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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 30, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines. the us senate has voted to avert a government shutdown that would have affected hundreds of thousands of federal workers. the vote on spending came after a deal between the republicans and the democrats with just hours left to avoid the crisis. hundreds of police officers are trying to restore order inside a prison in ecuador where clashes between rival gangs has left at least a hundred and sixteen people dead. it's the worst prison violence in the country's history. the police officer who kidnapped, raped and murdered londoner sarah everard has been sentenced to life in prison. he used covid lockdown rules as a pretence to arrest and handcuff her. petro retailers say there's been no improvement in petro supplies. independent petrol stations in the last 2a hours over a quarter are out of fuel.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are rachel cunliffe, deputy online editor at the new statesman and kate proctor, political editor at politicshome and the house magazine. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... a starting with. .. few a starting with... few more in since we spoke an hou ago. a few more in since we spoke an hour ago. one story dominates the front page. it's the lead in the metro the life sentence for under the graphic headline, take him down. whole life care as it's called. whole life care as it's called. wayne couzens for the kidnap, rape and murder of sarah everard. the front of the i page has a picture of the met commissioner dame cressida dick, who the paper, says is facing calls to resign.
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the daily telegraph's headline says that the pressure bond of trust between the police and public has been damaged because of the high profile case. the daily mail has a photograph, a different photograph of dame cressida show in a more emotional image of her after she delivered her statement outside the court. and it's headline, hanging her head in shame. the guardian also has a picture of the met commissioner and it features her admission that the force has been shamed by the murder. the mirror has a call from siddique khan, the mayor of london and a large photograph of sarah everard. under the simple headline never again. and the time reports that five metropolitan police officers are currently under investigation for possessing offensive material. it also has a story about how nhs scans and tests are to be conducted on high streets and in stadiums to try help cut a backlog
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caused by covid. kate, do you want to start with that mail front page? hanging her head in shame. the full life sentence as well that has been handed down to the killer wayne couzens. , , . couzens. this full life sentence that wayne _ couzens. this full life sentence that wayne couzens _ couzens. this full life sentence that wayne couzens has - couzens. this full life sentence that wayne couzens has been i couzens. this full life sentence - that wayne couzens has been given its unusual he will die in prison. thejudge who handed it its unusual he will die in prison. the judge who handed it down said that because of the way that this murder and this kidnapper was committed it was akin to terrorism and serious errors terrorism and had the same seriousness of a murder of religious and political reasons. he used his warrant card to trick sarah into getting into his car and then raped and murdered her. so the life sentence is an unusual one but this is what the judge thought was fit in these circumstances. the story is
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also quickly moved onto dame cressida dick, the met police commissioner and her responsibility as head of the forest and it does appear that have been a number of errors that are being investigated. and what the met knew about when couzens had already committed, been investigated for exposing himself at a mcdonald's and there are questions to answer about what happened immediately after that. but also there are questions more generally about the culture within some officers, within the met and that is something that is going to be looked at a much more detail. there is a huge focus on whether cressida dick can continue in her role. and i'm sure we will see over the coming days how that turns. there is a lot of pressure on her this evening will stop it's a power of two powerful front page.
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stop it's a power of two powerful front page-— front page. yes, i am actually surprised _ front page. yes, i am actually surprised by _ front page. yes, i am actually surprised by how _ front page. yes, i am actually surprised by how many - front page. yes, i am actually surprised by how many of - front page. yes, i am actually surprised by how many of the | front page. yes, i am actually - surprised by how many of the papers are focusing on cressida dick and how the — are focusing on cressida dick and how the wave of anger against her seems _ how the wave of anger against her seems universal. harriet harman put out a _ seems universal. harriet harman put out a letter _ seems universal. harriet harman put out a letter to both the met commissioner and two priti patel saying _ commissioner and two priti patel saying that her position was untenable if we want to see reform and the _ untenable if we want to see reform and the police service and was quickly— and the police service and was quicklyjoined by some conservative mps _ quicklyjoined by some conservative mps this _ quicklyjoined by some conservative mps. this coming just weeks after her term _ mps. this coming just weeks after her term as — mps. this coming just weeks after her term as met commissioner was extended _ her term as met commissioner was extended by priti patel for the priti patel now saying that the met has questions to answer and cressida disc two— has questions to answer and cressida disc two cressida dick at this murder— disc two cressida dick at this murder took place in march and couzens— murder took place in march and couzens already... 50 murder took place in march and couzens already. . ._ couzens already... so these questions — couzens already... so these questions now _ couzens already... so these questions now have - couzens already... so these questions now have to - couzens already... so these questions now have to be i couzens already... so these - questions now have to be answered both end. . , , questions now have to be answered both end. ., ,, , ., both end. perhaps before her term was extended, _ both end. perhaps before her term was extended, that _ both end. perhaps before her term was extended, that would - both end. perhaps before her term was extended, that would be - both end. perhaps before her term was extended, that would be a - was extended, that would be a question _ was extended, that would be a question. one of the things that really— question. one of the things that really struck me yesterday when we were hearing some of the really horrific—
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were hearing some of the really horrific details as kate was saying about _ horrific details as kate was saying about him — horrific details as kate was saying about him using his warrant card and hand cuffs— about him using his warrant card and hand cuffs and using all of the status— hand cuffs and using all of the status and the equipment of a police officer— status and the equipment of a police officer in_ status and the equipment of a police officer in order to commit this murder~ — officer in order to commit this murder. where was cressida dick? she wasn't _ murder. where was cressida dick? she wasn't anywhere. instead we had some more junior— wasn't anywhere. instead we had some more junior police officers being interviewed one of whom kept referring — interviewed one of whom kept referring to him as a former police officer. _ referring to him as a former police officer. and — referring to him as a former police officer, and exploits officer, yes, he's _ officer, and exploits officer, yes, he's a _ officer, and exploits officer, yes, he's a former police officer now he was suspended after he was arrested but he _ was suspended after he was arrested but he was _ was suspended after he was arrested but he was serving at the time. so even _ but he was serving at the time. so even at _ but he was serving at the time. so even at that— but he was serving at the time. so even at that moment police officers are saving _ even at that moment police officers are saying we don't consider him one of us _ are saying we don't consider him one of us but— are saying we don't consider him one of us. but that's not particular helpful— of us. but that's not particular helpful because it was one of you when he — helpful because it was one of you when he committed the crime. so even at this— when he committed the crime. so even at this point— when he committed the crime. so even at this point there's a lack of accountability.— at this point there's a lack of accountabili . �* ., , accountability. and at times when revious accountability. and at times when previous concerns _ accountability. and at times when previous concerns were _ accountability. and at times when previous concerns were raised - accountability. and at times when i previous concerns were raised about his conduct. the daily mirror sarah everard and police overhaul. very powerful front page. everard and police overhaul. very powerfulfront page. a picture of sarah everard at her warmest and most human, and image that parents and family would love to have seen
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in much happier circumstances than this. but that phrase, never again. what confidence do you think there can be? is highly unusual but people can't confidently say we will ensure that this never happens again because that actually is what city can't come of the london mayor as insane as well. i can't come of the london mayor as insane as well.— insane as well. i think it depends b what insane as well. i think it depends by what you _ insane as well. i think it depends by what you mean _ insane as well. i think it depends by what you mean by _ insane as well. i think it depends by what you mean by this. - insane as well. i think it depends by what you mean by this. will i insane as well. i think it depends - by what you mean by this. will there be another police subduction where a police officer on his own manages to falsely arrested a woman and quite that way? possibly not. mainly because i think the attitudes of change. an sure of many in particular, i wouldn't if i was struck by a police officer would feel comfortable getting in the car. but never again when it comes to violence against women for some there have been hundreds of murders of women. just in the last year most of women. just in the last year most of which we don't even hear about. and in terms of police violence against others especially their
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wives and girlfriends and domestic violence and then it being covered up. this is a problem that we know about we just don't see it on the front pages very often. so never again have a pretty naive headline, i think. ., ., ~ , , again have a pretty naive headline, ithink. ., , , ., , i think. you take us very neatly onto the front _ i think. you take us very neatly onto the front of _ i think. you take us very neatly onto the front of the _ i think. you take us very neatly onto the front of the times - i think. you take us very neatly - onto the front of the times because the point that's being made here is that the sarah everard killer, wayne couzens and police in other words couege couzens and police in other words college shared abusive messages. yes, homophobic, misogynistic, racist content shared between five officers now under investigation. that was something that clearly people knew about and wasn't flagged. the indecent exposure allegations, one from 2015 one from just 72 hours before sarah everard's murder took place that wasn't planned or taken forward. so varying issues there. the fact that former colleagues referred to him in a jokey net meaning weight as a rapist because he made people feel
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uncomfortable. that wasn't enough to fight it. and this is to ask cressida dick why this is a problem for the police from the very, very top. there was a culture there that enable this man to get away with behaviour, and that culture not been there would've been flagged and would been picked up earlier. kate? i think this would been picked up earlier. kate? i think this is _ would been picked up earlier. kate? i think this is just _ would been picked up earlier. kate? i think this isjust a _ would been picked up earlier. kate? i think this is just a really _ i think this isjust a really depressing and a secondary story but it all feeds _ depressing and a secondary story but it all feeds into the same horrendous culture that we are hearing — horrendous culture that we are hearing about. yes, five officers were _ hearing about. yes, five officers were investigated for the whatsapp messages they shared with couzens as racist and _ messages they shared with couzens as racist and homophobic. some met offices _ racist and homophobic. some met offices were working in other parts offices were working in other parts of the _ offices were working in other parts of the country and when i think was being _ of the country and when i think was being investigated and another one for the _ being investigated and another one for the several nuclear constabulary. i would like to see hopefully— constabulary. i would like to see hopefully a look at culture be on the met —
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hopefully a look at culture be on the met and look at things more generally. the met and look at things more renerall . , ., ., generally. reminds me of having worked as a _ generally. reminds me of having worked as a london _ generally. reminds me of having worked as a london police - generally. reminds me of having worked as a london police beat l generally. reminds me of having l worked as a london police beat 20 years ago the quite considerable efforts that would be to address concerns about the culture in the laundered fire service which i think others will correct me from wrong, i think will prove to be largely felt we done quite a lot to move the service forward as if it did the zist service forward as if it did the 21st century never mind the 21st century. interesting that was driven very much by the combination of the chief officers and the political goal of the sites of the home secretary in case the chairwoman of the london fire and civil defence authority who is very heavily involved in that process and her successors as well. do you want to pick up on our next story? a related story that is the undercover police officers who ended up having an inappropriate relationship with women, activist, political activists whose workday was post be monitoring
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as infiltrating the organisation to try and find out whether these organisations were going to commit criminal acts was up and this is one of the women who has had a successfully challenge the relationship that she had unwittingly feeling she was exploited by this officer. yes, this is the environmental _ exploited by this officer. yes, this is the environmental as _ exploited by this officer. yes, this is the environmental as kate - exploited by this officer. yes, this i is the environmental as kate wilson who was— is the environmental as kate wilson who was in— is the environmental as kate wilson who was in a relationship with an undercover— who was in a relationship with an undercover police officer mark kennedy. and she has fought and fought— kennedy. and she has fought and fought for— kennedy. and she has fought and fought for very long time and shut many— fought for very long time and shut many of— fought for very long time and shut many of your viewers will have some familiarity _ many of your viewers will have some familiarity with the story, she felt that she _ familiarity with the story, she felt that she had been deceived into having _ that she had been deceived into having a — that she had been deceived into having a very long—standing relationship with him and she didn't know— relationship with him and she didn't know his _ relationship with him and she didn't know his true identity was on and so a judge _ know his true identity was on and so a judge has— know his true identity was on and so a judge has now ruled that he has violated her human rights. it's being — violated her human rights. it's being described is a landmark case. generativ— being described is a landmark case. generally in terms of the way the undercover operations take place. and the _ undercover operations take place. and the judges ruled that senior officers — and the judges ruled that senior officers in — and the judges ruled that senior officers in charge of mark kennedy even knew —
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officers in charge of mark kennedy even knew that he was having a relationship with her or they chose to not— relationship with her or they chose to not to _ relationship with her or they chose to not to know the existence or exceptionally ignored it. this is a very long — exceptionally ignored it. this is a very long legal fight that kate wilson — very long legal fight that kate wilson has had. it will pose more questions — wilson has had. it will pose more questions about undercover operations. i'm sure that if the sarah — operations. i'm sure that if the sarah everard case wasn't dominating all the _ sarah everard case wasn't dominating all the front _ sarah everard case wasn't dominating all the front pages this would be another— all the front pages this would be another very forensic examination of police _ another very forensic examination of police operations and police culture _ police operations and police culture. i'm sure for many thousands of police _ culture. i'm sure for many thousands of police officers across the country _ of police officers across the country that are facing the news today, _ country that are facing the news today, there's a lot going on within the british— today, there's a lot going on within the british police. this today, there's a lot going on within the british police.— the british police. this is one of those obscure _ the british police. this is one of those obscure organisations - the british police. this is one of| those obscure organisations that exist to protect us to try and actors from sort of check on the exercise of powers that can't be effectively supervised in public, as it were or can't be held to account in a more conventional way. the
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investigatory powers tribunal. it’s investigatory powers tribunal. it�*s important because this was a violation, another example of women being used basically as objects of the net or collateral damage. nobody cared that this woman wasted potentially a year of our life and was violated in this way. it reminds me not in terms of what actually happened but the dismissive way that the murder of sarah everard just discarded her body, and object, not worried about, put set fire to it. that attitude that objectification, it is pervasive in society. before we move on i want to say what will about violence against women in society in general and which is the government has been lots of positive noises about making it all safe and how can we make women feel safe is it more police officers, is it talking to women and telling them what their rights are? what would make the women feel safe as if they
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weren't unreported offences not necessarily as horrific as the murder of sarah everard but the rate, the assault, the harassment that they will believe that they were taken seriously, police had the resources to properly investigate that those cases were taken at trial they didn't have to wait years, actually years to see the perpetrators of those crimes stand trial and be seen in court but those perpetrators didn't then have years ago on an abuse of the women. the conservative government is/ the justice budget by such an extent that it takes years, courts have been closed, the courts don't have the staff to be able to try these cases. in that situation women even if they are brave enough to come forward don't get the justice they need. that is what's making women feel safer it looks like. that is what tackling the violence against women problem looks like. not more police officers on the street. i was listenin: police officers on the street. i was listening to _ police officers on the street. i was listening to sir _ police officers on the street. i was listening to sir keir _ police officers on the street. i was listening to sir keir starmer - listening to sir keir starmer speech yesterday in which he talked about tougher sentences for people who
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commit six crimes. but he didn't mention arguably the much harder issue which, there was nothing about trying to deal with the problem of either case is not being reported or when they are reported not success either put up as you say, taken through the system quickly or prosecuted successfully. the percentage of rate convictions actually result a guilty verdict. 95% don't end in a guilty verdict. it's partly about the police believing victims, about the police and the crown prosecution service having the resources to properly investigate. it's partly about the timing so that women don't have to wait years and they don't have to live in fear for those years was up and essentially it's about victim did not fixing the brokenjustice system which is going to take longer and more expensive than just paying lip service to do we hope women will now feel safe. lip service to do we hope women will now feel safe-— now feel safe. how can we? it's not something for— now feel safe. how can we? it's not something for keir— now feel safe. how can we? it's not something for keir starmer- now feel safe. how can we? it's not something for keir starmer to - now feel safe. how can we? it's not something for keir starmer to be i something for keir starmer to be solving _ something for keir starmer to be solving right now. just
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something for keir starmer to be solving right now.— something for keir starmer to be solving right now. just given it was one of his policy — solving right now. just given it was one of his policy .net _ solving right now. just given it was one of his policy .net this - solving right now. just given it was one of his policy .net this is - solving right now. just given it was one of his policy .net this is what l one of his policy .net this is what he would do in government saying we will have tougher sentences kind of misses the point, doesn't it? i agree with you there. sentencing is 'ust agree with you there. sentencing is just one _ agree with you there. sentencing is just one thing that you can do. the most _ just one thing that you can do. the most important thing is at the very basic— most important thing is at the very basic level— most important thing is at the very basic level is that when people report— basic level is that when people report things that they are believed and is _ report things that they are believed and is taken seriously. i've been flash— and is taken seriously. i've been flash at— and is taken seriously. i've been flash at about seven times in my life. flash at about seven times in my life the — flash at about seven times in my life. the most recent one two seven? yes. life. the most recent one two seven? yes i'm _ life. the most recent one two seven? yes i'm not — life. the most recent one two seven? yes. i'm not making that up. i�*m life. the most recent one two seven? yes. i'm not making that up.— yes. i'm not making that up. i'm not sa in: yes. i'm not making that up. i'm not saying you — yes. i'm not making that up. i'm not saying you were- _ yes. i'm not making that up. i'm not saying you were- i — yes. i'm not making that up. i'm not saying you were. i just _ yes. i'm not making that up. i'm not saying you were. i just want - yes. i'm not making that up. i'm not saying you were. i just want to - saying you were. ijust want to reinforce the people heard you correctly, seven times.- reinforce the people heard you correctly, seven times. when i was at school. — correctly, seven times. when i was at school, university _ correctly, seven times. when i was at school, university when - correctly, seven times. when i was at school, university when i - correctly, seven times. when i was at school, university when i been l at school, university when i been living _ at school, university when i been living in _ at school, university when i been living in various cities in the last what _ living in various cities in the last what happened in london and i actually— what happened in london and i actually didn't bother to take it forward — actually didn't bother to take it forward because i thought, who's got the time _ forward because i thought, who's got the time to— forward because i thought, who's got the time to look at this? is kind of attitude _ the time to look at this? is kind of attitude that women have that you really need to fix. that's the
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police — really need to fix. that's the police and something mayors can do as well— police and something mayors can do as well when there getting messages out to— as well when there getting messages out to cities. | as well when there getting messages out to cities-— out to cities. i want to mention as a didn't last _ out to cities. i want to mention as a didn't last review— out to cities. i want to mention as a didn't last review the _ out to cities. i want to mention as a didn't last review the front - a didn't last review the front page of the northern echo which if you have the chance take a look at it online if you don't have the northern echo. it is a graphic representation of the 80 women who have allegedly been killed by men since the murder of sarah everard. it's a six month period which is 80 women across this country, a lot of them are voters and their women who look like and could beat the women in our so bear that in mind. let's move on to the times that my story. important story given the concerns about the impact covid has had another treatment.— about the impact covid has had another treatment. these scans takinr another treatment. these scans taking place _ another treatment. these scans taking place in _ another treatment. these scans taking place in the _ another treatment. these scans taking place in the diagnostic i taking place in the diagnostic treatments taking place at venues that are medically, normal medical
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centres without one—stop shop for scans and tests will be set up on high streets, football stadiums, shopping centres and all of this is to try and clear the nhs backlog as we go into what's expected to be an extremely tough winter. this just sounds so good and ijust really, it's a shame the government haven't been doing this earlier. they are saying that there would be four seven day a week hubs which means that you can get about 2.8 million scans done and it should hopefully try and cut waiting lists for routine care. doctors have been very frank about and things being this hopefully this should really hurry things along. hopefully this should really hurry things along-— hopefully this should really hurry thins alonu. ., ., things along. rachel, a good move? we sorted down _ things along. rachel, a good move? we sorted down a _ things along. rachel, a good move? we sorted down a bit _ things along. rachel, a good move? we sorted down a bit with _ things along. rachel, a good move? we sorted down a bit with covid - we sorted down a bit with covid using those bands appearing outside supermarkets and stuff like that do you think it forces the nhs to be a bit more adaptive in its approach? is a you don't have to come to us,
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we can come to vices that you could work around. i we can come to vices that you could work around-— work around. i got my first vaccination _ work around. i got my first vaccination done _ work around. i got my first vaccination done in - work around. i got my first vaccination done in a - work around. i got my first| vaccination done in a rugby work around. i got my first - vaccination done in a rugby stadium. my friend _ vaccination done in a rugby stadium. my friend that in his science museum although— my friend that in his science museum although i_ my friend that in his science museum although i probably went to a kansas cancer— although i probably went to a kansas cancer scanner science museum. fairpoint _ cancer scanner science museum. fairoint. ., ., �* ., cancer scanner science museum. fairoint. ., ., ., cancer scanner science museum. fairoint. ., ., �* ., ., , cancer scanner science museum. fairoint. ., ., ., fairpoint. you don't want to be an exhibit to your? _ fairpoint. you don't want to be an exhibit to your? too _ fairpoint. you don't want to be an exhibit to your? too much - fairpoint. you don't want to be an i exhibit to your? too much madness there _ exhibit to your? too much madness there for— exhibit to your? too much madness there for the — exhibit to your? too much madness there for the predicate is important. i think it's absolutely crucial— important. i think it's absolutely crucial because of things like cancer— crucial because of things like cancer are way way way down. that's not that _ cancer are way way way down. that's not that people are stopped getting cancer— not that people are stopped getting cancer is _ not that people are stopped getting cancer is because they haven't had the screenings and are being missed, anything _ the screenings and are being missed, anything we could do do those test to catch _ anything we could do do those test to catch up. in addition anything we can do— to catch up. in addition anything we can do to _ to catch up. in addition anything we can do to clear the backlog of over 5,000,000 operations for the baby not doing _ 5,000,000 operations for the baby not doing the operations in shopping centres _ not doing the operations in shopping centres and stadiums but test they are having — centres and stadiums but test they are having a more flexible, pragmatic approach so that we can clear— pragmatic approach so that we can clear that — pragmatic approach so that we can clear that backlog is quickly as we can. �* , ., clear that backlog is quickly as we can. �* y ., �*., can. briefly, choctaw, britain in uruent can. briefly, choctaw, britain in urgent need _ can. briefly, choctaw, britain in urgent need of _ can. briefly, choctaw, britain in urgent need of butchers. - can. briefly, choctaw, britain in| urgent need of butchers. 15,000 can. briefly, choctaw, britain in - urgent need of butchers. 15,000 of them. if urgent need of butchers. 15,000 of them- if we — urgent need of butchers. 15,000 of them. if we don't _ urgent need of butchers. 15,000 of them. if we don't get _ urgent need of butchers. 15,000 of them. if we don't get them - urgent need of butchers. 15,000 of them. if we don't get them soon i them. if we don't get them soon there's going to be a pigs in a
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blanket shortage. i've been tweeting about how i think a turkey shortage of matter because actually turkey is not very nice it's very dry and nobody actually likes it. and we can do something else. their pigs and blanket shortages, that would worry me. ibe blanket shortages, that would worry me. �* , ., ., me. be the first thing that would cause alarm _ me. be the first thing that would cause alarm but _ me. be the first thing that would cause alarm but this _ me. be the first thing that would cause alarm but this whole - me. be the first thing that would cause alarm but this whole thing | me. be the first thing that would l cause alarm but this whole thing is about— cause alarm but this whole thing is about points—based system that priti patel has _ about points—based system that priti patel has introduced it whether it's working _ patel has introduced it whether it's working or— patel has introduced it whether it's working or not. clearly at the moment— working or not. clearly at the moment the british meat processors association — moment the british meat processors association is saying the industry is short— association is saying the industry is short by— association is saying the industry is short by 15,000 workers. and there _ is short by 15,000 workers. and there is— is short by 15,000 workers. and there is a — is short by 15,000 workers. and there is a big push to try to get more people to come into the country and whether the home office will relax any— and whether the home office will relax any of its rules remains to be seen _ relax any of its rules remains to be seen. . . relax any of its rules remains to be seen. ., ., .,. ., ~ relax any of its rules remains to be seen. ., ., ., ~ i., seen. kate and rachelthank you both ve much. seen. kate and rachelthank you both very much- a — seen. kate and rachelthank you both very much. a real _ seen. kate and rachelthank you both very much. a real pleasure _ seen. kate and rachelthank you both very much. a real pleasure to - seen. kate and rachelthank you both very much. a real pleasure to have i very much. a real pleasure to have your company again this evening. nice to speak to you both. have a goodnight you at home. sport coming up goodnight you at home. sport coming up next and we will be joining weather and the team for newsday. from all of us on the bbc news channel, thanks for your company.
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good evening. i'm marc edwards and we start with a busy night of european football for british sides. west ham united top their group in the europa league after a 2 0 win over rapid vienna at the london stadium. the opener was scored by declan rice in the first half his second goal in as many games in europe this season tapping in after good work down the left from michail antonio. they had to grind it out though, and the visitors had a penalty decision overturned before said benrama wrapped up the points for david moyes's side. celtic already face a huge challenge if they're to qualify out of their group in the europa league. they lost 4—0 at home to bayer leverkusen; florian wirtz making it 2 0 in the first half. amine adli made it four late on, meaning. now conceding eight goals in their opening two matches. and in the earlier kick offs, leicester were beaten by legia warsaw to continue
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their poor start to the season. mahir emreli scored the only goal of the game in the first half. a draw to defeat so far for the foxes in europe. and rangers are rooted to the bottom of their group after they were beaten 1—nil by sparta prague. david hanckos headerjust about crossed the line in the first half despite allan mcgregors best efforts and things got wo worse for steven gerrards side when glen kamara was shown his second yellow card with 17 minutes remaining. in europe or conference league harry cabne hatrick despite the only been on a feel for half an hour. showed a comfortable win for tottenham hotspur over slovenia inside. tottenham boss disanto brought on kane it tookjust ten minutes for kane to score his first. england captain then sealing a 90 minute hat trick for that at the end, his 13 for the club.
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spurs first victory in the group stages. phil foden and ollie watkins have been named in gareth southgate's england squad for the up coming world cup qualifiers against andorra and hungary next month. foden returns having missed the last matches in september because of injury the same applies for the aston villa forward ollie watkins, who southgate said came close to making his squad for the european championship. ac milan defender fikayio tomoroi is also included along with arsenal goalkeeper aaron ramsdale in place of nick pope. manchester united defender harry maguire misses out we've got to now push each time to we are together we got to push performance every day on the training pitch. yes, we've kept some stability which i think is right. but every player in that team and in that squad knows that there is a huge competition for places. and i think that's driving
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some of the performances that we have. a west brom supporter has been jailed for racially abusing a footballer online, in what is believed to be the first time an immediate custodial sentence has been imposed for the crime in england and wales. 50 year old simon silwood has been sentenced to eight weeks in prison, for sending an offensive message regarding a black player, romaine sawyers, via social media in january, following west bromwich albion's 5—0 defeat by manchester city. he admitted to posting the message but he blamed predictive text for its offensive nature. the cps and west midlands police were able to prove his account was not plausible. an investigation is found the system to catalans dragons are through to their first grand final after beating hull kr in the play off semi final the dragons there is also speculation about rumours swirling around rio and the
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boxing tournament was corrupt. there were certain fights that were hit the headlines because the results were astonishing to some people. certainly experts within the game. one of them was michael conlon, the irish fighter in the quarterfinal and the team of russia. he lost that fight a fight that most observers thought he won easily. afterwards he was really critical and outspoken of the judge and, was really critical and outspoken of thejudge and, of was really critical and outspoken of the judge and, of the refereeing and affect the whole of the image or international boxing organisation and another one isjoe international boxing organisation and another one is joe joyce international boxing organisation and another one isjoejoyce and his super heavyweight final which he had lost to a french opponent who was quite a close fight for that many people thought that looked a little bit suspicious. that is one of the contest on the regulars. he said he can't confirm at this stage that it was rigged, that it was manipulated that the wrong fight to my fighter was given a gold medal. but that is something that they
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will look at in the coming months. they beat hol 28 — ten in the playoff semifinal. dragons always in control and went over in the second half of the game was beyond doubt. they now face the rhinos in the green doing a grand final on the ninth of october. history made on thursday is just loud and broke cycling record for women. she beat the previous best of 48 kilometres by 398 metres, which is almost two laps of the grenchen velodrome in switzerland where the attempt took place. lowden will support her partner dan bingham's attempt on friday before competing in the women's tour which starts in bicester in oxfordshire on monday. that's all the sport for now. from the rest of the team and me bye—bye.
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good evening. it's been a warm september for many, but we've certainly closed the chapter on that story in recently days, haven't we, with gusty winds and heavy rain for many. this was ambleside earlier on this afternoon, and that heavy rain, well, it's spreading its way steadily south and east. that means overnight tonight, we'll see some heavy rain pushing into west wales, particularly to higher ground, with strong, squally gusts of winds at times. now, that is going to gradually push its way south and east, a blanket of cloud and rain moving towards the south east by dawn. behind it, squally showers continuing to be a feature into western scotland, northern ireland and parts of north west england. but because of the cloud and the rain around, it's not going to be as cold as the nightjust passed. temperatures holding up into double figures. but it does mean a grey and wet start into the south—east corner, with that rain slowly easing away by the middle part of the morning. leaving some sunshine behind, but still some blustery winds and squally showers continue to be a feature into western scotland,
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northern ireland, parts of north west england and north wales at times. some of these heavy, possibly even thunder. top temperatures in the sunshine maybe a degree or so up, 17—18 degrees. but it's all about low pressure as we move into the weekend. we've got one low pressure sitting to the far north of scotland, but it's this fellow that we need to keep an eye on that's going to move in during the early hours of saturday morning. so, it's going to bring a spell of wet and windy weather into the south west first thing on saturday. it's going to gradually move its way steadily north and east throughout the day. so, a dry start to the east of the pennines, a dry start into the east of scotland, but eventually we will see some rain to all areas by the end of the afternoon, with gusts of winds in excess of a5, close to 50 mph on exposed coasts. now, that area of low pressure is going to be an issue. in terms of the feel of the weather, top temperatures again 12—16 degrees, but the low will be sitting up into the far north, and that's where the strongest of the winds are likely
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to be as well. it's certainly worth keeping abreast of the forecast for the second half of the weekend. there may be some changes to the story, but it looks likely that the low will sit in scotland. that's where the heaviest of the rain and the strongest of the winds to the southern flank of that low is likely to be. gusts in excess of 50—60 mph, heavy rain or sunny spells look likely to be the story from sunday into monday.
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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines: the bill is passed. the us congress votes to avoid a government shutdown, but more tough negotiations lie ahead for president biden. tough questions for british police as the officer who raped and murdered sarah everard is jailed for life. with the cop26 climate summit looming, we look at why australia is lagging behind in its carbon commitments. the rising young star in the world of classical music.
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he's determined to make his field more inclusive.

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