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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 30, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at tpm. the family of sarah everard say they're "very pleased" at the whole life sentence imposed on the police officer who kidnapped and murdered her. they say they are "outraged and sickened" by wayne couzens�* abuse of his position of trust. and sickened" by wayne couzens�* questions and sickened" by wayne couzens�* are being axed a wayne questions are being axed about how wayne couzens was able to carry out his crime and the future of the met police cressida dick will be heard. an albanian man appears at the old bailey accused of murdering primary school teacher sabina nessa in south—east london earlier this
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month. the petrol retailers association, which represents thousands of garages, says they are seeing unprecedented demand, despite additional deliveries of fuel. britney spears wins a bitter legal battle to regain control of her finances. a usjudge suspends her father's conservatorship. good afternoon, welcome to bbc news. the metropolitan police officer who kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard will spend the rest of his life in prison. a judge at the old bailey handing down the whole life tariff said he had no doubt that wayne couzens had used his position as a police officer to coerce sarah into his car and that he had shown no sign of contrition.
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sarah everard, who was 33, was abducted from a street in south london in march as she was walking home from a friend's house. herfamily say her family say they welcome the verdict and knowing he will be in prison forever brings some relief. megan patterson reports. in the aftermath of sarah everard's murder, shock, grief and anger were shared at vigils around the country. at her killer's sentencing, the chilling details of her death described as unspeakably grim. the everard family present throughout proceedings. in a statement, her mother said she was brokenhearted, the family tormented by the circumstances of her daughter's death. arriving at the old bailey this morning, wayne couzens was later sentenced to a whole life order, his actions were described as warped, selfish and brutal. a man who under the guise of his duty as a police officer picked sarah everard up in the street as she walked home from a friend's house. in an exchange that lasted
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less than five minutes, he showed his warrant card and used knowledge of covid restrictions to handcuff sarah everard and put her in his hire car. witnesses saw this. the moment of the calculated kidnap, they believed wayne couzens was an officer doing hisjob. couzens drove to a remote rural area where he raped and murdered sarah everard. he is later seen on cctv calmly continuing with daily life, ordering a hot chocolate in a nearby coffee shop. questioned by police, he feigned innocence, knowing he put sarah's body inside a fridge and set it on fire. during the sentencing, wayne couzens sat with his head bowed. sarah everard's family asked him to look at them. herfather told him, the horrendous murder of my daughter is in my mind all the time and will be for the rest of my life.
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a family broken by unimaginable loss, a police force left questioning how it will recover. im deeply ashamed, i'm deeply angry and so, inevitably, yes, that fragile trust certainly between women and the police has been fractured yet further. described as a wholly blameless victim, to those who loved her, sarah everard will always be the precious little girl who became a woman with a beautiful mind, taken cruelly from them by a man who took advantage of his position. megan patterson, bbc news. our correspondent helen wilkinson is at the old bailey. in a lot of reaction coming out at this whole life tariff. who has been speaking and what have they been saying? we have and what have they been saying? - have had any last half an hour or so, a statement released through the police which has been released by
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the family of sarah everard. i will redo a couple of lines from that statement. after wayne couzens was sentenced to a whole life order today at the old bailey. her found this in a statement, we are very pleased that wayne couzens has received a whole life sentence and will spend the rest of his life in jail. nothing can make things better, nothing can bring sarah back, but knowing he will be in prison forever brings some relief. saito lost her life needlessly and cruelly and all the years of life —— sarah. and was stolen from her. he held the position as a police officer and we are outraged and seconded that he abused his trust in order to lure sarah to her death. the world is a safer place with him in present. that is a statement from her family in present. that is a statement from herfamily ——
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in present. that is a statement from her family —— with in present. that is a statement from herfamily —— with him in prison. we have those incredibly powerful victim personal statements that her parents read to court yesterday. they use the words that were described in report, the pain, the anguish, the torment. that they continue to suffer as a result of what couzens, a surfing metropolitan police officer, did to ms everard. anyjudge, and his sentencing remarks, said at the seriousness of the case was so exceptionally high that it warranted a whole life order and he also said to couzens, who was shaking in the dock as he was sentenced today, that he had eroded public confidence in the police in england and wales. i do not know if you can see just find us england and wales. i do not know if you can seejust find us here england and wales. i do not know if you can see just find us here at the old bailey, there are dozens of people, mainly camera crews, photographers, reporters, but also members of the public here waiting to see if there will be any kind of on camera reaction from the metropolitan police. the
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commissioner of the met, cressida dick, was in court earlier on when couzens was sentenced earlier today. we have, in the last few moments, but asjohnson we have, in the last few moments, but as johnson nearby we have, in the last few moments, but asjohnson nearby minister has tweeted about this case and has said, there are no words that adequately express the horror of sarah's murder. like the rest of the country, i have been sickened by what we have heard over the course of their sentencing and the pain and suffering endured by family and friends is truly unimaginable. the prime minster goes on to say, our police are there to protect us and i know officers will share in our shock and devastation at a total betrayal of this duty. people must be able to walk on our streets without fear of harm and with full confidence that the police are there to keep them safe. we should hearfrom the police are there to keep them safe. we should hear from the metropolitan police a bit later on
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following the sentencing here at the old bailey, but wayne couzens, who, to repeat, he was a serving metropolitan officer when, in march, he spotted sarah everard. she had been walking home from a friend's house that night. he falsely arrested her, showed her his warrant card and within five minutes he had kidnapped her, put her into the back of a hire car, drove her to kent and thejudge in court at of a hire car, drove her to kent and the judge in court at some of a hire car, drove her to kent and thejudge in court at some point today said it was a devastating crime and we heard yesterday from the prosecution who had said that at some point after couzens had driven off with a sarah everard any back, she must have known that he wasn't taking to scratch my car to a police station. he then raped and murdered her, —— taking herto station. he then raped and murdered her, —— taking her to a police station. he then raped and murdered her. he has been sentenced to a
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whole life order and will never be released from prison.— released from prison. helen wilkinson — released from prison. helen wilkinson at _ released from prison. helen wilkinson at the _ released from prison. helen wilkinson at the old - released from prison. helen wilkinson at the old bailey. | released from prison. helen - wilkinson at the old bailey. the prime minister has released a statement and said... new labourmp, new labour mp, harriet harman, is chair of the human rights committee and a former minister of equality is —— the labour mp. thank you for taking time to speak to us this
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afternoon. first of all, your reaction to the sentence questioning i think it is the right sentence. our hearts go out to sarah everard's family who read their statements and said the impact on them with such dignity. we said the impact on them with such diuni . ~ . ., said the impact on them with such diuni .~ . ., ., , dignity. we have heard, of course, revulsion expressed _ dignity. we have heard, of course, revulsion expressed by _ dignity. we have heard, of course, revulsion expressed by many - dignity. we have heard, of course, j revulsion expressed by many other serving police officers, but what has at this case done, do you believe, to the reputation of the police? believe, to the reputation of the olice? ~ ., , , ., , ., police? well, women must be able to trust the police. _ police? well, women must be able to trust the police. they _ police? well, women must be able to trust the police. they must _ police? well, women must be able to trust the police. they must not - police? well, women must be able to trust the police. they must not fear l trust the police. they must not fear them, they must be confident that them, they must be confident that the police are there to help them and to make them safe. not to harm them. and therefore, there needs to be fundamental changes in order that women can be certain and can have that confidence, and i've written to priti patel today setting up ten points of action which need to be taken immediately. but i have also written to the metropolitan commissioner, cressida dick, saying that i think she should resign
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because she cannot be the metropolitan commissioner that takes these changes forward. truth? metropolitan commissioner that takes these changes forward.— these changes forward. why do you believe that — these changes forward. why do you believe that to _ these changes forward. why do you believe that to be _ these changes forward. why do you believe that to be the _ these changes forward. why do you believe that to be the case? - these changes forward. why do you believe that to be the case? that i believe that to be the case? that she is well regarded within the force by the officers who serve for her. ., , force by the officers who serve for her. . , ., , ., , her. there have been many warnings about perpetrators _ her. there have been many warnings about perpetrators of _ her. there have been many warnings about perpetrators of male - her. there have been many warnings about perpetrators of male violence | about perpetrators of male violence against women within the police force, which she has not acted on. she has not heeded. it was on her watch that wayne couzens' offences, sexual offences that he carried out in a few days before were swept under the carpet by his colleagues and not investigated. so she also responded by saying he was a bad one, like it was one bad apple. i think she showed she is not the person to legally change that is necessary. for example, we need to have immediate suspension as soon as there is an allegation against a police officer of a male balance against women, we need to make sure
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that covering up for the colleague is also regarded as a gross misconduct leading to the special —— allegation against a police officer of male violence against women. and attitudes of male violence against women needs to be looked at with new recruits, including male violence during six. she is not the person to lay these changes so she should step aside and let somebody take these changes forward with determination. that might mean cressida dick feeling inclined to resign, but how else might she be removed from she is appointed by the home secretary, as all commissioners for the metropolitan police are. the home secretary needs _ metropolitan police are. the home secretary needs to _ metropolitan police are. the home secretary needs to ask _ metropolitan police are. the home secretary needs to ask yourself - secretary needs to ask yourself whether she needs to make absolutely certain that that precious bond of trust between women and london ——
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women in london and the police is absolutely secure. she is bound to note that that is her responsibility. she is bound to know that there needs to be dramatic and immediate action and she will also know that she will not be able to rely on cressida dick to take these forward with determination. i think she will want to ask cressida dick to resign. she will want to ask cressida dick to resin. ., ., ., to resign. you mention some of the vettin: to resign. you mention some of the vetting procedures _ to resign. you mention some of the vetting procedures or— to resign. you mention some of the vetting procedures or recruitment l vetting procedures or recruitment procedures that need to be looked at, particularly in an�*s attitude towards women. how can you uncover that any recruitment process? surely if someone is intent on hiding their true feelings, they will? i if someone is intent on hiding their true feelings, they will?— true feelings, they will? i think ou can true feelings, they will? i think you can look — true feelings, they will? i think you can look at _ true feelings, they will? i think you can look at people's - true feelings, they will? i think i you can look at people's outages, you can look at people's outages, you can look at people's outages, you can ask them about their attitudes. and also there can be training for police officers about male violence against women and also
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how to spot it in their colleagues. there should not only be changed betting processes for new recruits, but also training —— of existing officers so we can be sure they have addressed in their own mind the issue of their approach to women and their approach to violence against women. and then women can be reassured. the overwhelming majority of men in the police will want the police to be absolutely trusted by women, that is why theyjoined the police, to make people safe, but it is only if we take these attitudes, these actions, we can be sure that is the case. women should not be looking over their shoulder wondering, is that this man actually using his powers of arrest to harm me? or is he actually acting within the law? we cannot have women looking over their shoulder when they are approached by a police officer. ,, , , ., officer. surely there is an inevitability _ officer. surely there is an inevitability about - officer. surely there is an inevitability about some i officer. surely there is an l inevitability about some of officer. surely there is an - inevitability about some of these misogynistic attitudes ending up
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within our police force they're given that we have a societal problem with the way women are treated by a great number of men? notjust treated by a great number of men? not just those treated by a great number of men? notjust those in uniform. we certainly do — notjust those in uniform. - certainly do have a great societal problem. it has always been there and it has been turbo—charged by social media and by pornography online. but it is not good enough to say that is the same as in the police. at the police are there to protect women, to enforce the law. they take an oath of office and they gain extra powers, the powers of arrest, the powers to detain people, they gain those powers by being actually law—abiding themselves, not just being like everybody else. it is a position of trust. there was also criticism of the way the vigil for sarah everard was police earlier in the year. what are wider changes would you like to see in the way the
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police approach events like that which were staged by women for a woman of? i which were staged by women for a woman of?— which were staged by women for a woman of? ~ ,., . woman of? i think the police needed to resect woman of? i think the police needed to resoect the _ woman of? i think the police needed to respect the right _ woman of? i think the police needed to respect the right to _ woman of? i think the police needed to respect the right to demonstrate. | to respect the right to demonstrate. demonstrations is literally the lifeblood of democracy and the police ought to ensure that whilst people do not break the law, that they are able to have their voices heard. i think that cressida dick displayed her attitude when she seemed to regard the protests that women were making and their great sense of grief and anger is somehow in your sins sense of grief and anger is somehow in yoursins and sense of grief and anger is somehow in your sins and that this was just one bad apple, a wrong one, —— was somehow a nuisance. she did not understand that trust between the police and women was being pulled to breaking point and i believe it has snapped. figs breaking point and i believe it has sna ed. �* , breaking point and i believe it has snaued. r . ., breaking point and i believe it has sna ed. a . ., .,
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breaking point and i believe it has sna ed, m . . ., . snapped. as the chair of the human ri . hts snapped. as the chair of the human rights committee, _ snapped. as the chair of the human rights committee, what _ snapped. as the chair of the human rights committee, what further - rights committee, what further legislative pressure can be brought to bear to make sure women feel safer on our streets? i to bear to make sure women feel safer on our streets?— to bear to make sure women feel safer on our streets? i am speaking as a london — safer on our streets? i am speaking as a london mp _ safer on our streets? i am speaking as a london mp of _ safer on our streets? i am speaking as a london mp of very _ safer on our streets? i am speaking as a london mp of very long - safer on our streets? i am speaking i as a london mp of very long standing and what i would like to see is not only the changes that can be enacted immediately within the police, but i would like to see a victim's law, as a keir starmer has called for, and also a specific law to prohibit violence against women and girls. in the prime minister said today he once women and girls to feel safe in a straight so he should bring forward a law which criminalises curb crawling, criminalises men harassing a woman on the street, following her at night, asking for her number, asking for her to get any car, all of these things should be made criminal offences because the murderer is very rarely a first offence and it is acting on those early signs and are sending a clear message that this is not acceptable which is necessary.—
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message that this is not acceptable which is necessary. harriet harman, mp, thank you _ which is necessary. harriet harman, mp. thank you very _ which is necessary. harriet harman, mp, thank you very much _ which is necessary. harriet harman, mp, thank you very much for- which is necessary. harriet harman, j mp, thank you very much for talking to us this afternoon. we have just had the statement from the home secretary, priti patel.— had the statement from the home secretary, priti patel. what we have heard today — secretary, priti patel. what we have heard today is _ secretary, priti patel. what we have heard today is a _ secretary, priti patel. what we have heard today is a sickening _ secretary, priti patel. what we have heard today is a sickening to - heard today is a sickening to everyone and there are simply no words, no more at all that can describe the appalling tragedy around sarah everard's murder. all our thoughts and sympathy are with her family and she our thoughts and sympathy are with herfamily and she is our thoughts and sympathy are with her family and she is constantly in my thoughts as well. in terms of the monster that has been convicted today, it is right that he has been given a whole life tariff and with that he can never walk the streets of our country again. alongside that, of course, it is right we constantly hold any police to account for what has happened and with regards to the whole issue around the fact he was a serving police officer, which has been
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reflected upon in thejudgment today, there are questions, serious questions about will need to be answered by the metropolitan police. and i would just say further to that that from the very day that sarah went missing, i had been clearly in contact with the metropolitan police and putting forward some questions around the conduct of the potential suspect at the time. and all the requirements and checks that had or should have been put in place. but it is notjust his conduct, it is the police's conduct? he was known to his colleagues as someone who women were uncomfortable with. his colleagues called him the rapist. one of the questions, why was this man allowed to be a police officer? first of all, these are questions for the metropolitan police and these are questions that have been asked already. i should just be very clear about that. and my holding on account of the metropolitan police
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in previous months. from the minute sarah went missing, these were clear points, questions and challenges but to the metropolitan police and to the met commissioner directly. on this point in particular, we will have to be very clear that right now there is a grieving family and with that there are many women and girls who simply feel unsafe as to what has happened and will listen to what is being said by thejudge has happened and will listen to what is being said by the judge today around the abuse of trust and at the abuse of power by a serving officer, abuse of power by a serving officer, a serving officer in the metropolitan police. it is my duty and responsibility to continue to hold at the police to account, to continue to ask the questions that i have been asking over recent months, but also i think, importantly, to ensure the change that we need to see within the police actually takes place. and that is clearly why i have commissioned our strategy, the
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inspectorate has produced a report where we are looking at the findings right now in terms of what the police need to do to be held to account, be more transparent, but fundamentally change their approach to these issues around crimes and violence against women and girls. and that is absolutely central to the work that i am doing. i said is notjust as home secretary, but has a women, all of us want to feel safe and be safe. that is absolutely right that we have and with that, of course, the police need to engage in the right way and they will be held to account going forward. what the right way and they will be held to account going forward. what are the questions _ to account going forward. what are the questions you're _ to account going forward. what are the questions you're asking - to account going forward. what are the questions you're asking and - to account going forward. what are l the questions you're asking and what is the change you want to see? first of all, is the change you want to see? first of all. you're — is the change you want to see? first of all, you're asking _ is the change you want to see? f “st of all, you're asking questions specific to this case. i have asked questions and these have been ongoing, around issues around the conduct, the abuse of power. we have heard very clearly today from the judge over this monster abusing his
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position of authority, the power and trust that he had as a serving police officer. that should not have happened. and with that, of course, there are wider issues around public confidence that will need to be addressed and it is right at the metropolitan police addressed those concerns. ,, ., ., , , ., concerns. should the commissioner resin? as concerns. should the commissioner resign? as she _ concerns. should the commissioner resign? as she lay _ concerns. should the commissioner resign? as she lay person - concerns. should the commissioner resign? as she lay person to - concerns. should the commissioner. resign? as she lay person to oversee that change?— that change? first of all, that are im ortant that change? first of all, that are important questions _ that change? first of all, that are important questions and - that change? first of all, that are l important questions and questions that change? first of all, that are i important questions and questions i have been asking and challenges. we had to be honest about this, particular to this case, but also the conduct of that serving officer and conduct of policing more broadly. as i will continue to work with the metropolitan police and the commissioner to hold them to account, as everybody would expect me to do. and i will continue to do that. ., me to do. and i will continue to do that. . ., that. priti patel, the home secretary- _ nickelljacobs is with me now. we
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have heard the victim statements that will have resonated across the country. what is your reaction to this today? i country. what is your reaction to this today?— country. what is your reaction to this today? i share the sentiment that almost _ this today? i share the sentiment that almost everyone _ this today? i share the sentiment that almost everyone would. - this today? i share the sentiment that almost everyone would. it i this today? i share the sentiment that almost everyone would. it is| that almost everyone would. it is the sentence we needed to hear. we needed to hear the kind of sentence that would reassure the public and all of us that wayne couzens will never be out of prison. and quite obviously it is a justified sentence. i think about the family statements that we heard yesterday and how heartbreaking they were. but how similar they are too when i have talked to many, many families who have lost a loved one who has been murdered in the context of domestic abuse. we do have people using these terms, but it is true, an epidemic of violence against women and girls and some of what we are talking
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about today about this specific case, which is, of course, so important, but we have to think about the trust and deteriorating trust in our criminaljustice system any wider context. in recent yea rs recent years we have seen rick not prosecuted, barely at all. we have seen a five year decreasing trend —— rate not prosecuted at all. the outcry your healing and that we have heard in the sarah everard case —— the outcry you are healing. in that context we need to do much, much more. ., ,., ., context we need to do much, much more. ., ., ,, ., more. there are some a cappella merely elements _ more. there are some a cappella merely elements to _ more. there are some a cappella merely elements to this. - more. there are some a cappella merely elements to this. let's i more. there are some a cappella l merely elements to this. let's look at the police side first. —— there are so many elements to this. the people you turn to when you need your safety protection. what needs to change across all police forces, not just the metropolitan to change across all police forces, notjust the metropolitan police where officer serve, but generally in terms of cultural change that needs to brought about. i appreciate
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ou sa in: needs to brought about. i appreciate you saying that _ needs to brought about. i appreciate you saying that because _ needs to brought about. i appreciate you saying that because we - needs to brought about. i appreciate you saying that because we are - you saying that because we are focused on the met police, but of course this will resonate through all of our police force areas. the reaction and confidence or the billowing confidence that we are seeing —— blow in confidence is relevant to all forces. what we need to see is chief constable is talking directly to the public, to women and girls, what are they doing and what have they been doing about some of these are chronic problems within police forces about the public, to women and girls, what are they doing and what have they been doing about some of these are chronic problems within police forces about vetting, recruitment? what do they do when concerns are raised? i was reminded from the police inspectorate that they had a report two years ago where they found that two thirds of forces do not have adequate resources in place when concerns are raised about officers in this way. we have a lot to hear. the public needs to hear action. what action has been taken? they need to be clear what action and reassurance.
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the chief constables have to provide today, but also what they will do. and of course, taking a step back from today, there are so many things that our criminal justice from today, there are so many things that our criminaljustice agencies, but government should be doing to address these wider problems. how much of it is — address these wider problems. how much of it is down to resource and? money, notjust societal much of it is down to resource and? money, not just societal attitude? much of it is down to resource and? money, notjust societal attitude? aha, money, notjust societal attitude? huge amount is down to resourcing and i think that is resourcing the criminaljustice and i think that is resourcing the criminal justice system and i think that is resourcing the criminaljustice system to have adequate provision in place, but also so much any last few days we have talked about wanting to see societal change, prevention. well, all of that is vastly under resourced. vastly underdeveloped. it always has been. and so, if we want to see action, here is a great example of what we can all look to words, what will our spending review look like? in coming weeks, what investment will our government make towards that prevention and early
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intervention in the societal changes we want to see in relation to how we behave in our society? how we raise our boys and how we keep safe all of our boys and how we keep safe all of our citizens and, in particular, women and girls. that is all sitting as an aspiration in our violence against women and girl strategy. what are home secretaryjust against women and girl strategy. what are home secretary just said against women and girl strategy. what are home secretaryjust said is true, it is there but need to resourcing. one indicatorfor us all to look towards is to see if that gets adequately resourced. some of it 'ust gets adequately resourced. some of it just needs — gets adequately resourced. some of it just needs to _ gets adequately resourced. some of itjust needs to be _ gets adequately resourced. some of itjust needs to be taken _ gets adequately resourced. some of itjust needs to be taken seriously, l itjust needs to be taken seriously, doesn't it quest make you speak to a lot of women and girls who just have that expectation that, at the very least, they will be harassed when they go out. and that is the least of it. of course, that is not what we're talking about here, in on who raped and murdered a woman and used his police status to full her —— a man who raped and murdered women. what change do we need in society to
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make it clear that women and girls should be allowed out and to be kept safe? it should be allowed out and to be kept safe? , , ., , safe? it seems overwhelming these hu . e safe? it seems overwhelming these huge questions _ safe? it seems overwhelming these huge questions and _ safe? it seems overwhelming these huge questions and it _ safe? it seems overwhelming these huge questions and it feels - safe? it seems overwhelming these huge questions and it feels we - safe? it seems overwhelming these huge questions and it feels we are i huge questions and it feels we are very much on the back foot, but one of the things i have been trying to point out in an effort to kind of show what can the actions be, one is about that resource, but also the opportunities that are right in front of us. we have had the inspectorate of policing just two weeks ago, ironically on the day that sabina nessa was kidnapped and murdered, or murdered, so violently as well. reporting to us in very clear findings from an inspectorate that the home secretary commissioned herself and in your clip of the home secretary earlier, she indicated that a report, we are looking at it she said. in those recommendations, there are some very clear steps. one will be to have a duty placed upon a
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local areas, local partnerships, will be to have a duty placed upon a localareas, local partnerships, not just the police alone, to address violence against women and girls. we have a bill right now in the lords stage, the policing bill which includes a similar duty that right now it does not include the definition. any definition of serious violence, domestic abuse and serious violence, domestic abuse and serious violence. it is something in the inspectorate's report, great advice, let's take it and do something with it. we could change the strategic policing requirement. this is about changing the culture of the police. to prioritise and elevate these crimes and make them a priority. that is one of the key ways it is done at this strategic policing requirement. it struck police and crime commissioners and constables about their priorities. we can include violence against women and girls in that, certainly domestic abuse and sexual violence there are some ways that are tangible and right in front of us
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that would have this kind of effect. of course, it will not answer everything, but it would be a great start. it everything, but it would be a great start. , ., everything, but it would be a great start. ,. ,. ,, ., ., start. it is a huge discussion to have. start. it is a huge discussion to have- we _ start. it is a huge discussion to have. we have _ start. it is a huge discussion to have. we have just _ start. it is a huge discussion to have. we have just scratched l start. it is a huge discussion to l have. we have just scratched the surface. nicole, thank you, really appreciate talking to her this afternoon. let's ta ke let's take a look at the weather forecast with mick. tomorrow is looking likely sunny day with showers around. today, plenty of cloud. many of us have seen rain today and through the afternoon there will be further outbreaks, especially across western scotland. maybe some brighter spells and east of scotland. a blustery day out there. highs of around 13— i7 celsius. there will be clear spells in scotland and northern ireland overnight but showers around here. a wet night in wales. in morning, it will be spreading into the midlands.
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some heavy bursts of rain and squally winds. very mild in england overnight and a chilly one for north—east scotland. there are clear in the midlands. a sunnier day tomorrow, there will be some shower surround, especially northern ireland, especially western scotland. some heavy with hail and thunder. looking a little cooler in the showers. this is bbc news, the headlines... the family of sarah everard say they're "very pleased" at the whole life sentence imposed on the police officer who kidnapped and murdered her. they say they are "outraged and sickened" by wayne couzens' abuse of his position of trust. questions are being asked about how couzens was able to carry out his crime. thejudge said he had eroded public confidence in the police in england
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and wales. the confidence in the police in england and wales. ., , ., ., , , and wales. the monster that has been convicted today. _ and wales. the monster that has been convicted today, it _ and wales. the monster that has been convicted today, it is _ and wales. the monster that has been convicted today, it is right _ and wales. the monster that has been convicted today, it is right he - and wales. the monster that has been convicted today, it is right he has - convicted today, it is right he has been given a whole life tariff and with that, he can ever walk the streets of our country again. —— never walk the streets. lets streets of our country again. -- never walk the streets. lets get further reaction _ never walk the streets. lets get further reaction to _ never walk the streets. lets get further reaction to this - never walk the streets. lets get further reaction to this handing | further reaction to this handing down of a whole life tariff to wayne couzens for the murder of sarah everard. our correspondent is at the old bailey. she has been following events throughout the day. a lot of interest, as we can see from the many camera crews and members of the public you have gathered outside the old bailey. a lot of reaction to this sentence.— old bailey. a lot of reaction to this sentence. , , ., , , this sentence. yes, you can probably see behind me _ this sentence. yes, you can probably see behind me dozens _ this sentence. yes, you can probably see behind me dozens of— this sentence. yes, you can probably see behind me dozens of people, - this sentence. yes, you can probably see behind me dozens of people, a i see behind me dozens of people, a lot of camera crews, just members of the public who have heard about the sentence that wayne couzens was handed down earlier today. we are
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expecting somebody from the metropolitan police, we think, to come out and speak, although it is not entirely clear at this stage. in terms of reaction we have in the last ten minutes heard from the prime minister about this case and he has on social media said there is no words to adequately express the horror of sarah's motor. like the rest of the country, i have been sickened by what we have heard over the course of this sentencing and the course of this sentencing and the pain and suffering endured by herfamily and friends the pain and suffering endured by her family and friends is truly unimaginable. we also had a statement from sarah everard to's family. her parents were in quite today to see the man who kidnapped, raped and murdered their daughter, sentenced to that whole life tariff. in that statement her parents have said they are pleased that wayne couzens has received a full life
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sentence and that he will spend the rest of his life in jail. nothing can make things better, nothing can bring sarah back, but knowing he will be imprisoned for ever brings some relief. bringing you some of the sentencing remarks by the lord justice earlier on at the sentencing hearing here at the old bailey. he talked about the seriousness of this case, it was so exceptionally high it warranted a whole life or death. whole life orders are rarely handed out byjudges. they are reserved for the most serious crimes. —— whole life order. it means he will die in prison. thejudge used life order. it means he will die in prison. the judge used the words devastating and tragic, and said that sarah everard was a wholly blameless victim of a grotesquely executed series of offences. the family in court were hugged by some
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of the officers involved in this incredibly difficult investigation. and her parents, in that statement, say they are pleased that to date wayne couzens has received a full life sentence.— wayne couzens has received a full life sentence. pressure from some uuarters life sentence. pressure from some quarters on _ life sentence. pressure from some quarters on dame _ life sentence. pressure from some quarters on dame cressida - life sentence. pressure from some quarters on dame cressida dick, i life sentence. pressure from some i quarters on dame cressida dick, the metropolitan police commissioner, to step down, the argument being she is not any position to bring about the kind of cultural change that force requires. but widespread revulsion expressed by serving officers across the country?— the country? absolutely, that is the feelin: the country? absolutely, that is the feeling across _ the country? absolutely, that is the feeling across police _ the country? absolutely, that is the feeling across police forces - the country? absolutely, that is the feeling across police forces up - the country? absolutely, that is the feeling across police forces up and i feeling across police forces up and down the country, that one of their own, a metropolitan police officer wayne couzens, was off duty at the time when he carried out these horrific crimes, offences against sarah everard, but he was a serving metropolitan police officer. the
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morning of when he attacked sarah everard, he had just finished a 12 hour shift guarding the american embassy. he was a serving officer and i think that is obviously what is due shocking about this case. he tricked her, he showed her his warrant card and falsely arrested her. he got her into the back of the car. the details heard in court yesterday that laid out the full facts of this case were horrific to listen to and very difficult to imagine what sarah everard's parents were thinking and how they were feeling as those sentencing remarks were made and the details of the case where it laid out in court. the church as well, as he sentenced couzens today, he said he had eroded public confidence in the police in england and wales. we are expecting, as i say, a statement outside the
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old bailey shortly. again, we don't know who is going to give that statement. we have yet to hear from the metropolitan police. but as you rightly say, there have been calls for the metropolitan police commissioner cressida dick to resign. some say she cannot restore this confidence within the police force. she had her contract renewed fairly recently. she is going to continue in herjob until 2024, but because for her to resign. we are expecting a statement fairly imminently, but we don't know who is going to be making that statement. we will leave it for a moment and keep an eye on things. we will come back to you if somebody emerges from the met to make that statement. we will go back to the old bailey. the government is being urged to make graduates in england to start repaying student loans when they are earning £21,000 a year rather than the current level of £27,000. the
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former university minister lord willetts said this would save £2 billion of public money every year. the university and college union has said it could deter young people from studying for a degree. and lord willetts, david willetts, former mp and now a conservative peerjoins us now. thank you for setting sufficiently and waiting, and our apologies if we need to interrupt this interview and go back to the old bailey. why do you believe threshold for repaying student loans in england should come down? the repaying student loans in england should come down? the argument is uraduates should come down? the argument is graduates to — should come down? the argument is graduates to more _ should come down? the argument is graduates to more than _ should come down? the argument is l graduates to more than non-graduates graduates to more than non—graduates and i want a healthy, vibrant, growing university system in britain. the best way of financing it is to expect graduates to pay back if they are any well paying job. we set the threshold back in 2012 and the good news is it did not deter young people from applying to university. applications grew. this
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is something that puts a university finances any good footing. they no longer dependent on the taxpayer writing off a large part of a loan, that you only pay back if you are any well—paid job, otherwise you don't pay back. you any well-paid job, otherwise you don't pay back-— don't pay back. you are the university _ don't pay back. you are the university minister - don't pay back. you are the university minister when i don't pay back. you are the| university minister when the government agreed to raise the cap on tuition fees to £9,000. that is where a lot of the stems from, surely, that decision to allow universities to charge so much more and therefore students had to borrow so much more. one followed from the other? ~ , ., so much more. one followed from the other? ~ i. ., , other? when you say borrowing, it is not like borrowing _ other? when you say borrowing, it is not like borrowing from _ other? when you say borrowing, it is not like borrowing from a _ other? when you say borrowing, it is not like borrowing from a bank- other? when you say borrowing, it is not like borrowing from a bank or - other? when you say borrowing, it is not like borrowing from a bank or a l not like borrowing from a bank or a mortgage. it is the government providing the funding and then expecting, if you are any well—paid job, to pay back through paye at a rate of 9% above the threshold. most rate of 996 above the threshold. most eo - le rate of 996 above the threshold. most people would — rate of 996 above the threshold. most people would say _ rate of 996 above the threshold. most people would say that _ rate of 9% above the threshold. most people would say that is borrowing. they are having access to money that you then have to pay back with interest on top.— you then have to pay back with interest on top. you do have to pay it back, but —
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interest on top. you do have to pay it back, but only _ interest on top. you do have to pay it back, but only if— interest on top. you do have to pay it back, but only if you _ interest on top. you do have to pay it back, but only if you are - interest on top. you do have to pay it back, but only if you are earning | it back, but only if you are earning above a threshold, and in my case it would be £21,000 at a fixed rate of 9% through paye. a parent or student is leaving university with a debt on the credit card or an overdraft at the credit card or an overdraft at the bank, they would be far more worried about it than this, which is essentially a higher rate of paye deductions while you are pay back the cost of higher education. fortunately, because students understand they are not paying upfront and it is not like commercial loans, students have been willing to take that on. when this threshold was £21,000, graduates were repaying at that level. that meant three quarters of the cost of higher education is met by those graduate repayments and a quarter it was taxpayers writing it off for the least well—paid graduate. we are now at a position where over half the costis at a position where over half the cost is being borne by the generality of taxpayers because the
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threshold is so high. i don't think thatis threshold is so high. i don't think that is a sustainable system. many of those taxpayers are actually earning less than the graduates are. but there was a time when the taxpayer funded all of it. now, according to recent research, getting a degree in england is one of the most expensive places in the world to study. unions are saying, surely, it would deter people from less advantaged backgrounds, the very people that politicians always say they want to encourage to level “p say they want to encourage to level up in the conservatives parlance, they are the people who are not going to have the wealth from the back of them from families to help them out. surely they are going to be more deterred than ever. the aradox be more deterred than ever. the paradox is _ be more deterred than ever. the paradox is the — be more deterred than ever. tie: paradox is the situation is be more deterred than ever. ti2 paradox is the situation is the opposite of what you say. when it is financed by the taxpayer out of public expenditure, governments control spending and the holdout spending by holding up places, so less people go. when you remove the
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control of numbers, it is the marginal students from the lowest disadvantaged backgrounds who lose out when there are number controls, who get their chance. we have seen a surge in the number of students from disadvantaged backgrounds going to university since this new system was brought in because government doesn't limit the numbers and they understand the only playback if they are in well—paid job. —— they only pay back. are in well-paid 'ob. -- they only -a back. ., are in well-paid 'ob. -- they only pay back.— are in well-paid 'ob. -- they only -a back. ., . ., , pay back. how concerned are you this will deter young _ pay back. how concerned are you this will deter young people _ pay back. how concerned are you this will deter young people from - will deter young people from supporting the conservatives as a political entity, something the party has said it will want to try and turn around, to reduce the age of the average conservative supporter?— of the average conservative su aorter? ., ., , supporter? you are right, it is really important _ supporter? you are right, it is really important for _ supporter? you are right, it is really important for the - really important for the conservative party that it appeals to younger people. that means fulfilling their aspirations, owning their own home and getting a decent job, and in many cases getting a job at university. this will ensure more people will have the opportunity and
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when they go to university, it is well funded and they will only playback if they are any well—paid job after this. it is in the best interest of young people themselves and that is why imposing it. thank ou for and that is why imposing it. thank you for talking _ and that is why imposing it. thank you for talking to _ and that is why imposing it. thank you for talking to us. _ the government because myjob retention scheme ends today. over 19 months for a low has helped to pay the wages of 11 million workers across the uk. at the last count 1.6 million people were still receiving support to the scheme. a business correspondent had been to crawley in sussex, the term of the highest number of people in the uk. -- of the highest number of people in the uk. —— the town with a highest number of people on a furlough in the uk. not all airportjobs involve working with planes or baggage. michael and emma look after the pets and other animals that in more normal times flew with us around the world. but when flights were grounded, theirjobs were furloughed. now, though, they're back. nice to have some work and a bit more stability and a bit of a routine and something to get up
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for and come out the house for! it's nice to be back and actually — yeah, feel like you're earning your money, not just getting it from the government. i think, without furlough, yeah, i dread to think, really, the staff might be back but it isn't business as usual. they are worn to the job might business as usual. they are worn to thejob might now be at business as usual. they are worn to the job might now be at risk. the government has said furlough has been a success, but support schemes are now withdrawn. thea;r been a success, but support schemes are now withdrawn.— are now withdrawn. they were announcing — are now withdrawn. they were announcing the _ are now withdrawn. they were announcing the hassle - are now withdrawn. they were j announcing the hassle support are now withdrawn. they were - announcing the hassle support fund. that is a new response which will be delivered through councils and that will be going live in october to provide additional help through the course of this winter. get provide additional help through the course of this winter.— course of this winter. get mick -- gatwick airport — course of this winter. get mick -- gatwick airport is _ course of this winter. get mick -- gatwick airport is about _ course of this winter. get mick -- gatwick airport is about two - course of this winter. get mick -- | gatwick airport is about two miles in this direction. but in crawling
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its impact can be seen all around. there are plenty of boarded up shops and vacant businesses here. those that do remain are incredibly reliant on the economic activity that comes from being near a major international airport. firms like this sewing and craft shop, it is still open for now.— this sewing and craft shop, it is still open for now. people have not not the still open for now. people have not got the money _ still open for now. people have not got the money this _ still open for now. people have not got the money this year. _ still open for now. people have not got the money this year. worse - still open for now. people have not i got the money this year. worse than last year, actually. haifa got the money this year. worse than last year, actually.— last year, actually. how confident are ou last year, actually. how confident are you that _ last year, actually. how confident are you that you _ last year, actually. how confident are you that you will _ last year, actually. how confident are you that you will be _ last year, actually. how confident are you that you will be here - last year, actually. how confident are you that you will be here this | are you that you will be here this time next year?— are you that you will be here this time next year? difficult question. difficult question. _ time next year? difficult question. difficult question. i _ time next year? difficult question. difficult question. i want _ time next year? difficult question. difficult question. i want to - time next year? difficult question. difficult question. i want to still. difficult question. i want to still be here and i will do my damnedest to still be here. for be here and i will do my damnedest to still be here.— to still be here. for industries and communities. _ to still be here. for industries and communities, still— to still be here. for industries and communities, still feeling - to still be here. for industries and communities, still feeling the - communities, still feeling the effects of this pandemic, the future without furlough could involve some tough decisions. ben thompson, bbc news, in crawley. a lot of interest
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in the story. let's speak about it more of their business presenter. it is affecting so many people and it has kept seven people afloat for such a long time. that has kept seven people afloat for such a long time.— has kept seven people afloat for such a long time. at its height, i think 8.9 billion _ such a long time. at its height, i think 8.9 billion people - such a long time. at its height, i think 8.9 billion people were - such a long time. at its height, i think 8.9 billion people were on| such a long time. at its height, i i think 8.9 billion people were on the furlough scheme and now it is 1.8, 1.9. -- 8.9 furlough scheme and now it is 1.8, 1.9. —— 8.9 million people. these people are still dependent on that scheme to subsidise their way. there is a lot of uncertainty and worry about what will happen is a go back to work. we will talking out tojill from citation, who can tell us a bit more about employment rights as people go back to work. a lot of people go back to work. a lot of people will be concerned. what sort of question should they be asking their employer? the of question should they be asking their employer?— their employer? the first thing to understand _ their employer? the first thing to understand for _ their employer? the first thing to understand for employees - their employer? the first thing to understand for employees in - their employer? the first thing to understand for employees in the | understand for employees in the situation — understand for employees in the situation is they should expect to id situation is they should expect to go back_ situation is they should expect to go back on— situation is they should expect to go back on terms and conditions that they enjoyed before going on furlough. i hope most businesses have _ furlough. i hope most businesses have reached out to their employees to discuss— have reached out to their employees to discuss a — have reached out to their employees
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to discuss a return and if it is not a return— to discuss a return and if it is not a return on— to discuss a return and if it is not a return on that basis to discuss potential— a return on that basis to discuss potential options because there are a lot of— potential options because there are a lot of options available. if they hadn't _ a lot of options available. if they hadn't heard from their employer, i would _ hadn't heard from their employer, i would certainly get in touch and discuss — would certainly get in touch and discuss when they are expected to go back _ discuss when they are expected to go back in_ discuss when they are expected to go back. , ., ., , ., , discuss when they are expected to go back. , ., .,, ., , , back. in terms of the options they have, back. in terms of the options they have. lots — back. in terms of the options they have. lots of— back. in terms of the options they have, lots of businesses - back. in terms of the options they have, lots of businesses are - back. in terms of the options they have, lots of businesses are also i have, lots of businesses are also facing the very tough questions of how much they can afford to keep staff on. what about things like redundancy? how are people eligible for those schemes? the redundancy? how are people eligible for those schemes?— redundancy? how are people eligible for those schemes? the good thing is in terms of the _ for those schemes? the good thing is in terms of the furlough _ for those schemes? the good thing is in terms of the furlough scheme, - for those schemes? the good thing is in terms of the furlough scheme, it i in terms of the furlough scheme, it didn't— in terms of the furlough scheme, it didn't change anything about the normal_ didn't change anything about the normal principles of redundancy and redundancy entitlement. in fact, the government legislated on this point last summer to make it clear that redundancy calculation and redundancy calculation and redundancy notice would be calculated, ignoring the fact that people _ calculated, ignoring the fact that people had receipt reduced pay during — people had receipt reduced pay during furlough. in terms of the
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principles— during furlough. in terms of the principles of the redundancy, all that remains the same. the key questions — that remains the same. the key questions for businesses will be if they want— questions for businesses will be if they want to make those permanent cuts now _ they want to make those permanent cuts now i— they want to make those permanent cuts now. i do certain they will not need _ cuts now. i do certain they will not need those — cuts now. i do certain they will not need those employees within the next few months and these jobs are not viable. _ few months and these jobs are not viable, because if they may be viable — viable, because if they may be viable in — viable, because if they may be viable in the near future, albeit not now. — viable in the near future, albeit not now. it _ viable in the near future, albeit not now, it may be worthwhile looking — not now, it may be worthwhile looking at _ not now, it may be worthwhile looking at some alternative options because _ looking at some alternative options because of redundancy itself is not only a _ because of redundancy itself is not only a very— because of redundancy itself is not only a very tragic situation for the individuals. — only a very tragic situation for the individuals, but also very expensive for business. it is individuals, but also very expensive for business-— for business. it is something worth ex . lorin: for business. it is something worth exploring for _ for business. it is something worth exploring for individuals _ for business. it is something worth exploring for individuals going - exploring for individuals going back, if they think perhaps the future is a bit uncertain at the company they are working at. as you mentioned there, businesses are finding themselves in a very tough operating environment, particularly for those industries having gone back to normal. what can they do in these circumstances?— these circumstances? well, i can completely _ these circumstances? well, i can completely understand _ these circumstances? well, i can completely understand why - these circumstances? well, i can i
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completely understand why sectors such as _ completely understand why sectors such as the airline sector and international tourism sector really have a _ international tourism sector really have a very — international tourism sector really have a very strong case to say, actually, — have a very strong case to say, actually, we need some continue to support— actually, we need some continue to support because they are still subject— support because they are still subject to some restrictions, albeit they are _ subject to some restrictions, albeit they are producing over time, but they are producing over time, but the important point is the level of customer— the important point is the level of customer confidence is not nearly where _ customer confidence is not nearly where it _ customer confidence is not nearly where it needs to be for those businesses to be. they are facing some _ businesses to be. they are facing some very— businesses to be. they are facing some very tough choices. we don't know— some very tough choices. we don't know what— some very tough choices. we don't know what is going to happen when the changes come into play and at the changes come into play and at the beginning of october, will that restore _ the beginning of october, will that restore confidence? i can understand why there _ restore confidence? i can understand why there are calls from those sectors, — why there are calls from those sectors, that they should be made in exemption _ sectors, that they should be made in exemption and there should be certainly— exemption and there should be certainly not an extension of furlough _ certainly not an extension of furlough because we know that is not on the _ furlough because we know that is not on the cards, but some other support those _ on the cards, but some other support those industries can be given. thank ou ve those industries can be given. thank you very much _ those industries can be given. thank you very much for — those industries can be given. thank you very much forjoining _ those industries can be given. thank you very much forjoining us. - those industries can be given. thank you very much forjoining us. she . you very much forjoining us. she pointed out there that it is very
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hard time for businesses and employees, a lot of uncertainty but they do rights to say —— so, it is well worth talking to employers about what they are. stew; well worth talking to employers about what they are. very useful indeed. about what they are. very useful indeed- we _ about what they are. very useful indeed. we will _ about what they are. very useful indeed. we will hopefully - about what they are. very useful indeed. we will hopefully see . about what they are. very useful| indeed. we will hopefully see you later. let's go back to the old bailey and hear from later. let's go back to the old bailey and hearfrom our correspondence how annette wilkinson who has been following developments following the handing down of the whole life tariff to wayne couzens for the rape and murder of sarah everard. we are expecting to hear from the metropolitan police very shortly. from the metropolitan police very shortl . , ~ ., ~ shortly. yes, i think we are. we have been _ shortly. yes, i think we are. we have been waiting _ shortly. yes, i think we are. we have been waiting for _ shortly. yes, i think we are. we | have been waiting for somebody shortly. yes, i think we are. we i have been waiting for somebody to come out of the door is behind us at the old bailey for the last couple of hours or so, but we are expecting somebody from the metropolitan police to give their reaction to that whole life order sentence that was handed down by the lord justice earlier on today, this morning, to wayne couzens, a serving
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metropolitan police officer at the time when he kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard who was just walking home from a friends house that night. a lot of questions, of course, about how he was vetted and there have been calls for the commissioner of the metropolitan police to resign. we had a statement from sarah everard's family who said in that statement that they were glad that wayne couzens had been handed a whole life order. what that means is he will never be released from prison. he will die in prison. we had those very personal statements by the family, her parents yesterday in court, where they talked about the torment, the horror, the absolute grief that they continue to feel at the loss of its era, and we had a statement from sarah's mother, susan, who said she
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yearned for her daughter and she said sarah died in horrendous circumstances. she said i go through the sequence of events. i wonder when she realised she was in mortal danger, but i think in a moment we are going to hear a statement outside the steps of the old bailey and i think we can hear now from the commissioner of the metropolitan police. ., �*, commissioner of the metropolitan aolice. ., �*, ,, ., police. sarah's kidnap, rape and murder was— police. sarah's kidnap, rape and murder was one _ police. sarah's kidnap, rape and murder was one of _ police. sarah's kidnap, rape and murder was one of the - police. sarah's kidnap, rape and murder was one of the most - police. sarah's kidnap, rape and - murder was one of the most dreadful events— murder was one of the most dreadful events in_ murder was one of the most dreadful events in the 190 year history of the metropolitan police. this hearing — the metropolitan police. this hearing has revealed the full brutality of this man's crimes against — brutality of this man's crimes against sarah. i am absolutely horrified — against sarah. i am absolutely horrified that this man used his position— horrified that this man used his position of trust to deceive and coerce — position of trust to deceive and
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coerce sarah, and i know it you all are as _ coerce sarah, and i know it you all are as welt — coerce sarah, and i know it you all are as well. his actions were a gross — are as well. his actions were a gross betrayal of everything policing stands for. what he did was unthinkable and appalling. he showed himself— unthinkable and appalling. he showed himself to _ unthinkable and appalling. he showed himself to be the cavity is through his lies _ himself to be the cavity is through his lies and — himself to be the cavity is through his lies and seeking to minimise his two responsibility for his crimes. -- the _ two responsibility for his crimes. —— the coward he is. police officers are here _ —— the coward he is. police officers are here to— —— the coward he is. police officers are here to protect people, to be trustworthy, courageous and compassionate. his every action is the exact— compassionate. his every action is the exact opposite of that. as the judge _ the exact opposite of that. as the judge said, he has eroded the confidence that the public are entitled — confidence that the public are entitled to have in the police. it
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is critical— entitled to have in the police. it is critical that every subject in this country can trust police officers _ this country can trust police officers when they encounter them. the judge _ officers when they encounter them. the judge went on to say he has very considerably added to the sense of insecurity— considerably added to the sense of insecurity that many have living in our cities, — insecurity that many have living in our cities, perhaps particularly women — our cities, perhaps particularly women i_ our cities, perhaps particularly women. i have followed this investigation very closely. i have been _ investigation very closely. i have been in — investigation very closely. i have been in court yesterday and today. i am absolutely second. —— sickened. my thoughts are with sarah, _ —— sickened. my thoughts are with sarah, her— —— sickened. my thoughts are with sarah, herfamily and —— sickened. my thoughts are with sarah, her family and friends and her loved — sarah, her family and friends and her loved ones. he will now spend the rest _ her loved ones. he will now spend the rest of— her loved ones. he will now spend the rest of his life in prison. i
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hope — the rest of his life in prison. i hope that— the rest of his life in prison. i hope that will give them some slight comfort _ hope that will give them some slight comfort. this man has brought shame on the _ comfort. this man has brought shame on the net _ comfort. this man has brought shame on the net. speaking frankly, as an organisation, we have been rocked. i do want _ organisation, we have been rocked. i do want to— organisation, we have been rocked. i do want to thank everyone involved in bringing — do want to thank everyone involved in bringing him tojustice and doing so, so _ in bringing him tojustice and doing so, so swiftly. sarah's courageous and dignified family and friends, the prosecution team and all those who supported the investigation and prosecution. the judge recognised and commended the work of our investigators. i echoed those thoughts. i saw for myself first
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hand _ thoughts. i saw for myself first hand their extraordinary determination and professionalism. this is— determination and professionalism. this is the _ determination and professionalism. this is the metropolitan police service — this is the metropolitan police service i— this is the metropolitan police service i know. it is capable and caring. — service i know. it is capable and caring. it — service i know. it is capable and caring. it is— service i know. it is capable and caring, it is full of people who are good _ caring, it is full of people who are good and — caring, it is full of people who are good and who work all their lives to protect— good and who work all their lives to protect others. i absolutely no that there _ protect others. i absolutely no that there are _ protect others. i absolutely no that there are those who feel their trust in us _ there are those who feel their trust in us shaking. i recognise that for some _ in us shaking. i recognise that for some people a precious bond of trust has been _ some people a precious bond of trust has been damaged. our dedication to you, has been damaged. our dedication to you. our— has been damaged. our dedication to you, our public, remains undiminished. as commissioner, i will do _ undiminished. as commissioner, i will do everything in my power to ensure _ will do everything in my power to ensure we — will do everything in my power to ensure we learn any lessons. i know that what _
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ensure we learn any lessons. i know that what happened to sarah and indeed _ that what happened to sarah and indeed what has happened to other women _ indeed what has happened to other women in _ indeed what has happened to other women in london and beyond in recent times— women in london and beyond in recent times has— women in london and beyond in recent times has raised important questions about— times has raised important questions about women's safety. here in the met, _ about women's safety. here in the met. i_ about women's safety. here in the met, i commit to keep working with others _ met, i commit to keep working with others to— met, i commit to keep working with others to improve women's safety and reduce _ others to improve women's safety and reduce the _ others to improve women's safety and reduce the fear of violence. there are no— reduce the fear of violence. there are no words that can fully express the fury— are no words that can fully express the fury and overwhelming sadness that we _ the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all— the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened to sarah _ that we all feel about what happened to sarah i_ that we all feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry. shouting that was the metropolitan police
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commissioner cressida dick. you heard reporters trying to ask her questions but it was just a statement from the commissioner who said that she is absolutely sickened by what wayne couzens had done. she said the brutality of this man's crime against sarah everard, and they are horrified he used his position of trust to deceive sarah. it was a gross betrayal of policing standards. we heard the commissioner also touching on the issue of trust within the metropolitan police, between the police are members of the public. she acknowledged that and said she was committed to keeping people safe and to work with others. she said no words can fully express the fury and she ended by saying i am so sorry. for express the fury and she ended by saying i am so sorry.— saying i am so sorry. for the moment. — saying i am so sorry. for the moment, thank— saying i am so sorry. for the moment, thank you - saying i am so sorry. for the moment, thank you very - saying i am so sorry. for the i moment, thank you very much. we saying i am so sorry. for the _
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moment, thank you very much. we will have more on that story throughout the afternoon. let's pause for a moment for the weather. tomorrow is looking like a sunny day were some showers around. today, plenty of cloud and many of us have seen rain so far today and through the afternoon there will be further outbreaks of rain around, especially across western scotland. some heavier breasts here and maybe some brighter spells in eastern scotland. a blustery day out there. —— heavier bursts. there will be clear spells overnight, a wet night in wales. by morning, it will be spreading into the midlands, some heavy bursts of rain and some squally winds. mild for england and wales overnight and italy chilly one for north—east scotland once again. in east anglia and south—east england tomorrow morning, a sunny day. some showers around, especially northern ireland,
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especially western scotland. some heavy with hail and thunder, and will feel a little cooler in the showers. this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines... the family of sarah everard welcome the whole life sentence handed down to her killer, saying "the world is a safer place with him imprisoned". thejudge said wayne couzens showed no evidence of contrition and said and said ——contrition. the home secretary described the crime as sickening. the the crime as sickening. monster that has been con�* today, the monster that has been convicted today, it is right he has been given a whole life tariff and with that, he can never walk the streets of our country again. but he can never walk the streets of our country again-— country again. but questions are bein: country again. but questions are being asked _ country again. but questions are being asked about _ country again. but questions are being asked about how - country again. but questions are being asked about how couzens| country again. but questions are i being asked about how couzens could have been able to carry out his cane and new calls for cressida dick to resign. it and new calls for cressida dick to resi . n. ., , .,
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and new calls for cressida dick to resin. .,, ., ., . and new calls for cressida dick to resiyn. . , ., . . . resign. it was on her watch that wa ne resign. it was on her watch that wayne couzens, _ resign. it was on her watch that wayne couzens, the _ resign. it was on her watch that wayne couzens, the offences i resign. it was on her watch that| wayne couzens, the offences he carried out, the sexual offences a few days before were swept under the carpet by his colleagues are not investigated. —— and not investigated. good afternoon, welcome to bbc news. the metropolitan police officer who kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard will spend the rest of his life in prison. the judge at the old bailey, handing down the whole life tarriff, said he had no doubt that wayne couzens used his position as a police officer to coerce miss everard into his car, and that he'd shown no sign of contrition. the 33—year—old was abducted from a street in south london in march as she was walking home from a friend's house. the everard family have released a statement following today's sentencing. it says, "we are very pleased that wayne couzens has received a full
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life sentence and will spend the rest of his life in jail. nothing can make things better, nothing can bring sarah back. but knowing he will be imprisoned forever brings some relief". the family added, "it is almost seven months since sarah died and the pain of losing her overwhelming. we miss her all the time. she was a beautiful young woman in looks and character and our lives are the poorer without her". megan paterson has this report. in the aftermath of sarah everard's murder, shock, grief and anger were shared at vigils around the country. at her killer's sentencing, the chilling details of her death described as unspeakably grim. the everard family present throughout proceedings. in a statement, her mother susan said she was brokenhearted, the family tormented by the circumstances of her daughter's death. arriving at the old bailey this morning, wayne couzens was later sentenced to a whole life order.
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his actions were described as warped, selfish and brutal. a man who, under the guise of his duty as a police officer, picked sarah everard up in the street as she walked home from a friend's house. in an exchange that lasted less than five minutes, he showed his warrant card and used knowledge of covid restriction policing to handcuff sarah everard and put her in his hire car. witnesses saw this. witnesses saw this, the moment of the calculated kidnap. they believed wayne couzens was an officer doing hisjob. couzens drove to a remote rural area where he raped and murdered sarah everard. he's later seen on cctv calmly continuing with daily life, ordering a hot chocolate in a nearby coffee shop. questioned by police, he feigned innocence, knowing he put sarah's body inside a fridge and set it on fire. during the sentencing, wayne couzens sat with his head bowed. sarah everard's family asked him to look at them as they gave their statments.
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herfather told him... a family broken by unimaginable loss, a police force left questioning how it will recover. it is right that we constantly hold the police to account for what has happened and with regards to the whole issue around the fact that he was a serving police officer, which has been reflected upon anyjudgment today, there are questions, serious questions that will need to be answered by the metropolitan police. described as a wholly blameless victim, to those who loved her, sarah everard will always be the precious little girl who became a woman with a beautiful mind, taken cruelly from them by a man who took advantage of his position. megan patterson, bbc news.
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a few moments ago, cressida dick, the metropolitan police commissioner gave a statement. our correspondent to hell and heed it. she gave a statement. our correspondent to hell and heed it.— to hell and heed it. she came out of court after— to hell and heed it. she came out of court after the _ to hell and heed it. she came out of court after the sentencing _ to hell and heed it. she came out of court after the sentencing of - to hell and heed it. she came out of court after the sentencing of wayne | court after the sentencing of wayne couzens, a whole life order means he will never be released from prison. a cressida dick, the met commissioner came outside the old billy to give a statement and she said she is absolutely sickened —— old bailey. she talked about this being one of the most dreadful events. she said she was absolutely horrified and used his position of trust to receive said. we heard the full details of what he did, he stopped her she was walking home from a friends house, showed her his warrant card and then falsely
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arrested. the commissioner said the police are here to protect people. his every action is the exact opposite of that. and then she talked about, and we have heard today about trust within the police force from members of the public, and at the commissioner touched on that and said, as an organisation, they have been rocked by this case. she said the met is key full of capable and caring people who are good. she said our dedication to you, the public, remains undiminished. that are some of the words are from the commission of the metropolitan police who came outside the old bailey in the last few moments. —— and from the commissioner. to give you a bit of colour of what went on as wayne couzens was handed down that life, whole life order, he was shaking as he was sentenced. and at the judge described the case as devastating,
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as tragic. he said sarah had just been walking home that night. and he said to couzens that he had eroded public confidence in the police in england and wales. sarah everard's parents have given a statement saying they are pleased that wayne couzens has been sentenced to a whole life order, but yesterday we heard from sarah's father and court who asked cousins to look directly at him as he made his statement and he said, no punishment will ever compare to the pain and torture couzens inflicted on us. all that they want, their family, couzens inflicted on us. all that they want, theirfamily, is couzens inflicted on us. all that they want, their family, is a for sarah to be back.— they want, their family, is a for sarah to be back. helena, for the moment, thank— sarah to be back. helena, for the moment, thank you _ sarah to be back. helena, for the moment, thank you very - sarah to be back. helena, for the moment, thank you very much, i sarah to be back. helena, for the i moment, thank you very much, helena wilkinson at the old bailey. as we had, dame cressida dick has been speaking outside the old bailey in the last few minutes. let's listen to what she said. there are
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no words that _ listen to what she said. there are no words that can _ listen to what she said. there are no words that can fully _ listen to what she said. there are no words that can fully express i listen to what she said. there are i no words that can fully express the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry.— we all feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry. dame cressida dick, the commissioner _ sarah. i am so sorry. dame cressida dick, the commissioner of _ sarah. i am so sorry. dame cressida dick, the commissioner of the i dick, the commissioner of the metropolitan police. the prime minister has released a statement. he said, "there are no words that adequately express the horror of sarah's murder. like the rest of the country, i have been sickened by what we have heard over the course of this sentencing, and the pain and suffering endured by herfamily and friends is truly unimaginable. our police are there to protect us and i know that officers will share in our shock and devastation at the total betrayal of this duty. people must be able to walk on our streets without fear of harm and with full confidence that the police are there to keep them safe. no woman should have to fear harassment or violence. we will do everything possible
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to prevent these abhorrent crimes and keep our communities safe. the home secretary said the met police and cressida dick had questions to answer. questions�* to answer over how it handled reports about couzens before he abducted miss everard. our political correspondent, damian grammaticas is in westminster. it was only recently that priti patel renewed her contract to continue on, cressida dick's and i put to priti patel questions about the conduct and the fact this was a serving police officer about whom there were questions about his behaviour. there were questions about his behaviour-— there were questions about his behaviour. . , ., , ,, behaviour. that his colleagues knew. should moore — behaviour. that his colleagues knew. should moore have _ behaviour. that his colleagues knew. should moore have been _ behaviour. that his colleagues knew. should moore have been done? i behaviour. that his colleagues knew. | should moore have been done? what about public confidence? the home secretary described this as a sickening crime, described him as a monster, and she said there were an
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important questions, questions she said notjust around his abuse of power, but also around the police and what she said was that questions for the met, they been asked. the change we need to see, she talked about. she talked about that as an approach to crimes involving women and girls. when asked about dame cressida dick's position, she said those questions need to be answered first. , , , , ., those questions need to be answered first. ,, ,, ., , those questions need to be answered first. , , ,, ., , ., first. depression is well from the home secretary _ first. depression is well from the home secretary to _ first. depression is well from the home secretary to consider i first. depression is well from the home secretary to consider heri home secretary to consider her position if she thought fit to renew —— pressure as well. if she thought to renew the contract for cressida dick. ., ,, . ., , dick. the home secretary was saying that fundamentally _ dick. the home secretary was saying that fundamentally she _ dick. the home secretary was saying that fundamentally she had - dick. the home secretary was saying that fundamentally she had been i that fundamentally she had been asking questions of the police throughout the course of this and that she wanted to hear those answers. there have also been
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questions from the labour party, harriet harman, the labour mp has said that she has put forward a group of reforms that need to be, or new policies that need to be put in place. she does not believe it dame cressida dick is the right person to oversee that and has called on dame cressida dick to resign. harriet harman has written to priti patel saying that there was changes that need to be brought in include that any police officer who is accused of violence against women should be suspended. if those accusations are admitted approving, that officer should be dismissed and there should be checks made to new recruits, checks made when police move between forces. so those are the sort of thing that could be practically done within the police force. the home secretary says she is asking these
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questions and is waiting to see answers. ., ., ., answers. damian, for the moment, thank ou answers. damian, for the moment, thank you very _ answers. damian, for the moment, thank you very much. _ let's speak now to nazir afzal former chief prosecutor for north west england from 2011 to 2015. thank you very much forjoining us this afternoon. how tenable is the home secretary's position and dame cressida dick's position in the light of the sentencing today? iprpfeilii. light of the sentencing today? well, we have heard _ light of the sentencing today? well, we have heard some _ light of the sentencing today? well, we have heard some words - light of the sentencing today? -ii we have heard some words of shame and we've heard people say sorry, but as we know, that doesn't bring sarah everard back and it doesn't rebuild confidence in our policing system. there are women telling me, and i'm sure they are telling others, if they were confronted by a single male officer in circumstances that made they made them fear, they would resist arrest. rather than get into the car with that officer. how much more damaging can that be? the
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responsibility lies first and foremost with the commissioner, a catalogue of errors notjust in this case but in others over the last few months. at the very least, i'd extension should not have been agreed to. but in any event, that has happened now and the person responsible for agreeing the extension is the home secretary. i was listening to what you saying a moment ago and your correspondent was about questions being asked. when i was in government service, if a minister asked a question, you would answer that day. i do not understand why it is taking so long for those questions to be asked and answered. at the moment, the confidence in our policing is a close to an all—time low as i recall it. i have never come across a situation where the police officer has years his warrant card and its powers as a police officer to detain, kidnap, rape and murderan innocent member of the public. this is not a one—off. you have to add,
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thejudge said there is not a one—off. you have to add, the judge said there were some supportive statements made by officers at the sentencing hearing. well, if this individual was a one—off, how is it that there are other officers are talking supportively about him? and as you have indicated, there have been allegations going back to a number of forces over the years and a language is about him which gave us a real red flags of concern. —— language use about him. this is sadly not a one—off. and there are many incidents over the year where misogyny has driven this behaviour. at the end of the day, his warrant card didn't do it, it was the fact he hated women, he planned this, premeditated, he wanted to find somebody to kill and he did. misogyny in the force has been remarked upon many, many times over the years and now is the time for an independent enquiry into institutionalised misogyny, in the same way there was in regards to
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institutionalised racism when stephen lawrence's investigation failed. we have a call for the commissioner to resign today and i personally believe the home secretary should follow suit as she extended her tenure despite knowing what we all know now and thirdly, perhaps most importantly, there needs to be an independent enquiry into institutionalised misogyny so that women can feel safe. at the moment, i'm sorry to say that women do not feel safe from the people who are meant to keep them safe. shy, lat are meant to keep them safe. a lot of women would _ are meant to keep them safe. a lot of women would say _ are meant to keep them safe. a lot of women would say it _ are meant to keep them safe. a lot of women would say it is _ are meant to keep them safe. a lot of women would say it is notjust from the people who are meant to keep them safe, but a lot of men in general, so if misogyny is that much of a problem across the country, as we are led to believe it is in our society, what use would it be to have arguably tokenistic resignations by a minister and the head of a police force if it is more widespread than that?— head of a police force if it is more widespread than that? well, we deal with one thing _ widespread than that? well, we deal
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with one thing at _ widespread than that? well, we deal with one thing at a _ widespread than that? well, we deal with one thing at a time. _ widespread than that? well, we deal with one thing at a time. in - with one thing at a time. in relation to these events, these tragic events that we have dealt with, there has to be accountability. but you're absolutely spot—on. misogyny is a deep seated in our society and community. women do not feel safe, women are treated unfairly, women suffer tremendous... you know the figures, two women a week are killed by partners ex partners. many women kill themselves because of their beers. 96% of women say they are sexually harassed. it is the pandemic that will —— because of the abuse. that enquiry into policing should extend and an independent enquiry should extend into misogyny and society. women are not to minority, the majority, but time and time and time again it is women who are suffering the consequences of male violence and male power. where does it begin? — male violence and male power. where does it begin? we _ male violence and male power. where does it begin? we are _ male violence and male power. where does it begin? we are starting - male violence and male power. where does it begin? we are starting to i does it begin? we are starting to talk about the societal issues here
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because it starts when boys are small, how they see their family members being treated, surely? and how to intervene in every family where these misogynistic views are prevalent? you start as early as possible. we have a relationship and sexuality education are rolled out in wales, mandatory in all schools. i have been national adviser there. additionally, it is something we should be doing elsewhere. we need to teach young men and young boys what good relationships are, about equality, about hate and bigotry and the earlier you start, the earlier good intervene, the more likely it is they will not become more misogynistic the older they get. and we need to be relentless about this. it needs to start as early as possible and by that i mean kindergarten and primary skill, but it needs to go on pretty much through the whole of their lives. —— primary school. and also rehabilitation, when someone
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initially offence, hopefully not as serious as we have team today, those people need to be rehabilitated. they simply can't just people need to be rehabilitated. they simply can'tjust be locked up and let out after a few weeks and months to carry on reoffending because that tends to happen over and over again. this because that tends to happen over and over again.— and over again. this is a whole s stem and over again. this is a whole system approach _ and over again. this is a whole system approach starting i and over again. this is a whole system approach starting as i and over again. this is a whole i system approach starting as early as possible. again, many to take responsibility. i have lost a lot of male friends because i have chanced on their sexism on their abusive words and languages and you need men to stand up. i bulk up the fact that i tried to organise a million man mark five years ago and forgot 52 sign—ups. we have to recognise that this is not an issue about women's safety, it is an issue about men's violence. b. safety, it is an issue about men's violence. �* ., ., safety, it is an issue about men's violence. . ., ., , violence. a lot of men will say, but i'm not violence. a lot of men will say, but i'm not like — violence. a lot of men will say, but i'm not like that. _ violence. a lot of men will say, but i'm not like that. and _ violence. a lot of men will say, but i'm not like that. and then - violence. a lot of men will say, but i'm not like that. and then women| i'm not like that. and then women will turnaround and say, it may not be you, but it is always a man somewhere. that is the difference, isn't it? ., ' :: :: , somewhere. that is the difference, isn't it? ., ' i: :: , ., isn't it? your 10096 right. more than 9596 of violence _ isn't it? your 10096 right. more than 9596 of violence against _ isn't it? your 10096 right. more than 9596 of violence against women i isn't it? your 10096 right. more than 9596 of violence against women is i isn't it? your10096 right. more than|
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9596 of violence against women is by 95% of violence against women is by men and the same for men against men. it is not all men, absolutely, but that always mask the reality which is a you do not want to do with the issue. i would rather not have friends that are abusive or sexist and misogynistic and you challenge them over and over again and that is how you change their views. and ultimately, you change society, but it has to be all of us operating in this way. and it should notjust be left to women and ngos and women's groups to speak on the subject. it is us, all of us, men who need to do the same. what about social media? — who need to do the same. what about social media? there _ who need to do the same. what about social media? there are _ who need to do the same. what about social media? there are some - who need to do the same. what about social media? there are some really l social media? there are some really abundant staff? and antmusic, all sorts of aspects of life —— potent stuff. and in music. sorts of aspects of life -- potent stuff. and in music.— sorts of aspects of life -- potent stuff. and in music. social media alatforms stuff. and in music. social media platforms have — stuff. and in music. social media platforms have response - stuff. and in music. social media| platforms have response abilities. the trolling of women is happening right in front of me. when people
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are sticking up on the subject, people are being attacked and abused online. social media platforms need to be much more proactive about what they do here, not simply responding to complaints. social media, music, the industry, arts, culture, all of it is reflective of society. if you outlaw something, say it is just not tolerable and will not be tolerated, then everybody else has a two step into line. and you can make great music without attacking them, you can make great movies without attacking women. the reality is we have to change mindsets. iprpfhat attacking women. the reality is we have to change mindsets.- have to change mindsets. what is our have to change mindsets. what is your hope? _ have to change mindsets. what is your hope? its — have to change mindsets. what is your hope? as sarah _ have to change mindsets. what is your hope? as sarah everard's i have to change mindsets. what is i your hope? as sarah everard's family have said, sending wayne couzens to prison for life bring some relief, but does not bring her back, what is your hope that something positive will come out of this appalling crime? ~ ., ., ., .,, will come out of this appalling crime? ~ ., ., ., . crime? we have to have hope. between sarah's murdering _ crime? we have to have hope. between sarah's murdering today, _ crime? we have to have hope. between sarah's murdering today, there - crime? we have to have hope. between sarah's murdering today, there have i sarah's murdering today, there have been 80 other women killed by partners or exporters in domestic
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abuse type situations and thousands and thousands of sexual offences are —— ex partners. let's not forget the context. my hope is that men are signed up and take responsibility for the issue of male violence rather than women having to keep doing it. —— then stand up. that we challenge each other what we're doing, stand together to tackle with women the issue of male violence, which impacts horribly on men and theirfamilies. and to optimism, i look at my own children and some are behind me right now and i see people who challenge me when i sometimes unconsciously are sexist or misogynistic or whatever it may be, when i make a joke or something that is totally out of order. the next generation of our children and young people really do get it more than we do. and i really hope that we can give them the tools and skills and opportunities to change the rest of us. in opportunities to change the rest of us. , ., ,., . , us. in terms of policing, this should be — us. in terms of policing, this should be a _ us. in terms of policing, this should be a watershed i us. in terms of policing, this i
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should be a watershed moment for your? should be a watershed moment for our? ' :: :: ' should be a watershed moment for our':::m , ,., should be a watershed moment for our':::m , .., should be a watershed moment for our':::m , .. your? 10096. dunblane change the way we deal with — your? 10096. dunblane change the way we deal with a — your? 10096. dunblane change the way we deal with a hillsborough _ your? 10096. dunblane change the way we deal with a hillsborough change i we deal with a hillsborough change the way we do with football and football crowds. harold shipman change the way we deal with medical care. the murder of sarah everard should change the way we police. policing should be by consent, is by consent. it goes back 180 years where the police and the public and the public are the police —— in the police are the public possible right now, the public do not feel the police and the public and that needs to change. police and the public and that needs to chance. ., �* police and the public and that needs tochanre. ., �* , to change. you're absolutely right about teenagers. _ to change. you're absolutely right about teenagers. i _ to change. you're absolutely right about teenagers. i took _ to change. you're absolutely right about teenagers. i took it - to change. you're absolutely right about teenagers. i took it me i about teenagers. i took it me thinking about my attitudes as well, they really do get it a lot more than some of us who are a bit longer in the tooth. a lwa ys always good to have your bbc news, thank you. ana an a million man has appeared at the old bailey accused of murdering
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sabina nessa. koci selamaj allegedly hit her with a weapon before carrying her away unconscious. it was a premeditated attack and he did not know his victim. officers are searching an area of woodland in kent as part of the investigation into her death. the government'sjob the government's job retention scheme which helped save millions of jobs during the pandemic and save. it has helped to pay more than 11 million workers' wages. many were still receiving support through the team. benjohnson has been to crawley in sussex, the highest number of people unfurlough in the uk. -- number of people unfurlough in the uk. —— ben thompson. not all airportjobs involve working with planes or baggage.
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michael and emma look after the pets and other animals that in more normal times flew with us around the world. but when flights were grounded, theirjobs were furloughed. now, though, they're back. nice to have some work and a bit more stability and a bit of a routine and something to get up for and come out the house for! it's nice to be back and actually — yeah, feel like you're earning your money, not just getting it from the government. i think, without furlough, yeah, i dread to think, really, where we would be now. the staff may be back, but it is not business as usual. the government has announced help with a cost of living. igrate has announced help with a cost of livina. ~ ., ., has announced help with a cost of livina. ~ . ., ., ., . living. we are now announcing the household support _ living. we are now announcing the household support fund _ living. we are now announcing the household support fund to - living. we are now announcing the household support fund to help i living. we are now announcing the | household support fund to help the most vulnerable families in england with the cost of living, food and utilities and that is in your response which will be delivered through councils and will be going live in october to provide
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additional help throughout the course of this winter.- course of this winter. gatwick air-ort course of this winter. gatwick airport is _ course of this winter. gatwick airport is about _ course of this winter. gatwick airport is about 2.5 _ course of this winter. gatwick airport is about 2.5 miles i course of this winter. gatwick airport is about 2.5 miles in l course of this winter. gatwick i airport is about 2.5 miles in that direction, but here in crawley, the need is the biggest town, its impact can be seen all around. like other towns and cities across the country, there are 90 are boarded up shops and vacant businesses here. —— there are plenty. they are reliant on economic activity that comes from being near a major international airport. firms like divina's sewing and craft shop, it is still open, for now. ., , ., ., ., for now. people have not got the money this _ for now. people have not got the money this year. _ for now. people have not got the money this year. worse - for now. people have not got the money this year. worse than i for now. people have not got thej money this year. worse than last year, actually. money this year. worse than last year. actually-— year, actually. how confident are ou that year, actually. how confident are you that you _ year, actually. how confident are you that you will— year, actually. how confident are you that you will be _ year, actually. how confident are you that you will be here - year, actually. how confident are you that you will be here this i year, actually. how confident are i you that you will be here this time next year? you that you will be here this time next ear? ' . you that you will be here this time next year?— next year? oh, difficult question. difficult question. _ next year? oh, difficult question. difficult question. i _ next year? oh, difficult question. difficult question. i want - next year? oh, difficult question. difficult question. i want to i next year? oh, difficult question. difficult question. i want to still. difficult question. i want to still be here and i will do my damnedest to still be here. for
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be here and i will do my damnedest to still be here.— to still be here. for industries and communities. _ to still be here. for industries and communities, still— to still be here. for industries and communities, still feeling - to still be here. for industries and communities, still feeling the i communities, still feeling the effects of this pandemic, the future without furlough could involve some tough decisions. ben thompson, bbc news, crawley. the government has started deploying if fuel reserve delivery fleet. but a quarter are still without fuel. the delivery fleet. but a quarter are still without fuel.— delivery fleet. but a quarter are still without fuel. the queue at the south london _ still without fuel. the queue at the south london for _ still without fuel. the queue at the south london for kurt _ still without fuel. the queue at the south london for kurt belong, i still without fuel. the queue at the south london for kurt belong, but| south london for kurt belong, but drivers are managing fill up. according to the latest analysis from the petrol retailers association, which represents two thirds of station owners, the picture is still bleak. what we heard this morning, again slightly surprisingly is that the surge in demand appears to be continuing. though there has been no easing off
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of the pressure from drivers wanting to refuel whenever they can, whenever they can. for to refuel whenever they can, whenever they can. for some key workers, whenever they can. for some key workers. getting _ whenever they can. for some key workers, getting petrol— whenever they can. for some key workers, getting petrol in - whenever they can. for some key workers, getting petrol in their. workers, getting petrol in their tanks is essential. at the suffolk forecourt, the owners have decided to give them a dedicated to reversing any morning just for them. in these drivers appreciated. i{fruite in these drivers appreciated. quite aood to in these drivers appreciated. quite good to know _ in these drivers appreciated. quite good to know we _ in these drivers appreciated. quite good to know we can _ in these drivers appreciated. quite good to know we can come - in these drivers appreciated. qt it2 good to know we can come and in these drivers appreciated. (zei it2 good to know we can come and get some because i'm watching my diesel go down and it's not good if you can't come and get some, there's no pointjoining the queue. mat can't come and get some, there's no point joining the queue.— point joining the queue. not only lettin: a point joining the queue. not only letting a residence _ point joining the queue. not only letting a residence time, - point joining the queue. not only letting a residence time, we're . letting a residence time, we're letting — letting a residence time, we're letting the family stone. and our colleagues and if we do not get to work_ colleagues and if we do not get to work -- _ colleagues and if we do not get to work —— letting the families down. el work —— letting the families down. e9 group, — work —— letting the families down. eg group, which has 400 sites across the country and employs 10,000 people says it is giving staff a pay rise. the industry says some petrol station staff have faced a verbal and physical abuse. the government says at the first of the reserve tank that they have promised has hit the roads. army personnel are expected to deliver fuel —— start delivering fuel in the next few days
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but the message from both industry and government as per drivers do not buy more than the actually need. —— is for drivers. we just had a new statement from the petrol retailers association. it is about the state of play with regard to petrol, diesel arriving at forecourts. members are reporting that while they are continuing to take further deliveries of fuel, says the executive director, this is running at faster than usual due to unprecedented demand. we would urge drivers to maintain their normal buying habits and only feel up as and when they need to to ensure there is plenty of fuel around —— only feel of those are only take what you want when you need it. we have been hearing it for days but people are not listening. were also hearing of further instances of forecourt stuff experiencing a high level of verbal and physical abuse which is completely unacceptable. you have may have seen online some footage of people fighting on forecourts over fuel. we are all
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being asked to only buy what we need when we really need it. let's take a look at the weather forecast. tomorrow is looking like a sunny day with showers around. today plenty of cloud and well many of us have seen rain already, it will be further outbreaks of rain around. a particular across western scotland, some heavier bursts here. maybe some brighter spells across eastern scotland free time. a blustery day, south—westerly west gusting and highs of 13—17 c. they will be clear spells in scotland and northern ireland, but showers around here. a wet night in wales and some of that heavy rain pushing on towards northern and western parts of england. by morning, spreading into the midlands as well. there could be some heavy bursts of rain and squally winds. a very mild for wales and england overnight, a chilly one for north—east scotland once again. rain clearly midlands and then east anglia in south—east england tomorrow morning, a sunny day tomorrow. a few showers are in,
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especially in northern ireland. a particularly western scotland. some heavy with thunderbolts of a little cooler in the showers. this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines... the family of sarah everard welcome the whole life sentence handed down to her killer, saying "the world is a safer place with him imprisoned". thejudge said wayne couzens showed no evidence of contrition and said
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the home secretary described the crime as sickening. the monster that has been convicted today, it is right he has been given a whole life tariff and with that, he can never walk the streets of our country again. questions remain as to how cousins was able to carry out his crime with new calls for the commissioner to resign. as an organisation, we have been rocked. the furlough scheme, which helped protect millions ofjobs during the pandemic, ends today, with uncertainty for those who still can't return to theirjobs. an albanian man — koci selamaj — appears at the old bailey accused of murdering primary school teacher sabina nessa in south—east london earlier this month. the number of people seeing a gp face—to—face in england has barely changed since the last lockdown. new figures show 58% of appointments are in person. this now it's time for a look at the sports news. a football supporter has been jailed for racially abusing a professional footballer online. it is believed to be the first time an immediate custodial sentence has been imposed for the crime in
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england and wales. 50—year—old simon silwood has been sentenced to eight weeks in prison for sending an offensive message regarding a black footballer, romaine sawyers, via social media injanuary, following west bromwich albion's 5—0 defeat by manchester city. he admitted to posting the message, but he blamed predictive text for its offensive nature. the cps and west midlands police were able to prove his account was not plausible. people looking in will see that if you are going to think about sending a message to a footballer or anybody else, there are consequences for your action and i think there was a conception there wasn't any couldn't be trapped on social media or found out. this clearly shows that you can. you can be identified and you can. you can be identified and you can be taken to court for it. if you are charged and found guilty, you will risk getting a criminal conviction. a new report has found that the
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system was in place to manipulate the outcome of a boxing matches in the outcome of a boxing matches in the real olympics. suspicious belts included the final when joyce was defeated and won a silver. it was an independent investigation commissioned by the sports leading body. they said they were concerned by the findings. it is the first stage of the report commodities are expected in november. foden returns having missed the last matches in september to the england squad. the same applies for the aston villa player. the arsenal keeper aaron ramsdale comes on in place of nick pope. manchester united defender
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harry maguire misses out through injury. tottenham manager nuno espirito santo insists it's up to his team to recover from their poor run of form. santo has faced criticism following three successive league defeats, where they've only scored once. tottenham face slovenian side ns mura in the europa conference league tonight — and santo says he wants to see a reaction. we need to change it. today and tomorrow and the day after. because this is the moment that we have to react. we have to react. it is not, as you can imagine, it is not good feeling this way, like we are feeling now, like our fans are feeling now. it is not good. but the difference between us and our fans is that we can change it. it is up to us to change it. england's cricketers will play three one day internationals in the netherlands injune 2022. the games were due to be played this summer but were postponed because of the covid—19 pandemic. they will now take place at the same time as a three test series against new zealand, meaning players who play all forms are unlikely to tour.
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some big news in formula one — bosses have announced the sport will stage its first race in qatar in november. it has been added to the calendar this season. it will stage the 20th race of the season. the final two races of the season then follow in saudi arabia and abu dhabi, raising the prospect of the title challenge being settled in that hat—trick of races in the middle east. that is all from me for now. it is back to you. thank you. a whole life term has been given to the man who kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard, meaning wayne couzens will die in prison. thejudge wayne couzens will die in prison. the judge described the crime as grotesque stop her family said the world was a safer place with couzens in prison. the home secretary has welcomed the sentence. what in prison. the home secretary has welcomed the sentence.—
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in prison. the home secretary has welcomed the sentence. what we have heard today is — welcomed the sentence. what we have heard today is sickening _ welcomed the sentence. what we have heard today is sickening to _ heard today is sickening to everybody and there are simply no words, no words at all that can describe the appalling tragedy around sarah everard's merger. all our thoughts and sympathy are with her family. our thoughts and sympathy are with herfamily. she is constantly in my thoughts as well. in terms of the monster that has been convicted today. it is right he has been given a whole life tariff and with that he can ever walk the streets of our country again. alongside that, of course, —— he can ever walk the streets of a country again. it is important we hold the police to account over what has happened and in regards to the whole issue around the fact he was a serving police officer, which has been reflected in the judgment today, there are serious questions which will need to be answered by the metropolitan police. i would just say further to that that from the very day that
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sarah went missing, i had been clearly in contact with the metropolitan police and put forward some questions around the conduct of the potential suspect at the time. and all the requirements and cheques that had or should have been put in place. it that had or should have been put in lace. . that had or should have been put in lace. , ., , that had or should have been put in lace, , ., , , that had or should have been put in lace. , ., , , . place. it is not 'ust his conduct, it is the place. it is notjust his conduct, it is the conduct _ place. it is notjust his conduct, it is the conduct of _ place. it is notjust his conduct, it is the conduct of the - place. it is notjust his conduct, it is the conduct of the police. l place. it is notjust his conduct, i it is the conduct of the police. he was known — it is the conduct of the police. he was known to his colleagues as someone — was known to his colleagues as someone who women were uncomfortable with. someone who women were uncomfortable with his _ someone who women were uncomfortable with. his colleagues called him the rapist _ with. his colleagues called him the rapist. why was this man allowed to be a police — rapist. why was this man allowed to be a police officer? first rapist. why was this man allowed to be a police officer?— be a police officer? first of all, these are _ be a police officer? first of all, these are questions _ be a police officer? first of all, these are questions for - be a police officer? first of all, these are questions for the - these are questions for the metropolitan police and these are questions that have been asked already, i should just be very clear about that. in my account of the metropolitan police in previous months, as i said from the minute sarah went missing, these were a clear points and questions and challenges that were put to the metropolitan police and the met commissioner directly. i think on this point in particular we all have
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to be very clear that right now there is a grieving family, and with that there are many women and girls who simply feel unsafe as to what has happened and who will listen to what has been said by the judge today around the abuse of trust and the abuse of power by a serving officer in the metropolitan police. it is my duty and responsibility to continue to hold the police to account, to continue to ask the questions i have been asking over recent months, but also importantly to ensure the change that we need to see within the police actually takes place. and that is clearly why i have commissioned our strategy, the inspectorate has produced a report where we are looking at the findings right now, in terms of what the police need to do to be held to account, to be more transparent, but fundamentally change their approach
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to these issues around crimes and violence against women and girls. that is central to the work i am doing. i say this notjust as home secretary but as a woman. all of us want to feel safe and be safe. that is absolutely a right we have, and with that, the police need to engage in the right way and they will be held to account going forward. what held to account going forward. what are the questions, _ held to account going forward. what are the questions, what is the change — are the questions, what is the change you want to see? you are askin: change you want to see? you are asking questions _ change you want to see? you are asking questions specific - change you want to see? you are asking questions specific to - change you want to see? you are asking questions specific to this i asking questions specific to this case. i have asked questions and these have been ongoing around issues around the conduct, the abuse of power we have heard clearly today from the judge of this monster, abusing his position of authority, the power and trust he had as a serving police officer. that should not have happened and with that, of course, there are wider issues around public confidence that we need to address. despite the
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metropolitan police addressed those concerns. figs metropolitan police addressed those concerns. �* . metropolitan police addressed those concerns. ~ , ,, ., ., concerns. as the commission of the resent concerns. as the commission of the present oversee _ concerns. as the commission of the present oversee that _ concerns. as the commission of the present oversee that change? - concerns. as the commission of the present oversee that change? first | present oversee that change? first of all, present oversee that change? first of all. there _ present oversee that change? first of all, there are _ present oversee that change? f “st of all, there are important questions and i have been asking these questions and challenges. we have to be honest about this, in relation to this case and conduct of the serving officer and in relation to the police more broadly. i will continue to work with the police and commissioner to hold them to account, as everybody would expect me to do. i will continue to do that. ., ,, . . , that. the home secretary, priti patel. that. the home secretary, priti patel- the _ that. the home secretary, priti patel. the metropolitan - that. the home secretary, priti patel. the metropolitan policel patel. the metropolitan police commissioner dean cressida dick give a statement outside the old bailey. sarah's and kidnap, rape and murder it was— sarah's and kidnap, rape and murder it was one _ sarah's and kidnap, rape and murder it was one of— sarah's and kidnap, rape and murder it was one of the most dreadful events— it was one of the most dreadful events in— it was one of the most dreadful events in the 190 year history of the metropolitan police service. this hearing has revealed the full brutality — this hearing has revealed the full brutality of this man's crimes against — brutality of this man's crimes against sarah. i am absolutely
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horrified — against sarah. i am absolutely horrified that this man used his position— horrified that this man used his position of trust to deceive and coerce — position of trust to deceive and coerce sarah, and i know you all are as weit~ _ coerce sarah, and i know you all are as weit~ his — coerce sarah, and i know you all are as well. his actions were a gross betrayal— as well. his actions were a gross betrayal of— as well. his actions were a gross betrayal of everything policing stands — betrayal of everything policing stands for. what he did was unthinkable and appalling. he showed himseif— unthinkable and appalling. he showed himself to _ unthinkable and appalling. he showed himself to beta—carotene is —— he showed _ himself to beta—carotene is —— he showed himself to be the coward he is there _ showed himself to be the coward he is there his — showed himself to be the coward he is there his lies and seeking to minimise — is there his lies and seeking to minimise the true response ability for his— minimise the true response ability for his crimes. police officers are here _ for his crimes. police officers are here to _ for his crimes. police officers are here to protect people, to be trustworthy, courageous and compassionate. his every action is the exact— compassionate. his every action is the exact opposite of that. as the
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judge _ the exact opposite of that. as the judge said, he has eroded the confidence that the public are entitled — confidence that the public are entitled to have in the police. it is critical— entitled to have in the police. it is critical that every subject in this country can trust police officers _ this country can trust police officers when they encounter them. the judge _ officers when they encounter them. the judge went on to say he has very considerably added to the sense of insecurity— considerably added to the sense of insecurity that many have living in our cities, — insecurity that many have living in our cities, perhaps particularly women~ — our cities, perhaps particularly women i_ our cities, perhaps particularly women. i have followed this investigation very closely. i have been _ investigation very closely. i have been in — investigation very closely. i have been in court yesterday and today. i am absolutely sickened. overwhelmingly, my thoughts are with
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sarah and _ overwhelmingly, my thoughts are with sarah and herfamily overwhelmingly, my thoughts are with sarah and her family and friends, her ioved — sarah and her family and friends, her loved ones. he will now spend the rest _ her loved ones. he will now spend the rest of— her loved ones. he will now spend the rest of his life in prison. i hope — the rest of his life in prison. i hope that— the rest of his life in prison. i hope that will give them some slight comfort~ _ hope that will give them some slight comfort. this man has brought shame on the _ comfort. this man has brought shame on the met _ comfort. this man has brought shame on the met. speaking frankly, as an organisation, we have been rocked. i do want _ organisation, we have been rocked. i do want to— organisation, we have been rocked. i do want to thank everyone involved in bringing — do want to thank everyone involved in bringing him tojustice and doing so so _ in bringing him tojustice and doing so so swiftly. sarah's courageous and dignified family and friends, the prosecution team and all those who supported the investigation and prosecution. the judge recognised
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and commended the work of our investigators. i echoed those thoughts. i saw for myself as turned their extraordinary determination and professionalism. —— i saw for myself— and professionalism. —— i saw for myself first—hand. this is the metropolitan police i know. it is capable — metropolitan police i know. it is capable and caring. it is full of people — capable and caring. it is full of people who are good. and to worked all their— people who are good. and to worked all their lives to protect alice. —— and who— all their lives to protect alice. —— and who worked all their lives to protect— and who worked all their lives to protect others. i know there are those _ protect others. i know there are those who — protect others. i know there are those who feel their trust in us is shaken — those who feel their trust in us is shaken i— those who feel their trust in us is shaken. i recognise that for some people. _ shaken. i recognise that for some people. a — shaken. i recognise that for some people, a precious bond of trust has been _ people, a precious bond of trust has been damaged. our dedication to you, our public, _ been damaged. our dedication to you, our public, remains undiminished. as
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commissioner, i will do everything in my— commissioner, i will do everything in my power to ensure we learn any lessons~ _ in my power to ensure we learn any lessons i_ in my power to ensure we learn any lessons. i know that what happened to sarah _ lessons. i know that what happened to sarah and indeed what has happened to other women in london and beyond in recent times, has raised _ and beyond in recent times, has raised important questions about women's — raised important questions about women's safety. here in the met, i committed — women's safety. here in the met, i committed to keep working with others _ committed to keep working with others to— committed to keep working with others to improve women's safety and reduce _ others to improve women's safety and reduce the _ others to improve women's safety and reduce the fear of violence. there are no— reduce the fear of violence. there are no words that can fully express the fury— are no words that can fully express the fury and overwhelming sadness that we _ the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all— the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened to sarah _ that we all feel about what happened to sarah i_ that we all feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry stop dean
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cressida _ to sarah. i am so sorry stop dean cressida dick.— cressida dick. the victims commissioner _ cressida dick. the victims commissioner for - cressida dick. the victimsj commissioner for england cressida dick. the victims - commissioner for england and cressida dick. the victims _ commissioner for england and wales, we can speak to her now. thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. first of all, your reaction to the sentencing of wayne couzens. obviously, an exceptional... the judge had heard what he had heard over the preceding days, long premeditation of abduction, rape and almost inevitably of murder, because the way this officer was to lure away was to use his identification. not a surprising outcome, although an exceptional one.— an exceptional one. indeed, if it is exceptional. _ an exceptional one. indeed, if it is exceptional, what _ an exceptional one. indeed, if it is exceptional, what difference - an exceptional one. indeed, if it is exceptional, what difference will l an exceptional one. indeed, if it isj exceptional, what difference will it make in terms of how other crimes of violence against women are investigated and prosecuted in the future? i investigated and prosecuted in the future? ., , . ,, , investigated and prosecuted in the future? .~ , , . . future? i hope it makes very clear that this judge. — future? i hope it makes very clear that this judge, on _ future? i hope it makes very clear that thisjudge, on behalf- future? i hope it makes very clear that this judge, on behalf of - future? i hope it makes very clear
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that this judge, on behalf of the l that this judge, on behalf of the judiciary, is expressing a strong view that there is no more serious crime than the crime that has been committed here. i have listened to what the commissioner for the metropolitan police said one has to accept her sorrow and her anger is genuine, but there it remained the questions that the home secretary indicated, they need answering from the metropolitan police. how did this man get into the position to be able to abuse his authority in the first place? how, when he was clearly accused at least twice of offences of thrashing, was he not investigated properly? doesn't that show in him and appalling grading attitude to women, which if it is not stopped is likely to escalate, as it rapidly did into serious violence. why are the police not policing their own officers who show
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these kinds of traits? i am afraid it isn'tjust these kinds of traits? i am afraid it isn't just as these kinds of traits? i am afraid it isn'tjust as cressida has said at one time, a bad one. he is certainly that, but it is the police were not policed their own people sufficiently well to disclose this individual before he could do what he did. the have not got good record for policing their own abusers of women. there is a piece of work done by byline times very recently which showed that of 83 police officers in the met who are committed to sexual misconduct in the last four years, half of them were left in coastal. they were not dismissed. —— they were left in post. and 700 complaints of domestic abuse by officers on their partners. very few
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were prosecuted. i think it was 43 cases. we are not talking about a bad one. we are talking about a culture that is in our police that stops them tackling, in the public domain that is clear, from all of the outpourings when sarah was first abducted, but in their own backyard, they have distracted dealing strongly with male violence. if strongly with male violence. if then, police chiefs are not dealing with that level of violence in their own force, and we have got politicians who are responsible for appointing some of those police chiefs, how important is it that we start afresh? that there are resignations of senior police officers and senior politicians? i officers and senior politicians? i don't think that those are matters, frankly, for the victims commissioner. my role is to say that victims of violence against women
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and girls are not being protected and girls are not being protected and won't be protected by police forces which don't police it in its own ranks. the problem is, of course, much wider than that failure. although it has been catastrophic in this case. the inspectors of constabulary called on by the home secretary rightly and, well done to her to report it, reported today that sabine nasser was killed, but there was an epidemic of violence against women and girls in society at large and that the police, although they had improved were not policing it properly. —— sabina nessa. she asked that the sample of forces intended to represent them all to earmark the ten men they said were dangerous to women in theirforces, and they ten men they said were dangerous to women in their forces, and they all did under the direction of chief inspector billingham. but prior to that direction, 34 of those men had
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not been recognised as dangerous to women and consequently they were not being managed. the police have well—known tactics to manage criminals, be they regular burglars or criminals or drug dealers or robbers. the police manage in the community people they know are likely to reoffend. let them know they are being managed. it will be more difficult for them to offend. they are likely to be apprehended if they do. none of that skill was being applied to these dangerous men because they hadn't even been identified. it is that sort of shocking undervaluing of the impact of violence against women and girls, i'm afraid it is a serious endemic fault. and the prioritisation of violence against women and girls has tojust be violence against women and girls has to just be elevated hugely. i violence against women and girls has tojust be elevated hugely. i do hope the home secretary follows the recommendations of that report by
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inspector billingham, which suggested that this crime should be elevated to a national and strategic policing requirement, like counterterrorism and county lines, because it certainly does a huge amount of physical or mental harm to amount of physical or mental harm to a very large number of women. a woman is killed every three years. if it was elevated in that way, it would up its priority. it would add resource and give central direction, so good practice from some forces could be transferred over to others, and the whole lot brought up. officers would become specialists in high priority area which would then become a good career move, they would be proud of what they did and tension would be given, where it isn't being given now. i think the home secretary needs to do that very
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quickly. there is, as we have heard, i think many times today, some underlying culture of misogyny in policing. it is still highly male dominated. there has to be a clear change now and i myself think that is a step which needs to be taken to change it. is a step which needs to be taken to chance it. ., , , ., is a step which needs to be taken to chanaeit. ., , ., change it. how supportive would you be in terms — change it. how supportive would you be in terms of _ change it. how supportive would you be in terms of trying _ change it. how supportive would you be in terms of trying to _ change it. how supportive would you be in terms of trying to be _ be in terms of trying to be established trust that victims of crime and witnesses of crime can have in the police forces across the country, notjust the met, in there being some sort of enquiry into institutionalised misogyny? i am not sure about long-term _ institutionalised misogyny? i am not sure about long-term inquiries, - sure about long—term inquiries, which might take six months to appoint a judge to head up. and then appoint a judge to head up. and then a couple of years past witnesses are summoned. and let's remember, a woman every three days is being killed. and literally hundreds being abused, thousands being raped, which
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the common justice system simply to acknowledge. —— criminaljustice acknowledge. —— criminal justice system. acknowledge. —— criminaljustice system. i think the deficit is clear. this is my support for a step, i believe, that could help put it right. absolutely backed by the inspectors of constabulary. i would not spend the time on enquiry of that kind. i think although the home secretary is rightly continuing to ask questions of cressida dick, i think the answers as to how they should change are becoming clearer and clearer, and this awful, bleak, appalling moment at which women's face in the police must be shattered, if this is not the moment in which to do it, they will never be a moment to do it. we have to tackle a societal and cultural attitudes which undervalue women as people in authority, as people with skills, as fellow employees, and
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prioritise them as sexual creatures. there is something in that societal culture that encourages, is permissive of violent men, because it is only violent men, it certainly isn't all none whatsoever, but it encourages that permissive understanding that women are priorities of sexual attention, that permits men who have violent intentions to go further, to go further and go further. that is why it is very important to kick it off early at the time of this behaviour. so, we have societal demands as well, which i think the home secretary has to try and take forward. we do have to set about trying to change though societal norms, but the police need to read it, not to be running a long way behind as they appear to be today. thank you very much for talking to us. large unauthorised contactless
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payments can be made on locked iphones by exploiting how an apple pate feature works with visa. any video, researchers demonstrated a contactless payment of £1000 from a locked iphone. apple says the matter was a concern with a visa system. these are sirs attacks of this type are impractical outside of the lab. outside of a lab is thankfully not where we live, but it is a possibility. where we live, but it is a possibility-— where we live, but it is a ossibili . , . , , possibility. these are researchers from two universities, _ possibility. these are researchers from two universities, surrey - possibility. these are researchers from two universities, surrey and j from two universities, surrey and birmingham. they have figured out a way to get a locked iphone to make these very large, well above the contactless limit visa payments. they have even got a demo, they've shown it any video. it relates to visa cards set up in something called express transit mode and iphone wallet. that is the mode, you
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might have it in when you go to the cheap new tapping into a pouch. it means you can pay without unlocking your phone. 50. means you can pay without unlocking our hone. ,, means you can pay without unlocking your phone-— your phone. so, you don't have to ut our your phone. so, you don't have to put your finger — your phone. so, you don't have to put your finger print _ your phone. so, you don't have to put your finger print on? - your phone. so, you don't have to put your finger print on? it - your phone. so, you don't have to put your finger print on? it is - put your finger print on? it is cuick, put your finger print on? it is quick. that — put your finger print on? it is quick, that is _ put your finger print on? it is quick, that is the _ put your finger print on? it 3 quick, that is the basic idea. using a very complicated way of doing this, i want to go into all the gory details, but essentially they have been able to fill the iphone to think it is playing at a ticket barrier, when in fact what it is doing is relaying messages from another payment machine to the iphone and it is plain that. that machine would be handling a payment of thousand pounds, but any amount really. of thousand pounds, but any amount reall . ~ .. of thousand pounds, but any amount reall . ~ . . ., really. what about other payment cards that you _ really. what about other payment cards that you might _ really. what about other payment cards that you might put - really. what about other payment cards that you might put into - really. what about other paymentj cards that you might put into your apple pate white it —— wallet? mastercard? it could work with those two? ., , ,,. , two? no, they tried it with samsung -a and two? no, they tried it with samsung pay and mastercard, _ two? no, they tried it with samsung pay and mastercard, and _ two? no, they tried it with samsung pay and mastercard, and in - two? no, they tried it with samsung pay and mastercard, and in both - pay and mastercard, and in both cases, differences in the system
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meant it didn't work.— meant it didn't work. being very careful, then, _ meant it didn't work. being very careful, then, how— meant it didn't work. being very careful, then, how you - meant it didn't work. being very careful, then, how you use - meant it didn't work. being very careful, then, how you use it. . meant it didn't work. being very - careful, then, how you use it. thank you very much. let's ta ke take a look at the weather with nick. tomorrow is looking like a sunny day with showers around. today, plenty of cloud many of us have seen rain already so far today and through the afternoon, there will be further mix of rain around, particularly across western scotla nd. particularly across western scotland. maybe some brighter spells in eastern scotland for a time. a blustery day out there, south—westerly winds gusting at 30-40 south—westerly winds gusting at 30—40 miles an hour and highs of around 13 — 17 celsius. they will be clear spells and scotland and violent overnight, but showers around here. a wet night in wales with heavy rain pushing on the northern and western parts of england and by morning, spreading into the midlands as well. some heavy bursts of rain and squally winds, very mild for wales and england overnight, actually one for north—east scotland once again. when clearing in the midlands and east anglia in south—east england tomorrow morning, a sunny day
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tomorrow. some showers around, especially northern ireland, especially northern ireland, especially western scotland. some heavy with hail and thunder, feeling a little cooler in the showers.
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this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines... the family of sarah everard welcome the whole life sentence handed down to her killer, saying "the world is a safer place with him imprisoned". questions remain as to how couzens was able to carry out his crime, with renewed calls for the met police commissioner to resign. this man has brought shame on the met. speaking frankly, as an organisation, we have been rocked. inaudible the furlough scheme,
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which helped protect millions ofjobs during the pandemic, ends today, with uncertainty for those who still can't return to theirjobs. an albanian man appears at the old bailey accused of murdering primary school teacher sabina nessa in south—east london earlier this month. the number of people seeing a gp face—to—face in england has barely changed since the last lockdown. new figures show 58% of appointments are in person. good afternoon. welcome to bbc news. the metropolitan police officer who kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard will spend the rest of his life in prison. the judge at the old bailey, handing down the whole life tarriff, said he had no doubt that wayne couzens used his position as a police officer to coerce miss everard into his car,
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and that he'd shown no sign of contrition. the 33 year—old was abducted from a street in south london in march as she was walking home from a friend's house. the everard family have released a statement following today's sentencing. it says... megan paterson has this report. in the aftermath of sarah everard's murder, shock, grief and anger were shared at vigils around the country. at her killer's sentencing,
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the chilling details of her death described as unspeakably grim. the everard family present throughout proceedings. in a statement, her mother susan said she was brokenhearted, the family tormented by the circumstances of her daughter's death. arriving at the old bailey this morning, wayne couzens was later sentenced to a whole life order. his actions were described as warped, selfish and brutal. a man who, under the guise of his duty as a police officer, picked sarah everard up in the street as she walked home from a friend's house. from the met police today, an apology. from the met police today, an a olo: . .. from the met police today, an a olo: . . ., from the met police today, an aolo: . . ., ., , . apology. there are no words that can ex - ress apology. there are no words that can express the — apology. there are no words that can express the fury _ apology. there are no words that can express the fury and _ apology. there are no words that can express the fury and overwhelming i express the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry. in an exchange that lasted less than five minutes, couzens showed his warrant card and used knowledge of covid restriction policing
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to handcuff sarah everard and put her in his hire car. witnesses saw this, the moment of the calculated kidnap. they believed couzens was an officer doing hisjob. couzens then drove to a remote rural area where he raped and murdered sarah everard. he's later seen on cctv calmly continuing with daily life, ordering a hot chocolate in a nearby coffee shop. questioned by police, he feigned innocence, knowing he'd put sarah's body inside a fridge and set it on fire. during the sentencing, wayne couzens sat with his head bowed. sarah everard's family asked him to look at them as they gave their statments. herfather told him...
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a family broken by unimaginable loss, a police force left questioning how it will recover. it is right that we constantly hold the police to account for what has happened and with regards to the whole issue around the fact that he was a serving police officer, which has been reflected upon in thejudgment today, there are questions, serious questions that will need to be answered by the metropolitan police. described as a wholly blameless victim, to those who loved her, sarah everard will always be the precious little girl who became a woman with a beautiful mind, taken cruelly from them by a man who took advantage of his position. megan patterson, bbc news. our correspondent has been outside court and listened when the metropolitan police commissioner cressida dick made her statement. she came out of court after the sentencing of wayne couzens, a whole life order which means he will never be released from prison, and the met commissioner cressida dick came
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outside the old bailey to give a statement and in that statement she said that she is absolutely second and talked about this being one of the most dreadful events — absolutely sickened. she said she was horrified that wayne couzens had used his position of trust to deceive sarah and we have the details yesterday of what he did to sarah everard. he stopped her as she was walking home from a friend �*s he showed her a warrant card and falsely arrested her. the commissioner went on to say that the police are here to protect people. his every action is the exact opposite of that. and then she taught, and we have heard today — and then she talked, we have heard about trust from members of the public about the commissioner touched on that and she said as an organisation they have been rocked by this case. she said the met is
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full of capable and caring people who are good and she said our dedication to you, the public, remains undiminished. that is some of the words from the commission of the metropolitan police who came outside of the old bailey in the last few moments. to give you a bit of colour of what went on in the courtroom as wayne was handed down that whole life order. he was shaking as he was sentenced and the judge described the case as devastating, as tragic, and he said that sarah had just been walking home that night and he said to wayne couzens that he had eroded public confidence in the police in england and wales. sarah everard's parents gave a statement, saying they are pleased that wayne couzens has been sentenced to a whole life order but yesterday we heard from her father
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in court who asked wayne couzens to look directly at him as he made his statement and he said, no punishment will ever compare to the pain and torture wayne couzens inflicted on us. all the family want is for sarah to be back. us. all the family want is for sarah to be back-— to be back. helena wilkinson reporting _ to be back. helena wilkinson reporting from _ to be back. helena wilkinson reporting from the _ to be back. helena wilkinson reporting from the old - to be back. helena wilkinsonl reporting from the old bailey. the prime minister has released a statement. he said...
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the home secretary priti patel said the metropolitan police and the commissioner cressida dick had serious questions to answer about how it dealt with wayne couzens. our correspondent is at westminster and priti patel says she is waiting for a number of answers.— priti patel says she is waiting for a number of answers. yes, she says she has been _ a number of answers. yes, she says she has been asking _ a number of answers. yes, she says she has been asking questions - a number of answers. yes, she says she has been asking questions from| she has been asking questions from the beginning of this case and also in the light of what has come out during the sentencing. especially the questions which revolve around, the questions which revolve around, the questions which revolve around, the questions for the place, revolving around the fact this was a serving police officer about whom there were questions about his conduct, that were known to his colleagues. his attitudes to women and where that he should have been, whether any action should have been taken because of that, and the home secretary has said today, when i
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asked her about this, she said there are questions and she has been asking questions of the met police and she is looking for answers to those. but when i asked her about cressida dick's position and whether she should stand down, some have called for that, the home secretary said simply that she was still waiting for the answers to these important questions that she thinks need to be answered. she important questions that she thinks need to be answered.— need to be answered. she is in a difficult position _ need to be answered. she is in a difficult position because - need to be answered. she is in a difficult position because she - need to be answered. she is in aj difficult position because she did agree to cressida dick's ten year being extended.— agree to cressida dick's ten year being extended. absolutely, only earlierthis _ being extended. absolutely, only earlier this month _ being extended. absolutely, only earlier this month - _ being extended. absolutely, only earlier this month - tenure. - being extended. absolutely, only earlier this month - tenure. that| earlier this month - tenure. that was after the _ earlier this month - tenure. that was after the murder _ earlier this month - tenure. that was after the murder but - earlier this month - tenure. that was after the murder but when i earlier this month - tenure. that was after the murder but when it earlier this month - tenure. that - was after the murder but when it was publicly well known that this was a serving police officer at the time who had been responsible. questions there. that make that a difficult position. the home secretary has
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said her thoughts are with the family and that women need to feel safe and there are questions about the police's conduct towards issues around crimes involving violence and women, their transparency, and all of those are important things that need to be addressed.— need to be addressed. thanks for 'oinin: need to be addressed. thanks for joining us- _ with me now is farah nazeer, chief executive officer of charity women's aid. thanks forjoining us. your reaction to the whole life tariff that has been handed down to wayne couzens? it is absolutely the appropriate sentence that needed to be handed down to him. this is a serving police officer who used his position of authority to commit the most atrocious of crimes and it is absolutely right that he has been handed that sentence and it sends the right message to other perpetrators and violent men out there. ~ .. perpetrators and violent men out there. ~ . ., , ,
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perpetrators and violent men out there. ~ . .,, , _ . there. what does this case by a servin: there. what does this case by a serving police _ there. what does this case by a serving police officer— there. what does this case by a serving police officer done - there. what does this case by a serving police officer done to i serving police officer done to women's confidence in the police? it is fair to say that women's confidence has dropped dramatically in the police. the crimes of wayne couzens followed by the heavy—handed treatment of women attending the vigil to honour her life has really dented the confidence of women in the police and the met police in particular, but this is not a one—off case. we hear reports from across the country of women not being victims of domestic abuse are not being treated sensitively and not being treated sensitively and not being treated sensitively and not being believed, so i think there are a lot of issues that this case has thrown up with regards the way that the police do treat violence against women and girls. hagar that the police do treat violence against women and girls. how do you chance the against women and girls. how do you change the attitudes _ against women and girls. how do you change the attitudes towards - against women and girls. how do you change the attitudes towards women | change the attitudes towards women and violence towards women and girls in this country? the
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and violence towards women and girls in this country?— in this country? the first thing to sa , it is in this country? the first thing to say. it is a _ in this country? the first thing to say, it is a society _ in this country? the first thing to say, it is a society approach. - in this country? the first thing to say, it is a society approach. we| say, it is a society approach. we need to really consider ending violence against women and girls and children as a priority and it is not prioritised at the moment, we are not funding it and taking it seriously enough and that is the first thing. the government and the police and all the other agencies need to think about it as a priority and need to fund it as a priority and need to fund it as a priority and when it comes to the police and indeed other authorities, they need to think about the culture of change they need to make they need to think about training, and currently only 14 of the 43 forces have taken up training on domestic abuse so it is a choice based thing and they are not prioritising it. these things need to be made mandatory and we need to be made mandatory and we need to be made mandatory and we need to enter the postcode lottery when it comes to how different forces treat women who are victims of violent abuse, they need to have consistent standards. the of violent abuse, they need to have consistent standards.— consistent standards. the domestic abuse commissioner _ consistent standards. the domestic abuse commissioner for _ consistent standards. the domestic abuse commissioner for england i
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consistent standards. the domestic. abuse commissioner for england and wales has described the problem as an epidemic. to what extent do you agree with that as a characterisation? i agree with that as a characterisation? .. characterisation? i agree with it wholeheartedly, _ characterisation? i agree with it wholeheartedly, because - characterisation? i agree with it wholeheartedly, because when | characterisation? i agree with it - wholeheartedly, because when three women per week are being murdered and three women per fortnight are being murdered by a former or current partner, you have got to describe it as an epidemic. it is pervasive in our culture that women feel they have to let people know they have arrived home safely which is a proxy for saying, i am still alive, which is no way for a woman to live her life. there is an epidemic but also in equalfailing of taking it seriously and prioritising it. the inspectorate, the constabulary inspectorate a couple of weeks ago, on the day that sabina nessa was murdered, produced a report saying that ending violence against women and girls should be treated as highly as terrorism, and
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i think that is a good recommendation, a good indicator of how seriously as a society we need to begin to take this. we need to think about this in terms of prevention and the messages we are sending in schools and the messages that our cultural institutions are sending out and then there is everyday interactions. you hear people being misogynistic and making jokes about women, belittling them, you need to address that and see that there is a spectrum of violence and it is the inequality of women that leads to these crimes where women are attacked because they are women. , ., , ., . , women. often you see women raising their concerns — women. often you see women raising their concerns and _ women. often you see women raising their concerns and eyes _ women. often you see women raising their concerns and eyes are _ women. often you see women raising their concerns and eyes are rolled - their concerns and eyes are rolled and women are accused of being humourless, so it requires men to get on board. how should men start to support this effort more vocally and more visibly? men to support this effort more vocally and more visibly?—
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to support this effort more vocally and more visibly? men are a key part ofthe and more visibly? men are a key part of the solution _ and more visibly? men are a key part of the solution in _ and more visibly? men are a key part of the solution in the _ and more visibly? men are a key part of the solution in the same _ and more visibly? men are a key part of the solution in the same way - and more visibly? men are a key part of the solution in the same way thatl of the solution in the same way that they are often the key perpetrators, so it is about men calling out misogynistic and sexist attitudes, be it in the public university, colleges, wherever they happen to be. they need to call out when other men are making jokes about women and are demeaning women and being misogynistic. that needs to happen in order for the culture to be challenged. we need to think about how we report and we need to think about the culture that we are allowing to be perpetuated through our theatre and literature and museums, all of these cultural institutions have a role to play but ultimately it needs to be led by the government. the government needs to take violence against women seriously and set the tone for every institution and every person in our country to really think hard about the messages that they are perpetuating on the things they are saying and what they believe, and
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begin to challenge some of these long—held norms. begin to challenge some of these long-held norms.— begin to challenge some of these long-held norms. what about how the media reports — long-held norms. what about how the media reports violence _ long-held norms. what about how the media reports violence against - long-held norms. what about how thej media reports violence against women and girls? sometimes you read a woman has been raped but in fact a man has raped a woman. how pervasive is that? ~ ,,., , , man has raped a woman. how pervasive is that? ~ , , . is that? absolutely. it is a dominant _ is that? absolutely. it is a dominant way _ is that? absolutely. it is a dominant way that - is that? absolutely. it is a i dominant way that reporting is that? absolutely. it is a - dominant way that reporting of violence against women is done. there is significant victim blaming, may be that girl was wearing something that was not right, should she have been at that rate? rather than saying, should a man have been attacking her, should a man have been stalking her? irrespective of anything else. victims are often blamed and the focus really should be on the perpetrator. that needs to be on the perpetrator. that needs to be challenged by reporters and the media and by the institutions that govern them. it is really shocking that quite often you see reports
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trying to generate sympathy for the perpetrator, or the man is crying because he murdered a baby, that was a recent one, but that is shocking. this man brutally did this, committed this crime, that is what the headline should read, so it is quite interesting and shocking and disturbing the way our culture allows for that form of reporting and that in turn fuels permissiveness of violence against women and girls. the permissiveness of violence against women and girls.— permissiveness of violence against women and girls. the chief executive of women's — women and girls. the chief executive of women's aid. _ women and girls. the chief executive of women's aid, thanks _ women and girls. the chief executive of women's aid, thanks for _ women and girls. the chief executive of women's aid, thanks forjoining i of women's aid, thanks forjoining us. an albanian man has appeared at the old bailey accused of murdering the primary school teacher, sabina nessa, in south east london nearly two weeks ago. koci selamaj, who's 36 and from eastbourne, allegedly hit ms nessa with a two foot long weapon as she walked through a park, before carrying her away unconscious. prosecutors say it was a "premeditated and predatory" attack and he didn't know his victim. he was remanded in custody
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for a plea hearing in december. officers are searching an area of woodland near tunbridge wells in kent as part of the investigation into her death. the headlines on bbc news... the family of sarah everard welcomed the whole life sentence handed down to the police officer who killed her, saying the world is a safer place with him in prison. the fellow scheme which help protect millions ofjobs ends to date with uncertainty for those who still cannot return to theirjobs — furlough. in a an albanian man is charged with the murder of sabina nessa. the government's job retention scheme which helped save millions ofjobs during the pandemic, ends today. over 19 months, furlough has helped to pay the wages of more than 11 million workers across the uk.
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at the last count, 1.6 million people were still receiving support through the scheme. our business correspondent, ben thompson has been to crawley in sussex, the town with the highest number of people on furlough in the uk. not all airportjobs involve working with planes or baggage. michael and emma look after the pets and other animals that in more normal times flew with us around the world. but when flights were grounded, theirjobs were furloughed. now, though, they're back. nice to have some work and a bit more stability and a bit of a routine and something to get up for and come out the house for! it's nice to be back and actually — yeah, feel like you're earning your money, not just getting it from the government. i think, without furlough, yeah, i dread to think, really, where we would be now. the staff might be back but it isn't a business as usual and they have been warned theirjobs could be at risk. the government insists furlough has been a success but has announced extra help towards the cost of living as support schemes are with drawn.
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that is a new response which will be delivered through councils and that will be going live in october to provide additional help throughout the course of this winter. gatwick airport's 2.5 miles in that direction but here in crawley, the nearest biggest town, its impact can be seen all around. like other towns and cities across the country there are plenty of boarded—up shops and vacant businesses here. but those that do remain are incredibly reliant on the economic activity that comes from being near a major international airport. firms like divina's sewing and craft shop. it is still open, for now. people haven't got the money. worse than last year actually. how confident are you that you will
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be here this time next year? oh, difficult question. difficult question... i want to still be here and i will do my best to still be here. for industries and communities still feeling the effects of this pandemic, the future without furlough could involve some tough decisions. ben thompson, bbc news, in crawley. our economics editor faisal islam told us the furlough scheme's end coincides with strong demand in parts of the labour market. there is evidence in areas such as the airport towns crawley, slough, the south of manchester, we have seen some suggestion that those workers that were worried about instantly losing theirjobs as the scheme ends, their employers are worried about when normality does return
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that they will be able to get the staff they need, so some of those people are getting those jobs back even as demand hasn't come back. so some hope in terms of the general picture. we have also seen some modest amounts of support announced today by the government, about £500 million. it is relatively small compared to the sums before but the hope is normality starts to assert itself, such schemes not required on an ongoing basis. the number of people seeing their doctor face to face in england has barely changed since the last lockdown when most appointments were carried out on the telephone. before the pandemic, about 80% of appointments were carried out in person but figures out today show that is now only 58%. gps say they're struggling with rising demand and staff shortages. jim reed reports. my day—to—day medicine cabinet will have multiple painkillers in it, nsaids, anti—inflammatories. through the pandemic,
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katie has been living with endometriosis — a painful, chronic condition. it was the most difficult time of my life. she needs check—ups as her symptoms change. she's happy with her gp in manchester but says she's struggled with telephone appointments. i haven't seen a gp face—to—face since before the pandemic. everything went to become on the phone in terms of appointments, which is really difficult to say, "i have this pain and it's here." you can't show somebody where "here" is over the phone. before the pandemic, gps in england were seeing 83% of patients face—to—face. the first lockdown saw that figure fall sharply. since then, it has climbed back to 57%, though it does depend on where you live. in parts of the north—west, less than half see their gp in person. in parts of essex, it's as high as 73%. good morning, bridgewater surgeries. hello, bridgewater surgeries. bridgewater surgeries, how can i help? - this gp surgery in watford looks after 30,000 patients.
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they've taken hundreds of calls this morning. some are given face—to—face appointments, others are offered phone consultations. thank you, bye. hi, good morning, it's simon hodes, i'm one of the gps in bridgewater surgeries. downstairs, doctors are calling those patients back. i think even though you've been vaccinated, you probably should get a proper covid test, which is called a pcr. first up is someone who may have covid, orjust a cough. equally, if you feel you'd rather sort of take a course of antibiotics over the phone, that's probably not unreasonable, given your symptoms. doctors say keeping the virus out of waiting rooms is crucial, and often patients do prefer... hello! ..phone or video appointments. sometimes you don't really need to come in, to be honest. when you tell them what is going on, they prescribe something for you. just come down and pick your medication. people with language barriers, they're finding it very difficult. to express their symptoms over the phone. _ later that morning and after a phone consultation, dr hodes has asked this patient to come into the surgery. i have, like, a fever.
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0k~ _ demand for gp services like this has bounced back strongly since lockdown. i'm pleased i've seen you, everything looks fine. at the same time, the number of fully qualified gps has been falling in england and wales, though not in scotland or northern ireland. have patients just got to accept that the way they access health care and their gp has got to change? i think it should come down to what the patients want. they need to have the choice. if they want a phone call and they're dealt with safely, great. you know, if they need face—to—face, they should be seen. ministers say gps must provide face—to—face appointments to those who want them. the demands on all parts of the health service make that request far from straightforward. jim reed, bbc news. the government has started deploying a reserve fuel tanker fleet, driven by civilians, to try to boost deliveries to forecourts. but the petrol retailers association says that whilst they are continuing to take further deliveries of fuel, this is running out quicker than usual due to unprecedented demand.
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they say they would urge drivers to maintain their buying habits and only fuel up as and when needed. ramzan karmali has the latest. a week of chaos and queues for many at petrol stations across the country. the queue at this south london forecourt may be long but drivers are managing to fill up. but, according to the latest analysis from the petrol retailers association, which represents two thirds of station owners, the picture is still bleak. what we have this morning, again slightly surprisingly, is that the surge in demand appears to be continuing. so there's been no easing off of the pressure from drivers wanting to refuel whenever they can, wherever they can. for some key workers getting petrol in their tanks is essential and at this suffolk forecourt the owners have decided to give them a dedicated hourfirst thing in the morning, just for them. a move these drivers appreciated. quite good, actually, to know that we can come and get
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some because i'm watching my diesel go down and it's not good if you can't come and get some, there's no pointjoining a queue. we're not only letting our residents down, we're letting the families down and our colleagues down if we don't get to work. forecourt giant eg group, which has 400 sites across the country and employs around 10,000 people, says it's giving its staff a pay rise. the industry say that some petrol station staff have faced verbal and physical abuse. the government say that the first of the reserve tankers they promised have hit the roads. army personnel are expected to deliver fuel in the next few, days but the message from both industry and government is for drivers to not buy more than they actually need. ramzan karmali, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. i'm sensing a chill in the air at times? that is right, icy is all very
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different, ending with a rather cool september — icy is all very different. icy is also ending on a wet note, as well. the picture continues into tonight, as well. some clear spells in scotland and northern ireland, showers will be heavyin northern ireland, showers will be heavy in wales and northern england. very mild night in england and wales. still quite chilly in north—east scotland but not as cold as in recent nights. rain across the midlands and eastern england to clear away but tomorrow will a chilly be a brighter day, sunshine for everyone, showers around, and northern ireland, especially in western scotland, these are average speeds, gusts will be higher, very blow icy with the showers in the afternoon, some heavy with hail and thunder. icy will feel cooler in scotland and northern ireland and a bit warmer with the afternoon
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sunshine across east anglia and south—east england. hello this is bbc news with maxine croxall. the headlines... the family of sarah everard welcome the whole life sentence handed down to the police officer who killed her saying that 'knowing he will be imprisoned forever brings some relief�* questions remain over how couzens
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was allowed to remain in the force despite concerns about his conduct, with renewed calls for the police commissioner to resign. this man has brought shame on the met. speaking frankly, as an organisation we have been rocked. i will continue to work with the metropolitan police and the commissioner to hold them to account, as everybody would expect me to do in other news — the furlough scheme which helped protect millions ofjobs during the pandemic ends today with uncertainty for those who still can't return to work. an albanian man appears at the old bailey accused of murdering primary school teacher, sabina nessa, in south east london earlier this month. the number of people seeing a gp face to face in england has barely changed since the last lockdown — new figures show 58% of appointments are in person.
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just before we go to the sport, let's bring you the latest government figures on covid. we are hearing today there have been 137 deaths recorded in the uk today, that compares to 150 yesterday. that is people who have died within 28 days of testing positive for covid. the uk is still recording tens of thousands of new cases of covid. today, 36,400 cases were recorded, compared with 36,722 yesterday. it has come down a little bit but less than 300. those are the latest figures. now it is time for the sport. good afternoon. a new reports has been found a system was in place to manipulate
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the outcome of boxing matches at the rio 2016 olympics. suspicious bouts include the final of the men's super heavyweight division between great britain's joe joyce and france's tony yoka, in whichjoyce was defeated and won silver. there was lots of speculation, rumours are swirling around rio de janeiro at a boxing tournament was corrupt. there were a that hit the headlines because the results were astonishing to some people, certainly experts within the game. one of them was the irish fighter in the quarterfinal against the russian. he lost the fight, a fate that most observers had won easily. afterwards, he was critical and outspoken of the judging, the refereeing and in fact the whole of the amateur international boxing organisation. another isjoe the amateur international boxing organisation. another is joe joyce and organisation. another isjoejoyce and his super weight heavy final which he lost to a french opponent.
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it was quite a close fight but many people thought that looked suspicious. that is one of the contests on the red list. he said he cannot confirm at this stage that it was rigged, it was manipulated. but thatis was rigged, it was manipulated. but that is something they will look at in the coming months. yes, more details expected in november. conlon says he fears the decision ruined his dream of becoming olympic champion. the ruined his dream of becoming olympic chamion. ., . .., champion. the thing of what could have been will— champion. the thing of what could have been will always _ champion. the thing of what could have been will always be - champion. the thing of what could have been will always be there - champion. the thing of what could have been will always be there for| have been will always be there for me. don't get me wrong, think what happened in real has probably benefited my career more if i had won gold. at the same time, it still a dream that i had from a kid, to be
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an olympic champion, and that will always be there. a west brom supporter has been jailed for racially abusing a footballer online, in what is believed to be the first time an immediate custodial sentence has been imposed for the crime in england and wales 50 year old simon silwood has been sentenced to eight weeks in prison, for sending an offensive message. he admitted to posting the message but he blamed predictive text for its offensive nature. the cps and west midlands police were able to prove his account was not plausible. phil foden and ollie watkins have been named in gareth southgate's england squad for the up coming world cup qualifiers against andorra and hungary next month. foden returns having missed the last matches in september because of injury the same applies for the aston villa forward ollie watkins, who southgate said came close to making his squad for the european championship. ac milan defender fikayio tomoroi
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is also included, along with arsenal goalkeeper aaron ramsdale in place of nick pope. manchester united defender harry maguire misses out through injury, along with liverpool defender trent alexandor arnold. tottenham manager nuno espirito santo insists it's up to his team to recover from their poor run of form. santo has faced criticism following three successive league defeats, where they've only scored once. tottenham face slovenian side ns mura in the europa conference league tonight and santo says he wants to see a reaction. you need to change it today and tomorrow and the day after. because this is the moment we have to react. you have to react. it is not, as you can imagine, it is not good feeling this way like we are feeling now, like our fans are feeling now. it is not good. the difference between us as we can change it. that
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not good. the difference between us as we can change it.— as we can change it. that is all from me _ as we can change it. that is all from me for— as we can change it. that is all from me for now. _ as we can change it. that is all from me for now. john, - as we can change it. that is all from me for now. john, thank| as we can change it. that is all. from me for now. john, thank you very much. wayne couzens has been given a whole life tariff. this is what was said in a statement outside the old bailey. i in a statement outside the old baile . . , ,., , in a statement outside the old baile . . , , ,, ., in a statement outside the old baile . . , , «i ., . bailey. i absolutely know that --eole bailey. i absolutely know that people feel — bailey. i absolutely know that people feel their _ bailey. i absolutely know that people feel their trust - bailey. i absolutely know that people feel their trust in - bailey. i absolutely know that people feel their trust in us i bailey. i absolutely know that people feel their trust in us is shaken. i recognise that for some people a precious bond of trust has been damaged. our dedication to you, our public, remains undiminished. as commissioner, i will do everything in my power to ensure we learn any lessons. i know that what happened
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to sarah, and indeed what has happened to other women in london and beyond in recent times, has raised important questions about women's safety. here in the metropolitan police i commit to keep working with others to improve women's safety and reduce the fear of violence. there are no words that can fully express the fury and overwhelming sadness that we all feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry. the feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sorry-— feel about what happened to sarah. i am so sor . ., ,, ., ., am so sorry. the commissioner of the metropolitan — am so sorry. the commissioner of the metropolitan police. _ nazir afzal is former chief crown prosector for north west england
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he told me the trust in the police force had plummeted. at the moment, the confidence in our policing is as close to an all—time low as i recall it. i have never come across a situation where a police officer has used his warrant card and powers as a police officer to detain, kidnap, rape and murder an innocent member of the public. this is not a one off. thejudge said that there were some supportive statements made by officers at the sentencing hearing. if this individual was a one off, how is it there were other officers talking supportively about him. as you just said, there have been allegations about him over a number of years and language about him that gave us red flags of concern. is it a one off?
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it certainly is not. there are many instances over the years where misogyny has driven this behaviour. it was the fact he hated women. he planned this. he wanted to find somebody to kill and he did. misogyny in the force has been remarked upon many, many times in the years. now is a time for an independent enquiry into institutionalised misogyny, the same there was into racism 25 years ago. so we have a call today for the commissioner to resign. i believe the home secretary should follow suit, given that she extended her ten year, despite knowing what we know now. and thirdly, most importantly, there needs to be an enquiry into institutionalised misogyny so women can feel safe. women do not feel safe from the
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people who are meant to keep them safe. ., , . ., ., safe. the chief crown prosecutor for the north west _ safe. the chief crown prosecutor for the north west of _ safe. the chief crown prosecutor for the north west of england _ safe. the chief crown prosecutor for the north west of england speaking | the north west of england speaking to us earlier. baroness newlove is the former victims commissioner she spoke about the impact of the sentence on sarah's family. i thinkjustice is an interesting word. thejustice i thinkjustice is an interesting word. the justice system i thinkjustice is an interesting word. thejustice system has i thinkjustice is an interesting word. the justice system has given a whole life tariff to this vendor who has taken an innocent life away. for the family, their sentence began the day they find out about sarah being murdered and for them, their life will be taking a differentjourney, their life will be very difficult and at the moment, i don't think they know what is going on around them, very blurry, very up and down. after today, when they go back home, once the media goes away, it becomes the loneliest place because now life goes on without sarah properly.
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there is no one coming in everyday to let you know what is going on. the labour mp and former minister for women and equalities harriet harman has called for the metropolitan police commissioner cressida dick to resign she explained her reasons why. there have been many warnings about perpetrators of male violence against women within the police force which she has not acted on. it was on her watch that wayne couzens, the offences he carried out, sexual offences if you days before, were swept under the carpet by his colleagues are not investigated. so she also responded by saying he was a bad one, one bad apple. she is not the person to lead the change that is necessary. we need to have immediate suspension as soon as there are allegations against a police officer of male violence
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against women. we need to make sure that covering up for a colleague is also regarded as gross misconduct, leading to dismissal. there needs to be change in the vetting process so that attitudes of male violence to women are looked at in recruits, including male violence during six. we need a whole range of changes and she has shown by her attitude and actions that she is not the person to leave these changes so she should step aside and let someone who can take these changes forward with a termination take up the post. the mental health of children and young people has not improved since last year's lockdown acrroding to figures out today which show that one in six children in england had a probable mental health disorder this year, a similar rate to last year. michelle roberts has this report this 20—year—old law student is a mental health ambassador at his university. last year, when covid hit,
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he experienced a breakdown. of course after that, when i had that realisation came back into reality i was like, you know what? i need to get help. i referred myself to my gp. he referred me to an organisation in birmingham called healthy minds. they got me through therapy and a programme to help me out. he is one of many young people who say their mental health has suffered during the pandemic. a survey has asked more than 3,500 children and young people about their family and school life and any anxieties or worries they've been experiencing in recent months. the findings up to march of this year reveal one in six likely had a mental disorder in 2021. an increase from four years ago. four in ten of children aged 6—16 said they had experienced a deterioration in their mental health. among those aged 17—23, just over half said their mental health had declined.
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girls fared worse than boys, possible eating problems, disturbed sleep and loneliness were some of the issues young people faced. experts say the pandemic has put extra strain on children and parents alike. this was not a blip. we need to be worried about the well—being of our young people and that... the standard risk factors that come up in lots of study out with this one look like we're just seeing more of them and they are impacting on our most vulnerable people in society over time. charities working with young people are also concerned. brute charities working with young people are also concerned.— are also concerned. we need the government _ are also concerned. we need the government to — are also concerned. we need the government to invest _ are also concerned. we need the government to invest in - are also concerned. we need the government to invest in early - government to invest in early intervention that is face—to—face. and early support is where we are asking for a people can go outside of gps, to a non—stigmatising
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environment that isjust of gps, to a non—stigmatising environment that is just for young people. we are calling for a network of this across the country. the government says it is investing in mental health services but campaigners say provision in schools and the community must be boosted to cope with the high need. michelle roberts, bbc news. the family of sarah everard welcome the whole life sentence handed down to the police officer who killed her 'saying the world is a safer place with him imprisoned' in other news the furlough scheme which helped protect millions ofjobs during the pandemic ends today, with uncertainty for those who still can't return to theirjobs an albanian man appears at the old bailey accused of murdering primary school teacher, sabina nessa, in south east london earlier this month.
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the father of britney spears, has been formally suspended as the conservator of her estate which he's managed for the last 13 years. the singer had accused jamie spears of abusing her mental health, and forcing her to use contraception against her will to stop her falling pregnant. ajudge in los angeles has now passed control of the estate to an accountant nominated by britney spears' lawyer. sophie long reports from los angeles cheering. it was the day they had been waiting for. ever since britney spears told the world her father's control over her life was abusive, they have believed the end must be in sight. for hours, members of the free britney movement who had travelled from all over the united states — marched in protest at her 13—year—old ordeal and the system they say is failing many thousands of others. by taking a lens to britney spears, an icon the world over, i am hoping
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that people who don't have a voice, who don't have name recognition, will be able to get the same scrutiny in their lives that britney is getting today. britney's lawyer had asked the judge to remove her father from the conservatorship. in reaction, his lawyers asked for it to be terminated completely. inside court, after more than an hour of argument, the judge said the current situation was untenable, reflected a toxic environment and required immediate the suspension ofjames spears. cheering. this was the reaction outside court. euphoric cheers, tears ofjoy. i'm just overcome with emotion because i'm actually exhausted right now but also, you know, full of adrenaline and my heart is so full, there are so many people here today who came out to support the movement, to support britney spears, to support everyone who is trapped in this corrupt system. the pop star was not in court. her reaction came
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in a symbolic post. "on cloud nine," she said, as she flew a plane for the first time. outside court, britney spears�* lawyer was given a hero's welcome. jamie spears and others are going to face even more serious ramifications for his misconduct. but there is a larger issue here, and the larger issue is now being looked into by state legislators throughout the country, certainly in california. and by the united states congress and to the extent we can shine a light on that issue as well, that is something that is very important. he said the ruling was a substantial step towards the star gaining her freedom which he said she hoped she would have by her 40th birthday, in december.
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let's speak now to a member from the free britney campaign. what is your reaction to this news? just free britney campaign. what is your reaction to this news?— reaction to this news? just total, like, late. _ reaction to this news? just total, like, late. i _ reaction to this news? just total, like, late. lam _ reaction to this news? just total, like, late. i am beyond _ reaction to this news? just total, like, late. i am beyond myself. i reaction to this news? just total, i like, late. i am beyond myself. all like, late. lam beyond myself. all of us _ like, late. lam beyond myself. all of us were — like, late. lam beyond myself. all of us were super... it has been a long _ of us were super... it has been a long time — of us were super... it has been a long time coming. it has been to and years— long time coming. it has been to and years for— long time coming. it has been to and years for some of us and for some of us it has— years for some of us and for some of us it has been— years for some of us and for some of us it has been 13 years. fans have been _ us it has been 13 years. fans have been crying — us it has been 13 years. fans have been crying about this and yelling into the _ been crying about this and yelling into the void about this since 2008. and it _ into the void about this since 2008. and it wasn't until that bombshell voice _ and it wasn't until that bombshell voice mail— and it wasn't until that bombshell voice mail from 2019 that really made _ voice mail from 2019 that really made sparked this whole thing. i am exhausted, — made sparked this whole thing. i am exhausted, i am made sparked this whole thing. i am exhausted, lam relieved. but we're not done _ exhausted, lam relieved. but we're
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not done yet. exhausted, i am relieved. but we're rrot done yet-— exhausted, i am relieved. but we're not done yet. what comes next? this is onl a not done yet. what comes next? this is only a suspension. _ not done yet. what comes next? this is only a suspension. how _ not done yet. what comes next? this is only a suspension. how do - not done yet. what comes next? this is only a suspension. how do you - is only a suspension. how do you think britney spears might try to use this period to her advantage? i am not sure. i assume that she will use the cpa to help her choose a team that she wants around her and to help her navigate that after not being able to have a control for 13 years. but i also think that this period will be a transition area period will be a transition area period where, you know, all of the legal finance from the last 13 years i turned over to someone who is on britney's side are now britney's teen gets to have all of that stuff. all of that legal stuff.— all of that legal stuff. jamie
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s - ears all of that legal stuff. jamie spears says _ all of that legal stuff. jamie spears says he _ all of that legal stuff. jamie spears says he has - all of that legal stuff. jamie spears says he has only - all of that legal stuff. jamie | spears says he has only ever all of that legal stuff. jamie - spears says he has only ever been acting in his daughter's best interest and he will continue to do that. why do you think so many people around the world have joined your campaign and called for this change? i your campaign and called for this chance? ., , , change? i think the evidence is re change? i think the evidence is pretty clear _ change? i think the evidence is pretty clear at _ change? i think the evidence is pretty clear at this _ change? i think the evidence is pretty clear at this point, - pretty clear at this point, especially after the most recent new york times reporting. some of the allegations that seem to be most likely true i really concerning and are just awful. you likely true i really concerning and arejust awful. you know, there have been whispers and rumours throughout the last 13 years thatjimmy was incredibly controlling. there was a voice mail that leapt in 2009 of britney trying to contact lawyers saying that her father is threatening to take away her children. it is something we have
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always known itjust hasn't come out in the way it has now, until now. nelson, thank you for talking to us. thank you. an arrest warrant has been issued for a 96 year old german woman who worked as a secretary at a nazi concentration camp. she was due to stand trial in northern germany this morning, but failed to arrive at court. as an 18 year old, irmgard furchner was secretary to the commander of stutthof concentration camp, where 65,000 prisoners — many of them jewish people — were murdered or died. she's accused of complicity in the murder of more than 11,000 people. it isa it is a challenge made all the more urgent after the flooding this year. when the climate change summit cop26 begins in glasgow
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in a month's time, world leaders will discuss how to cope with extreme weather. it's a challenge made all the more urgent by a series of catastrophes this year, including flooding in europe which left more than 200 people dead. our correspondentjames cook has been hearing from survivors of that disaster, in germany's ahr valley, near bonn. this place should be buzzing now. wine is the life blood of the ahr valley and harvest festivals would normally be in full swing. but with vines damaged and visitors absent, this community is struggling. translation: we were due - to open this wine garden a week and a half before the flood. we spent six months doing the place up, cleaning it, making it beautiful. the tables and chairs were all set out ready. and then came the flood. and climate change means a rising risk of such floods. and the trauma they bring. we don't sleep in this night. we always heard cries and my husband heard a man in the water and saved him. linda survived, but her
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restaurant was ruined. and as high as there? this was the highest place. and it's so sad. my heart is broken. everything is ending here with the flood. for the winemakers, too, with their ruined crop, this is a bleak autumn, with a long and bitter aftertaste. on the night of the floods, the water came halfway up these vines, and this crop is no good for this year. but further on, it's even worse. closer to the river, the vines have been completely destroyed. they'll have to replant them, and that means it will be four or even five years before this area bears fruit again. when we look at what happened in this event, we ask yourself how we can better prepare for the future
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and we need to improve our systems, make more accurate forecast. so perhaps this disaster is a warning that even the richest nations are ill—prepared for climate change. and you can see more on 'our planet now�* a special programme looking at how scotland is making an impact in tackling climate change as it prepares to host the glasgow climate summit. that's tonight at 8pm on the bbc news channel and bbc one scotland. jane is with you at five o'clock. let's take a look at the weather forecast. a wet day across many parts. not raining all the time but we have seen reins at times with varying intensities. september comes to a wet and. pumpkin is to make the change of the month. low pressure sitting towards the north west of
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us. these bands of wet weather i coming across. you can count one, two, three as we go into the evening. there will be some clear spells around the east as well. turning wet in wales and parts of northern england. temperatures across wales and england hold up. double figures for many. low single figures in the chili is and clearest spots. early rain clearing away in england. a lot northern ireland and scotland seeing showers. it will be a cooler feeling day tomorrow in scotland and northern ireland. a warmer one, there will, after the rain. here comes the weekend and here comes more low pressure. this one moving right across us into the weekend.
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strengthening two as it falls. that will be rain moving in, some of it will be rain moving in, some of it will be rain moving in, some of it will be heavy and the rains will pick up as well. you may start dry on saturday, probably not going to last. some things to play for and how saturday looks and where the heaviest rain is going to be and how strong the winds will be. if you have plans, check the detail. we are expecting rain to become more widespread as it spreads north and east. the rains are picking up, too. initially strongest in england and wales. a chance of gales, especially around coastal areas. for the weekend, temperatures into the mid to low teens. saturday evening, you can still see this rain further north. you may not see much into the far north of scotland. sunday, wettest on sunday. strongest winds here as well. gales especially in the north. sunday will be a brighter day. showers around. monday,
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sunshine and showers before the next area of low pressure, the next wet and windy system comes our way monday night and into tuesday. that is your weather forecast.
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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines at 5pm: the police officer who kidnapped, raped and murdered sarah everard will spend the rest of his life in jail. he will never be released. wayne couzens used his police id to carry out a bogus arrest on sarah as she walked home from a friend's house in london in march. outside court, the head of the met police said she had been horrified by sarah's murder, which had damaged precious trust in the police. this man has brought shame on the met. speaking frankly, as an organisation, we have been rocked.

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