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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 29, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines. it's a day of drama and diplomacy for president biden, who's working round the clock trying two massive builds are hanging in the balance. two massive builds are hanging in the balance. a massive infrastructure bill on thursday. america's top military chiefs are appearing for a second day of hearings on the us exit from afghanistan this time in the house of representatives. they're being pressed on earlier testimony that two top generals told president biden that two and a half thousand troops, should be left in afghanistan. japan's governing liberal democratic party has elected a new leader fumio kishida. he's set to become the country's prime minister within days. mr kishida won after a tight election within his party. and lava from an erupting volcano on spain's la palma has reached the atlantic ocean, raising fears of toxic gases being released and explosions. located alabama as reach the ocean raising fears of toxic gases being
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released. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are author and journalist rachel shabi and tom newton—dunn, the chief political commentator at times radio. tomorrow's front pages starting with... the starting with. .. telegraph. the starting with... telegraph. the paper leads with sarah the telegraph. the paper leads with sarah everard milder. he reports that her cousin killer couzens falsely arrested for the couzens used his police card to lure her up the street. it also carries a picture of the labour leader clear steer two keir starmer following his wind in brighton. sarah didn't stand a chance. that's the headline in the sun which reports on the agony of sarah's milder at the thought of
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what her daughter in dord. the i says president dick is being urged to restore trust in the police after sarah's milder. a different story in the financial times. it reports state minister is out to shift green surcharges from household electricity builds and onto gas builds. let's begin. obviously the papers reflect on two big stories. the aftermath of the sarah everard milder and keir starmer speech. we will start with kier summers speech and a look in the guardian newspaper. the headline the picture of sir keir starmer and his wife victoria on the front page after his speak start tells trivial pm "get a grip i get out of the way". i thought it was meant to be in france. the speech was entirely in english with a what did you make of it? ., ., , ., ., ., , it? not a big deal, i have to be honest. it? not a big deal, i have to be honest- i _ it? not a big deal, i have to be
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honest. ithink_ it? not a big deal, i have to be honest. i think that _ it? not a big deal, i have to be honest. i think that stormer i it? not a big deal, i have to be honest. i think that stormer is| honest. i think that stormer is delivery was fine, he seemed much better in the speech that he has beenin better in the speech that he has been in recent broadcast interviews. ease also very good when he drawing upon the personal, what grounds him in his personal politics his experience and his father and milder is tragic death and the nhs staff whose incredible work to take care of her in those final days. those stories are incredibly poignant and moving. but where it falls or wire his speech fell in my opinion was attaching that to a bigger vision for the country. a country that is in the middle of various crises, emerging from the pandemic in which there's been a horrendous death tolls, a workforce that is battered as a result. and that's before we
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get onto the fuel crisis, the energy crisis, shortages in supermarkets and so on. as a country that desperately needs some concrete policy proposals to get britain out of this and into a better place. and that's where you didn't really see a whole lot of substance from the speech today. whole lot of substance from the speech today-— whole lot of substance from the seech toda . ., , ., . speech today. tom, before we reflect on that, speech today. tom, before we reflect on that. can — speech today. tom, before we reflect on that. can you _ speech today. tom, before we reflect on that, can you remember— speech today. tom, before we reflect on that, can you remember how - speech today. tom, before we reflect| on that, can you remember how many labour party speeches you've seen in your life? i’pe labour party speeches you've seen in our life? �* .,, labour party speeches you've seen in our life? �* , _, , your life? i've lost count. they eventually _ your life? i've lost count. they eventually meld _ your life? i've lost count. they eventually meld into _ your life? i've lost count. they eventually meld into one. - your life? i've lost count. they eventually meld into one. it i your life? i've lost count. they i eventually meld into one. it must your life? i've lost count. they - eventually meld into one. it must be 20, 30 at least _ eventually meld into one. it must be 20, 30 at least where _ eventually meld into one. it must be 20, 30 at least where it _ eventually meld into one. it must be 20, 30 at least where it should - 20, 30 at least where it should not would you rain this one? this 20, 30 at least where it should not would you rain this one?— would you rain this one? as italia, i was in the _ would you rain this one? as italia, i was in the hall, _ would you rain this one? as italia, i was in the hall, i— would you rain this one? as italia, i was in the hall, i was standing i would you rain this one? as italia, | i was in the hall, i was standing on the side _ i was in the hall, i was standing on the side of— i was in the hall, i was standing on the side of other broadcast journalists and some other keir starmer— journalists and some other keir starmer staffers and it was the most interesting _ starmer staffers and it was the most interesting opposition leader speech conference i've ever seen. not
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necessarily because of the quality of the _ necessarily because of the quality of the speak each other alike to do quite _ of the speak each other alike to do quite a _ of the speak each other alike to do quite a hit — of the speak each other alike to do quite a bit more than rachel but the drama _ quite a bit more than rachel but the drama was_ quite a bit more than rachel but the drama was great. it was great spectacle — drama was great. it was great spectacle with heckler after heckler standing _ spectacle with heckler after heckler standing up, keir starmer giving line after— standing up, keir starmer giving line after line and being carefully prepared — line after line and being carefully prepared by the way. i think team sturmer— prepared by the way. i think team stormer knew exactly what was coming their way _ stormer knew exactly what was coming their way today. a chilly the medium was the _ their way today. a chilly the medium was the message and they think the hecklers. _ was the message and they think the hecklers, keir starmera was the message and they think the hecklers, keir starmer a chilly tryinq — hecklers, keir starmer a chilly trying to— hecklers, keir starmer a chilly trying to spell out what he was doing. — trying to spell out what he was doing. he _ trying to spell out what he was doing, he was taking on his hard ieft~ _ doing, he was taking on his hard left and — doing, he was taking on his hard left. and there it was played out for us _ left. and there it was played out for us in — left. and there it was played out for us in the hall.— left. and there it was played out for us in the hall. rachel, picking u- on for us in the hall. rachel, picking up on this. _ for us in the hall. rachel, picking up on this, there _ for us in the hall. rachel, picking up on this, there is _ for us in the hall. rachel, picking up on this, there is a _ for us in the hall. rachel, picking up on this, there is a fuel supply | up on this, there is a fuel supply crisis, there is an energy crisis, the country is still in the latter stages and we hope the latter stages of a pandemic. stages and we hope the latter stages ofa pandemic. if stages and we hope the latter stages of a pandemic. if this was all on paper you would expect the opposition of a country like that to be far ahead. why is keir starmer not getting the reaction that you would expect on paper? i
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not getting the reaction that you would expect on paper?- would expect on paper? i think that's an important _ would expect on paper? i think. that's an important observation. i know people like me get accused of saying things like this but part of the reason that our politics is in the reason that our politics is in the situation is because political commentary tends to treat it like a parlour game and treated did not focus on the drama rather than the actual substance was up on me get to the substance that's what's lacking with keir starmer was up if you want to —— your left flank fine. you did promise not to, he one his leadership saying promising unity and promising to stick to pledges over left—wing policy platform. for one thing, you lied to your party over that. one thing, you lied to your party overthat. if one thing, you lied to your party over that. if you generalise your party of that why should you be trusted about anything else? never the firmament, if you your purpose is to eliminate the left what then
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is to eliminate the left what then is the plan? what is the point of eliminating the left? so far we don't have anything except for because we've eliminated the left. i think that's what the public is picking up on. we want concrete solutions. we have a fuel crisis, at climate emergency, we are looking at a country where there is a wage crisis, where gusts are smiling. the economy clearly is not working, it wasn't working going into the pandemic and it certainly isn't coming out of it. there is a public appetite polars repeatedly showing this for big change for nationalisation, higher tax on higher earners, for concrete state intervention on climate change. and so i think this is why we are not seeing a pole shift for keir starmer. because he is not a chilly offering anything other than what we don't like the left very much. the financial times _
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don't like the left very much. the financial times which has a picture of keir starmer in serious mode on the front page of its paper. stormer seeks new labour it says interestingly if you like a criminologist at the end of new labour is not capitalised we clearly want to be new labour without being too labour. a slightly different question for you. it is similar keir starmer of the labour politician who scares the most? and if not why? i scares the most? and if not why? i don't think he is. i think he scared them _ don't think he is. i think he scared them a _ don't think he is. i think he scared them a little — don't think he is. i think he scared them a little bit more today than they were — them a little bit more today than they were expected to be scared. which _ they were expected to be scared. which would have you thought of the quality _ which would have you thought of the quality of _ which would have you thought of the quality of the speech and not agree with some — quality of the speech and not agree with some of rachael's critics and say there — with some of rachael's critics and say there was substance and taking on the _ say there was substance and taking on the left — say there was substance and taking on the left. he was identifying a new position. he didn't flash out as well but _ new position. he didn't flash out as well but the subject matter where he highlighted strong on lauren order, patriotism. — highlighted strong on lauren order, patriotism, commanding the army, these _ patriotism, commanding the army, these are _ patriotism, commanding the army, these are all centrist policies.
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there — these are all centrist policies. there is— these are all centrist policies. there is a _ these are all centrist policies. there is a pun in the headlight you 'ust there is a pun in the headlight you just read _ there is a pun in the headlight you just read out. the new labour could easiiy— just read out. the new labour could easily have — just read out. the new labour could easily have a l. i don't think easily have a l. idon't think there's— easily have a l. i don't think there's anything in that speech that tony blair— there's anything in that speech that tony blair couldn't or wouldn't have said _ tony blair couldn't or wouldn't have said i_ tony blair couldn't or wouldn't have said ithink— tony blair couldn't or wouldn't have said. i think he would a up quite more _ said. i think he would a up quite more pithy— said. i think he would a up quite more pithy fashion in 45 more minutes— more pithy fashion in 45 more minutes rather than 88 minutes. but ithink— minutes rather than 88 minutes. but i think that _ minutes rather than 88 minutes. but i think that detail is to come. the tories _ i think that detail is to come. the tories would fear the northern east along _ tories would fear the northern east along lines— tories would fear the northern east along lines of any burn him a little bit more _ along lines of any burn him a little bit more than keir starmer, a southern _ bit more than keir starmer, a southern metropolitan lawyer they feel quite comfortable in taking on. in feel quite comfortable in taking on. in terms— feel quite comfortable in taking on. in terms of— feel quite comfortable in taking on. in terms of what he did with the party— in terms of what he did with the party move it back onto the blair qround _ party move it back onto the blair ground which we do know has one three _ ground which we do know has one three general election that is something i think that i wouldn't say worried tonight, i think that certainly— say worried tonight, i think that certainly be setting up a little bit and not — certainly be setting up a little bit and not quite expected keir starmer to make _ and not quite expected keir starmer to make his big policy or as politically as he did today. let's
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aet stuck politically as he did today. let's get stuck into _ politically as he did today. let's get stuck into substance. - politically as he did today. let�*s get stuck into substance. on the fight tonight from page of the financial times, another story just below the keir starmer story green tax burden shift away from electricity set to drive up gas builds. do we know by how much? the excess on builds. do we know by how much? tie: excess on electricity according to the species, the thinking is it's kind of nudge unit kind of thinking approach to the shift agreement that needs to happen in this country and across the world. at the moment there isn't really an incentive, a tax incentive for shifting from gas, a bigger pollutant to electricity in which increasingly is coming from renewable sources, or that's the goal. so the idea is to shift that metric so that you do a chilly end “p metric so that you do a chilly end up paying a little bit more if you are using gas. i think the trouble
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with this is that we need to look at something that is a lot bigger. we need to look at a state intervening rather than encouraging consumers to move in one direction or another. we need a state intervention in rewiring the energy economy in itself. at the moment we could see a lot of energy companies failing. that is one more argument for taking them into public control. but the more urgent argument in terms of the climate emergency is that if you want to rewire in economy, make it face much more towards renewable energy then you really need to be able to use the leaders of the state to do that. and there for have it in public ownership. countries across europe that do that have much more renewable energy in the mix. tam. renewable energy in the mix. tom, the ft uses — renewable energy in the mix. tom, the ft uses nudge _ renewable energy in the mix. tom, the ft uses nudge consumers - renewable energy in the mix. tom, the ft uses nudge consumers in . renewable energy in the mix. tom, the ft uses nudge consumers in the first paragraph is up does nudging more? i
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first paragraph is up does nudging more? ~ �* , first paragraph is up does nudging more? ,, �* , ., , first paragraph is up does nudging more? ,, �*, ., , , ., more? i think it's a bit stronger than nudge- — more? i think it's a bit stronger than nudge. this _ more? i think it's a bit stronger than nudge. this is _ more? i think it's a bit stronger than nudge. this is simply - more? i think it's a bit stronger. than nudge. this is simply talking about— than nudge. this is simply talking about transferring one effective tax due on _ about transferring one effective tax due on type of energy to another. that's— due on type of energy to another. that's more — due on type of energy to another. that's more than nudge that is brihery— that's more than nudge that is bribery if— that's more than nudge that is bribery if you could look at it another _ bribery if you could look at it another way. this green surcharge is precisely— another way. this green surcharge is precisely what david cameron used or referred _ precisely what david cameron used or referred to _ precisely what david cameron used or referred to as green crap. he said take ail— referred to as green crap. he said take all the — referred to as green crap. he said take all the green crop off the bill because _ take all the green crop off the bill because you need to make it cheaper for people _ because you need to make it cheaper for people during less cost of living — for people during less cost of living crisis back in 2014. i think the government will be slightly concerned about making this brave poiiticai _ concerned about making this brave political move again. the problem is this is— political move again. the problem is this is something from a document that we've — this is something from a document that we've been waiting on now for a month— that we've been waiting on now for a month coid _ that we've been waiting on now for a month cold the heat building strategy which is part of the government sets zero strategy. all of which _ government sets zero strategy. all of which before 26 and under monsanto. they do need to get on with this _ monsanto. they do need to get on with this and get on with this fast. this is— with this and get on with this fast. this is ail— with this and get on with this fast. this is all about trying to persuade people _ this is all about trying to persuade people to — this is all about trying to persuade people to get rid of their gas
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boilers _ people to get rid of their gas boilers. the problem the government will have _ boilers. the problem the government will have with it is that's great, there _ will have with it is that's great, there are — will have with it is that's great, there are heat pumps, hydrogen boilers. — there are heat pumps, hydrogen boilers, all of them very expensive at the _ boilers, all of them very expensive at the moment to persuade people to rip out _ at the moment to persuade people to rip out their— at the moment to persuade people to rip out their gas boilers and put in a green— rip out their gas boilers and put in a green energy pump you are going to have to— a green energy pump you are going to have to subsidise it. this feels like a — have to subsidise it. this feels like a rebid of the story it's money to the _ like a rebid of the story it's money to the tune — like a rebid of the story it's money to the tune of for a £5,000 per household _ to the tune of for a £5,000 per household i hear about to persuade them _ household i hear about to persuade them onto — household i hear about to persuade them onto the next bit. i think will get ali— them onto the next bit. i think will get all of— them onto the next bit. i think will get all of that but i absolutely aqree — get all of that but i absolutely agree with rachel, it is absolutely iittered _ agree with rachel, it is absolutely littered with potential tight wires with will— littered with potential tight wires with will be very serious indeed the cost of— with will be very serious indeed the cost of living crisis were to live with _ cost of living crisis were to live with. ~ ., ~ ., with. will turn to the metro newspaper _ with. will turn to the metro newspaper and _ with. will turn to the metro newspaper and look - with. will turn to the metro newspaper and look at - with. will turn to the metro newspaper and look at the l with. will turn to the metro - newspaper and look at the very hunting story of sarah everard milder. the metro newspaper has on its front page as you can see there a still footage from a passing car shows couzens reaching for a cost when he was moving to abduct sarah
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everard who thought he was a proper police officer. the moment the cop took surface of this is obviously been an extraordinary difficult time for sarah everard's family, they were able to speak in court. you really have _ were able to speak in court. you really have to — were able to speak in court. you really have to think— were able to speak in court. ym. really have to think of the family on this date must�*ve been in absolutely agonising day for them. they were able to speak in court. so much respect for them for doing so. just you have to go through not only this devastating loss of this incredible woman, this daughter and sister and someone who is loved by friends and family but also as her milder described having to go through the knowledge, the harrowing way in which showers killed and that will haunt her for days and years to come. it's absolutely unbearable to think about. but that manner of her
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death is something that is utterly chilling. notjust for sarah everard family and friends but far more widely. the fact that her murderer abused his power as a police officer, that he was able to get her to comply with being handcuffed and there for essentially kidnap her and then rain, milder her and burn her body. that he was able to do that because he was a police officer, because he was a police officer, because he was a police officer, because he could cite covid regulations. it's absolutely chilling and it points to a real culture and the police force, in the met police... edi culture and the police force, in the met police- - -_ met police... of abuse. and that brinus us met police... of abuse. and that brings us to _ met police... of abuse. and that brings us to the _ met police... of abuse. and that brings us to the next _ met police... of abuse. and that brings us to the next newspaper| met police... of abuse. and that - brings us to the next newspaper that covers the story at late night in the daily telegraph is up everard killer use covid law to entrap her. the paper says questions over police
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vetting, will anything change? i vetting, will anything change? i think it will after this

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