Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 1, 2021 4:00am-4:31am BST

4:00 am
welcome to bbc news. i'm ben boulos. the headlines: the news stranded australians have been waiting for is the prime minister announces international borders will reopen in november after an 18 month closure. the bill is passed. the us congress _ the bill is passed. the us congress votes _ the bill is passed. the us congress votes to - the bill is passed. the us congress votes to avoid i the bill is passed. the us congress votes to avoid a | congress votes to avoid a government shutdown but more tough negotiations lie ahead for president biden. tough questions for british police as the officer who raped and murdered sarah everard last march is jailed for life. nearly 1000 police officers try to restore order inside the high security prison in ecuador where clashes between rival gangs left over 100 people dead. based upon the global head of safety has
4:01 am
defended the social media giant against accusations it's photo sharing app instagram negatively affects the mental health of young people. and the rising young star in the world of classical music determined to make his field more inclusive. hello, everyone welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and indeed around the globe. the australian prime minister scott morrison has announced the country's travel ban, one of the most active in the world during the pandemic, will be lifted. the first phase of the plan will focus on citizens and permanent residents being allowed to leave australia with further changes expected to allow foreign travellers to enter the country. the prime
4:02 am
minister is currently taking questions at the press conference.— questions at the press conference. �*, , . conference. let's 'ust cross live and h conference. let's 'ust cross live and listen _ conference. let's 'ust cross live and listen in. h conference. let's just cross live and listen in. haven't l live and listen in. haven't moved into phase c will continue to have some restrictions and i would expect that but it shouldn't stop people from new south wales or victoria thing able to travel or in larger numbers and they will come back through, i suspect we will see victoria follow suit at some point, i know the premier is keen on achieving that when it is safe to do so so the question is how can you go to bali or fiji but you cannot go to queensland. i'm sure there are plenty of tourism operations of operators in queensland who will ask themselves the question but when vaccination rates at 80% in queensland there will be opportunity for queensland to join an open country. when they hit that mark. i've noted the comments that have been made on the hospitals and our government has increased funding for hospitals across the state by over 70% since we came to government. states have increased their spending by
4:03 am
just over a0%. so if they would like to match us than i am sure they will be able to close the gap at a lot of talk about what the responsibilities of the states are, i can tell you what one of them is — running your public hospitals and getting them ready to deal with any surge in demand that would come. there has been a lot of opportunity to prepare for this and i must say it's been a high priority item of the national government and we will be doing that again today but i don't think the pandemic should be used as an excuse for shakedown politics. theyjust need to get on with the job, get the hospitals ready, we have showered the states in cash when it comes to the health system to support them through covid—19 and supporting the industries and economies, whether it be shopkeeper or the more recent economic support or the covid disaster plan. the commonwealth has more than stepped up when it comes to steering and carrying state economies through this crisis. theirjob is to get the public
4:04 am
hospitals ready to go.- hospitals ready to go. scott morrison. _ hospitals ready to go. scott morrison, the _ hospitals ready to go. scott morrison, the australian i hospitals ready to go. scott . morrison, the australian prime minister, giving that press conference which he outlined those changes, the relaxing of australia's travel restrictions. let's bring in our australian correspondent shaimaa khaliljoining us from sydney. this has been a long time coming but it will not happen all in one go, nor, it seems, will it be applied across the whole of australia in one go. across the whole of australia in one 90-— across the whole of australia in one go— in one go. the devil is definitely _ in one go. the devil is definitely in _ in one go. the devil is definitely in the - in one go. the devil is definitely in the detailj in one go. the devil is i definitely in the detail in this opening up but in no doubt, this is a moment that millions of australians here inside the country have been waiting for but of course, a very emotional moment as well for the thousands of stranded australians overseas that have been waiting to come home. from november, fully vaccinated australians will be able to return, quarantining at home, so no longer having to quarantine in hotels — and that
4:05 am
is the most significant move because it means essentially that there will be no limits on the number of australians fully vaccinated, that is, that could come into the country or could leave and return. unvaccinated australians, well, they will still have to apply for exemptions or if they come back they will have to go into hotel quarantine so it means there will be a lot to i out until those vaccination rates are up and really, all of this — the big plan, the big opening up of international borders — is really hinging on those vaccination numbers and this is why you've heard from the prime minister scott morrison that new south wales, where i am, is going to be most likely the first state to open up its doors internationally. it is inching towards the 70% vaccination rate which means we are likely to get out of lockdown by october but then, it is then going to reach 80% more than the other states
4:06 am
which could then open up international borders and then allow people to return with hotel quarantine but still so many details for example they coming and we know the vaccinated arrivals will spend seven days and these vaccines have to be approved by australian medical authorities. we know that two vaccines from china and india will be approved and people will be allowed to come in we still don't know the vaccination rules for example we know, there will be vaccination passports and what their requirements are going to be, it is still needing to be reviewed but what will be very, very interesting though is how the different states are going to apply those rules. you have the prime minister there saying if new south wales opens, for example, people in new south wales can go on a vacation to bali but if queensland does not open then they cannot travel to
4:07 am
queensland. there is a scenario where australians can travel abroad and come back and find it more tricky to travel domestically and come back. qm. domestically and come back. 0k, shaimaa khalil, _ domestically and come back. 0k, shaimaa khalil, very interesting, thank you for breaking it down and explaining it for us. shaimaa khalil in sydney. two other news now and presidentjoe biden has signed into law a short—term spending bill after successfully passing us congress earlier. the bill is aimed at avoiding a government shutdown and keeping the lights on but only for another two months. president biden public problems they have not gone away with fellow democrats struggling to agree a plan to vote on his trillion dollar infrastructure proposal for bridges, roads, broadband and electric vehicles. this vote has been postponed because progressive members of the democratic party are refusing to vote for it until a much bigger bell which could inject $3.5 trillion into america's post pandemic economy and kick—start the president's vast climate change reforms passes the senate. hugo lyle is a
4:08 am
congressional reporter for the guardian's us newspaper and joined me a short time ago to explain the shape —— state of play. explain the shape -- state of -la . , explain the shape -- state of play. they managed to government _ play. they managed to government shutdown | play. they managed to - government shutdown with play. they managed to _ government shutdown with hours to spare, as you said, passing through the senate this morning and then it came down to the house and the house also passed it with a bipartisan majority. it was subject to a lot of kind of contentious debate, actually, in the weeks leading up actually, in the weeks leading up to it because democrats wanted to pair one of the other issues facing congress, which issues facing congress, which is the debt limit, with the stopgap funding measure but they had to strip it out because republicans refused to back it and so they have passed what is known as a team continuing resolution, a tcr, that keeps the government funded to early december and it includes funding also for disaster relief, from hurricanes and wildfires as well as also the afghan refugee resettlement programme. i’m resettlement programme. i'm . lad resettlement programme. i'm lad ou resettlement programme. i'm glad you mentioned the debt
4:09 am
ceiling because that is the second issue i wanted to come to, a much more evidence deadline now, 0ctober to, a much more evidence deadline now, october 18 is the date by which congress has to approve, effectively, the ability to pay the interest due on debts of —— that have already been accrued by the government. if they don't do that, doesn't mean the us government would default its debts? . �* , government would default its debts? ., �*, ., , , debts? that's absolutely right. october 18 _ debts? that's absolutely right. october 18 is _ debts? that's absolutely right. october 18 is the _ debts? that's absolutely right. october 18 is the big _ debts? that's absolutely right. october 18 is the big crunch . october 18 is the big crunch date by which the us has to lift or in this case suspend the debt ceiling. janet yellen has warned repeatedly actually over the last couple of weeks and months that congress must take action on the debt ceiling, otherwise the us will default on around $28 trillion of debt and the consequences of it could be really calamitous, involving potentially double—digit unemployment in the us, chileans wiped from household income, interest rates would soar, american's loan rate would increase and it
4:10 am
would be an all—round mega issue that they have to deal with —— trillions wiped. it has been plagued by intransigence from both republicans and democrats were at an impasse at the moment because either side can agree how to tackle it. there's democrats on the one side who say republicans should join them and give them votes to raise the debt ceiling on a bipartisan basis because that's what they did during the trump administration and republicans should return the favour but republicans say no, it should be done by a partyline vote and if the republicans in the party line formed responsibility and they did not want to be ones raising the debt limit.- raising the debt limit. hugo lowell from _ raising the debt limit. hugo lowell from the _ raising the debt limit. hugo lowell from the guardian. l raising the debt limit. hugo i lowell from the guardian. the british police officer who murdered sarah everard will die injail after a judge murdered sarah everard will die in jail after a judge sentenced him to life in prison. wayne couzens pretended to arrest sarah in london in march during a coburg lockdown. he handcuffed her, kidnapped her and raped and killed her —— covid lockdown. there's family were in court watching as he
4:11 am
was sentenced. lucy manning reports. sarah everard was, thejudge said, simply walking home. for herfamily, nothing can make things better, nothing can bring sarah back, they said. but the rapist, murderer policeman will never be released, and herfamily said that brings some relief. this moment, using his position of trust and privilege as a police officer to falsely arrest the 33—year—old, his arm out holding his warrant card, his use of handcuffs, persuaded thejudge he should die in prison. the misuse of a police role to murder a lone victim needed the greatest punishment. in the dock, couzens, as he had done throughout, kept his head down. he started shaking as the judge sentenced him, with sarah's family looking on. lord justice fulford told wayne couzens, "you kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard, having long planned a violent sexual assault.
4:12 am
you have eroded the confidence the public is entitled to have in its police forces. you have considerately added to the insecurity felt by people, perhaps particularly women. "i have seen no evidence of genuine contrition." thejudge condemned his lies. his behaviour, calmly buying snacks after raping and murdering sarah, and coolly letting his children play in the woods where he'd dumped her remains. should the police not have detected a murderer in their ranks? they admit they missed a check when vetting him that could have linked him to one of three indecent exposure allegations. how can women regain trust in the police now? this man has brought shame on the met. speaking frankly, as an organisation, we have been rocked.
4:13 am
i absolutely know that there are those who feel their trust in us is shaken. there are no words that can fully express the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry. no response to questions about whether she should resign. sarah everard lived her last hours in terror, but the final thoughts of herfamily are of a time before. in a statement, they said: their daughter never wanted to start a national debate about violence against women.
4:14 am
she just wanted to get home safely. lucy manning, bbc news. do stay with us on bbc news. still to come: to meet rental gurus become of the 25—year—old who has been described as the rising star of classical music. —— randall gooseby. in all russia's turmoil, it has never quite come to this. president yeltsin said the day would decide the nation's destiny. the nightmare that so many people have feared for so long is playing out its final act here. russians are killing russians in front of a grandstand audience. it was his humility - which produced affection from catholics throughout . the world, but his departure is a tragedy for - the catholic church. this man, israel's right—winger ariel sharon, visited the religious compound — and that started the trouble. he wants israel alone to have sovereignty over the holy sites — an idea that's unthinkable
4:15 am
to palestinians. after 45 years of division, germany is one. in berlin, a million germans celebrate the rebirth of europe's biggest and richest nation. this is bbc news, the headlines, and the australian prime minister has announced international borders will reopen in november after an 18—month closure. the bill has passed. 18-month closure. the bill has passed. the us congress — the bill has passed. the us congress votes _ the bill has passed. the us congress votes to - the bill has passed. the us congress votes to avoid - the bill has passed. the us congress votes to avoid a i congress votes to avoid a government shutdown, but a boat on the $1 trillion
4:16 am
infrastructure bill has been postponed. facebook�*s head of safety has defended act against accusations that instagram can affect the mental health of young people negatively. the hearing at the senate comes after a leak exposed how instagram's own research found how the platform could have a damaging impact on the body image and self esteem of teenagers. earlier, our correspondent gave me more details about the hearing. this all centres on the research that suggests that the potential harm from instagram, which is owned by facebook, could extend to a mental health and body image issues, particularly any younger and teenage girls, potentially leading to suicidal thoughts. as you say, the move to create
4:17 am
this facebook kids platform has been put on hold, and the company is saying it will consult with policymakers in regards to getting that up and running. in terms of what the research showed, they have been saying is a company that actually some of the respondents claimed that it helped them in certain issues, did they say anymore about that? that's right, that was from a senior facebook executive who was giving evidence to the senate subcommittee today. she said that this could actually, in some cases, help to give young people more control over their lives and to actually be helpful to them. that wasn't met with much sympathy, i might add, with senators from this committee, one describing that there is a facebook research as
4:18 am
a bombshell, accusing the company of a cover up. it was likened as well, this research, to the cover—up conducted by the tobacco industry over the harmful effects of cigarettes. that was several decades ago. they have been calls as well by the committee for facebook to release the full findings, the full research on the links between instagram and youth suicide. this is not an issue going away anytime soon because next week the same committee is due to hear from next week the same committee is due to hearfrom a facebook whistleblower, who left the company with apparently tens of thousands of documents related to internal research on these and other matters. this person is due to give evidence on tuesday. david willis. authorities in ecuador that say they have reclaimed a present after riots. at least 118
4:19 am
inmates have been killed in a right between rival gangs that began on tuesday. 0ur south american correspondent has been following the story. after the massacre, storming. a desperate attempt by authorities to get a handle on the situation which spiralled out of control. this footage by police shows the extent of the violence. more than 100 people dead, prisoners beheaded, shot and blown up. dozens more injured. the dispute broke out this week when inmates called through a hole into another wing and attacked rival gang members, believed to be linked to powerful mexican cartels vying for territory. ecuador has become a battleground in the lucrative cocaine trade is the lucrative cocaine trade is the drug is smuggled from local countries like peru and colombia as it makes its way on to the us. family members were outside, gathered in the hope
4:20 am
of hearing news about their loved ones. translation: ~ ., loved ones. translation: ., ., translation: when we got to the visit they searched _ translation: when we got to the visit they searched everything, - visit they searched everything, they even make us undress. i don't know how all the weapons get in. everyone inside is armed. this is the most deadly prison right in ecuador in its history, but not the first this year. the president announced a state of emergency entered the prison system to try and bring an end to the chaos. translation: , ., ., , translation: this will allow us to co-ordinate _ translation: this will allow us to co-ordinate through - translation: this will allow us to co-ordinate through the - translation: this will allow us to co-ordinate through the use | to co—ordinate through the use of our security forces and with absolute firmness. and to gain better control of the penitentiary, and to avoid that such events take place and other prison complexes in ecuador. but, in a country whose prisons are overcrowded and underfunded, there is little hope that things will improve with a jail is controlled by criminal gangs and the state losing control of its system.
4:21 am
in belgium, homes are being demolished as a part of a $1.1; billion reconstruction plan after devastating floods earlier this year. 41 people died in the rural ardennes region as streets turned to rivers. a town reduced to rubble, not the result of an explosion, this is the sheer force of mother nature. this is is belgium, torn to pieces by flooding injuly. 0n belgium, torn to pieces by flooding injuly. on thursday, excavators moved in. residents took a final look at the remnants of their homes, buildings once brimming with life and housing years of treasured memories about to be demolished. translation: , ., ., , demolished. translation: , ., ., translation: the situation is a difficult one _ translation: the situation is a difficult one for— translation: the situation is a difficult one for me _ translation: the situation is a difficult one for me from - translation: the situation is a difficult one for me from a - difficult one for me from a sentimental and emotional point of view because i was born in
4:22 am
the south in 19116. the floods were the most destructive in living memory, claiming dozens of lives. this drone footage gives you an indication of the scale of the catastrophe in the region. the current, inescapable. now begins a 1.2 billion euros reconstruction plan. translation: reconstruction plan. tuna/mom- reconstruction plan. translation: ., ., ., ., translation: we have a lot of infrastructure _ translation: we have a lot of infrastructure around _ translation: we have a lot of infrastructure around is - translation: we have a lot of infrastructure around is that - infrastructure around is that has been damaged, as you can see, whether it is that banks, the bridges or the vehicles or the bridges or the vehicles or the sewers. we still have a lot of work to do, it will take years. but winter is on its way and, for many, the situation remains dire. translation: ., , translation: nothing is happening. _ translation: nothing is happening. we _ translation: nothing is happening, we don't - translation: nothing isj happening, we don't even translation: nothing is - happening, we don't even know where we will sleep this winter. we have no accommodation, it is not normal to leave people like that. at the end of the month, world leaders will verge on glasgow for the cop26 summit. images like these will be front of mind, with climate change
4:23 am
fuelling an increase in extreme weather events. leaders will need to discuss how to cope while addressing the need to cut emissions. called the rising star of the classical music world, randall goosby is determined to make classical music more inclusive. born to african—american and korean parents, his work reflects black culture. mark savage went to meet him. violin prodigy randall goosby, in the welsh capital for the first show of his uk tour. his playing has been called profound, stylish, illuminating — not bad for someone who chose his instrument at random. i chose violin having not really seen or heard one before, to my memory. and did you find that you just understood the instrument instantly? i probably felt that way when i was a kid. of course, everyone learning to start the violin probably sounds a bit like a sick cat or something.
4:24 am
at 13, he was the youngest ever winner of the prestigious sphinx prize, then studied under the renowned violinist itzhak perlman. but the music he's playing now champions black and african—american composers, a decision prompted by last year's black lives matter protests. i was feeling very, very sort of stuck, i was feeling useless and hopeless in the fight against systemic racism and prejudice and bias, and all of these things. i didn't want to go out and march and protest. i just didn't feel like that was fulfilling. i needed something to validate what i was doing, you know? there was certainly the question of, "0k, whatam i doing, making a living playing works of, you know, dead european guys who haven't been around for a couple hundred years, who didn't know anything about my existence and didn't know anything about the existence of those who came before me?" this music answered that question. at the recent 9/11 memorial
4:25 am
concert, he played one of those pieces — adoration by florence price. florence price, you know, had to pick up and move herfamily from her home town of arkansas because of the segregation in the southern united states. to know that she was actually able to channel feelings of adoration, love and respect into her music is really profound. i hope that that was able to make it through to some of those who were mourning there on that day. randall's next goal is to help children in low—income communities discover these works. it's not any sort of inherent disinterest or distaste in classical music that keeps these communities from being involved. it's just the lack of access. an admirable ambition for a rising star. mark savage, bbc news, cardiff.
4:26 am
very inspiring. don't forget, you can reach me and the team on social media. see you soon. good morning. new month, but unfortunately not a new weather story. it looks likely that the beginning of october will be quite an autumnal, unsettled picture, with some rain at times. there will be some brighter interludes as well, but the winds certainly a feature, with plenty of leaves coming down off the trees over the next few days. now, as you can see, friday's weather will continue to see this frontal system moving in over the next few hours. it means first thing on friday morning, it still has yet to clear away from the south east. it will do so, and into the afternoon, we should see some sunshine coming through. so, a better second half to the day. there'll be plenty of frequent showers accompanied by a blustery wind on exposed west—facing coasts of scotland, northern ireland and north west england.
4:27 am
temperatures ranging from 11—18 celsius. now, as we move out of friday into saturday, low pressure is anchoring itself up into the far north of scotland, and we've got another developing low pushing into the far south west. this is going to bring a spell of, yet again, wet and windy weather. it'll move in from the south west, gradually pushing its way steadily northwards. so, if you start the day dry, it's highly unlikely that you will finish the day dry because that rain is going to continue to push its way steadily north and east. maybe the far north east of scotland will see some brightness for much of the day. the winds picking up as well, gusts in excess of 45—50 mph on exposed coasts. that's going to make it feel disappointingly cool in the cloud, the wind and the rain. moving out of saturday into sunday, that frontal system still to clear away, and low pressure looks likely to park itself into the far north of scotland. the southern flank of the low, we could see the strongest winds, 50—60 mph gusts not out of the question. and that's where potentially the heaviest of the rain is likely to lie for the second
4:28 am
half of the weekend. bright and breezy elsewhere, with a scattering of sharp showers on and off throughout the day. those temperatures, well, still on the disappointing side, and gales certainly are going to be more of a significant feature close to the area of low pressure. top temperatures on sunday once again between 12—16 celsius. monday into tuesday looks likely to stay with that showery theme, with some blustery winds as well from time to time. it's autumn good and proper. whatever you do, take care.
4:29 am
4:30 am
hello, this is bbc news. i'm ben boulos with the headlines. australia will lift its covid—19 ban on international travel next month. the first phase of the plan will focus on citizens and permanent residents being allowed to leave australia with further changes expected to allow foreign travellers to enter the country. the us senate has voted to avoid a government shutdown that would have affected hundreds of thousands of federal workers. the vote on spending came after a deal was struck between the republicans and the democrats with just hours left to avoid the crisis. the authorities in ecuador say they have regained control of a high security prison in this —— after a major operation involving 900 police officers and soldiers. at least 118 inmates have been killed in a right between rival gangs which began on tuesday.
4:31 am
now

28 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on