend. when we were telling everyone that _ blowing up over the weekend. when we were telling everyone that we _ blowing up over the weekend. when we were telling everyone that we were i were telling everyone that we were talking _ were telling everyone that we were talking to _ were telling everyone that we were talking to you today, one of the things— talking to you today, one of the things we — talking to you today, one of the things we said was of course we will celebrate _ things we said was of course we will celebrate your fabulous aoth celebrate your fabulous 40th birthday and it is brilliant and a milestone _ birthday and it is brilliant and a milestone and one you never thought you would _ milestone and one you never thought you would see, which is in itself brilliant, — you would see, which is in itself brilliant, but we also said he would be remembering those people you have
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met in— be remembering those people you have met in life _ be remembering those people you have met in life over the last few years since _ met in life over the last few years since your— met in life over the last few years since your diagnosis who have not made _ since your diagnosis who have not made it. — since your diagnosis who have not made it, which makes this day all the more — made it, which makes this day all the more special. | made it, which makes this day all the more special.— made it, which makes this day all the more special. i am here because of modern medicine _ the more special. i am here because of modern medicine so _ the more special. i am here because of modern medicine so i _ the more special. i am here because of modern medicine so i was - the more special. i am here because of modern medicine so i was on i the more special. i am here because. of modern medicine so i was on drugs that gave me a few more years and i'm not necessarily in a great place at the moment, i am back on chemotherapy and we know full well that about three months ago, and i wasn't in a good place and things i got really hairy for me. i went into liver failure got really hairy for me. i went into liverfailure and it got really hairy for me. i went into liver failure and it was a really stark reminder of those really harsh statistics when you have late stage bowel cancer and unfortunately only around 8% of people will survive for five years and this is my fifth year milestone and you are always told to park there statistics and there always is help so i know people will be listening thinking that is really dire and early diagnosis is key but one thing i have learnt along the
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way is the friends that i have met, there are 92% of people that i have said goodbye to and they are my friends and people i have gone along this journey with and the one thing that this is a bittersweet milestone is whilst i'm sitting here with a big smile on my face, i don't know what the future might hold for me, it might be indeed my last birthday, but at the same time i note there are people desperate, my friends, to have wanted to reach that milestone and they never did.— and they never did. deborah, whenever— and they never did. deborah, whenever we _ and they never did. deborah, whenever we speak - and they never did. deborah, whenever we speak to - and they never did. deborah, whenever we speak to you, l and they never did. deborah, l whenever we speak to you, you completely confound me because your demeanour and the weight you are, i am so full of admiration for and then you hit us with the reality of our circumstance and if i'm not mistaken i think i sawjust before you came on air your daughter. was she adjusting your hair a moment ago? she is there, right? she
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she adjusting your hair a moment ago? she is there, right?- ago? she is there, right? she is 'ust ago? she is there, right? she is just sitting _ ago? she is there, right? she is just sitting on — ago? she is there, right? she is just sitting on the _ ago? she is there, right? she is just sitting on the floor. - ago? she is there, right? she is just sitting on the floor. and i ago? she is there, right? she is. just sitting on the floor. and your ability... ellie, — just sitting on the floor. and your ability... ellie, come _ just sitting on the floor. and your ability... ellie, come here! it - just sitting on the floor. and your ability... ellie, come here! it is i ability... ellie, come here! it is not fair. _ ability... ellie, come here! it is notfair. is— ability... ellie, come here! it is not fair, is it? _ ability... ellie, come here! it is not fair, is it? she _ ability... ellie, come here! it is not fair, is it? she is _ ability... ellie, come here! it is not fair, is it? she is camera i ability... ellie, come here! it is l not fair, is it? she is camera shy. she sticks — not fair, is it? she is camera shy. she sticks to _ not fair, is it? she is camera shy. she sticks to her _ not fair, is it? she is camera shy. she sticks to her guns, _ not fair, is it? she is camera shy. she sticks to her guns, good. - not fair, is it? she is camera shy. l she sticks to her guns, good. your ability to live in the now in the sure knowledge of the reality that faces you, you know much better than i know it has been a huge inspiration to a lot of people and that must mean a lot to you. thank ou. i that must mean a lot to you. thank yom i don't — that must mean a lot to you. thank you. i don't feel— that must mean a lot to you. thank you. i don't feel like _ that must mean a lot to you. thank you. i don't feel like an _ you. i don't feel like an inspiration. anyone who he was thrown into when the rope is whipped from beneath your feet, thrown into when the rope is whipped from beneath yourfeet, you cope however you can get by each day, do the best you can with the rubbish presented to you and i suppose i wanted some good to come out of my story which is why i started sharing it and people always ask, how do you
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start campaigning, how do you start sharing your story? my best advice to anybody is start on your own doorstep. i started on my own doorstep. i started on my own doorstep with my friends and family because i wanted to tell my friends and family about bowel cancer and it rolled out from there and i think people forget. you have to go big or go home, but you don't, the best things we can do is check our own friends and family, check they are ok, check they understand what they 0k, check they understand what they need to be looking for, encourage them to get an appointment and it is nice for you to say that hopefully i have been an inspiration. what i do hope is that my story or my meeting of this milestone will give other people hope because when i was diagnosed i couldn't find a textbook example of somebody with my type of mutation, so, yes, iwas example of somebody with my type of mutation, so, yes, i was diagnosed with advanced bowel cancer but i also have a very rare aggressive type of and it was only in recent years that some targeted therapy came along to start challenging that type of mutation and that in itself
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gave me hope. i don't know what the future might hold but i hope my story, for anybody that has been told, you know, the future looks a bit bleak, never lose sight of that hope. anything can happen. deborah, i am delighted — hope. anything can happen. deborah, i am delighted you _ hope. anything can happen. deborah, i am delighted you have _ hope. anything can happen. deborah, i am delighted you have spoken - hope. anything can happen. deborah, i am delighted you have spoken to - i am delighted you have spoken to us, it_ i am delighted you have spoken to us, it is— i am delighted you have spoken to us, it is a — i am delighted you have spoken to us, it is a privilege to speak to you on— us, it is a privilege to speak to you on your— us, it is a privilege to speak to you on your birthday. totally frivolously, you look fabulous at 40! absolutely fabulous! i hope you have the _ 40! absolutely fabulous! i hope you have the best day and get to run around _ have the best day and get to run around in — have the best day and get to run around in the rain and have lots of presents _ around in the rain and have lots of presents and lots of smiles and just enjoy— presents and lots of smiles and just enjoy it _ presents and lots of smiles and just enjoy it it— presents and lots of smiles and just enjoy it. it is a brilliant age. thank— enjoy it. it is a brilliant age. thank you. _ enjoy it. it is a brilliant age. thank you, thank you. it is an age i never thought i would reach. i will certainly be dancing without a shadow of a doubt.— certainly be dancing without a shadow of a doubt. good. you can't hel it, shadow of a doubt. good. you can't help it. she — shadow of a doubt. good. you can't help it, she makes— shadow of a doubt. good. you can't help it, she makes you _ shadow of a doubt. good. you can't help it, she makes you smile - shadow of a doubt. good. you can't help it, she makes you smile evenl help it, she makes you smile even though— help it, she makes you smile even though she — help it, she makes you smile even though she is going through something so difficult, she makes you smile — something so difficult, she makes you smile every time i am she brings so much _ you smile every time i am she brings so muchioy —
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you smile every time i am she brings so much joy-— so much 'oy. stay with us, headlines cominu so much joy. stay with us, headlines coming up- — good morning and welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: in the wake of the murder of sarah everard, scotland yard moves to regain public confidence, as former met police officer wayne couzens begins a whole life sentence. the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened
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to sarah... i am so sorry. why energy bills for 15 million households, how much more will you pay and what he needed to costs down? the parents of teenager natasha ednan—laperouse who died from an allergic reaction after eating a sandwich welcome the introduction of the new law in her name. tougher punishments for clubs guilty of racist abuse ranks to a call from the rangers manager steven gerard after his player glenn camara is booed and jeered in prague. and it is raining quite heavily for some of the moment, skies will brighten, dissension and a few showers later but blustery answer at this weekend they could be some damaging winds around. good morning. friday the 1st of
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october, our main story. the metropolitan police has outlined how it intends to reassure the public in the wake of the murder of sarah everard, promising more patrols across london. this comes after wayne couzens was handed a full life sentence for abducting and killing the 33—year—old while he was still working as a met officer. kit malthouse has told breakfast the police need to rebuild the trust of the public. simonjones has this report. sarah everard, described in court as intelligent, talented and much loved. the question now facing the met is, could and should her killer wayne couzens have been stopped earlier? share wayne couzens have been stopped earlier? . .., , ., wayne couzens have been stopped earlier? . , ., ., earlier? are recognised and for some --eole, a earlier? are recognised and for some people. a precious— earlier? are recognised and for some people, a precious bond _ earlier? are recognised and for some people, a precious bond of— earlier? are recognised and for some people, a precious bond of trust - earlier? are recognised and for some people, a precious bond of trust has| people, a precious bond of trust has been damaged stopped there are no words that can fully express the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened to
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sarah. i am so sorry. she we all feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry.— sarah. i am so sorry. she didn't resond sarah. i am so sorry. she didn't respond to _ sarah. i am so sorry. she didn't respond to questions _ sarah. i am so sorry. she didn't respond to questions about - sarah. i am so sorry. she didn't- respond to questions about whether she should resign. this was a moment when cousins falsely arrested sarah everard in march. his arm outstretched outstretched holding his warrant card. he would go on to rape and murder her, her body dumped in woodland in kent. but back in 2015 a car owned by couzens was linked to an allegation of indecent exposure. this wasn't picked up by police vetting. 72 hours before the kidnap there was another allegation of indecent exposure. iirate]!!! kidnap there was another allegation of indecent exposure.— of indecent exposure. we'll be -ushina of indecent exposure. we'll be pushing ministers _ of indecent exposure. we'll be pushing ministers and - of indecent exposure. we'll be pushing ministers and the - of indecent exposure. we'll be i pushing ministers and the home secretary to have a look at exactly what is going wrong in the vetting processes in the reporting process, in the scrutiny of police officers and how that gets dealt with. the met will shortly publish a new strategy for tackling violence against women and girls. it will be
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deploying 650 new officers into busy public places where people often feel unsafe. it insists it is focused on a blue route — make improving detections for indecent exposure. the improving detections for indecent ex - osure. . . improving detections for indecent exosure. .. ., , improving detections for indecent exosure. ., , ., improving detections for indecent exosure. ., ., exposure. the fact that this of a man used _ exposure. the fact that this of a man used the _ exposure. the fact that this of a man used the cover _ exposure. the fact that this of a man used the cover being - exposure. the fact that this of a man used the cover being a - exposure. the fact that this of a l man used the cover being a police officer to commit his crime does have devastating applications for trust, and i know that has caused distress throughout the ranks in british policing, and the thousands of police officers up and down the land. but what we hope is that over time the police can rebuild the trust of the british people would stop the death of sarah everard prompted an outpouring of public grief. ih prompted an outpouring of public arief. . prompted an outpouring of public i rief, ., , ., , prompted an outpouring of public arief. ., , ., . grief. in a new safety guidance, the met sa s grief. in a new safety guidance, the met says people — grief. in a new safety guidance, the met says people should _ grief. in a new safety guidance, the met says people should ask - grief. in a new safety guidance, the i met says people should ask questions if they are concerned enough as it is a threat, the advice backed by a police watchdog. flail is a threat, the advice backed by a police watchdog.— police watchdog. call the control and sa , police watchdog. call the control and say. i'm _ police watchdog. call the control and say, i'm being _ police watchdog. call the control and say, i'm being asked - police watchdog. call the control and say, i'm being asked to - and say, i'm being asked to cooperate with someone who says he is a police officer, i want to know is a police officer, i want to know is this person a policeman with mick if there is any real concern then
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that 99 call will be treated as party. that 99 call will be treated as -a . ., , ., that 99 call will be treated as party. couzens told lie after lie after his arrest. _ party. couzens told lie after lie after his arrest. do _ party. couzens told lie after lie after his arrest. do you - party. couzens told lie after lie after his arrest. do you know l party. couzens told lie after lie - after his arrest. do you know sarah? i don't. after his arrest. do you know sarah? i don't- the — after his arrest. do you know sarah? i don't. the met — after his arrest. do you know sarah? i don't. the met is _ after his arrest. do you know sarah? i don't. the met is investigating - i don't. the met is investigating whether he may have committed more crimes. the family of sarah everard say the world is a safer place now he will never be let out of prison. simon is outside new scotland yard. there are a number of issues being raised now, obviously one of the wider problem of trust, the other more specifically about literally, how do police behave if they are engaging with the public, particularly women and how women should respond in certain situations.— should respond in certain situations. , ., situations. yes, in the past half hour we have _ situations. yes, in the past half hour we have heard _ situations. yes, in the past half hour we have heard from - situations. yes, in the past half hour we have heard from the i situations. yes, in the past half - hour we have heard from the policing minister kit malthouse. he spoke of the devastating effect that the crimes of wayne couzens has had on the reputations of the force and on confidence in the police. he outlined this new safety advice. he
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said it is extremely rare for someone to be approached in the street by an individual plainclothes officer, but if you find yourself in that situation and you feel you are not satisfied, you feel you might be at risk from the behaviour of the officer, then it should potentially ask to speak to the control room via the officer's radio or if you're still not satisfied, you should perhaps shout out to members of the public for help, you could run to a nearby house and knock on the door and ask for help there. you could even dial 999 if you feel you are in imminent danger. kit malthouse was also asked about whether a dame cressida dick, the metropolitan police commissioner, should be considering her position. there had been some calls from some mps for that to happen yesterday. but he said that being the metropolitan police commissioner is one of the top three most difficultjobs in the
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country, and he has confidence that dame cressida dick takes the issue of violence against women very seriously. of violence against women very seriousl . ,, ., ., ,, of violence against women very seriously-— of violence against women very seriousl . ,, ., ., ,, , ., , seriously. simon, thank you very much. more than 50 million households face higher energy bills from today. there is a new increased price cap coming into effect foot change will see those on standard variable tariffs pay around £140 more each year put the bid follows a recent jump year put the bid follows a recent jump in wholesale gas prices which led to the collapse of several energy firms. irate led to the collapse of several energy firms-— led to the collapse of several ener: firms. ~ . . , ., energy firms. we are really worried about making _ energy firms. we are really worried about making sure _ energy firms. we are really worried about making sure customers - energy firms. we are really worried about making sure customers get l about making sure customers get through this period, sol about making sure customers get through this period, so i don't think is ending — and anyone is asking for the price cap to be increased again. so it is what it is, we are doing our best to get customers through it, we are trying to support well—run businesses through this period and otherwise if we need to do anything else we are talking to the guv—mac. we need to do anything else we are talking to the guv-mac._ we need to do anything else we are talking to the guv-mac. people have re orted talking to the guv-mac. people have reported issues _ talking to the guv-mac. people have reported issues trying _ talking to the guv-mac. people have reported issues trying to _ talking to the guv-mac. people have reported issues trying to register - reported issues trying to register for scotland's new covid passport
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at. they say overwhelming demand could be to blame for the province. from today anyone entering nichols in this large scale events only to prove they have had two doses of the coronavirus vaccine. nicola sturgeon says the new rules will not be enforced immediately. 48 diagnostic sites offering nhs tests and scans are being opened around england in local communities including shopping centres. it is out they will help reduce waiting times for routine operations and reduce pressure on hospitals. the health secretary sajid javid said he is determined to do everything he can to cut nhs waiting lists in the new diagnostic hubs will play a key part. new diagnostic hubs will play a key art. , ., ., , new diagnostic hubs will play a key part. there will be a one-stop shop, let's call it. — part. there will be a one-stop shop, let's call it, where _ part. there will be a one-stop shop, let's call it, where people _ part. there will be a one-stop shop, let's call it, where people can - part. there will be a one-stop shop, let's call it, where people can get i let's call it, where people can get the scans they need, the mri scans, ct scans, all in one place in a convenient location, like a shopping centre or a local football club, thenit centre or a local football club, then it will be open seven days a week and we believe that 40 of them in the first year of operation can get through another 2.8 million
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scans and checks so it will make a huge difference. the first mission to mercury is expected to reach its destination this weekend. the bepicolombo spacecraft will carry out six flybys around the planet. if successful the probe will start sending images back to earth. it will begin more detailed observations in around four years. our mission will orbit the planet for a year, taking a lot of data to help us understand a lot more about the surface. i should say anything about the mission which makes it special is that there are two spacecraft going to mercury, not just one that we have had in the past. that means we can have one spacecraft close to the planet, looking at the surface features in understanding the geology, history, a further away looking at the magnetic field, dynamics, the interaction with the sun. 50 we are able to do both things at once which is unusual. let's have a look at how things are
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a little closer to home. a bit wet and windy, if i'm honest! ock plenty of autumnal conditions. if you're in the mood, keep a close eye on the forecast. there will be bouts of strong winds, with its heavy rain and if you're on the move there is the potential for travel disruption. this money, icy is more about the rain than the wind. still fairly blustery but this band of rain has heavy burst push in towards east anglia and the south—east. but following in its wake, some sunshine will come out, there will be plenty of showers. pretty windy for the next few hours, make sure you have a waterproof in east anglia and the south—east because the downpours will be on the heavy side. but things will improve in terms of sunshine, but still be on guard for some showers, some of the most frequent in scotland and northern ireland, pushing their way north and east. the wind is lettuce across the north of scotland. while the winds
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are strongest towards east anglia and the cities, they will ease down here but pick up towards the west of scotland later. by the end of the day this is where we will see the strongest winds and the most frequent showers. heavy with hail and thunder. if showers across other parts but more people will have dry and sunny weather, getting a bit fresher than icy has done this evening, showers packing and across parts of scotland, more persistent rain edging towards the south—west later but tonight a cooler night than last night, temperatures in single figures. as for the weekend, it's time to cover your eyes and ears because it's going to be wet and windy at times. more details in half an hour. there has been a big conversation about energy costs. it's one of those very real issues people are going to know about more from today. that's right. it's that week in the autumn where you are thinking, will i stick the heating on? if you are someone who is going to go for it
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you might want to listen because it seems like everything is costing a bit more and your energy bill could be about to go up too. this is all to do with the price cap which is set by the energy regulator ofgem. it exists to limit what energy firms in england, wales and scotland can charge customers for their gas or electricity. from today, that limit is going up. that means an estimated 15 million households face a i2% rise in energy bills equivalent to around £139 a year for those on a standard tariff. if you're on a pre—payment meter, your bill could be costing you an extra £153 a year. so why�*s this happening now? well, the price cap is reviewed twice a year and is based on the latest estimated costs of supplying energy. and as we've seen over the last few weeks, the wholesale price of gas is soaring up 250% since january. the price cap means firms haven't been able to pass that full increase
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on to customers, so energy companies have been struggling to cover their costs many smaller firms have gone bust. if your energy firm has collapsed, your account will be transferred to one of the bigger suppliers but you'll find the tariff you're put on is almost certainly more expensive than your old deal. if you are on a fixed deal, the good news is that today's price cap probably will not affect you just yet. but if you are coming to the end of the contract, you probably won't be able to find a cheap deal to replace it. usually, you might be one of those people who uses comparison sites to shop around for a better quote, but some of the biggest ones have stopped advertising deals at all because there are not any. with that in mind, how can you save yourself some money on the bills this winter? global gas prices, companies going bust, rising bills. it's all a bit much right now. but there are a few things
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you could do that will save you more than the amount your bills are going up by. i've come round tojenny�*s house to have a look around. hi, jenny. hi. and just see how much money we can save. this is culprit number one. yeah, my thermostat. ok, and do you like it nice and warm in the house? i do, i always have the heating on a lot. well, turning your heating down by one degree — so most of us have it about 22, 2i — if you turn it down to 20, do you reckon anyone would notice? no. well, it could save you as much as 55 quid through the year. do you ever put the telly on standby? no, ijust use the remote, it's easier to press the button and throw the remote and up you go. well, turning off the telly either at the button or at the wall could save you 35 quid a year. the dishwasher and the washing machine. yeah. if... i guess they're always on, right? they are always on. if you do one less wash a week — whether that's on the washing machine or dishwasher — that's going to clock up some savings through the year.
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0k. behind you here, we've got an led light. this is pretty expensive to get in the first place so it's a bit of an outlay to begin with, but once you've bought them, led lights to save a good lot of money each year. i've got you a draft excluder — cost me all of £2.50. i didn't splash out much but the point is this would save you ten times that in a year if you're sticking that at the bottom of your doors, and save a load of money through the year. were you trying to hide this from me? my favourite appliance! my tumble dryer. ok, is this on a lot? it's on an awful lot. it uses a load of energy. if you were to use it a little bit less you could save a lot on your energy bill through the year. jenny, i think we're there, i think we've done it. yeah. i think between us... i think you have! ..we have maybe beaten the price—cap rise. easy things that maybe we could all do, do you think, jenny? yeah, little changes make up big savings.
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there is a lot of anger and confusion out there about these prices going up and the number of small company is going under. the industry regulator ofgem have defended the rise, saying nobody could have predicted the wholesale prices going up as much as they have but they also have warned consumers there could be another hike in six months. with the prices as high as they are at the _ with the prices as high as they are at the moment, prices continue to increase _ at the moment, prices continue to increase and there is a chance the cap will— increase and there is a chance the cap will have to be increased for the summer period. but the key thing is, it is— the summer period. but the key thing is, it is a _ the summer period. but the key thing is, it is a protection, so it is ensuring _ is, it is a protection, so it is ensuring that customers are paying a fair price _ ensuring that customers are paying a fair price and that means that when .as fair price and that means that when gas prices _ fair price and that means that when gas prices come back down again, the cap will_ gas prices come back down again, the cap will come down, as well, and follow— cap will come down, as well, and follow suit — cap will come down, as well, and follow suit-— cap will come down, as well, and follow suit. what she also told us late last night — follow suit. what she also told us late last night was _ follow suit. what she also told us late last night was that _ follow suit. what she also told us late last night was that this i follow suit. what she also told us| late last night was that this winter for consumers in lots of areas will
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be really difficult. we have just seen the end of the furlough scheme, we are seeing later next week universal credit disappearing, that's £20 uplift. a couple of e—mails we have had. simon says, i am watching bbc breakfast and hearing about the changes. it is really concerning to people like myself claiming universal credit it will be £80 less every month in my pocket. this is a sad state of affairs. they will be a choice this winter between food and fuel and he is not the only person to get in touch about those concerns around universal credit can be. sally has just received an e—mail from her provider saying her bill will increase by £50 every month, even though she was already in credit. she phoned them and has reduced it by £13, meaning a payment monthly has risen by £37 per month. sally has risen by £37 per month. sally has done the right thing, get in touch with your provider. also have a look at your statements because every statement you have will give
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your annual average and so you can work out where you are up to and if it will go up by this percentage and you know how much more you will pay. knowledge is power. we you know how much more you will pay. knowledge is power.— knowledge is power. we spoke to citizens advice _ knowledge is power. we spoke to citizens advice not _ knowledge is power. we spoke to citizens advice not long _ knowledge is power. we spoke to citizens advice not long ago i knowledge is power. we spoke to citizens advice not long ago and l knowledge is power. we spoke to i citizens advice not long ago and one of the things that the person we spoke to told us was that all energy providers, this goes to your point about calling up and querying the bill, all energy providers have departments which look at specifically people who are struggling with making payments and they have a duty to look at this. if you feel it is overwhelming and you can't afford it, you must flag it because they have a duty to do that. that is their duty illegally for them to help you out and come up with a payment plan long term but the best thing to do is look at your bills, work out where you are up to, how much more of a dent in it will make it your inca weight increases, because it will increase almost inevitably, then go from there. but do not struggle without reaching out to the provider might thank you. the time is 8:19am. in 2016
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tragically in 2016, teenager natasha ednan—laperouse died from a severe allergic reaction after she ate a baguette that, unknowingly to her, contained sesame seeds. since then her family have campaigned for businesses to include a full list of ingredients on the packaging of food they sell and today natasha's law comes into effect across the uk. breakfast�*sjohn maguire has the story. her death may well save many, many lives. natasha ednan—laperouse was flying from heathrow with herfather and best friend when she bought some food — a baguette. natasha knew she had a food allergy, and always checked labels. but the bread had been baked with sesame seeds — not included in the list of ingredients, and which triggered a severe reaction. natasha suffered several cardiac arrests on the plane, and died later in a french hospital. she was only 15. this new legislation, called natasha's law, comes into force today and closes a loophole so that, now,
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all pre—wrapped food — including sandwiches, fast—food and cheese or meat from deli counters — must be clearly labelled with a full list of ingredients. also 14 major allergens — including eggs, peanuts and sesame seeds — must be highlighted in the list. the food standards agency calls it a huge step in helping the 2 million people who live with food allergies in the uk. natasha's parents describe it as a bittersweet moment for them but, five years on from their daughter's death, say they they know in their hearts she would be very proud of the new rules in her name — natasha's law. john maguire, bbc news. we can speak now to natasha's parents, tanya and nadim, who join us from their home in west london.
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very good morning to you both. thank you for your time this morning. first of all, on that thought, it is something you have fought for so long. this must mean a lot to you, this day, as the changes in. it does. we have been waiting for this day for three years. natasha died five years ago but following the inquest we started campaigning for this law so today we really feel like we have achieved it and it feels really special. do like we have achieved it and it feels really special.— like we have achieved it and it feels really special. do you want to take us through _ feels really special. do you want to take us through the _ feels really special. do you want to take us through the practicalities i take us through the practicalities of this is like this is the most important thing. you going to a shop, cafe, you buy something, what is the thing that has changed that you believe could save lives? nearly all of us live — you believe could save lives? nearly all of us live a _ you believe could save lives? nearly all of us live a life _ you believe could save lives? nearly all of us live a life of _ you believe could save lives? nearly all of us live a life of eating - you believe could save lives? nearly all of us live a life of eating food i all of us live a life of eating food on the _ all of us live a life of eating food on the go. — all of us live a life of eating food on the go, buying something from some _ on the go, buying something from some kind — on the go, buying something from some kind of sandwich or salad or some _ some kind of sandwich or salad or some kind — some kind of sandwich or salad or some kind of sandwich or salad or some kind of chain boy individual
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cafe where — some kind of chain boy individual cafe where you grab and go. previously there has been no requirement to have any ingredients or allergen— requirement to have any ingredients or allergen markings on those packets— or allergen markings on those packets of food. they are preprepared and made on the premises and then— preprepared and made on the premises and then sold on that day. for e>
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trained to do that. that's right. unfortunately _ trained to do that. that's right. unfortunately what _ trained to do that. that's right. unfortunately what happened l trained to do that. that's right. i unfortunately what happened was she believed what she was reading on the label, those were the ingredients and she could eat it. she had eaten gets all her life. it looked absolutely fine. no sign of seeds baked into the dough. she bought it in faith that it was going to be ok and that is where everything went wrong. i and that is where everything went wronu. ~ ., ,, and that is where everything went wronu. ~ ., and that is where everything went wronu. ~' ., ., ., and that is where everything went wronu. w, ., wrong. i know you both want to push this even further. _ wrong. i know you both want to push this even further. it _ wrong. i know you both want to push this even further. it has _ wrong. i know you both want to push this even further. it has taken i wrong. i know you both want to push this even further. it has taken so i this even further. it has taken so long. it effectively should be so simple and so important. i know you want to take it further with the appointment of an allergy tsar and people having morejoined up treatments. tell me more about that. it is really simple and this comes out at _ it is really simple and this comes out at the — it is really simple and this comes out at the evidence. myself and tanya _ out at the evidence. myself and tanya have been to a number of inquests— tanya have been to a number of inquests of— tanya have been to a number of inquests of deaths of young people, teenagers _ inquests of deaths of young people, teenagers and young people in the
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uk, from _ teenagers and young people in the uk, from food allergies and each time _ uk, from food allergies and each time the — uk, from food allergies and each time the current is around the country— time the current is around the country have highlighted there is a real feeling essentially in the care under— real feeling essentially in the care under the — real feeling essentially in the care under the health system for young people _ under the health system for young people and the way they are treated and looked after when they have allergies, — and looked after when they have allergies, severe allergies. and often _ allergies, severe allergies. and often they fall through the grate. we are _ often they fall through the grate. we are calling for an allergy tsar. two to _ we are calling for an allergy tsar. two to 3— we are calling for an allergy tsar. two to 3 million people in this country— two to 3 million people in this country who are seriously food allergic. — country who are seriously food allergic, this is not about having a reaction _ allergic, this is not about having a reaction or— allergic, this is not about having a reaction or an upset tummy, this is a matter— reaction or an upset tummy, this is a matter of— reaction or an upset tummy, this is a matter of life and death. we are calling _ a matter of life and death. we are calling for— a matter of life and death. we are calling for an allergy tsar and have launched _ calling for an allergy tsar and have launched a — calling for an allergy tsar and have launched a parliamentary petition that people can sign up to and it is online _ that people can sign up to and it is online now— that people can sign up to and it is online now and we are calling the government saying it is time, enough of seeing _ government saying it is time, enough of seeing our young people and teenagers die unnecessarily. this is not what _ teenagers die unnecessarily. this is not what a — teenagers die unnecessarily. this is not what a great british nation should — not what a great british nation should accept, that young people can die in— should accept, that young people can
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die in this _ should accept, that young people can die in this day and age because of the food — die in this day and age because of the food they eat when all it takes is more _ the food they eat when all it takes is more joined up thinking to better protect— is more joined up thinking to better protect them. it is not about money, it is about _ protect them. it is not about money, it is about the actual care and be joined _ it is about the actual care and be joined up — it is about the actual care and be joined up thinking and an allergy tsar will— joined up thinking and an allergy tsar will bring those fragmented pieces— tsar will bring those fragmented pieces together and make a huge difference for families.— pieces together and make a huge difference for families. tanya, we have spoken _ difference for families. tanya, we have spoken to — difference for families. tanya, we have spoken to you _ difference for families. tanya, we have spoken to you a _ difference for families. tanya, we have spoken to you a few- difference for families. tanya, we have spoken to you a few times i difference for families. tanya, we i have spoken to you a few times over the years and our audience will know how determined you have all been, your family, how determined you have all been, yourfamily, to make sure how determined you have all been, your family, to make sure this law comes through. this is the day. can i ask you a very obvious question? the law comes in, but how does anyone make sure that it is adhered to? whosejob is it to make sure each shop, each place does stick to the reels, and do you have confidence that there is a structure in place to make sure it happens? there is a structure in place. it really is a local governments and councils who will be responsible for making sure that the law is adhered to. what we do know is that this is a law that has come in and two years
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were given to the food industry to come on board and we appreciate it has been a very difficult two years, but it is actually very straightforward, there is a lot of information about how businesses can come on board stop it is really up to those people to just do it. we have spoken to all types of businesses big and small and it is the worry, really. sometimes people put things out of their minds and think, my gosh, it will be a nightmare, but it isn't and it is also affordable. there is really no reason why businesses shouldn't be doing the right thing by their customers are.— doing the right thing by their customers are. ., , ., , , ., ,, customers are. really good to speak to ou customers are. really good to speak to you both. — customers are. really good to speak to you both, tanya _ customers are. really good to speak to you both, tanya and _ customers are. really good to speak to you both, tanya and nadim. i customers are. really good to speak to you both, tanya and nadim. that| to you both, tanya and nadim. that law comes into force today and i know it is a proud moment for you both stop saying thank you. find out the news where you are.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. people living in a tower block in east london are being moved out after inspections revealed it isn't safe unless it's refurbished or rebuilt. 120 families in clare house in bow will go into temporary accomodation. blocks built in this way have go through new assessments since the grenfell disaster. clarion housing association said there will be round the clock safety patrols as people move out. barking & dagenham has emerged as one of the worst places in england for fuel poverty. that's according to the end fuel poverty coalition, which has produced a map and said newham is also likely to be hardest hit. campaigners are warning it could become commonplace in certain areas. there are calls for more screening in young people to detect those who may be unaware they have a heart problem. every week in the uk, 12 people between the ages of 14 and 35 die of an undiagnosed heart condition.
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the charity, cardiac risk in the young, says early treatment is key. we've never accepted that, as a society, we should just sit back and see fit and healthy young people dying suddenly from undiagnosed conditions, and to do nothing about that. and we know that screening can prevent up to 89% of these sudden deaths — that's what the research has shown. two key workers from govia thameslink railway as having their stories told as part of a new public art installation. the exhibition, gratitude, opens tomorrow at southwark cathedral, paying tribute to keyworkers during the pandemic. the experiences of two govia thameslink workers will be shared by actors hugh bonneville and ciaran griffiths as part of the exhibition. if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. on to the weather now with kate kinsella.
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good morning. it's a mild start this morning. we start the day in mid teens celsius but low pressure — it is in charge, which means it is going to be a rather wet and windy at least morning today. we've got this cold front moving through and that's going to bring a spell of heavy and persistent rain but it does clear away south and eastwards, pushed through on a very gusty south—westerly wind. some showers to follow but largely dry with some sunshine through this afternoon and temperatures today — despite the wind and this morning's rain — getting up to 18 celsius. now into this evening, overnight, it remains dry and it remains clear. temperatures quite chilly overnight — certainly chillier than last night — but we'll see towards the early hours a bit more cloud feeding in as our next front approaches as we head into saturday. the minimum temperature dropping to six celsius. now for saturday itself, low pressure still in charge, as it is across the weekend. we see the isobars squeezing together and a big spell of rain for saturday. it's going to stay wet and windy tomorrow, perhaps sunday a drier day on the whole with some sunny spells, but there's also the risk
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of a shower on sunday. now the breeze is going to stay strong and conditions, as you can see, staying unsettled into next week. that's it for the moment. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. morning live follows us on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's in store from gethin and kimberly. coming up on morning live... lots of you have been asking about kym and wondering where she's been. and today we'll be checking in with her as she opens about up the impact her dad's devastating cancer diagnosis has had on her family, and the way it's also
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affected her health. i have suffered with anxiety attacks in the _ i have suffered with anxiety attacks in the past — i have suffered with anxiety attacks in the past and they have come back with a _ in the past and they have come back with a vengeance, let us say. life has been — with a vengeance, let us say. life has been pretty difficult for me, i am trying — has been pretty difficult for me, i am trying to support my family and working _ am trying to support my family and working away was making that really difficult _ working away was making that really difficult. . . , working away was making that really difficult. ., ., , ., , working away was making that really difficult. ., ., , difficult. that was really tricky for her, difficult. that was really tricky for her. it's — difficult. that was really tricky for her, it's been _ difficult. that was really tricky for her, it's been a _ difficult. that was really tricky for her, it's been a tough i difficult. that was really tricky l for her, it's been a tough time. we've certainly really missed her and it's been such a difficult time for kym, but i'm pleased to say there's been some really positive news, so she'll be joining us live to talk about that. also today, we're joined by skin specialist dr esho. from curing cracked hands to slathering on the spf, he explains how to protect our skin this autumn — including why investing in a humidifier could help. and our resident repair man will kirk's in the house! he'll be answering your questions — including how to remove watermarks from wood — and — how to get your worn—out furniture looking as good as new! plus, with one month to go until cop26 — the big climate change conference in glasgow — we'll meet the astronaut joining forces with prince william who says now
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is the time to start cleaning up the air around us. and the children in need countdown is on! countryfile rambler charlotte smith tells us why she's preparing to [ace up her walking boots and wants you tojoin in too! see you at 9:15. the metropolitan police commissioner, dame cressida dick, the police minister kit malthouse says there is a job to be done by police to rebuild trust. this follows the sentencing of former officer wayne couzens for the murder officer wayne couzens for the murder of a server error. we can speak now to zoe billingham. — man for the murder of sarah everard. thank you for your time. just the people understand because that i think there was confusion about which police body is which. the inspectorate of constabulary, looked at the official... are you appended the assessed —— you independently assessed policing and police forces, and this is the
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official blurb, we ask questions that citizens would ask, is that a fair description of the organisation? you have onlyjust left, in yesterday. organisation? you have only 'ust left, in yesterday.i organisation? you have only 'ust left, in yesterday. yes, spot on, it is a bit confusing, _ left, in yesterday. yes, spot on, it is a bit confusing, it's _ left, in yesterday. yes, spot on, it is a bit confusing, it's a _ left, in yesterday. yes, spot on, it is a bit confusing, it's a crowded i is a bit confusing, it's a crowded landscape out there but we inspect on behalf of the public, shining a light to look at the organisation of policing individual complaints about officers has dealt with by the independent office of police conduct but we are here to assure the public that policing is being done in the right way and when it isn't, it is ourjob to call it out. let right way and when it isn't, it is ourjob to call it out.— right way and when it isn't, it is ourjob to call it out. let me try and ask you _ ourjob to call it out. let me try and ask you some _ ourjob to call it out. let me try and ask you some questions i ourjob to call it out. let me try. and ask you some questions that people might ask. in that your experience, which many years of investigation of the police forces, the picture is emerging of an organisation in which misogyny, sexist behaviour, possibly predatory behaviour, dangerous behaviour, is tolerated. would you accept that's true? ., ., �* true? now, iwouldn't, actually. i let report —
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true? now, iwouldn't, actually. i let report two _ true? now, iwouldn't, actually. i let report two years _ true? now, iwouldn't, actually. i let report two years ago - true? now, iwouldn't, actually. i let report two years ago called i let report two years ago called shining a light on patrol, looking at these issues to investigate whether our police forces are reaching out to those types of behaviour and bearing down on officers whojoin behaviour and bearing down on officers who join policing for one thing and that is to prey on vulnerable members of the public. what we have seen in the last four years since that report, which was critical of the policing, is a big investment in training and leadership around making very clear to police officers what behaviour is acceptable and what isn't. and actually, getting police officers to become much more active bystanders. if they see their colleagues engaging in banter that makes others feel uncomfortable, if they are using demeaning language, being misogynistic, homophobic or racist, it is the duty of police officers to call that outcome and that is now beginning to happen across forces happened in the country, notjust the met, we want to see much more of that, we want to police officers to trust their instincts, stand—up, be
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counted, call it out. if i trust their instincts, stand-up, be counted, call it out.— counted, call it out. if i take that at face value, _ counted, call it out. if i take that at face value, that _ counted, call it out. if i take that at face value, that is _ counted, call it out. if i take that at face value, that is reassuring. | at face value, that is reassuring. then nicer reports in the papers but there was a whatsapp group that existed which couzens was part of, that was sharing misogynistic, racist, hollow phobic material with colleagues, this was in the immediate run—up to his offences. —— homophobic material. how do i and how do people try and match up what you've just told me which sounds reassuring, with what appears to be a reality? we also hearfrom your former boss, the chief inspector of constabulary, confirming that couzens was known as the rapist by other officers. this seems to fly in the face of what you have just told me about officers calling out other members, colleagues, possibly friends. it members, colleagues, possibly friends. ,, members, colleagues, possibly friends. , , ., ., friends. it is shocking what we have heard about —
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friends. it is shocking what we have heard about couzens _ friends. it is shocking what we have heard about couzens and _ friends. it is shocking what we have heard about couzens and it's i friends. it is shocking what we have heard about couzens and it's all i heard about couzens and it's all been reported in the media and i can talk about it because i have looked at it in the media as well but i think we need to get a sense of perspective. i have had the privilege of working for 12 years with police officers, police staff, pcsos with police officers, police staff, pcsos up and in the country whose onlyjob is to get up in the morning and keep the public safe, goodness me, what a job police officers do, particularly in the pandemic when they were completely putting themselves on the line of the virus to be absolutely honest, i think there is a small minority of really, really inappropriate people that are still getting into policing, and the discussion i think we should be having is, how do we stop that happening?— having is, how do we stop that happening? having is, how do we stop that haueninu?�* , , happening? and i 'ust stop you there if i ma ? happening? and i 'ust stop you there if! ma ? it happening? and i just stop you there if i may? it seems _ happening? and i just stop you there if i may? it seems in _ happening? and i just stop you there if i may? it seems in a _ happening? and i just stop you there if i may? it seems in a that - happening? and i just stop you there if i may? it seems in a that you i happening? and i just stop you there if i may? it seems in a that you are l if i may? it seems in a that you are accepting that these people exist within the police force and there is a reason why people like that can exist within an organisation, whatever organisation. in the police force it is even more important. it is because there is a conspiracy of
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silence. that's the reason that you save there may be a small number but they do exist. why can they carry on existing in 2021? the reason surely has to be for whatever reason, there is still some kind of conspiracy silence. �* ., ., ., , silence. i'm not going to deny the undeniable- _ silence. i'm not going to deny the undeniable. on _ silence. i'm not going to deny the undeniable. on occasions, - silence. i'm not going to deny the undeniable. on occasions, we i silence. i'm not going to deny the i undeniable. on occasions, we clearly see where police officers haven't stood up and called it out and that's what will be looked at in great detail by the ilo pc when they look at exactly what happened around couzens, who knew who was doing what, and that conspiracy of silence must stop, the only way it can stop is if in policing, violence against women and girls is treated at an absolute priority. there has been a culture in the past, and have looked at this for seven or eight years, to treat violence against women and girls, domestic abuse, 1.6 millions of abuse —— domestic abuse were
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female last year. if you want to shift the culture in policing, there needs to be a very clear statement from government that actually, the primary role of the police is to keep all citizens safe, and women cannot be relegated to second—class citizens. we cannot be relegated to second-class citizens. ~ ., �* ., . citizens. we don't have much time, i'm interested _ citizens. we don't have much time, i'm interested in _ citizens. we don't have much time, i'm interested in what _ citizens. we don't have much time, i'm interested in what you - citizens. we don't have much time, i'm interested in what you say i i'm interested in what you say about, if you know someone... let's look at that whatsapp group for example. if someone new, if this investigation, clearly there has to be an investigation, one of his colleagues saw, witnessed what he was saying, his attitudes, our day, those people who sat and did nothing, have they got a career in the police force? should they too... you talk about sending out statements, should the statement now be, if you say it and don't do anything, you cannot stay the police force? ~ . . ~ , anything, you cannot stay the police force? ~ ., ., ,, , ., force? well, that makes me more comfortable _ force? well, that makes me more comfortable to _ force? well, that makes me more comfortable to talk _ force? well, that makes me more comfortable to talk about - force? well, that makes me more comfortable to talk about it i force? well, that makes me more comfortable to talk about it in i comfortable to talk about it in broad terms because i do not want to
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prejudice any criminal investigation thatis prejudice any criminal investigation that is ongoing about potential colleagues, alleged suspects, alongside wayne couzens who are undertaking this activity, but in broad terms, absolutely spot—on, if there is this type of activity going on in whatsapp messages or in the parade ring or wherever, it needs to be called out, it must stop. police officers, the vast majority of whom will need to stand up and call this out and notjust be supported in doing so, this is a really subtle difference, they need to be actively encouraged to do so. and it needs to be seen as an act of trust and an act of responsibility on the part of officers to stand up and call it out, that's one way of getting to the heart of some of these cultural issues that we are seeing being exposed quite rightly and discussed in the wake of the appalling murder of sarah everard. flan in the wake of the appalling murder of sarah everard.— of sarah everard. can i ask you something _ of sarah everard. can i ask you something which _ of sarah everard. can i ask you something which is _ of sarah everard. can i ask you something which is very i of sarah everard. can i ask you | something which is very specific with me a lot of women will be
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worrying about this. we talked to kit malthouse about this earlier, in practical terms, kit malthouse about this earlier, in practicalterms, how kit malthouse about this earlier, in practical terms, how do police forces need to behave differently in relation to a circumstance, a police officer having some kind of engagement with a woman, may there arejust two people, how engagement with a woman, may there are just two people, how do they need to approach that now differently, literally from today? i think literally from today, mindfully, think police officers need to accept, and i suspect that they do because the debate has been very loud over the last few days, they need to understand that women being confronted by a lone police officer are going to feel afraid, it is inevitable. and therefore, i think police officers need to acknowledge that. if you are a woman and you are afraid, i think you should be asking the police officer, what communications he has entered the control room, they would always have a radio or a phone available to them, and if you don't trust that they are who they say they are,
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phone 99 and make sure that the control room operator confirms the identity of the person that is actually in front of you as a police officer, is genuine and is a legitimate... i officer, is genuine and is a legitimate. . .— officer, is genuine and is a legitimate... officer, is genuine and is a lecitimate... ., ,, . ., ., , legitimate... i appreciate that but in the event _ legitimate... i appreciate that but in the event that _ legitimate... i appreciate that but in the event that you _ legitimate... i appreciate that but in the event that you are - legitimate... i appreciate that but in the event that you are stopped| in the event that you are stopped from making a phone call, which is perfectly plausible, what then? i think that can't happen, think police officers up and down the land police officers up and down the [and have to accept that in the wake of this shocking, shocking murder, that they have to accept that women will be nervous and anxious, they must be allowed to either make a call themselves or insist that the officer radios into the control room in a way that they can hear and gets their identity confirmed. it is such a shame that it has come to this, that the public, for whom the police are there protectors, are so anxious, but i think it is so important that the police forces up and down around now really engage with their communities to restore
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that trust, because trust is absolutely at the heart of police legitimacy and we need to restore that balance. zoe legitimacy and we need to restore that balance-— legitimacy and we need to restore that balance. ., �* ., ., ,, that balance. zoe billingham, thank ou ve that balance. zoe billingham, thank you very much _ that balance. zoe billingham, thank you very much for — that balance. zoe billingham, thank you very much for your— that balance. zoe billingham, thank you very much for your time. i that balance. zoe billingham, thank you very much for your time. the i you very much for your time. the former inspector of constabulary, just finished thejob former inspector of constabulary, just finished the job yesterday and is the longest serving in that capacity. time to talk about the sport. but not about the actual sport, something that is very ugly and i'm trying to get my head around this, these children who were allowed to go to this match. the these children who were allowed to go to this match.— these children who were allowed to go to this match. the stadium should have been closed _ go to this match. the stadium should have been closed because _ go to this match. the stadium should have been closed because of - go to this match. the stadium should| have been closed because of previous incidents involving racist abuse but they decided to let 10,000 schoolchildren in. the they decided to let 10,000 schoolchildren in. ., ., , schoolchildren in. the reason it was closed was — schoolchildren in. the reason it was closed was because _ schoolchildren in. the reason it was closed was because of— schoolchildren in. the reason it was closed was because of racist - schoolchildren in. the reason it was closed was because of racist abuse, then the children were booing and jeering when this player came on, who was at the centre of... yes. who was at the centre of... yes, glenn kamara _ who was at the centre of... yes, glenn kamara was _ who was at the centre of... yes, glenn kamara was already i who was at the centre of... yes, glenn kamara was already on i who was at the centre of... yes, | glenn kamara was already on the pitch, there is history in that last season he was racially abused by a
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prague player on the pitch, who was then banned. that is the context. sorry delights of his lawyer has tweeted it was shameful, he had hoped that because the stadium was closed apart from the schoolchildren that players would be free of any abuse. stop what i'm trying to get my head around is the children. find my head around is the children. and i don't want — my head around is the children. and i don't want to assign, you know, the label of being racist at these children, sol the label of being racist at these children, so i wonder if the press there has kind of said, we have lost a brilliant player and it is this player because mcfaul, i'm just to see something that's... that i can understand more clearly. see something that's. .. that i can understand more clearly. something in society rather— understand more clearly. something in society rather than _ understand more clearly. something in society rather than a _ understand more clearly. something in society rather than a complete i in society rather than a complete about the reaction of children on the particular night. rangers manager steven gerrard said tougher punishments, are needed, to tackle racism, after glen kamara, was booed and jeered in their europa league
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defeat to sparta prague. rangers lost 1—0, this header just about crossed the line in the first half, despite allan mcgregor�*s best efforts. the game was initially supposed to be played behind closed doors, after sparta supporters had racially abused a monaco player in a champions league qualifier but it was later decided to allow 10,000 schoolchildren to attend. the jeering at kamara reached a peak in the second half, when he was sent off. and there was huge relief as harry kane came on as a substitute for tottenham and scored a hat—trick in a win 5—1win over ns mura in the europa conference league. goals have been harder to come by for the england captain this season, but he scored three in 20 minutes that was a morale—boosting win for the side, after their humbling defeat by neighbours arsenal last weekend. i think it was a good performance, i think— i think it was a good performance, i think we _ i think it was a good performance, i think we started very well. honestly it started _ think we started very well. honestly it started the very strongly, the energy— it started the very strongly, the energy of— it started the very strongly, the energy of the boys was important and
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it is always _ energy of the boys was important and it is always important to start the way we _ it is always important to start the way we did. we score, we score again. _ way we did. we score, we score again. we — way we did. we score, we score again, we dominate. the only period ithink— again, we dominate. the only period i think was— again, we dominate. the only period i think was the beginning of the second — i think was the beginning of the second half that we lost a bit of control, — second half that we lost a bit of control, but the reaction was good. 0verall— control, but the reaction was good. overall i_ control, but the reaction was good. overall i think a very good performance. england manager gareth southgate will have been pleased to see that, with world cup qualifiers against andorra and hungary coming up. manchester city midfielder phil foden is back in the squad after missing last month's triple header with a foot injury the same goes for the aston villa forward ollie watkins. and ac milan defender fikayo tomori is also included. australia's cricket captain says the ashes will go ahead this winter even if some england players decide not to travel because of covid concerns. joe root and other members of the england team have expressed doubts over the tour because of restrictions and relaxation only applies to australian citizens at the moment but could be extended to foreign travellers in time. that may allay some fears of the england players with the first test on the 8th of december. plenty of time to come before they
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have to travel to australia and as things start opening up, their fears may be made and they will feel safe. it is the weariness, the fatigue of the bubble, not the concern about actual covid, just being trapped in the bubbles that has affected a lot of the players' mental health. london marathon this week and. inspiring stories, i have seen amazing winners with stories, some of the 40,000 i do have another one now. . , ,., y of the 40,000 i do have another one now. �* , of the 40,000 i do have another one now. . , ., ., ., now. absolutely. looking forward to that tomorrow. _ now. absolutely. looking forward to that tomorrow. thank _ now. absolutely. looking forward to that tomorrow. thank you. - after dame barbara windsor was diagnosed with dementia, she used her profile to raise awareness and help others living with the disease. nine months after her death, her husband scott mitchell is continuing that campaign. on sunday, he'lljoin thousands of runners taking part in the london marathon and he's raising money for alzheimer's research uk. david sillito went to meet him. # ain't it a shame sparrows can't sing? barbara windsor. from carry on to peggy in eastenders
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— she was a part of british life for more than 50 years. and 27 of them she shared with her husband scott, and he was there by her side on one of her last public appearances — a trip to downing street to raise awareness about alzheimer's. and now, nine months after her death, that commitment they had to be open, to campaign, to raise awareness, continues. you lived here a long time together and it's a place full of memories, isn't it? yeah. we're talking nine months since barbara passed, and me more than anyone is aware that that's very early in stages of grieving. you know, we spent 27 years of our life together, and we really were together a lot as a couple. i think it's no secret that caring for someone with alzheimer's is a very challenging thing — i'd certainly say the most challenging thing i've ever
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been through in my life. the barbara the public met was funny and sharp and always open and gregarious. um... it must have been very difficult when you began to see changes in her. yeah. it seemed that barbara — once we got the diagnosis, it seemed that there in the room at the time she... i'v e. i've always recalled this story. she looked at me and she put her hand out and said "i'm sorry" to me. that was her initial reaction. and i said, "don't worry, bar," i said, "it'll be ok. it'll be ok." then she went into a completely different mode, which was, "ok, let's get on with life, let's, you know, i've got my work to get on with," and that's what she did and, you know, the advice given to me at the time was...let her continue as long
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as she can. the decision to go public — 2018, wasn't it? mm. what sort of impact did that have? what i didn't want was i didn't want barbara — and it's the same with people living with alzheimer's and dementia and theirfamilies — you don't want to have to hide that person away. you know, you don't want to have to feel that there's a shame to it, and i think for many years there has been a great shame attached to dementia, and how people feel they can talk about it and be open about it. and, of course, barbara being a public figure made it even more difficult because people constantly would be drawn to her the minute they saw her. and we spoke to her about it and explained to her what was happening — which she understood — and the other big thing that meant a lot to her was, isaid, "you know, barbara, by talking about this, you're going to be helping so many other people."
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you're about to do the marathon on sunday. you're going to have many thoughts nine months on, i'm guessing. when i go around this time it's going to be a completely different run for me. of course...| was supposed to do it last year, barbara was still here with us. i'm going to be reflecting on a lot. i'm going to be reflecting on that lady i spent 27 of my life with. she will be with me the whole way, like she's been on every training run. you know, i talk to her so much in my head when i'm running. the thing that will be missing for me is, when i finished in 2019, i got to the finish line and i phoned barbara — she was here with her carer and i phoned her and i wasjust, like, elated and euphoric and i said, "barbara, i'v e ju st r u n a mara th 0 n p. and she said, "oh, very good, dear, what time will you be home?"
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he laughs. totally not grasping the enormity of what i felt i'd done on my 56th birthday. and i went, "well, i'll be home soon, love, there'sjust a little celebration that i'm just going to stop off at." she said, "but you've been out all day!" which is wonderful and, oh, goodness, barbara, how i wish i could make that call again. but, you know... not to be this year. it is lovely to see scott smiling and the memories of barbara windsor. good luck on sunday! goad and the memories of barbara windsor. good luck on sunday!— good luck on sunday! good luck to eve one good luck on sunday! good luck to everyone taking — good luck on sunday! good luck to everyone taking part. _ good luck on sunday! good luck to everyone taking part. we - good luck on sunday! good luck to everyone taking part. we will i good luck on sunday! good luck to everyone taking part. we will have live coverage of the marathon this sunday on bbc two from 8am and then it switches over to bbc one from 10am and tomorrow we will have some really brilliant stories of people running to raise money for charities and white is important to them. it is that time of year we start
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looking for good things to watch on the tv. if you are looking for a new drama to replace vigil then this could fill the gap. i drama to replace vigil then this could fill the gap.— could fill the gap. i will say something _ could fill the gap. i will say something controversial. i | could fill the gap. i will say - something controversial. i watched vigil, it was fine, and i have seen, luckily enough, the first episode of ridley road, a new 4—part series, about a young jewish woman going undercover in 19605 britain in a neo—nazi organisation and i think it will be loads better than vigil. take a look. it's you. vivien. hello. i didn't know you were coming back. ididn't... i hear a maze! tov�*s in order. nice boy, good family. your parents must be delighted. we're all over the moon. so... what have you been...doing exactly?
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just. . . business. right. you couldn't write or...some such? i'm sorry. you'll always be my girl. yes. you said that last time. and tom varey — who you saw there — joins us now. what is he talking about with us? vigil. laughter i do think this is better. ., ,, laughter i do think this is better. . ~ , ., i do think this is better. thank you very much- _ i do think this is better. thank you very much- it _ i do think this is better. thank you very much- it is — i do think this is better. thank you very much. it is really _ i do think this is better. thank you very much. it is really gripping. it| very much. it is really gripping. it is only four _ very much. it is really gripping. it is only four points, _ very much. it is really gripping. it is only four points, much - very much. it is really gripping. it is only four points, much more i is only four points, much more digestible —— part5. is only four points, much more digestible -- parts.— is only four points, much more digestible -- parts. very exciting history and _ digestible -- parts. very exciting history and filling _ digestible -- parts. very exciting history and filling that _ digestible -- parts. very exciting history and filling that vigil- digestible -- parts. very exciting history and filling that vigil spot. i history and filling that vigil spot. do you want to do a scene setter for
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us? people — do you want to do a scene setter for us? people have a sense of it from that moment so 19605, we are in london _ that moment so 19605, we are in london and — that moment so 19605, we are in london and give a sense of what is going _ london and give a sense of what is going on— london and give a sense of what is going on at— london and give a sense of what is going on at that point in time, what story— going on at that point in time, what story does— going on at that point in time, what story does it — going on at that point in time, what story does it follow? it is going on at that point in time, what story does it follow?— story does it follow? it is a piece of history i _ story does it follow? it is a piece of history i have _ story does it follow? it is a piece of history i have no _ story does it follow? it is a piece of history i have no idea - story does it follow? it is a piece of history i have no idea about. | story does it follow? it is a piece | of history i have no idea about. in my head the idea of the 19605 was peace and flared trousers and i had no idea there was this 62 group, a group ofjewish men and women who fought the rise of the far right in the 19605 and got very hands on with it and worked to throwing a few punches. it is very exciting. you can't help _ punches. it is very exciting. you can't help but — punches. it is very exciting. you can't help but draw— punches. it is very exciting. you can't help but draw parallels when you look at the position around immigration here in the first episode with what is happening there. did anything resonate with you? we hear these horrible things being said and you worry about things, resurgence, and then in the 19605 that was happening so soon after the work. it is 1960s that was happening so soon after the work.— 1960s that was happening so soon after the work. it is crazy, so soon
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after. after the work. it is crazy, so soon after- everything _ after the work. it is crazy, so soon after. everything that _ after the work. it is crazy, so soon after. everything that colin - after the work. it is crazy, so soon | after. everything that colin jordan, after. everything that colinjordan, the leader in this, it says, can be heard nowadays. that was something that was spoken about in a q and a b of the day. she didn't want to write anything that couldn't be heard nowadays so it feels incredibly relevant and important to tell the story now. did relevant and important to tell the sto now. , relevant and important to tell the sto now. relevant and important to tell the | story now._ loved story now. did you en'oy it? loved it. what story now. did you en'oy it? loved it. what was h story now. did you en'oy it? loved it. what was it i story now. did you en'oy it? loved it. what was it like? i story now. did you enjoy it? loved it. what was it like? i _ story now. did you enjoy it? loved it. what was it like? i know - story now. did you enjoy it? loved it. what was it like? i know you i it. what was it like? i know you didn't get _ it. what was it like? i know you didn't get to — it. what was it like? i know you didn't get to spend _ it. what was it like? i know you didn't get to spend loads i it. what was it like? i know you didn't get to spend loads of i it. what was it like? i know you | didn't get to spend loads of time with the cast because it was during the pandemic. what was it like? it was a unique job in that way. it made us so grateful to be in work and around people when we were there and around people when we were there and we really can focus and put all of our energy into that, so it was great fun. of our energy into that, so it was ureat fun. _, of our energy into that, so it was great fun-— of our energy into that, so it was ureat fun. ,., ,., ., ., , of our energy into that, so it was ureat fun. ., ., , great fun. got some great names. the sto line, great fun. got some great names. the storyline. the — great fun. got some great names. the storyline, the time _ great fun. got some great names. the storyline, the time and _ great fun. got some great names. the storyline, the time and place - great fun. got some great names. the storyline, the time and place is - great fun. got some great names. the storyline, the time and place is one i storyline, the time and place is one thing _ storyline, the time and place is one thing and _ storyline, the time and place is one thing and then if you just want to see some — thing and then if you just want to see some legendary actors in the mix _ see some legendary actors in the
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min for— see some legendary actors in the mix. for example, eddie marsan, plays— mix. for example, eddie marsan, plays one — mix. for example, eddie marsan, plays one of— mix. for example, eddie marsan, plays one of the uncles. he is one of those _ plays one of the uncles. he is one of those actors like go to. if he is in it. _ of those actors like go to. if he is in it. i_ of those actors like go to. if he is in it, i always think it is a tick box~ — in it, i always think it is a tick box |— in it, i always think it is a tick box. ., , ~' in it, i always think it is a tick box. ., , ,, , in it, i always think it is a tick box. ., ,, ,., ., box. i always think he is always a bad and so _ box. i always think he is always a bad and so it _ box. i always think he is always a bad and so it surprises _ box. i always think he is always a bad and so it surprises me... i i box. i always think he is always a | bad and so it surprises me... i am not spoiling it to say he is not. he just looks... bad! laughter i saw him in tyrannosaur with olivia colman and he was a baddie in that so it was nice to see him. £311" so it was nice to see him. our audience _ so it was nice to see him. our audience will _ so it was nice to see him. our audience will remember some other names. _ audience will remember some other names. as _ audience will remember some other names, as well. rita tushingham, i am being _ names, as well. rita tushingham, i am being careful, she is elderly now but people _ am being careful, she is elderly now but people remember her from the 1960s _ but people remember her from the 1960s |_ but people remember her from the 19605. ., , ., but people remember her from the 1960s. . ., ., , 1960s. i imagine so. unfortunatelyl never aot 1960s. i imagine so. unfortunatelyl never got to — 1960s. i imagine so. unfortunatelyl never got to meet _ 1960s. i imagine so. unfortunatelyl never got to meet her. _ 1960s. i imagine so. unfortunatelyl never got to meet her. our - 1960s. i imagine so. unfortunatelyl never got to meet her. our cats i never got to meet her. our cats never got to meet her. our cats never crossed. much like most of the
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cast in this. never crossed. much like most of the cast in this-— cast in this. who was your body onset? i did — cast in this. who was your body onset? i did a _ cast in this. who was your body onset? i did a lot _ cast in this. who was your body onset? i did a lot of _ cast in this. who was your body onset? i did a lot of stuff i cast in this. who was your body onset? i did a lot of stuff with l onset? i did a lot of stuff with a: . . onset? i did a lot of stuff with aggy- we _ onset? i did a lot of stuff with aggy- we will _ onset? i did a lot of stuff with aggy. we will update - onset? i did a lot of stuff with | aggy. we will update together onset? i did a lot of stuff with i aggy. we will update together at onset? i did a lot of stuff with - aggy. we will update together at the city was closed so we spent lots of time walking around empty streets and i'd say, that's a good place when it opens.— and i'd say, that's a good place when it opens. and i'd say, that's a good place when it oens. ~ , ., ., ., when it opens. was this in london or manchester? — when it opens. was this in london or manchester? manchester. _ when it opens. was this in london or manchester? manchester. it- when it opens. was this in london or manchester? manchester. it is- when it opens. was this in london or manchester? manchester. it is set i when it opens. was this in london or manchester? manchester. it is set in both cities- — manchester? manchester. it is set in both cities. yeah, _ manchester? manchester. it is set in both cities. yeah, so _ manchester? manchester. it is set in both cities. yeah, so all _ manchester? manchester. it is set in both cities. yeah, so all of _ manchester? manchester. it is set in both cities. yeah, so all of it - manchester? manchester. it is set in both cities. yeah, so all of it was - both cities. yeah, so all of it was built u- both cities. yeah, so all of it was built up here- — both cities. yeah, so all of it was built up here. even _ both cities. yeah, so all of it was built up here. even the _ both cities. yeah, so all of it was built up here. even the london i built up here. even the london scenes? yeah. _ built up here. even the london scenes? yeah. it _ built up here. even the london scenes? yeah. it is _ built up here. even the london scenes? yeah. it is strange. i built up here. even the london i scenes? yeah. it is strange. the built up here. even the london - scenes? yeah. it is strange. the way ou scenes? yeah. it is strange. the way you describe — scenes? yeah. it is strange. the way you describe acting _ scenes? yeah. it is strange. the way you describe acting in _ scenes? yeah. it is strange. the way you describe acting in films - scenes? i'lal�*u it is strange. the way you describe acting in films being made. _ you describe acting in films being made. it— you describe acting in films being made. it is— you describe acting in films being made, it is a strange experience. i still assume — made, it is a strange experience. i still assume you will be meeting everyone. — still assume you will be meeting everyone, have that sense of camaraderie, but you literally don't .et camaraderie, but you literally don't get together. mill, and you don't .et get together. mill, and you don't get to— get together. mill, and you don't get to see — get together. mill, and you don't get to see anyone's face —— no and you donl— get to see anyone's face —— no and you don't get— get to see anyone's face —— no and you don't get to see faces. my make-up _ you don't get to see faces. my make—up artist, lisa, i never saw herface — make—up artist, lisa, i never saw herface for— make—up artist, lisa, i never saw her face for the whole shoot.
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because _ her face for the whole shoot. because she is in a mask? yes! sor . i because she is in a mask? yes! sorry- i was _ because she is in a mask? yes! sorry. i wasjust _ because she is in a mask? yes! sorry. i wasjust thinking, - because she is in a mask? yes! | sorry. i wasjust thinking, what? because she is in a mask? yes! i sorry. i wasjust thinking, what? i sorry. i was 'ust thinking, what? i don't sorry. i wasjust thinking, what? i don't understand. _ sorry. i wasjust thinking, what? i don't understand. sorry, - sorry. i wasjust thinking, what? i don't understand. sorry, i- sorry. i wasjust thinking, what? i don't understand. sorry, i wasn't| don't understand. sorry, iwasn't clear. everyone _ don't understand. sorry, iwasn't clear. everyone was _ don't understand. sorry, iwasn't clear. everyone was wearing - don't understand. sorry, i wasn't. clear. everyone was wearing masks don't understand. sorry, i wasn't- clear. everyone was wearing masks so when i saw lisa the other day and she didn't have i was like, oh, that's you. she didn't have i was like, oh, that's you-— she didn't have i was like, oh, that's ou. ~ , that's you. was it disappointing? she is watching! _ that's you. was it disappointing? she is watching! it _ that's you. was it disappointing? she is watching! it was _ that's you. was it disappointing? she is watching! it was -- - ridley road begins on sunday at 9pm, here on bbc one. you're watching bbc breakfast, it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines: following the murder of sarah everard by a serving police officer scotland yard tries to regain public confidence. as it seeks to reassure the public the met says it will increase patrols and advises people stop by a lone plainclothes police officer to challenge them.— lone plainclothes police officer to challenuethem. ' . , , ., ., challenge them. officers up-and-down the land recognised _ challenge them. officers up-and-down the land recognised the _ challenge them. officers up-and-down the land recognised the devastating - the [and recognised the devastating impacts of this event and there is a job to be done to rebuild trust by the police especially in london. are you reassured by the measures being proposed by the met police or what else would you like to see happen?
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