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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 28, 2021 2:00pm-4:59pm BST

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this is bbc news. the army is put on standby to help ease the fuel crisis but the transport secretary says there are signs the worst might soon be over. the 1st tentative signs now of stabilisation in forecourt storage which will not be reflected in the queueis which will not be reflected in the queue is as yet but it is the 1st time we have seen more petrol stations itself. we time we have seen more petrol stations itself.— stations itself. we are all wondering _ stations itself. we are all wondering how _ stations itself. we are all wondering how long - stations itself. we are all wondering how long it. stations itself. we are all| wondering how long it will stations itself. we are all- wondering how long it will go on for. ., , . wondering how long it will go on for. .,, ., , , ., the murder of the london teacher sabina nessa a 36 year old man appears in court charged with her murder.
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the rail operator southeastern is stripped of its franchise, after £25 million of historical payments were not paid to the department for transport. delegates at the labour conference will vote on a minimum wage of £15 an hour. andy mcdonald quit the shadow cabinet in protest at the opposition of the leadership to the proposal. liverpool legend roger hunt has died at the age of 83. james bond is back. the much anticipated final performance from daniel craig premiers in london tonight.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the transport secretary, grant shapps, says after days of fuel shortages at the pumps, there are indications the situation is stabilising. the petrol retailers' association says anecdotal evidence from its members suggests demand on forecourts is still significantly higher than normal but not as high as it was this weekend. the government is still putting the army on standby to drive tankers but mr shapps said the measures already put in place appeared to be having some effect. the surge in demand came because of fears that a shortage of drivers would hit fuel supply although there is plenty at refineries. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. day five and it is still a very long wait for petrol around telford. not everywhere has problems — urban areas are the worst affected. drivers hoping to fill up before the pumps run out, deliveries unable to keep up with all the panic buying. we are all wondering how long it can go on for.
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that is what every driver wants to know. there are now the first very tentative signs of stabilisation in forecourts' storage which will not be reflected in the queues as yet. but it is the first time we have seen more petrol in the petrol stations itself. i think, as the industry said yesterday, the sooner we can return to our normal buying habits, the sooner this situation will return to normal. but it's not easy for those who rely on fuel to get to work. emma's carers struggled to reach her last night. without my carers, my situation is life—threatening. i'm on a ventilator, as you can see, and i require 24—hour carejust to survive and to go about my day—to—day life. eventually, she was able to get to a petrol station to fill up, but that was after many hours of trying. more calls today for health and care
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workers to get priority for fuel. we have had no support, no messaging from government about this. wer are told things will ease later in the week. this is a problem today, colleagues have got limited amounts of fuel. as i said, we cannot wait two or three hours when we have patients at home needing our care and attention. but petrol retailers think that is easier said than done. it is a very complex and confrontational system which i am sure ministers and indeed industry would be loath to see, because who is an emergency worker? of course, it is notjust key workers being impacted. the knock—on effects are starting to be felt for many businesses. just think about all the vans we rely on these days for a host of goods and services. like this dry cleaning businesses in north west london. it's been extremely difficult. out of the 15 vans that we normally
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operate, we are only able to get six or seven on the road. which has meant, in the last week, a 35% drop in operations. which obviously has had a knock—on effect to our bottom line. the uk has plenty of fuel. the hope is the demand will soon fall to normal levels because the longer all of this goes on, the wider the ripple effects will be. emma simpson, bbc news. our defence correspondent, jonathan beale, says there are practical limits as to what the army can do. the army and the military have made a difference in issues like the covid pandemic, in the olympics in 2012. i think there is a limit to what they can do here. 150 is not an awful lot but there are 150 personnel on standby who qualify to drive lorries which carry fuel. another 150 personnel are also
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on standby to be their buddies in the cab, they would still have to be trained to drive those fuel company lorries, they would not drive military lorries, that might take 2—5 days. the earliest we would see them, if they are required, it would be the end of the week. in addition to that, i should say also remember, the shortage of fuel driver lorries is about 1,000, so 150's about one tenth but in addition to that, there are going to be 20 military personnel who are qualified to test hgv drivers, this is the wider issue of a shortage of hgv drivers. who will be made available to the department for transport to push through people through those tests. again, this is a small unlimited response and this is as much about politicians showing that they are doing something to assuage the public frustration.
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delegates at the labour conference in brighton are to vote on a motion proposing a minimum wage of 15 pounds an hour. it comes after andy mcdonald quit his shadow cabinetjob, in protest at the leadership�*s opposition to the proposal. the party leader, sir keir starmer thanked him for his service but said his own focus was on "winning the next general election". from brighton, here's our political correspondent iain watson. after lockdowns, this week was to have been the opportunity for keir starmer to get out and about communicating labour's message. he began his conference laying down the law to his own party by changing its leadership rules and braving resistance from the left. and now the plan was to move away from procedures and onto policy with an announcement on community policing. there should be an extra 5,000 special constables, it's 5,000 because i think that is a number that could be recruited very quickly. but this party conference has been a law unto itself. last night, the shadow minister for employment rights gave
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up hisjob in the shadow cabinet. he refused to argue against union demands for a £15 an hour minimum wage, even though the current policy is for a wage of at least £10 an hour. i cannot, in all conscience, stay in a shadow cabinet that can't make that commitment. keep going, andy! chanting: andy, andy, andy! his departure has created a storm, emboldening supporters of the former leadership and, indeed, the former leader. to win an election, we need to raise minimum wages and have socialist policies forjustice in our society. and today, the conference delegates will now debate the call for a £15 minimum wage. keir starmer wants to portray himself as a strong leader. his aides say he is moving the party away from thejeremy corbyn era. but facing likely defeat, the leadership has decided neither to support nor to reject a higher minimum wage. policies passed here by the membership and binding on the leadership,
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but they can certainly cause a distraction. keir starmer had promised to reform and unite his party. he may be able to do one or the other, but not both. iain watson, bbc news, brighton. iain is at the labour party conference in brighton. what conference in brighton. are the prospects for the debate what are the prospects for the debate this afternoon? the prospects are uuite debate this afternoon? the prospects are quite simply _ debate this afternoon? the prospects are quite simply that _ debate this afternoon? the prospects are quite simply that at _ debate this afternoon? the prospects are quite simply that at the _ debate this afternoon? the prospects are quite simply that at the moment, i are quite simply that at the moment, i would suggest, the conference delegates are likely to back a huge motion which includes the line about increasing the minimum wage to £15 per hour, and they will be asking a shadow cabinet minister about that but 1stjonathan ashworth is here, the shadow health secretary. lots of internal debate going on, but out there people are queueing up for petrol and there has been a call by the british medical association and unison, for key workers and health service workers to get priority at the petrol pumps. what would you do? they are important because we have
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-ot they are important because we have got nurses _ they are important because we have got nurses and doctors and health care assistants, worried they may not make — care assistants, worried they may not make it — care assistants, worried they may not make it to the bedsides of their patients— not make it to the bedsides of their patients because of a lack of petroh — patients because of a lack of petrol. i'm asking sajid javid, if he is _ petrol. i'm asking sajid javid, if he is watching, get the bma and the royal— he is watching, get the bma and the royal college of nurses, get the bodies _ royal college of nurses, get the bodies that represent care workers, unison— bodies that represent care workers, unison and — bodies that represent care workers, unison and gmb, get them round a table _ unison and gmb, get them round a table and _ unison and gmb, get them round a table and on a call now and work out a plan _ table and on a call now and work out a plan to— table and on a call now and work out a plan to reassure health care staff they will_ a plan to reassure health care staff they will have access to petrol and if he can _ they will have access to petrol and if he can do — they will have access to petrol and if he can do that, i'm sure they will stand — if he can do that, i'm sure they will stand with him and say, we have worked _ will stand with him and say, we have worked this— will stand with him and say, we have worked this out, people do not need to panic. _ worked this out, people do not need to panic, but at the moment he is keeping _ to panic, but at the moment he is keeping his— to panic, but at the moment he is keeping his head down hoping it blows _ keeping his head down hoping it blows over. people are worried and concerned — blows over. people are worried and concerned and health care staff are worried _ concerned and health care staff are worried they will not make it to the bedsides _ worried they will not make it to the bedsides of their patients so sajid javid has— bedsides of their patients so sajid javid has got to get a grip of these and he _ javid has got to get a grip of these and he has — javid has got to get a grip of these and he has got to get these organisations on the phone straight away _ organisations on the phone straight away if_ organisations on the phone straight away if i _ organisations on the phone straight away. if i was the health secretary i away. if i was the health secretary i would _ away. if i was the health secretary i would leave this conference and that is— i would leave this conference and that is what i would be doing a much out. , . , ,
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that is what i would be doing a much out. , ., , , , ., that is what i would be doing a much out. , ., out. presumably if you say, some of the etrol out. presumably if you say, some of the petrol stations _ out. presumably if you say, some of the petrol stations will _ out. presumably if you say, some of the petrol stations will be _ out. presumably if you say, some of the petrol stations will be reserved | the petrol stations will be reserved effectively for 1 section the petrol stations will be reserved effectively for1 section of the petrol stations will be reserved effectively for 1 section of the workforce, before that comes into being, you will get a range of people panicking again and they will try to fill up before it happens and it could stoke a further crisis. i believe in negotiating and discussing the issue and the leaders of unison— discussing the issue and the leaders of unison and the gmb, these are people _ of unison and the gmb, these are people who have got good ideas about how you _ people who have got good ideas about how you can designate certain petrol stations— how you can designate certain petrol stations for— how you can designate certain petrol stations for staff, and so it would help calm — stations for staff, and so it would help calm things down, but at the moment— help calm things down, but at the moment it — help calm things down, but at the moment it is all at sea and there are no— moment it is all at sea and there are no statements coming from the government don't have any credibility. i know what the health secretary— credibility. i know what the health secretary is doing, hoping that grant — secretary is doing, hoping that grant shapps will sort it out, he is trying _ grant shapps will sort it out, he is trying to— grant shapps will sort it out, he is trying to keep his head down and hope _ trying to keep his head down and hope it— trying to keep his head down and hope it will blow over, but this is a moment— hope it will blow over, but this is a moment for leadership. we needed to get— a moment for leadership. we needed to get a _ a moment for leadership. we needed to get a grip, so speak to the royal college _ to get a grip, so speak to the royal college of— to get a grip, so speak to the royal college of nurses and to unison,
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because — college of nurses and to unison, because i— college of nurses and to unison, because i can help bring them together. if he can't reach out to then _ together. if he can't reach out to then we — together. if he can't reach out to them. we have got to act in the national— them. we have got to act in the national interest and he has also -ot national interest and he has also got nry— national interest and he has also got my phone number and he can ring me, got my phone number and he can ring rne. lrut— got my phone number and he can ring me. but he _ got my phone number and he can ring me, but he has got to do something. the question— me, but he has got to do something. the question of leadership and the national minimum wage, you have said you would leave the conference to sort out a crisis and andy mcdonald has done the same, leaving his job, because he was told that the party could not back a plan for a £15 per hour minimum wage. you could not back a plan for a £15 per hour minimum wage.— could not back a plan for a £15 per hour minimum wage. you would have to ask and as hour minimum wage. you would have to ask andy as to — hour minimum wage. you would have to ask andy as to why _ hour minimum wage. you would have to ask andy as to why he _ hour minimum wage. you would have to ask andy as to why he has _ hour minimum wage. you would have to ask andy as to why he has resigned. - ask andy as to why he has resigned. i'm ask andy as to why he has resigned. i'm sorry— ask andy as to why he has resigned. i'm sorry he's— ask andy as to why he has resigned. i'm sorry he's gone. i respect him and have — i'm sorry he's gone. i respect him and have always valued hisjudgment and have always valued hisjudgment and insight although i disagree with him. and insight although i disagree with hint we _ and insight although i disagree with him. we are proposing at the moment that we _ him. we are proposing at the moment that we need a national living wage of at least — that we need a national living wage of at least £10 per hour but as we -et of at least £10 per hour but as we get closer— of at least £10 per hour but as we get closer to a general election, when _ get closer to a general election, when we — get closer to a general election, when we have assessed the state of the economy and what is happening in the economy and what is happening in the labour— the economy and what is happening in the labour market, we will have a
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policy _ the labour market, we will have a policy to — the labour market, we will have a policy to improve the pay and the terms _ policy to improve the pay and the terms and — policy to improve the pay and the terms and conditions of some of the lowest _ terms and conditions of some of the lowest paid — terms and conditions of some of the lowest paid staff in the country especially those in health care. what _ especially those in health care. what does it say about the leadership if you can't say whether you would support or reject £15, the leadership say they are quite relaxed about it, how would you vote this afternoon? i relaxed about it, how would you vote this afternoon?— this afternoon? i am not voting this afternoon. this afternoon? i am not voting this afternoon- it _ this afternoon? i am not voting this afternoon. it is _ this afternoon? i am not voting this afternoon. it is a _ this afternoon? i am not voting this afternoon. it is a question - this afternoon? i am not voting this afternoon. it is a question of - afternoon. it is a question of principle- — afternoon. it is a question of principle. would _ afternoon. it is a question of principle. would you - afternoon. it is a question of principle. would you vote . afternoon. it is a question ofj principle. would you vote for afternoon. it is a question of - principle. would you vote for £15 per hour? it principle. would you vote for £15 er hour? , ., ., _ ., per hour? it is not our policy at the moment— per hour? it is not our policy at the moment but _ per hour? it is not our policy at the moment but our— per hour? it is not our policy at the moment but our policy - per hour? it is not our policy at the moment but our policy is l per hour? it is not our policy at| the moment but our policy is to increase — the moment but our policy is to increase pay and as we assess what is happening in the common market, we will— is happening in the common market, we will put _ is happening in the common market, we will put forward a package in the general— we will put forward a package in the general election as to how much people _ general election as to how much people get paid. i've been coming to this conference for 25 years ago now, _ this conference for 25 years ago now. and — this conference for 25 years ago now. and i_ this conference for 25 years ago now, and i remember in 1996, the rows— now, and i remember in 1996, the rows about — now, and i remember in 1996, the rows about the national minimum wage, _ rows about the national minimum wage, why— rows about the national minimum wage, why wasn't labour putting a figure _ wage, why wasn't labour putting a figure on— wage, why wasn't labour putting a figure on it? we said we needed to make _ figure on it? we said we needed to make an _ figure on it? we said we needed to make an assessment on it when we were _ make an assessment on it when we were in— make an assessment on it when we were in government and we did that, at the _ were in government and we did that, at the tories — were in government and we did that, at the tories opposed it at the time, — at the tories opposed it at the time, of— at the tories opposed it at the time, of course. we delivered it and
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we will— time, of course. we delivered it and we will deliver again for the lowest paid in— we will deliver again for the lowest paid in the — we will deliver again for the lowest paid in the country when we next get into government. that paid in the country when we next get into government.— into government. that is the shadow health secretary, _ into government. that is the shadow health secretary, saying _ into government. that is the shadow health secretary, saying labour- health secretary, saying labour would increase the national living wage. the policy at the moment is £10 per hour but andy mcdonald said he could not stay in the shadow cabinet unless it was increased up to £15 per hour. we are expecting to end where we started, and most of the delegates were actually back the andy mcdonald position this afternoon but that will not be binding the leadership and that does not have to become a manifesto commitment. that is a process much further down the line.— further down the line. thanks for “oininu further down the line. thanks for joining us- _ a 36 year old man has appeared in court charged with the murder of the primary school teacher, sabina nessa, in south east london. koci selama from eastbourne was arrested in the early hours
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of sunday morning. our home affairs correspondent june kelly is outside willesden magistrates court in north west london for us now. this was a brief hearing this morning. koci selamaj was detained in eastbourne on sunday morning, he is an albanian national and before he came into court, there was discussion about where he would need an interpreter to follow the proceedings and there was an interpreter on standby. in fact, his lawyer said his english was good enough to be able to follow proceedings without the interpreter. he appeared in the dock in a grey tracksuit and he was wearing a face mask, and he is accused of murdering sabina nessa on friday the 17th of september in south—east london. sabina nessa, her body was found the following day in the park by a member of the public, but on that friday night, she had set off to meet a friend in a bar near the park and of course she never arrived.
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this morning in court, the lawyer for the defendant said his client had indicated that he would be pleading not guilty to the murder charge. this is not a formal entering of a plea and that will come later in the legal process. the next hearing in this case is on thursday when the defendant will appear at the old bailey. june kelly there in north _ appear at the old bailey. june kelly there in north west _ appear at the old bailey. june kelly there in north west london. - appear at the old bailey. june kelly there in north west london. we . appear at the old bailey. june kelly| there in north west london. we can now have a look at the headlines. the army is put on standby over the fuel crisis but the transport secretary grant shapps says it looks like it is stabilising. a man has been charged with the murder of sabina nessa. south—eastern trains has been taken over after not paying
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£25,000,000 to the department for transport. we will stay with that story. the government has stripped the rail operator, southeastern, of its franchise because of what it called "a serious breach of good faith". the company's services between london, kent and east sussex will now be publicly run. the decision was made after more than £25 million of historical payments due to the department for transport were not paid. 0ur transport correspondent caroline davies reports. it's not unusual for train lines to be renationalised. what is rare is when it's about trust. this morning, the government announced it would be taking over running lser's services after it found that £25 million had not been declared by the operator. the company itself is taking a large number of steps, and i'm sure they will be saying more about it. as far as i was concerned, no matter what steps they took, to breach the confidence of the public, to deliberately conceal payments due back to the taxpayer, is entirely unacceptable.
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the operator of last resort will take over the services from the 17th of october, but the government has ensured passengers and the railway�*s employees that the service and theirjobs will not change. the company that runs lser, go—ahead, has said that they have now repaid the £25 million. this morning, they said they were naturally disappointed with the decision, and that although the independent review is ongoing and the contracts concerned are highly complex, the group acknowledges that errors have been made in relation to the franchise. its stock price fell by more than 12% this morning. these issues go back to 2014. some have asked why they are only coming to light now, and could this be a bigger problem? if this matter is serious enough that it isjust beyond somebody getting it wrong in terms of accounting, and actually there is evidence of wrongdoing on a criminal nature, then of course that must be looked into. it's really important that there is integrity in the railway system, and if there's wrongdoing, then i'm sure the criminal bodies will be involved.
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other operators, like northern and virgin east coast main line, have previously been renationalised, but it is rare for the government to strip a company its franchise. very, very unusual. you have to go back to 2003, and you find that it was the strategic rail authority doing the stripping, and it was the operators of southeastern that lost their franchise back then, so in some ways, history is repeating itself. the way the trains are run has changed dramatically during the pandemic, and today the government has shown they are following a different track. caroline davies says the signals from ministers says they should be no impact on ministers. thea;r from ministers says they should be no impact on ministers.— from ministers says they should be no impact on ministers. they do run a lot of commuter _ no impact on ministers. they do run a lot of commuter routes _ no impact on ministers. they do run a lot of commuter routes between l a lot of commuter routes between kent and sussex and london but the government has reassured the public there will be no changes to services and there will be no changes to fares and tickets and the schedule and in effect it is just a change of the management and there will also be concerns by people who are
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employees of southeastern and for them at the government have also said that front line staff will not have any changes and their salaries were mowing the same, they will not be impacted by this, and i have stressed the decision is not a reflection on them. but for now the operator of last resort will take over the operation, they already run northern and lner but in future the government says it does intend to retender this line.— government says it does intend to retender this line. across the uk house prices have gone up by 8% in the last year — but in some coastal and rural areas, price increases are almost triple that. today the office of national statistics warned that in some areas rising property prices and increasing rents risked pricing locals out of the market. north devon is one of the most affected areas, and our correspondentjon kay reports on the impact there on people desperately needing accommodation. north devon, more popular than ever
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since the pandemic started. in the last year, house prices here have gone up by 22%, mainly fuelled by outsiders moving down. it is just a really horrible feeling to be made to feel like, yeah, a second—class citizen, really. emma is a cleaner. she's got little chance of buying a place, and now she is even struggling to rent. people i know have been living in converted sheds because they can't find anywhere to rent. living in a shed?! a converted shed, yeah. i'm not being funny, but at one point my parents were talking about, you know, whether they could put a bed in their garage for me. there's only two that's available... sarah—jane and lauren don't need official statistics to tell them there's a problem. it's a little bit - depressing, isn't it? they've been hunting for a flat to rent in bideford for six months. but landlords can make more money by renting to holiday—makers or short—term lets. got an alert yesterday at 9:43 for a property via e—mail, i phoned up at half past one
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on my lunch break and it had been taken off the market. in four hours, it had gone. how do they expect working people to find a house? - covid has effectively caused the perfect storm. we've got the urban—rural lifestyle concept, which has forced people from the cities into the coastal and rural areas, we have a shortage of stock, and we have a high demand for that stock. which means prices are going up and up. according to the property website zoopla, this year there are half as many rental properties available in the south—west of england compared with the five year average, but demand is up by more than 80%. 0ne local artistjoking that soon the only place to let will be the public toilets. jon kay, bbc news, north devon. some breaking news. vaccine passports which are due to be
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introduced shortly by the scottish government, there has been a delay and sources say this game will still be introduced on the 1st of october as planned but they will be a grace period before they take effect — say the scheme will still be introduced. the scheme is not being abandoned and there was speculation the government in scotland might gently pushit government in scotland might gently push it onto the back buffer as it were because the government at westminster decided not to proceed with a vaccine passports but they are still going ahead, we hear. it will apply to nightclubs and large events and nicola sturgeon will make a statement in parliament in the next few minutes so we will watch for that here on bbc news and bring you anything relevant she says. that news that vaccine passports are going to have a grace period of 2 weeks before they will have to be in use, even though the scheme comes into introduction on the 1st of
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october. women and children who were sexually abused over decades by the singer r kelly have welcomed his conviction. ajury in new york found him guilty on all counts after hearing evidence he used his fame to recruit and groom his victims, before abusing them. kelly has sold more than 75 million records worldwide he's now due to be sentenced in may when he'll find out whether he's to spend the rest of his life behind bars. south korea says a short range missile has been launched from north korea into the sea of japan. the launch came just before north korea's ambassador to the un urged the united states to give up its hostile policy towards pyongyang and said no one could deny his country's right to self defence and to test weapons.
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to the northern ireland protocol. the protocol was agreed by the uk and eu in 2019 to prevent a hard border in ireland by keeping northern ireland in the eu single market for goods. the leaders say northern ireland must be an integral part of the united kingdom. a cassette tape featuring an interview with john lennon and yoko ono, as well as an unpublished song is being auctioned later today. it was recorded in a remote part of denmark 50 years ago. the 33 minute audio track was made by four danish teenagers who trekked through the snow to meet their hero. auctioneers estimate it could fetch up to £36,000. it tells about their stay in denmark and it talks about peace and there is also some music so they actually are playing give peace a chance, but with different words the normal. he is incorporating a few danish local things which is of course very amusing to us but also radio piece which has never been heard before.
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it will be interesting to see how much it goes for. estimates are often lower than the price that is paid, especially for things to do with the beatles. apparently they joined in some traditions like dancing around the christmas tree. the latest james bond film is finally here. the world premiere of no time to die is taking place this afternoon at the royal albert hall. 0ur entertainment correspondent reports. it has been almost six years since daniel craig last walked a bond red carpet. anticipation for his fifth 007 movie is perhaps even higher than usual because fans have had such a long wait... there's something i want to tell you.
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..for the film to kick into gear. tyres squeal no time to die is the first post—covid film whose advance a bond film is a big film in any year. skyfall and spectre, the last two instalments, sit at number two and number three in the all—time uk box office. so i think there are great expectations that this will be another trigger to get people back into cinemas. i know there is a lot of things said about what i think about these films and all of those...and whatever, but i have loved every single second. one of the greatest honours of my life. the other big draw, of course, is that this is daniel craig's final bond movie. his tenure has so far been seen as a successful one, receiving praise from fans and from the family of the secret agent's creator. i think he would have particularly loved the way that daniel craig is playing bond, because he is bringing out the most sensitive side and the sort of back story, as it were.
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00... cheers. the blockbusting series of course has a very special place in cinema history. whenever you watch a bond movie, for the moment you are watching it is the best film in the world at that moment. it is pure cinema. falling in love with cinema all over again is what everyone from movie executives to cinemagoers is hoping will soon be happening. lizo mzimba, bbc news. time now for a look at the weather. the sermon unsaddled sums up the weather over the next couple of days and we have sunshine over the next couple of days — the word unsaddled. we have got an area of low pressure with associated weather fronts bringing heavy rain over parts of england and wales and you can see the green colours are showing the heavy bursts there. eastern england,
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17- heavy bursts there. eastern england, 17— a heavy bursts there. eastern england, 17- a 18 heavy bursts there. eastern england, 17— a 18 before the rain hits. a bit dry for the north—west of the uk, through the evening and overnight, but showers moving in. a colder night than we have seen recently with temperatures in towns and cities 6— 7 but cold in the countryside. wednesday the driest day of the week with a couple of showers moving through on the westerly breeze but many places remaining dry, although not warm, 12- 16. remaining dry, although not warm, 12— 16. goodbye.
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hello this is bbc news, the headlines... the army is put on standby to help ease the fuel crisis but the transport secretary says there are signs the worst might soon be over. there are now the first very tentative signs of stabilisation and
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forecourt storage, which will not be reflected in the queue is as yet, but it is the first time we have seen more petrol in the petrol stations itself. the murder of the london teacher sabina nessa a 36 year old man appears in court charged with her murder. the rail operator southeastern is stripped of its franchise, after £25 million of historical payments were not paid to the department for transport. delegates at the labour conference will vote on a minimum wage of £15 pounds an hour. andy mcdonald quit the shadow cabinet in protest at the leadership's opposition to the proposal. liverpool legend roger hunt one of england's 1966 world cup winning squad has died at the age of 83.
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let me take you to the scottish parliament where nicola sturgeon is making a statement on vaccine passports. making a statement on vaccine passports-— making a statement on vaccine --assorts. , , . , ., passports. this is exhausting and stressful for _ passports. this is exhausting and stressful for them _ passports. this is exhausting and stressful for them and _ passports. this is exhausting and stressful for them and i - passports. this is exhausting and stressful for them and i know - passports. this is exhausting and stressful for them and i know we | passports. this is exhausting and . stressful for them and i know we are all deeply grateful to each and every one of them. it is therefore important to emphasise again that by all of us behaving in ways that can get and keep covid cases under control, we are not simply protecting ourselves and those around us, we are also helping those who work so hard and our nhs and protecting their capacity to provide care and treatment to everyone who needs it. presiding officer, there are three further issues i want to give an update on today. first, we confirmed last friday changes to the rules on international travel. from the 4th of october the blanket requirement for predeparture tests for people travelling into scotland will be removed. people who have been fully vaccinated or are under age 18 will no longer need to
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provide a predeparture test result if they are coming from countries not on the red list. we also hope to align our policy on post—arrival testing with that of england, although details of this uk wide are still being finalised. as i indicated last week we are making the changes to the travel testing with some reluctance. we do have a concern that the removal of testing requirements could hamper efforts to detect new variants, however we have also considered, as i said last week, we would, the practical consequences of not having a uk wide aligned position. in particular, we have to be realistic about the fact that people living here in scotland could decide to return here via airports based in england if different roles are in place for scottish airports. the result of this would be disadvantaged to our aviation and travel sector, but without any
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aviation and travel sector, but witi confirm today we allocate can confirm today we will allocate up can confirm today we will allocate up to £25 million of funding to help small and medium—sized enterprises improve ventilation. this support, which will include grants, will help these businesses make necessary adjustments to their premises,
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including for example, the installation of carbon dioxide monitors or alterations to windows and vents. the fund, which we expect to start making payments in november, will initially target high—risk sectors where people spend significant amounts of time in close proximity to each other, such as hospitality and leisure. we will set out more details of the eligibility criteria and the application process over the next few weeks, however, i hope this funding package will help many small and medium—sized businesses make indoor setting safer, especially through the winter months. the final issue i want to give an update on is the covid certification scheme. last week we set out further details of how the scheme will operate. i can confirm we will be publishing further detailed guidance for businesses later today, which will demonstrate the proportionate common sense approach we are asking businesses to take. i would encourage businesses to familiarise themselves with this guidance, which will assist them in making the necessary preparations
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for the scheme coming into force. i can also confirm the introduction of certification means we are able to remove the capacity limits and the associated exemption process which have been in place for stadium and live events, and i know this will be welcomed by event planners and local authorities. the certification scheme will apply as previously indicated two late—night venues open after midnight, with alcohol, music and dancing. to live indoor unseated events of more than 500 people, to live outdoor unseated events of more than 4000 people, and to any event of more than 10,000 people. this means that once the scheme starts, anyone over the age of 18 who wants to go to a large event or to a late night venue will be required to provide evidence that they are fully vaccinated or evidence that they are exempt. to facilitate this the nhs covid status apple go live on thursday. they will provide a digital record of the user's
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vaccination status including a qr code for each vaccination a person has received. it is already possible for any of us, of course, to request a paper copy of her vaccination record, orto a paper copy of her vaccination record, or to download a pdf from the nhs informed website. presiding officer, we have continued to engage with businesses as we have developed the detail of the certification scheme. i understand that many businesses have concerns about certification, however, very grateful to all those that nevertheless engaged in these discussions so constructively. the government remains of the view that targeted certification scheme does have a part to play in driving vaccination rates are up as high as possible and providing an additional layer of protection over the winter months as we seek to achieve the potentially difficult task of keeping covid under control while keeping covid under control while keeping our economy fully open. indeed, many other countries are already demonstrating the value of covid certification. it is for these reasons cabinet decided this morning
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to proceed with the laying of the regulations that will bring such a scheme into operation. however, as i have said previously, we are also determined to listen to, and as far as possible, respond to the reasonable concerns of business, so that the introduction and practical implementation of the scheme is as smooth as possible. i can confirm therefore that cabinet agreed this morning a change to our original plans for the scheme because my commencement. the new staged approach we are proposing now is designed to help businesses adapt to the requirements the scheme will place upon them and give them a period in which they can operationalise and test their arrangements in practice. i can therefore confirm that after the legal obligation comes into force of 5am on friday, this week, we intend to allow a further period of slightly more than two weeks until the 18th of october before any business could face enforcement action for noncompliance. this period, effectively a grace period, will allow businesses to test, adapt
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and build confidence in the practical arrangements they will need to put in place to be compliant with the scheme. as i said earlier, the government is persuaded that a covid certification scheme will help us mitigate the risk to virus poses to all of those over the winter and that's why we intend to proceed with it. however, the pragmatic compromise that i've just outlined in relation to a staged introduction of the scheme demonstrates, i hope, that we are listening to business about the practical challenges they face and that we are determined to work with them to overcome these. presiding officer, to conclude, as we move for the first time entry went out with covid circulating but without any significant restrictions in place, we are, i am pleased to say, in a much better position than we might have hoped forjust a few weeks ago. cases have halved in the past few weeks and we hope this will be followed by an easing of at least the direct covid pressure on the nhs. however, there is no room for
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complacency about the potential impact we may face this winter. the efforts that have been made by so many over the past month to step up compliance with mitigations and drive up vaccination rates do seem to be working. we have collectively halted the search and brought case numbers down. but, and this is always the most difficult messages, cases are still too high for comfort, so it is vital we do not let up and we maintain the progress of the last few weeks. that has to be a collective endeavour, as ever. all of us have a part to play in keeping transmission under control so i will close as usual with the remainer of the three key things we can all do to protect ourselves and others. first, do get vaccinated if you are eligible and have not yet done so. this does remain the single most important thing any of us can do. second, please test regularly with lateral flow devices. these can be ordered through the nhs inform website are collected from a local
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test cyber pharmacy. if you test positive or are identified as a close contact or have symptoms of the virus, please sell vitally and book a pcr test. thirdly, please comply with the mitigations are still in place. where face coverings and indoor public places, shops, public transport, and when moving around in hospitality settings. meet outdoors as you can stop i know this will get harder as we move into autumn and winter, but outdoor meetings are still safer. when meetings are still safer. when meeting indoors, open windows and tried to keep safe distance from people from other households, what chance thoroughly. all of these precautions matter and will help keep you and others around you safer and as we can see from the data i have reported today, they are making a difference. let's all stick with it and hopefully get cases down even further. white addressing the scottish — nicola sturgeon addressing the
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scottish parliament. if - nicola sturgeon addressing the scottish parliament.— - nicola sturgeon addressing the scottish parliament. if there is any resonse scottish parliament. if there is any response we _ scottish parliament. if there is any response we will _ scottish parliament. if there is any response we will bring _ scottish parliament. if there is any response we will bring it _ scottish parliament. if there is any response we will bring it to - scottish parliament. if there is any response we will bring it to you - scottish parliament. if there is any response we will bring it to you on | response we will bring it to you on bbc news. the key thing was the pause in the enforcement of the vaccine passport, although they come live in the 1st of october and venues will be required to ask people to demonstrate they have been vaccinated or if they were exempt, they will not take action until october. another breaking story... let's go live to capitol hill in washington, where top pentagon officials who oversaw the united states's exit from afghanistan are due to testify in front of the senate armed services committee. the committee is hearing from defence secretary lloyd austin, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff mark milley and centcom commander general kenneth mckenzie.
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let's hear what they're talking about now. let's hear what they're talking about now— about now. the taliban is in a stronuer about now. the taliban is in a stronger position _ about now. the taliban is in a stronger position than - about now. the taliban is in a stronger position than 9/11. i about now. the taliban is in a i stronger position than 9/11. the terrorist members are now senior government, and senior government positions. we went from we will never negotiate with terrorists to we must negotiate with terrorists. in the years that i've been here, we have heard over and over again you do not negotiate with terrorists. and now it is required. worst of all, 13 brave americans were killed in the evacuation effort three days later the biden administration said it had struck an isis operative and in fact killed ten afghan civilians including seven children. president biden concluded the drawdown, by
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doing the unthinkable, he left the american spine. the men and women who served in uniform, their heroic families and the american people deserve answers — he left the americans behind. how did this disaster happened? why were americans left behind? president biden's decision to withdraw has expanded the threat of terrorism and increase the likelihood of an attack on the homeland. the administration is telling the american people that the plan to deal with these threats is something called over the horizon counterterrorism, and that that we do these types of operations elsewhere in the world. that is misleading at best and dishonest at worst. there is no plan, we have no reliable partners on the ground, we have no basis is nearby, the afghan government is now led by terrorists with long ties to al-qaeda, and we
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are... , , . ., with long ties to al-qaeda, and we are... , , ., ~ ., ., ., are... the republican of oklahoma. commenting _ are... the republican of oklahoma. commenting on _ are... the republican of oklahoma. commenting on the _ are... the republican of oklahoma. commenting on the decision - are... the republican of oklahoma. commenting on the decision to - commenting on the decision to withdraw abruptly by president biden. we will keep monitoring on that, it is onlyjust started, we will monitor the answers and exchanges, and the best of them we will try and bring you through the course of the afternoon. there is the secretary of state for defence and himself a former centcom commander. let's return to fuel shortages in the uk the doctors�* union, the british medical association are calling for healthcare staff to be given priority at petrol stations. they are warning that essential services could be hit if healthcare workers can't get to work. i'm nowjoined with aftab ahmed who is a nurse, who yesterday had to cancel a shift due to disruption caused by the fuel crisis. thank you very much for being with
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us on bbc news. tell us first of all what happened yesterday? what we should experience? where you are trying to top up your car or were you in the position where you really had to get petrol?— had to get petrol? actually, i worked on — had to get petrol? actually, i worked on sunday _ had to get petrol? actually, i worked on sunday night, - had to get petrol? actually, i worked on sunday night, so i j had to get petrol? actually, i - worked on sunday night, so i work in oxford and ifinish my shift worked on sunday night, so i work in oxford and i finish my shift and worked on sunday night, so i work in oxford and ifinish my shift and i had no fuel left. my car was unreserved feel. i decided to fill up, but i stayed in the uk for two hours and at the same point i was tired and towards the end of the queue, the petrol station staff came up queue, the petrol station staff came up and said there is no more petrol left, only diesel available. so i just went home and thought i would have a rest and check up later. later on, i got up early at four o'clock, i thought let's go and check it now. so i went again and
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stayed in the queue for an hour, and this was a different fuel stations, petrol station, so the one in the morning was shut down, i went to a different one and stayed there for an hour and there was no petrol again. so i had to cancel my shift and let my manager and staff who are coordinating in the ward no, so i was quite stressful for them that i had to cancel my shift, a lot of pressure on the ward as well. find pressure on the ward as well. and tirina for pressure on the ward as well. and tiring for you _ pressure on the ward as well. and tiring for you at — pressure on the ward as well. and tiring for you at the end of a long shift and then having to get up early before your next shift to try and find petrol. the obvious question is, did you sleep very well that night? question is, did you sleep very well that niuht? ., .. ,
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question is, did you sleep very well thatniuht? ., , �* , that night? no, exactly. because the stress was still _ that night? no, exactly. because the stress was still there. _ that night? no, exactly. because the stress was still there. i _ that night? no, exactly. because the stress was still there. i couldn't - stress was still there. i couldn't sleep very well because i kept thinking about how am i going to go to work? i kept waking myself up again and again, but then ijust woke up early and decided to go and check up, even though i was going to start at eight o'clock, but i went out at four o'clock, but there is no success. ~ . out at four o'clock, but there is no success. . . , . ., ., success. what effect did it have on the hospital. _ success. what effect did it have on the hospital, you _ success. what effect did it have on the hospital, you cancelling - success. what effect did it have on the hospital, you cancelling your i the hospital, you cancelling your shift? is there a knock—on effect of that? shift? is there a knock-on effect of that? , , shift? is there a knock-on effect of that? , y ., , . , that? definitely, it affects the continuity of— that? definitely, it affects the continuity of care _ that? definitely, it affects the continuity of care towards - that? definitely, it affects the - continuity of care towards patients. it just creates an continuity of care towards patients. itjust creates an environment of anxiety and pressure on the nurses on the floor in the ward. they have to check who can do the shift. if not, then agency staff comment. —
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come in. and it's a nursery does not know the patient, and there is a big gap between if you know your patients and if you do not know your patient. it affects the continuity of care. . . r' patient. it affects the continuity of care. . ., i. ., patient. it affects the continuity of care. . ., ., of care. can i ask you, what you think of the _ of care. can i ask you, what you think of the suggestion - of care. can i ask you, what you think of the suggestion that - of care. can i ask you, what you think of the suggestion that the | of care. can i ask you, what you - think of the suggestion that the bma have made today that there should be designated petrol stations in towns and cities, since this is a problem principally at the moment affecting towns and cities, where emergency workers, health care workers like yourself, presumably social care workers as well, could go and they would be the only people who were eligible to get fuel and that would, the theory is at least, would increase the availability of petrol? i think this would be the best thing to do in these circumstances. because the front line staff is being affected big time. i am just an example of it. there are porters,
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doctors, nurses, then there are delivery drivers, so it is just... it is just creating a big knock—on effect on the community overall, so i think it is a very good suggestion, but the thing is, how the petrol station staff, there should be signposts that there should be signposts that there should be signposts that there should be more awareness towards it so that nurses or doctors can go and... you know, the clues are so long — the queues are so long, you cannot overtake the queues. that is the main issue.— the main issue. we'll leave it there. thank _ the main issue. we'll leave it there. thank you _ the main issue. we'll leave it there. thank you so - the main issue. we'll leave it there. thank you so much . the main issue. we'll leave it| there. thank you so much and the main issue. we'll leave it. there. thank you so much and i the main issue. we'll leave it- there. thank you so much and i hope you have better luck soon. 0ne nurse's experiences of the problem is getting enough fuel to be able to get to work on time.
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ministers are understood to be cutting the threshold at which graduates begin to pay tuition. such a proposal would save the treasury about £2 billion a year. the final decision has not yet been taken. joining me now is nick hillman who is the director of the higher education policy institute. you've been immersing the questions of student finance for many years now. what do you make of this idea? no students or graduates want to have to repay more money than they do already, but the difficulty we haveis do already, but the difficulty we have is of course the country is less rich than we thought it was, partly because of the pandemic, and the treasury is absolutely determined to spend less on higher education in the future. so my
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position is very clear, i don't want this change to happen, but is a lot better than some other cuts that could happen. the better than some other cuts that could happen-— better than some other cuts that could ha en. .,, ., , .,, ., could happen. the least worst option but none are — could happen. the least worst option but none are particularly _ could happen. the least worst option but none are particularly appealing? | but none are particularly appealing? i think that's right. the alternative options are things like slashing the number of places available in universities. anyone on social media at the moment knows this is the week when people are going to university for the first time. they are very excited to be starting at university, and if we reduce the number of places, fewer people will be able to do that. so the treasury does need to find savings across government, and if education is on the receiving end, this is manageable, unpalatable, but manageable. this this is manageable, unpalatable, but manageable-— manageable. this is all about olitical manageable. this is all about political choices _ manageable. this is all about political choices in _ manageable. this is all about political choices in the - manageable. this is all about political choices in the end, l manageable. this is all about i political choices in the end, and they may... say hang on a minute, we are already saying to people of working age, you will have to pay
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more national insurance, that does not apply to the very oldest workers above pension age, but making changes to national insurance... it looks to be a lot of people like this is another example of the generation who did not enjoy the best advantages of public services, and will see a lower amount spent proportionally on public services than perhaps the grandparent�*s generation or even their patient was my generation, being penalised for the decisions that arguably every other generation should have to pay the share for. other generation should have to pay the share for-— the share for. naturally but when our grandparents _ the share for. naturally but when our grandparents were _ the share for. naturally but when our grandparents were 18 - the share for. naturally but when our grandparents were 18 or - the share for. naturally but when our grandparents were 18 or 19, l our grandparents were 18 or 19, almost none of them went to higher education. now more than half of people go to higher education. it is much more expensive. it is also the case that half of people still don't go to higher education, and if you expect taxpayers, all taxpayers to pick up the tab, that means people who have had no benefit directly from higher education picking up the
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cost. and remember, if this change is to happen, the threshold is still £23,000. people in very low paid professions that would pay nothing and you only pay a small percentage of your income above the threshold, which is currently about 27,000. fine which is currently about 27,000. one brief last point. _ which is currently about 27,000. one brief last point, is the problem here or not the way public spending is proportionate? is it not more sensible to look across the board rather than try and take one bit out? particularly bet that everybody says after a pandemic is arguably more important?— says after a pandemic is arguably more important? look, i agree with that. i more important? look, i agree with that- i would _ more important? look, i agree with that. i would like _ more important? look, i agree with that. i would like to _ more important? look, i agree with that. i would like to see _ more important? look, i agree with that. i would like to see more - more important? look, i agree with. that. i would like to see more money spent on education any crisis but the difficulty is, education is not just higher education, it is also early years, schooling, and therefore, in the ne for education will only get a fixed sum of money out of the treasury and is to decide
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how much you spend on schools, how much an early years, how much to spend on catch—up education because of the pandemic and how much to spend on further education colleges as well as universities.— as well as universities. thank you very much — as well as universities. thank you very much for— as well as universities. thank you very much for being _ as well as universities. thank you very much for being with - as well as universities. thank you very much for being with us. - as well as universities. thank you very much for being with us. a i very much for being with us. a fascinating subject. i'm sure you will have views on that, watching at home. the 1966 world cup winner roger hunt has died at the age of 83. the england striker also scored 244 league goals for liverpool, which is still a club record. here's our sports correspondent andy swiss. engen's other star striker of 1966. sir geoff hurst plus mangoes might have won the world cup final, but it roger hunt's that help them get there. his ability first emerged at liverpool. after making his debut in
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1959, he went on to become the club's record scorer, helping liverpool two league titles, and in 1965, to their first ever victory in the fa cup. at the same time, his international career was also blossoming. by the 1966 world cup he was an england regular, and he soon showed why. he scored three goals in the group stage, but withjimmy greaves returning from injury, hunt was unsure of his place in the final and tell the manager broke the news. we went to the cinema on the friday night, and this was when we were getting off the coach at the cinema it took me on one side and told me i'd be playing the next day, which was fantastic news. fa cup final relate was all my dreams as a professional, but the world cup final was something you do not imagine. in final was something you do not imauine. . ., ., , ,,
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imagine. in that final it was sir geoff hurst — imagine. in that final it was sir geoff hurst that _ imagine. in that final it was sir geoff hurst that grabbed - imagine. in that final it was sir geoff hurst that grabbed the i geoff hurst that grabbed the headlines... but it was hunt that had a close—up view of its crucial moment. the question of whether first�*s second go cross the line was one of the game's enduring controversies, but aren't following and am starting to celebrate had no doubt. 50 and am starting to celebrate had no doubt. . , and am starting to celebrate had no doubt. ., , , .,, and am starting to celebrate had no doubt. . , , ., ., doubt. so many people come to me and sa , one doubt. so many people come to me and say. one thing — doubt. so many people come to me and say. one thing they _ doubt. so many people come to me and say, one thing they see _ doubt. so many people come to me and say, one thing they see as _ doubt. so many people come to me and say, one thing they see as was - doubt. so many people come to me and say, one thing they see as was it - say, one thing they see as was it over the line? the other one is why did you not knock in? i turned away. i thought it was over the line and bouncing into the roof of the net. i'm still certain it was over the line. . ., , ._ ., line. hunt continued playing for liverool line. hunt continued playing for liverpool and _ line. hunt continued playing for liverpool and england - line. hunt continued playing for liverpool and england until- line. hunt continued playing for i liverpool and england until 1969. line. hunt continued playing for - liverpool and england until1969. he liverpool and england until 1969. he eventually left anfield with some 286 goals and after retiring from the game took on a very different job, joining his family's haulage
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company. his exploits for england were eventually recognised in 2000, when he was one of five world cup winners to receive mbe, but liverpool fans gave them an unofficial title, sir roger, liverpool fans gave them an unofficialtitle, sir roger, one liverpool fans gave them an unofficial title, sir roger, one of the most prolific strikers english football has ever seen. roger hunt, the liverpool and england footballer who has died at the age of 84. time for a look at the weather. the term unsettled really sums up the weather over the next couple of days. we have had some sunshine at times today, the picture at pool earlier. through the rest of the day it will be the story of showers and longer spells of rain and that sums up longer spells of rain and that sums up the weather for much of the week ahead. we have an area of low pressure with associated weather fronts, bringing heavy rain particularly across england and whales. the green cooler showing heavy birth of north—east england, the midlands and the southwest.
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eastern england, the main area of rain sweeps in, a little drierfor the north—west of the uk. still some showers moving in here. it will be a colder night than we have seen recently, with temperatures even in our towns and cities, 6—7 , but colder than that in the countryside. wednesday probably the driest of the week, one or two showers moving through on the north—westerly breeze, many persisting dry, not particularly warm, 12—16 .
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the army is put on standby to help ease the fuel crisis but the transport secretary says there are signs the worst might soon be over. there are the first tentative signs now of stabilisation in forecourt storage which will not be reflected in the queues as yet but it is the first time we have seen more petrol than in stations itself. we are all wondering how long it will go on for. rules have gone out the window. people are desperate. _ the murder of the london teacher sabina nessa — a 36 year old man — appears in court charged with her murder. the scottish government has decided
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to delay enforcement of its vaccine passport programme for nightclubs and larger live events by more than two weeks. delegates at the labour conference will vote on a minimum wage of £15 an hour. andy mcdonald quit the shadow cabinet in protest at the opposition of the leadership to the proposal. liverpool legend roger hunt, one of england's1966 world cup winning squad, has died at the age of 83. we all have our secrets, we just didn't get to yours yet. and bond is back — the much anticipated final performance from daniel craig premieres in london. good afternoon. the transport secretary, grant shapps, says after days
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of fuel shortages at the pumps, there are indications the situation is stabilising. the petrol retailers' association says anecdotal evidence from its members suggests demand on forecourts is still significantly higher than normal but not as high as it was this weekend. the government is still putting the army on standby to drive tankers but mr shapps said the measures already put in place appeared to be having some effect. the surge in demand came because of fears that a shortage of drivers would hit fuel supply although there is plenty at refineries. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. day five and it is still a very long wait for petrol around telford. not everywhere has problems — urban areas are the worst affected. drivers hoping to fill up before the pumps run out, deliveries unable to keep up with all the panic buying. we're all wondering how long it can go on for. that is what every driver wants to know. there are now the first very tentative signs of stabilisation
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in forecourts' storage which will not be reflected in the queues as yet. but it is the first time we have seen more petrol in the petrol stations itself. i think, as the industry said yesterday, the sooner we can return to our normal buying habits, the sooner this situation will return to normal. but it's not easy for those who rely on fuel to get to work. emma's carers struggled to reach her last night. without my carers, my situation is life—threatening. i'm on a ventilator, as you can see, and i require 24—hour carejust to survive and to go about my day—to—day life. eventually, she was able to get to a petrol station to fill up, but that was after many hours of trying. more calls today for health and care workers to get priority for fuel. we have had no support, no messaging from government about this.
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we are told things will ease later in the week. this is a problem today, colleagues have got limited amounts of fuel. as i said, we cannot wait two or three hours when we have patients at home needing our care and attention. but petrol retailers think that is easier said than done. it is a very complex and confrontational system which i'm sure ministers and indeed industry would be loath to see, because who is an emergency worker? of course, it is notjust key workers being impacted. the knock—on effects are starting to be felt for many businesses. just think about all the vans we rely on these days for a host of goods and services. like this dry cleaning business in north west london. it's been extremely difficult. out of the 15 vans that we normally operate, we are only able to get six or seven on the road.
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which has meant, in the last week, a 35% drop in operations. which obviously has had a knock—on effect to our bottom line. the uk has plenty of fuel. the hope is the demand will soon fall to normal levels because the longer all of this goes on, the wider the ripple effects will be. emma simpson, bbc news. 0ur defence correspondent, jonathan beale, says there are practical limits as to what the army can do. the army and the military have made a difference in issues like the covid pandemic, in the olympics in 2012. i think there's a limit to what they can do here. 150 is not an awful lot but there are 150 personnel on standby who qualify to drive lorries which carry fuel. another 150 personnel are also on standby to be their buddies in the cab — they would still have to be trained to drive those
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fuel company lorries, they would not drive military lorries, that might take 2—5 days. the earliest we would see them out, if they are required, would be the end of the week. in addition to that, i should say also remember, the shortage of fuel driver lorries is about 1,000, so 150's about a tenth, but in addition to that, there are going to be 20 military personnel who are qualified to test hgv drivers, this is the wider issue of a shortage of hgv drivers. who will be made available to the department for transport to push through people through those tests. again, this is a small limited response and this is as much about politicians showing that they are doing something to assuage the public frustration. 0ur political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster. what's being said about the government's strategy over this crisis? 0ver over the last couple of days, the
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strategy from the government has been to hope this goes away, and there was a hope that by saying, fuel is not going to run out, it is about what is going on at forecourts and if people act normally this situation will disappear, but the hope from ministers was that woodwork and that is why there was so much emphasis in whitehall last week on the statement from the industry — was that would work. the statement said stick to your normal habits and they will not be a shortage, and i have got to say, there seems to be cautious optimism in government that the strategy is starting to pay off. the data ministers are getting through daily at the moment about distribution suggests to them about the situation is starting to stabilise at petrol stations, but that does not mean if you go out this afternoon, you won't see some queues, because it could take a couple of days before the
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trickle down off that means that the situation at petrol stations gets back to normal, but when we heard from the transport secretary this morning, he seemed a bit more optimistic than ministers had been over the last few days. that said, i don't think this is a slam dunk, and i think we know that some of the warnings and optimism we have heard over the last couple of weeks from the government has not always filtered through to answers. [30 the government has not always filtered through to answers. do the government _ filtered through to answers. do the government accept _ filtered through to answers. do the government accept that _ filtered through to answers. do the government accept that if - filtered through to answers. do the government accept that if you - filtered through to answers. do the government accept that if you say i filtered through to answers. do the l government accept that if you say to people, there isn't a shortage, because fuel is available but there is a shortage where they expect to get it, that that dissidents undermines confidence in the overall message? — descendants. — dissidents during dissonance. there's a lot of stuff going on in
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terms of the strategy the government has approached this with and yesterday it was a sense of trying to ignore it, really, and hope it goes away, but today there is more reassurance from ministers and i would not be surprised if that continues over the course of the day. i suppose, continues over the course of the day. isuppose, the continues over the course of the day. i suppose, the other element is whether the government starts to feel more political heat on this and whether the labour party starts to talk more about this. ed miliband, the shadow energy secretary, he said this afternoon that this is a crisis that was made in downing street, and i wonder if we will hear more pressure from the opposition about giving priority to key workers when it comes to filling up their tanks because even if the strategy of the government, hoping that this starts to go away works, it will be another 48 hours or so before it gets back to normal. we have heard from unions and industry bodies saying maybe we should think about letting key workers to the front of the queue or
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opening certain petrol stationsjust for them. opening certain petrol stationsjust forthem. not opening certain petrol stationsjust for them. not ruled out by the government but in whitehall there is scepticism that that could be done efficiently. scepticism that that could be done efficientl . . ., ., , a 36 year old man has appeared in court charged with the murder of the primary school teacher, sabina nessa, in south east london. koci selama from eastbourne was arrested in the early hours of sunday morning. our home affairs correspondent june kelly gave me this update from outside willesden magistrates court in north west london. this was a brief hearing this morning. koci selamaj was brought to court from a police station in north west london nearby. he'd been detained in eastbourne on sunday morning. he is an albanian
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national and before he came into court, there was discussion about whether he would need an interpreter to follow the proceedings and there was an interpreter on standby. in fact, his lawyer said his english was good enough to be able to follow proceedings without the interpreter. he appeared in the dock in a grey tracksuit and he was wearing a face mask, and he is accused of murdering sabina nessa on friday the 17th of september in south—east london. sabina nessa's body was found the following day in the park by a member of the public, but on that friday night, she had set off to meet a friend in a bar near the park and, of course, she never arrived. this morning in court, the lawyer for the defendant said his client had indicated that he would be pleading not guilty to the murder charge. this is not a formal entering of a plea and that will come later in the legal process. the next hearing in this case is on thursday when the defendant will appear at the old bailey. june kelly there in north west london. delegates at the labour conference
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in brighton are to vote on a motion proposing a minimum wage of £15 an hour. it comes after andy mcdonald quit his shadow cabinetjob, in protest at the leadership's opposition to the proposal. the party leader sir keir starmer thanked him for his service but said his own focus was on "winning the next general election". from brighton, here's our political correspondent iain watson. after lockdowns, this week was to have been the opportunity for keir starmer to get out and about communicating labour's message. he began his conference laying down the law to his own party by changing its leadership rules and braving resistance from the left. and now the plan was to move away from procedures and onto policy with an announcement on community policing. there should be an extra 5,000 special constables, it's 5,000 because i think that is a number that could be recruited very quickly. but this party conference has been a law unto itself.
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last night, the shadow minister for employment rights gave up hisjob in the shadow cabinet. he refused to argue against union demands for a £15 an hour minimum wage, even though the current policy is for a wage of at least £10 an hour. i cannot, in all conscience, stay in a shadow cabinet that can't make that commitment. keep going, andy! chanting: andy, andy, andy! his departure has created a storm, emboldening supporters of the former leadership and, indeed, the former leader. to win an election, we need to raise minimum wages and have socialist policies forjustice in our society. and today, the conference delegates will now debate the call for a £15 minimum wage. keir starmer wants to portray himself as a strong leader. his aides say he is moving the party away from thejeremy corbyn era. but facing likely defeat, the leadership has decided neither to support nor to reject a higher minimum wage.
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policies passed here by the membership and binding on the leadership, but they can certainly cause a distraction. keir starmer had promised to reform and unite his party. he may be able to do one or the other, but not both. iain watson, bbc news, brighton. iain is at the labour party conference in brighton. 0ne one thing that occurs to me, andy mcdonald spoke specifically about the fact that he said it was odd that keir starmer had once argued for £15 per hour when campaigning for £15 per hour when campaigning for mcdonald's workers, so has the leadership responded to that point? the leadership of�*s point is that circumstances are different now with the pandemic, and they are also keen, having put forward an employment rights package on saturday, to say they are also very pro—business, but the other thing they have been emphasising is, while they have been emphasising is, while
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they are emphasising the £10 minimum wage which is still an increase, let's face it, the words they are emphasising today are at least, so the policy pledges at least £10 so they are giving a hint if that is what it is, that they could move at least between ten and £15 as a way of trying to defuse the row but it was the case that keir starmer had campaigned for this in the past and what some of his critics would say is that it is not the only area in which he has moved policy. during the leadership election campaign he suggested that energy companies would be nationalised but now he said to the bbc on sunday that would not be the case. when i talk about his critics, i'm going to bejoined by one now, currently party of the ruling national executive — currently part of the. there is going to be a motion today which
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includes the £15 minimum wage commitment. they say they are relaxed about it and i am not saying whether they should support or reject it, do you think that perhaps andy mcdonald was a bit too rash and he could have stayed in the shadow cabinet? a, . , he could have stayed in the shadow cabinet? , , ., cabinet? maybe they are responding to the pressure _ cabinet? maybe they are responding to the pressure from _ cabinet? maybe they are responding to the pressure from members - cabinet? maybe they are responding to the pressure from members who | to the pressure from members who have been— to the pressure from members who have been outraged that the leader of the _ have been outraged that the leader of the labour party could have held a banner— of the labour party could have held a banner saying, support £15 per hour. _ a banner saying, support £15 per hour. this — a banner saying, support £15 per hour, this comes from the demands for workers — hour, this comes from the demands for workers and we are a party supposed _ for workers and we are a party supposed to be representing working class people. and fast food workers who say— class people. and fast food workers who say £15 per hour is what will keep _ who say £15 per hour is what will keep them — who say £15 per hour is what will keep them out of poverty and of course _ keep them out of poverty and of course we — keep them out of poverty and of course we should agree with the principle — course we should agree with the principle that work should not entrench _ principle that work should not entrench poverty. i think it is a climb—down from the labour party. andy— climb—down from the labour party. andy mcdonald is a man of principle and it— andy mcdonald is a man of principle and it was— andy mcdonald is a man of principle and it was a — andy mcdonald is a man of principle and it was a red line for him. especially— and it was a red line for him. especially the second part which was about— especially the second part which was about a _ especially the second part which was about a living statutory sick pay, that is _ about a living statutory sick pay, that is important. we have seen cleaners. — that is important. we have seen cleaners, one of the most important
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aspects _ cleaners, one of the most important aspects of— cleaners, one of the most important aspects of the workforce who have brought _ aspects of the workforce who have brought us — aspects of the workforce who have brought us out of the pandemic, having _ brought us out of the pandemic, having to — brought us out of the pandemic, having to isolate on statutory sick pay which — having to isolate on statutory sick pay which you cannot live on so the call for— pay which you cannot live on so the call for a _ pay which you cannot live on so the call for a living sick pay is absolutely right and being asked to id absolutely right and being asked to go into— absolutely right and being asked to go into that meeting is a bit boring. _ go into that meeting is a bit boring, but this is where you try to .et boring, but this is where you try to get a _ boring, but this is where you try to get a common position. effectively, this would be _ get a common position. effectively, this would be an _ get a common position. effectively, this would be an attempt _ get a common position. effectively, this would be an attempt to - get a common position. effectively, this would be an attempt to keep i get a common position. effectively, i this would be an attempt to keep the issue off the conference floor, behind closed doors. you would hammer out the issue with various people including unions and you would ask him to keep the pledge away from being voted on. it seems remarkable- — away from being voted on. it seems remarkable. we _ away from being voted on. it seems remarkable. we know _ away from being voted on. it seems remarkable. we know how - away from being voted on. it seems remarkable. we know how much - away from being voted on. it seems - remarkable. we know how much people are struggling in the pandemic and wes streeting talked about a child poverty— wes streeting talked about a child poverty group, but the best way for people _ poverty group, but the best way for people not— poverty group, but the best way for people not to be in poverty is that the people caring for them should be paid a _ the people caring for them should be paid a proper wage. the people caring for them should be paid a proper wage-— paid a proper wage. jeremy corbyn toda , he paid a proper wage. jeremy corbyn today. he said _ paid a proper wage. jeremy corbyn
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today, he said to _ paid a proper wage. jeremy corbyn today, he said to win _ paid a proper wage. jeremy corbyn today, he said to win an _ paid a proper wage. jeremy corbyn today, he said to win an election i today, he said to win an election that you need a higher minimum wage, coming from a man who has last two elections in succession, maybe he should have a bit more humility? you could have had these arguments away from conference. we could have had these arguments away from conference.— could have had these arguments away from conference. we are a democratic member led — from conference. we are a democratic member led organisation _ from conference. we are a democratic member led organisation and - from conference. we are a democratic member led organisation and this - from conference. we are a democratic member led organisation and this is i member led organisation and this is the members opportunity to have a say. jeremy corbyn represents socialist — say. jeremy corbyn represents socialist and he is an important person — socialist and he is an important person he _ socialist and he is an important person. he is a fellow socialist and a very— person. he is a fellow socialist and a very important political person. it a very important political person. it was _ a very important political person. it was a _ a very important political person. it was a complex set of circumstances that lost the last general— circumstances that lost the last general election, 2017 brought us close _ general election, 2017 brought us close to _ general election, 2017 brought us close to government and some of these _ close to government and some of these people should be humble about their part _ these people should be humble about their part that they played in denigrating that man. so their part that they played in denigrating that man.- their part that they played in denigrating that man. so it was their fault? _ denigrating that man. so it was theirfault? it— denigrating that man. so it was their fault? it is _ denigrating that man. so it was their fault? it is very _ denigrating that man. so it was their fault? it is very complex. | their fault? it is very complex. laura peacock, _ their fault? it is very complex. laura peacock, who _ their fault? it is very complex. laura peacock, who lost - their fault? it is very complex. laura peacock, who lost her. their fault? it is very complex. i laura peacock, who lost her seat their fault? it is very complex. - laura peacock, who lost her seat at the last election, but she is supporting the £15 pledge which we voted on this afternoon. we are
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expecting that the leadership stance that it should be at least £10 will be defeated. that it should be at least £10 will be defeated-— that it should be at least £10 will be defeated. ., ., , . ,, be defeated. you are bringing back ha- be defeated. you are bringing back happy memories — be defeated. you are bringing back happy memories that, _ be defeated. you are bringing back happy memories that, those - be defeated. you are bringing back happy memories that, those who i happy memories that, those who recall mr solomon binding! nicola sturgeon told the scottish parliament that the vaccine passport scheme would come into effect on friday but will not be enforced until the 18th of october. let's talk to our scotland correspondent alexandra mackenzie who is in glasgow. we can hear from we can hearfrom nicola sturgeon first. we can hear from nicola sturgeon first. ., . ., ., first. the introduction of certification _ first. the introduction of certification means - first. the introduction of certification means that| first. the introduction of i certification means that we first. the introduction of - certification means that we are first. the introduction of _ certification means that we are able to remove the capacity limits and the associated exemption process which have been in place for stadium and live events and i know this will be welcomed by event planners and
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local authorities. the certification scheme will apply as previously indicated, to late—night venues open after midnight with alcohol, music and dancing, to live indoor unseated events of more than 500 people, to live outdoor unseeded events of more than 4000 people and to any event of more than 10,000 people. this means that when the scheme starts anyone over the age of 18 who wants to go to a large event or to a late night venue will be required to provide evidence they are fully evacuated dip vaccinated, and the nhs status app dip vaccinated, and the nhs status app will go live on thursday and it will provide a digital record of a usehs will provide a digital record of a user's status including a qr code for each vaccination a person has received. it is already possible for any of us to request a paper copy of our vaccination record or to download a pdf from the nhs inform website. .., ., ,, ., ., ,,
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website. nicola sturgeon talking earlier. alexandra, _ website. nicola sturgeon talking earlier. alexandra, what - website. nicola sturgeon talking earlier. alexandra, what is - website. nicola sturgeon talking earlier. alexandra, what is the i earlier. alexandra, what is the explanation for this? there were not any suggestions that i recall that there was going to be any breaking in period or a period of grace, and now that is, is that because of industry pressure? irate now that is, is that because of industry pressure?— now that is, is that because of industry pressure? we have 'ust heard about fl industry pressure? we have 'ust heard about this in i industry pressure? we have 'ust heard about this in the i industry pressure? we have 'ust heard about this in the last i industry pressure? we have just heard about this in the last half| industry pressure? we have just i heard about this in the last half an hour or so, heard about this in the last half an hour orso, and it has heard about this in the last half an hour or so, and it has also come as news to us. nicola sturgeon had described it as a bit of a grace period for businesses and you could call it a delay and you could say it is coming out in a phased way but on the 1st of october we will still see the 1st of october we will still see the introduction of the scheme and that will be if you go clubbing, you will have to show your vaccine passport and you will have to show that you have been double vaccinated, or if you go to a large football match on saturday. as nicola sturgeon said, the app will
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still go live on thursday but there is going to be a delay or grace period in the enforcement of this. there had been a lot of disquiet within the nightclub community in particular because they had been the last businesses to open after the covid restrictions were relaxed, so they said they were being treated quite badly again. they had made a lot of changes and invested a lot of money but now they were having to deal with vaccine passports. so this delay could help them, we have not heard reaction from them yet. it will still be in place but not going to be enforced until the 18th of october. we have had some political 0ctober. we have had some political reaction in the chamber this afternoon. the leader of the scottish tories douglas ross described it as a botched plan and he said this makes it more confusing and suggests that they should do
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away with it altogether. and acai work the labour leader said he lacked confidence in the scheme being able to work — anas sarwar, the scottish labour leader. being able to work - anas sarwar, the scottish labour leader.- the scottish labour leader. nicola sturueon the scottish labour leader. nicola sturgeon made — the scottish labour leader. nicola sturgeon made clear— the scottish labour leader. nicola sturgeon made clear that - the scottish labour leader. nicola sturgeon made clear that she - the scottish labour leader. nicola sturgeon made clear that she was the scottish labour leader. nicola - sturgeon made clear that she was not exactly happy with the falling into line with what the westminster government had decided to do on international travel which expects people arriving in england — affects people arriving in england — affects people arriving in england, but this is where she has chosen to take a different path. what is the kind of thinking on that? why in some areas is the scottish government prepared to go along with westminster and in other areas it is saying no, we want to do something different? people are affected by covid across the whole of the uk after all. nicola sturueon whole of the uk after all. nicola sturgeon does _ whole of the uk after all. nicola sturgeon does say _ whole of the uk after all. nicola sturgeon does say that - whole of the uk after all. nicola sturgeon does say that she -
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whole of the uk after all. nicola sturgeon does say that she just| whole of the uk after all. nicola - sturgeon does say that she just want and would prefer a four nations approach but she doesn't always go that way and she does say that she is looking at the science and at different situations in scotland. scotland had seen very high levels of covid figures over the last few weeks. that has gone down in the last week or so and today we had 2370 covid cases. she says people still need to be cautious because we are coming into winter and also because hospital numbers are still up because hospital numbers are still up and there is still also a thousand people in hospital. you are right, overthe thousand people in hospital. you are right, over the travel vaccinations or travel testing, right, over the travel vaccinations ortravel testing, i right, over the travel vaccinations or travel testing, i should say, scotland has been more cautious. what she did say today, she confirmed that from the 4th of october, predeparture test for 0ctober, predeparture test for people coming to scotland will be removed except for red countries, so thatis removed except for red countries, so
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that is now in line with england, and the difference with england at the moment, but it sounds like scotland will come into line with england, the post—arrival pcr test is still in place currently but that is still in place currently but that is being discussed. she made the point that if scotland doesn't come into line with england, that is going to have a negative impact on the aviation industry, but she did hint that she doesn't particularly want to come in line with england with this but feels that she possibly should because of the aviation industry. 18 possibly should because of the aviation industry.— possibly should because of the aviation industry. 18 months into this pandemic — aviation industry. 18 months into this pandemic now, _ aviation industry. 18 months into this pandemic now, slightly - aviation industry. 18 months into this pandemic now, slightly over| this pandemic now, slightly over now, and is there a sense in which, do you think there is a sense in which on both sides, perhaps, there has been a change of attitude about how devolution is or isn't working? nicola sturgeon has said since the election and before the election that her number one priority is the
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covid pandemic, getting scotland through this pandemic, making sure the nhs gets through this next winter and she said this could be the most difficult winter for the nhs in living memory. 0bviously, she has also mentioned independence, and since the election, the election victory, but she has given the sense that she would prefer to have a four nations approach but she has definitely in certain areas said that scotland will go its own way and as i said she has been quite cautious on this change in testing in terms of international travel. alexandra mckenzie, thanks for joining us. the government has stripped the rail operator, southeastern, of its franchise because of what it called "a serious breach of good faith". the company's services between london, kent and east sussex
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will now be publicly run. the decision was made after more than £25 million of historical payments due to the department for transport were not paid. 0ur transport correspondent caroline davies reports. it's not unusual for train lines to be renationalised. what is rare is when it's about trust. this morning, the government announced it would be taking over running lser's services after it found that £25 million had not been declared by the operator. the company itself is taking a large number of steps, and i'm sure they will be saying more about it. as far as i was concerned, no matter what steps they took, to breach the confidence of the public, to deliberately conceal payments due back to the taxpayer, is entirely unacceptable. the operator of last resort will take over the services from the 17th of october, but the government has ensured passengers and the railway�*s employees that the service and theirjobs will not change.
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the company that runs lser, go—ahead, has said that they have now repaid the £25 million. this morning, they said they were naturally disappointed with the decision, and that although the independent review is ongoing and the contracts concerned are highly complex, the group acknowledges that errors have been made in relation to the franchise. its stock price fell by more than 12% this morning. these issues go back to 2014. some have asked why they are only coming to light now, and could this be a bigger problem? if this matter is serious enough that it isjust beyond somebody getting it wrong in terms of accounting, and actually there is evidence of wrongdoing on a criminal nature, then of course that must be looked into. it's really important that there is integrity in the railway system, and if there's wrongdoing, then i'm sure the criminal bodies will be involved. other operators, like northern and virgin east coast main line, have previously been renationalised, but it is rare for the government to strip a company of its franchise. very, very unusual.
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you have to go back to 2003, and you find that it was the strategic rail authority doing the stripping, and it was the operators of southeastern that lost their franchise back then, so, in some ways, history is repeating itself. the way the trains are run has changed dramatically during the pandemic, and today the government has shown they are following a different track. caroline davies there. time now for a look at the weather. the term unsettled sums up the weather over the next couple of days. we have had sunshine at times. we have got an area of low pressure with associated weather fronts bringing some heavy rain over parts of england and wales and you can see the green colours showing
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the heavy bursts there. eastern england, 17—18c before the area of rain hits. a bit drierfor the north—west of the uk, through the evening and overnight, but still some showers moving in. a colder night than we have seen recently with temperatures in towns and cities 6—7c but colder in the countryside. wednesday, the driest day of the week, with a couple of showers moving through on the westerly breeze but many places remaining dry, although not warm, 12— 16c. goodbye. hello, this is bbc news, the headlines... the army is put on standby to help ease the fuel crisis but the transport secretary says there are signs the worst might soon be over. there are now the first very
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tentative signs of stabilisation in forecourt storage, which will not be reflected in the queues as yet, but it is the first time we have seen more petrol in the petrol stations itself. the murder of the london teacher sabina nessa — a 36 year old man appears in court charged with her murder. colour sturgeon announces the enforcement of vaccine passports, which will be introduced on the 1st of october, will be delayed by more than two weeks. — nicola sturgeon. delegates at the labour conference will vote on a minimum wage of £15 pounds an hour. andy mcdonald quit the shadow cabinet in protest at the leadership's opposition to the proposal. time for the sport. the 1966 world cup winner roger hunt has died at the age of 83.
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the england striker also scored 244 league goals for liverpool, which is still a club record. the current maangerjurgen klopp, says hunt "comes second to no one in his importance in the history of liverpool fc." here's our sports correspondent andy swiss. england's other star striker of 1966. sir geoff hurst goals might have won the world cup final, but it roger hunt's that helped get them there. his ability first emerged at liverpool. after making his debut in 1959, he went on to become the club's record scorer, helping liverpool to two league titles, and in 1965, to their first—ever victory in the fa cup. at the same time, his international career was also blossoming. by the 1966 world cup he was
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an england regular, and he soon showed why. he scored three goals in the group stage, but withjimmy greaves returning from injury, hunt was unsure of his place in the final until the manager broke the news. we went to the cinema on the friday night, and this was when we were getting off the coach at the cinema, he took me on one side and told me i'd be playing the next day, which was fantastic news. fa cup final really was all my dreams as a professional, but the world cup final was something you do not imagine. hunt continued playing for liverpool and england until 1969. he eventually left anfield with some 286 goals and after retiring from the game took on a very different job, joining his family's haulage company. his exploits for england were eventually recognised in 2000,
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when he was one of five world cup winners to receive mbes, but liverpool fans gave them an unofficial title, sir roger, one of the most prolific strikers english football has ever seen. roger hunt, the liverpool and england footballer who has died at the age of 83. the england test captainjoe root has not confirmed whether he will lead the side. the tour is in the air drew two to restrictions and some players reluctant to travel without families. a decision could come later this week. the ecb have beenin come later this week. the ecb have been in dialogue with cricket australia about the exact quarantine protocols england would have to adhere to. i protocols england would have to adhere to. ., �* ~' protocols england would have to adhere to. ., �* ,, �*, ., adhere to. i don't think it's fair for me to _ adhere to. i don't think it's fair for me to see _ adhere to. i don't think it's fair for me to see what _ adhere to. i don't think it's fair for me to see what i _ adhere to. i don't think it's fair i
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for me to see what i personally... we've got to wait until we get the information, and decisions will be made of the back of that. it's really important that that is respected and that the guys get the opportunity to think that through and through what is best for them, their mental well—being. and a number of otherfactors their mental well—being. and a number of other factors they will have to figure n. joe root has been named men's player of the year by the professional cricketer�*s association. the award rounds off a brilliant summer, he scored 661 runs, including hundreds in three successive tests against india. also at those pca awards, central sparks and birmingham phoenix batter evejones has become the first domestic player to win the women's award, they've previosuly been won by england players. gareth bale will miss next month's world cup qualifiers against czech republic and estonia with a hamstring tear. the welsh captain hasn't played since the last international break and picked up the injury
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on his return to real madrid. he was due to win his 100th cap against the czechs. the wales boss robert page has described the injury as significant but hopes that he will be back for their final qualifiers in november. the full whales squad on the bbc website, scotland and northern ireland have also announced there is today. lancashire both out in their first innings forjust 78 runs against the county champions warwickshire, who are already looking to overtake that in their first innings... quite a start to the first—day match that won us days — won't last five days — wales. the teaching union has called for the government to make teachers a priority group to access locally available fuel, saying education could be disrupted if intervention
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is not made. many teachers do not have the option of using public transport because schools are in areas not easily accessible by alternatives. let's hear from the general secretary of the nasuwt. thank you for being with us on bbc news. what examples have you learnt of from your members of the impact this is having so far?— this is having so far? we've been heafina this is having so far? we've been hearing from _ this is having so far? we've been hearing from members _ this is having so far? we've been hearing from members the - this is having so far? we've been | hearing from members the length this is having so far? we've been - hearing from members the length and breadth of the country and their representatives, who are telling us that despite their best endeavours, without wanting to engage in panic buying and fuel, they are struggling to obtain fuel. for many, that has left teachers either stranded on the way to work or stranded on the way home from school. 0r, way to work or stranded on the way home from school. or, you know, very anxious about whether they are going to be able to make the journey for the remainer of the week. that is
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one of the reasons why we've said to the government that if they are considering prioritising access to fuel from local fuel stations, considering prioritising access to fuel from localfuel stations, to make teachers a priority, because children's education has already been very badly disrupted. irate children's education has already been very badly disrupted. we are told by the — been very badly disrupted. we are told by the government _ been very badly disrupted. we are told by the government and - been very badly disrupted. we are| told by the government and indeed the petrol retailers that the problem is concentrated in urban areas, in cities and in towns. surely those places were generally it is possible to use public transport? indeed, many pupils get to school by public transport in those places. to school by public transport in those places-— to school by public transport in those laces. . , , , , those places. indeed, many pupils will aet those places. indeed, many pupils will net to those places. indeed, many pupils will get to school _ those places. indeed, many pupils will get to school using _ those places. indeed, many pupils will get to school using public - will get to school using public transport and quite often for the vast majority of pupils, schools are broadly within the neighbourhoods within which those pupils lives. but thatis within which those pupils lives. but that is not the case for teachers. many of whom will travel into those areas, whether they are urban areas
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or rural areas. the fact remains, it is vitally important, without an effective public transport infrastructure which connects directly to schools, and that often is not the case, that teachers rely on the use of private to get to and from their places of work. — private vehicles. from their places of work. - private vehicles. �* from their places of work. - private vehicles. . , ., .., ., , vehicles. are you encouraging things like car sharing _ vehicles. are you encouraging things like car sharing another— vehicles. are you encouraging things like car sharing another option - vehicles. are you encouraging things like car sharing another option is - like car sharing another option is for now at least four members to work around this? are people trying to improvise, is what i'm saying? the reality is people are trying to improvise. the reality is for many teachers, and many members of the general public, they are thinking twice about their use of fuel. but the reality of the matter is, schools need to be open monday through to friday, teachers need to be there in front of their classrooms and in front of their classes at the start of the school
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day, and can leave nothing to chance. that is one of the reasons why we are saying, if the government has made some moves to try to get fuel to local stations, but the reality is, there are still queues outside filling stations, there are still teachers reporting to us that they are not able to refill their vehicles in order to be certain that they will make their way into school on time every day for the remainer of this week and into next.- of this week and into next. thank ou ve of this week and into next. thank you very much — of this week and into next. thank you very much for _ of this week and into next. thank you very much for speaking - of this week and into next. thank you very much for speaking to i of this week and into next. thank| you very much for speaking to us. let's go live to capitol hill in washington, where top pentagon officials who oversaw the united states's exit from afghanistan are testifying in front of the senate armed services committee. both sides have criticised
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present brighton leaving afghanistan. the committee is hearing from defence secretary lloyd austin, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff mark milley and centcom commander general kenneth mckenzie. let's hear what they're talking about now. as for the mission's end, my judgment remains that extending beyond the end of august would have greatly imperilled the people in our mission. the taliban made clear that their cooperation would end on the 1st of september. as you know, we face grave and growing threats from isis quay. staying longer than we did would have made it even more dangerous for our people and would not have a significantly changed the number of evacuees we could have got out — isis—k. as we consider these tactical issues today, we must also ask ourselves an equally tough questions about the wider war itself. an pause to think about the lessons we have learnt over the past
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20 years. did we have the right strategy? did we have too many strategies? did we put too much faith in our ability to build effective afghan institutions? and army, police force, government ministries? we helped build the state, mr chairman, but we could not forge a nation. the fact that the afghan army that we and our partners train simply melted away, in many cases without firing a shot, took us all by surprise and it would be dishonest to claim otherwise. we need to consider some uncomfortable truths. that we did not fully comprehend the depth of corruption and peer leadership in the senior ranks, that we did not grasp the dampening effect the frequent and unexplained rotations by the president of his commanders. that we did not anticipate the snowball effect caused by the deal is the
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taliban commander struck with local leaders in the wake of the doha agreement and that the doha agreement and that the doha agreement itself had a demoralising effect on afghan soldiers. finally, that we failed to grasp there is only so much for which the afghan forces with white. .. it is obviously war in afghanistan did not— it is obviously war in afghanistan did not end on the terms he wanted, with the _ did not end on the terms he wanted, with the taliban now in power in kabul~ _ with the taliban now in power in kabul. unprecedented, the largest area of— kabul. unprecedented, the largest area of actuation in history, evacuating hundred 24,000 people, it came at— evacuating hundred 24,000 people, it came at an _ evacuating hundred 24,000 people, it came at an incredible cost of 11 marines. — came at an incredible cost of 11 marines, one soldier and a new requirement — largest evacuation. those _ requirement — largest evacuation. those give — requirement — largest evacuation. those give their life so that people they have —
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those give their life so that people they have never met will have an opportunity to live in freedom. we must _ opportunity to live in freedom. we must remember that the taliban was and remains a terrorist organisation, and they still have not broken ties with al-qaeda. i have _ not broken ties with al-qaeda. i have no— not broken ties with al-qaeda. i have no illusions who we are dealing with _ have no illusions who we are dealing with it _ have no illusions who we are dealing with. it remains to be seen whether or not— with. it remains to be seen whether or not the _ with. it remains to be seen whether or not the taliban can consolidate power. _ or not the taliban can consolidate power. or— or not the taliban can consolidate power. or if— or not the taliban can consolidate power, or if the country will further— power, or if the country will further fracture into soap award. gary. _ further fracture into soap award. gary. that — further fracture into soap award. gary, that hearing is ongoing as we speak. two of the things that struck me from the first part of the session, lloyd austin saying that actually donald trump is my decision to make peace with the taliban had demoralised afghan soldiers — trump's decision to make peace. in saying the taliban remain a terrorist organisation and have not broken links with al-qaeda. terrorist organisation and have not broken links with al—qaeda. that’s broken links with al-qaeda. that's ri . ht. broken links with al-qaeda. that's riuht. one broken links with al-qaeda. that's right. one interesting _ broken links with al-qaeda. that's right. one interesting statistic- broken links with al-qaeda. that's right. one interesting statistic to i right. one interesting statistic to give was that, in terms of the doha agreement you were referring to, the
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deal with the taliban that donald trump dead, there were seven requirements they say on the taliban and eight requirements on the americans. they say the taliban almost up to one of their requirements, not to attack us troops. 0ne requirements, not to attack us troops. one out of seven. and that the american stock to all of theirs. they would say that, i suppose, anyway. you can see that in some way they view doha i was a particularly damaging part of the whole process of winding down in afghanistan, but they underestimated all sorts of elements, a whole list from lloyd austin about the things they did underestimate and fail to recognise. the interesting thing from mark, asked directly in the last few minutes about the damage this had done to america's credibility around the world, and to use the phrase that he believed america's opponents around the world were intensively reviewing america's abilities and
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its will to succeed, and that damage is one word you could use for it. there is an acknowledgement what has happened at the end of america's time in its longest war has had long consequences and will continue to have consequences for her. this has come in the — have consequences for her. this has come in the past, _ have consequences for her. this has come in the past, been _ have consequences for her. this has come in the past, been a _ have consequences for her. this has come in the past, been a very - come in the past, been a very important and powerful committee. is there a prospect, given the political backgrounds all of this, that its decisions are going to our findings are going to have some kind of impact on policy going forward, when america looks to other military interventions?— interventions? that's a good question- — interventions? that's a good question. these _ interventions? that's a good question. these are - interventions? that's a good i question. these are extremely partisan times, as you know. it's not kind of that likely that you're going to get a kind of very unified set of conclusions out of this committee, particularly because many of the republicans will feel the
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need to defend donald trump's actions and the democrats feeling the need to find joe biden's actions, given the process radically to presidencies. — defend. they are getting information, for one thing, it became clear this morning that donald trump had issued an orderfor all troops to be withdrawn from afghanistan before the end of his presidency, after the election took place. the order ended up being rescinded, but that is quite an extraordinary thing to try and demand, even before his own dough deadline, which was in may of this year. — doha deadline. interesting data coming in. a robust defence of the military, in terms of the soldiers, marines, airmen, navy, people on the ground, but you're seeing some acknowledgement from the leadership year that this has been a problem for them and will continue to be a problem for them, the way
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this ended. and of course, the most stark fact of all that is that 20 years on, guess who's back in charge? it years on, guess who's back in charae? ., ,, ., ., years on, guess who's back in charae? ., ,, ., , charge? it almost speaks for itself. thank ou charge? it almost speaks for itself. thank you so _ charge? it almost speaks for itself. thank you so much. _ charge? it almost speaks for itself. thank you so much. talking - charge? it almost speaks for itself. thank you so much. talking about. thank you so much. talking about what is clearly turning into a very revealing session of the senate armed forces committee, ongoing at the moment. we will bring you more in the course of the day on bbc news and of course back—up on any important new bits of information that emerge. south korea says a short—range missile has been launched from north korea into the sea of japan to stop united states and the uk condemn the missile test. they launch camejust and the uk condemn the missile test. they launch came just before not great�*s capacity to the eye today charge the united states to give up his hostile policy towards them. they said no one could deny a country's right to self—defence and to its weapons. women and children who were sexually abused over decades by the singer or
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kelly have welcomed his conviction yesterday. ajury in new york found him guilty on all counts after hearing evidence he used his fame to recruit and groom his victims, before abusing them. kelly has sold more than 75 million records worldwide he's now due to be sentenced in may when he'll find out whether he's to spend the rest of his life behind bars. only half of children and teenagers in england are currently willing to be vaccinated against covid19, according to a new study. nearly 28 thousand school pupils took part in the survey, which found vaccine hesitancy increased among younger children and those from deprived backgrounds. this report from our health correspondent katharine da costa. earlier this month the uk recommended offering all 12 to 15—year—olds a single shot of the pfizerjab to help reduce the spread of the virus and disruption within schools. but up until now little has been known about how young people themselves feel about having a covid vaccine.
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nearly 28,000 pupils in england aged between nine and 18 were questioned. just over half said they would be willing to receive a jab, 37% said they were undecided and 13% said they would decline the offer. those less willing tended to be younger, from deprived backgrounds and children who did not feel part of the school community. the researchers say social media should be used to help target accurate information at young people about covid vaccines. young people have access to more information now than ever, so much information is at their fingertips, often being thrown at them through social media and other ways so we need to make sure the information we think�*s important for them to take a decision is also made available to them in the medium they're most likely to access it. the report acknowledges views may differ in other parts of the uk and attitudes may change as more over 12s are vaccinated.
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katharine da costa, bbc news. the bereaved families forjust the bereaved families for just this group is calling on the government to bring forward the date of the public inquiry into the uk's response to the pandemic, scheduled to begin next spring. today's meeting took place outside and with social distancing in place. the leaders of northern ireland's four main unionist parties have signed a joint declaration affirming their opposition to the northern ireland protocol. the protocol was agreed by the uk and eu in 2019 to prevent a hard border in ireland by keeping northern ireland in the eu single market for goods. the leaders say northern ireland must be an integral part of the united kingdom. researchers say levels of illegal drugs entering the soil at glastonbury festival are so high that they affect the life cycle of the european eel. public urination, by festival goers, is suspected as having caused the increase. the scientists from bangor
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university have urged people to relieve themselves in the site toilets, and not in the fields. across the uk house prices have gone up by 8% in the last year — but in some coastal and rural areas, price increases are almost triple that. today the office of national statistics warned that in some areas rising property prices and increasing rents risked pricing locals out of the market. north devon is one of the most affected areas, and our correspondentjon kay reports on the impact there on people desperately needing accommodation. north devon, more popular than ever since the pandemic started. in the last year, house prices here have gone up by 22%, mainly fuelled by outsiders moving down. it is just a really horrible feeling to be made to feel like, yeah, a second—class citizen, really. emma is a cleaner. she's got little chance
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of buying a place, and now she is even struggling to rent. people i know have been living in converted sheds because they can't find anywhere to rent. living in a shed?! a converted shed, yeah. i'm not being funny, but at one point my parents were talking about, you know, whether they could put a bed in their garage for me. there's only two that's available... sarah—jane and lauren don't need official statistics to tell them there's a problem. it's a little bit - depressing, isn't it? they've been hunting for a flat to rent in bideford for six months. but landlords can make more money by renting to holiday—makers or short—term lets. got an alert yesterday at 9:43 for a property via e—mail, i phoned up at half past one on my lunch break and it had been taken off the market. in four hours, it had gone. how do they expect working people to find a house? - covid has effectively caused the perfect storm. we've got the urban—rural lifestyle concept, which has forced people
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from the cities into the coastal and rural areas, we have a shortage of stock, and we have a high demand for that stock. which means prices are going up and up. according to the property website zoopla, this year there are half as many rental properties available in the south—west of england compared with the five year average, but demand is up by more than 80%. 0ne local artistjoking that soon the only place to let will be the public toilets. jon kay, bbc news, north devon. we have our own volunteer, but this one is licensed to kill. the latest james bond film is finally here. the world premiere of no time to die is taking place this afternoon at the royal albert hall. 0ur entertainment
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correspondent reports. it has been almost six years since daniel craig last walked a bond red carpet. anticipation for his fifth 007 movie is perhaps even higher than usual because fans have had such a long wait... there's something i want to tell you. ..for the film to kick into gear. tyres squeal no time to die is the first post—covid film whose advance bookings are at pre—covid highs. cinemas are hopeful that that momentum will help them with all films over the coming weeks and months. a bond film is a big film in any year. skyfall and spectre, the last two instalments, sit at number two and number three in the all—time uk box office. so i think there are great expectations that this will be
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another trigger to get people back into cinemas. i know there is a lot of things said about what i think about these films and all of those...and whatever, but i have loved every single second. one of the greatest honours of my life. the other big draw, of course, is that this is daniel craig's final bond movie. his tenure has so far been seen as a successful one, receiving praise from fans and from the family of the secret agent's creator. i think he would have particularly loved the way that daniel craig is playing bond, because he is bringing out the more sensitive side and the sort of back story, as it were. 00... cheers. the blockbusting series of course has a very special place in cinema history. whenever you watch a bond movie, for the moment you are watching it is the best film in the world at that moment. it is pure cinema. falling in love with cinema all over again is what everyone from movie executives to cinemagoers is hoping will soon be happening. lizo mzimba, bbc news.
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if there is anything that might start as from our sofas and on demand films on the telly, i guess it's going to be that. time for a look at the weather. a changeable week of weather. thing is feeling much more autumnal. cooler and more unsettled. low pressure in charge today. many of us seeing some showers are longer spells of rain. not everywhere, a bit of brightness coming through across the north—west of the uk as we had through the afternoon and into the evening hours. further south, the influence of this area of low pressure pushing these frontal systems across england and wales in particular, breaking some fairly heavy bursts of rain. you can see where the wet weather will be through the course of the afternoon. south—west of england through the admittance up to the north—east of england, as well as that any of rain tracks gradually eastwards. could be quite heavy, thunderstorms possibly mixed in with the area of lane. could be some localised water
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flooding. cooler air moving could be some localised water flooding. coolerair moving in, 13-14 flooding. coolerair moving in, 13—14 from the north—west. a few showers for scotland and northern ireland, drier weather here into the evening. 0vernight eventually that band of rain will clear away from that used, may lingerfor band of rain will clear away from that used, may linger for a time band of rain will clear away from that used, may lingerfor a time in east anglia and the far south—east. we cold an item we've seen recently with temperatures in our towns and cities 6—7 , but colder in the countryside. to start wednesday, this frontal system is not far away, sitting out in the north sea. could be a bit of early rain for some its radius but a ridge of high pressure building its way in from the west. i think wednesday will be our driest day of the week. sunny spells, a few scattered showers and a beginner in a north—westerly breeze, that many pieces avoiding the showers staying dry with a good deal sometime. it will not attempt as much, how is about 12—16 or so will not attempt as much, how is about 12—16 orso on will not attempt as much, how is about 12—16 or so on wednesday. less wet and windy, certainly compared to today. moving on into wednesday night, the quieter winter does not last very long because the exterior of low pressure comes in from the atlantic. it will be quite
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a windy spell of weather overnight into thursday, with the next area of low pressure bringing those fronts. rain moving west to east, across all parts of the uk at some point on thursday. followed by sunshine and showers, but perhaps more persistent rain into northern ireland by the end of the day. it will not feel prickly warm, 13—70 , feeling cooler when you add on the breeze as well. things looking unsettled for friday into the weekend. more showers, many of us on the outlook, temperature is not great for the time of year. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the army is put on standby to help ease the fuel crisis but the transport secretary says there are signs the worst might soon be over. there are the first tentative signs now of stabilisation in forecourt storage which will not be reflected in the queues as yet but it is the first time we have seen more petrol the petrol stations itself. we are all wondering how long it will go on for. rules have gone out the window. people are desperate. _ the murder of the london teacher sabina nessa — a 36 year old man — appears in court charged with her murder. nicola sturgeon announces that the enforcement of vaccine
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passports will be delayed by more than two weeks the scottish government has decided to delay enforcement of its vaccine passport programme for nightclubs and larger live events by more than two weeks. delegates at the labour conference will vote shortly on a minimum wage of £15 an hour. andy mcdonald quit the shadow cabinet in protest at the opposition of the leadership to the proposal. liverpool legend roger hunt, one of england's1966 world cup winning squad, has died at the age of 83. we all have our secrets, we just didn't get to yours yet. and bond is back — the much anticipated final performance from daniel craig premieres in london.
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good afternoon. the transport secretary, grant shapps, says after days of fuel shortages at the pumps, there are indications the situation is stabilising. the petrol retailers' association says anecdotal evidence from its members suggests demand on forecourts is still significantly higher than normal but not as high as it was this weekend. the government is still putting the army on standby to drive tankers but mr shapps said the measures already put in place appeared to be having some effect. the surge in demand came because of fears that a shortage of drivers would hit fuel supply although there is plenty at refineries. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. day five and it is still a very long wait for petrol around telford.
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not everywhere has problems — urban areas are the worst affected. drivers hoping to fill up before the pumps run out, deliveries unable to keep up with all the panic buying. we're all wondering how long it can go on for. that is what every driver wants to know. there are now the first very tentative signs of stabilisation in forecourts' storage which will not be reflected in the queues as yet. but it is the first time we have seen more petrol in the petrol stations itself. i think, as the industry said yesterday, the sooner we can return to our normal buying habits, the sooner this situation will return to normal. but it's not easy for those who rely on fuel to get to work. emma's carers struggled to reach her last night. without my carers, my situation is life—threatening. i'm on a ventilator, as you can see, and i require 24—hour carejust to survive and to go about my day—to—day life. eventually, she was able to get
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to a petrol station to fill up, but that was after many hours of trying. more calls today for health and care workers to get priority for fuel. we have had no support, no messaging from government about this. we are told things will ease later in the week. this is a problem today, colleagues have got limited amounts of fuel. as i said, we cannot wait two or three hours when we have patients at home needing our care and attention. but petrol retailers think that is easier said than done. it is a very complex and confrontational system which i'm sure ministers and indeed industry would be loath to see, because who is an emergency worker? of course, it is notjust key workers being impacted. the knock—on effects are starting to be felt for many businesses. just think about all the vans we rely on these days for a host
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of goods and services. like this dry cleaning business in north west london. it's been extremely difficult. out of the 15 vans that we normally operate, we are only able to get six or seven on the road. which has meant, in the last week, a 35% drop in operations. which obviously has had a knock—on effect to our bottom line. the uk has plenty of fuel. the hope is the demand will soon fall to normal levels because the longer all of this goes on, the wider the ripple effects will be. emma simpson, bbc news. 0ur defence correspondent, jonathan beale, says there are practical limits as to what the army can do. the army and the military have made a difference in issues like the covid pandemic, in the olympics in 2012. i think there's a limit to what they can do here.
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150 is not an awful lot but there are 150 personnel on standby who qualify to drive lorries which carry fuel. another 150 personnel are also on standby to be their buddies in the cab — they would still have to be trained to drive those fuel company lorries, they would not drive military lorries, that might take 2—5 days. the earliest we would see them out, if they are required, would be the end of the week. in addition to that, i should say also remember, the shortage of fuel driver lorries is about 1,000, so 150's about a tenth, but in addition to that, there are going to be 20 military personnel who are qualified to test hgv drivers, this is the wider issue of a shortage of hgv drivers. who will be made available to the department for transport to push through people through those tests. again, this is a small
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limited response and this is as much about politicians showing that they are doing something to assuage the public frustration. some breaking news. these are the latest coronavirus figures. 34,526 fresh cases of infection reported in the last 24 hours, compared to a figure of 37,960 the day before, and honour dig the number of people who have died in the last reported 24 hours until this morning, 127. a 36 year old man has appeared in court charged with the murder of the primary school teacher,
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sabina nessa, in south east london. koci selama from eastbourne was arrested in the early hours of sunday morning. our home affairs correspondent june kelly gave me this update from outside willesden magistrates court in north west london. this was a brief hearing this morning. koci selamaj was brought to court from a police station in north london nearby. he'd been detained at around 3am in eastbourne on sunday morning. where he was living. he is an albanian national and before he came into court, there was discussion about whether he would need an interpreter to follow the proceedings and there was an interpreter on standby. in fact, his lawyer said his english was good enough to be able to follow proceedings without the interpreter. he appeared in the dock in a grey tracksuit and he was wearing a face mask, and he is accused of murdering sabina nessa on friday the 17th of september in south—east london. sabina nessa's body was found the following day in the park by a member of the public,
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but on that friday night, she had set off to meet a friend in a bar near the park and, of course, she never arrived. this morning in court, the lawyer for the defendant said his client had indicated that he would be pleading not guilty to the murder charge. this is not a formal entering of a plea and that will come later in the legal process. the next hearing in this case is on thursday when the defendant will appear at the old bailey. june kelly there. the government has stripped the rail operator, southeastern, of its franchise because of what it called "a serious breach of good faith". the company's services between london, kent and east sussex will now be publicly run. the decision was made after more than £25
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million of historical payments due to the department for transport were not paid. 0ur transport correspondent caroline davies reports. it's not unusual for train lines to be renationalised. what is rare is when it's about trust. this morning, the government announced it would be taking over running lser's services after it found that £25 million had not been declared by the operator. the company itself is taking a large number of steps, and i'm sure they will be saying more about it. as far as i was concerned, no matter what steps they took, to breach the confidence of the public, to deliberately conceal payments due back to the taxpayer, is entirely unacceptable. the operator of last resort will take over the services from the 17th of october, but the government has ensured from the 17th of october, but the government has reassured passengers and the railway�*s employees that the service and theirjobs will not change. the company that runs lser, go—ahead, has said that they have
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now repaid the £25 million. this morning, they said they were naturally disappointed with the decision, and that although the independent review is ongoing and the contracts concerned are highly complex, the group acknowledges that errors have been made in relation to the franchise. its stock price fell by more than 12% this morning. these issues go back to 2014. some have asked why they are only coming to light now, and could this be a bigger problem? if this matter is serious enough that it isjust beyond somebody getting it wrong in terms of accounting, and actually there is evidence of wrongdoing on a criminal nature, then of course that must be looked into. it's really important that there is integrity in the railway system, and if there's wrongdoing, then i'm sure the criminal bodies will be involved. other operators, like northern and virgin east coast main line, have previously been renationalised, but it is rare for the government to strip a company of its franchise. very, very unusual. you have to go back to 2003, and you find that it was the strategic rail authority doing the stripping, and it was the operators of southeastern that lost their franchise back then, so, in some ways, history
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is repeating itself. the way the trains are run has changed dramatically during the pandemic, and today the government has shown they are following a different track. and our transport correspondent caroline davies says the signals coming from government ministers suggests there should be no impact on services. southeastern do run a lot of commuter routes between kent and sussex and london but the government has reassured the public there will be no changes to services and there will be no changes to fares and tickets and the schedule and in effect it is just a change of the management. there will also be concerns by people who are employees of southeastern and for them, the government have also said that front line staff will not have any changes and their salaries
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will stay the same, they will not be impacted by this, and i have stressed the decision is not a reflection on them. but for now the operator of last resort will take over the operation, they already run northern and lner but in future the government says it does intend to retender this line. caroline davies. delegates at the labour conference in brighton are to vote on a motion proposing a minimum wage of £15 an hour. it comes after andy mcdonald quit his shadow cabinetjob, in protest at the leadership's opposition to the proposal. the party leader sir keir starmer thanked him for his service but said his own focus was on "winning the next general election". from brighton, here's our political correspondent iain watson. after lockdowns, this week was to have been the opportunity for keir starmer to get out and about communicating labour's message. he began his conference laying down the law to his own party by changing its leadership rules and braving resistance from the left. and now the plan was to move away
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from procedures and onto policy with an announcement on community policing. there should be an extra 5,000 special constables, it's 5,000 because i think that is a number that could be recruited very quickly. but this party conference has been a law unto itself. last night, the shadow minister for employment rights gave up hisjob in the shadow cabinet. he refused to argue against union demands for a £15 an hour minimum wage, even though the current policy is for a wage of at least £10 an hour. i cannot, in all conscience, stay in a shadow cabinet that can't make that commitment. keep going, andy! chanting: andy, andy, andy! his departure has created a storm, emboldening supporters of the former leadership and, indeed, the former leader. to win an election, we need to raise minimum wages and have socialist policies forjustice in our society. and today, the conference delegates will now debate the call for a £15 minimum wage.
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keir starmer wants to portray himself as a strong leader. his aides say he is moving the party away from thejeremy corbyn era. but facing likely defeat, the leadership has decided neither to support nor to reject a higher minimum wage. policies passed here by the membership and binding on the leadership, but they can certainly cause a distraction. keir starmer had promised to reform and unite his party. he may be able to do one or the other, but not both. iain watson, bbc news, brighton. iain is at the labour party conference in brighton. in the past we had the news that one of the so—called affiliated unions to the labour party, that pay their membership fees to the party, they have cancelled that membership fee and they are leaving the labour club, it is a relatively small
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union, the bakers union, and it is related to what we are talking about, the minimum wage, they held a meeting today and they agreed overwhelmingly that they would walk out of the labour party because they say keir starmer had backed a £15 minimum wage in 2019 but isn't doing that now, also partly in sympathy with andy mcdonald who resigned, and also because there union president was during a discipline from the labour party which they said was unfair. — was in during discipline. 0ut there, people arguing up for battle and this is concerning the biggest public service union, unison, and they want both labour and the government to be doing more for their members. i'm joined and the government to be doing more fortheir members. i'mjoined by gavin edwards who takes a lead in
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that union for social care, what is happening for social care members at the moment? irate happening for social care members at the moment?— happening for social care members at the moment? we are hearing they are not able to the moment? we are hearing they are rrot able to get — the moment? we are hearing they are not able to get the _ the moment? we are hearing they are not able to get the feel _ the moment? we are hearing they are not able to get the feel they _ the moment? we are hearing they are not able to get the feel they need - not able to get the feel they need to get— not able to get the feel they need to get to — not able to get the feel they need to get to work or to carry out their roles. _ to get to work or to carry out their roles, especially in care where people — roles, especially in care where people have to do multiple visits in multiple _ people have to do multiple visits in multiple locations, they are struggling to get the fuel they need. — struggling to get the fuel they need, so we want the government to put in _ need, so we want the government to put in place — need, so we want the government to put in place a system where those key workers that need to get there if you _ key workers that need to get there if you were — key workers that need to get there if you were to carry out those roles are given _ if you were to carry out those roles are given priority access and able to get— are given priority access and able to get the — are given priority access and able to get the fuel they need. this are given priority access and able to get the fuel they need.- to get the fuel they need. this is the idea of— to get the fuel they need. this is the idea of saying _ to get the fuel they need. this is the idea of saying some - to get the fuel they need. this is the idea of saying some petrol i the idea of saying some petrol stations should be reserved for key workers including social care workers including social care workers and health care workers? for particular parts of the day, similar to the _ particular parts of the day, similar to the system that was put in place in the _ to the system that was put in place in the supermarket industry at the start of— in the supermarket industry at the start of the pandemic, to make sure they could _ start of the pandemic, to make sure they could get the food they need, and it— they could get the food they need, and it cannot be beyond the wit of government to make sure key workers .et government to make sure key workers get the _ government to make sure key workers get the fuel— government to make sure key workers get the fuel they need because the consequences of that not happening are very— consequences of that not happening are very serious so it needs to happen— are very serious so it needs to happen now are not next week. haste
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happen now are not next week. have ou happen now are not next week. have you stressed — happen now are not next week. have you stressed the _ happen now are not next week. have you stressed the point _ happen now are not next week. the: you stressed the point to the government? irate you stressed the point to the government?— you stressed the point to the government? you stressed the point to the covernment? ~ . ., government? we have indeed and we are hearin: government? we have indeed and we are hearing that _ government? we have indeed and we are hearing that the _ government? we have indeed and we are hearing that the government - government? we have indeed and we are hearing that the government is i are hearing that the government is considering this measure which is welcome — considering this measure which is welcome but we need to know urgently that this _ welcome but we need to know urgently that this is _ welcome but we need to know urgently that this is going to happen. it may be that— that this is going to happen. it may be that they are disabled people and vulnerable people, those in need of care. _ vulnerable people, those in need of care. you _ vulnerable people, those in need of care, you won't get the visits they needed _ care, you won't get the visits they needed people are not able to get the fuel— needed people are not able to get the fuel so we need an answer. it is alread the fuel so we need an answer. it 3 already happening. the fuel so we need an answer. it is already happening. yes, _ the fuel so we need an answer. it is already happening. yes, some - the fuel so we need an answer. it is - already happening. yes, some members sa the already happening. yes, some members say they have — already happening. yes, some members say they have rrot _ already happening. yes, some members say they have not got _ already happening. yes, some members say they have not got the _ already happening. yes, some members say they have not got the fuel— already happening. yes, some members say they have not got the fuel they - say they have not got the fuel they need. _ say they have not got the fuel they need. so _ say they have not got the fuel they need, so we need an answer very quickly— need, so we need an answer very quickly indeed. you need, so we need an answer very quickly indeed-— quickly indeed. you said the government _ quickly indeed. you said the government are _ quickly indeed. you said the government are open - quickly indeed. you said the government are open to - quickly indeed. you said the . government are open to this, quickly indeed. you said the - government are open to this, how quickly are they able to move? we have been told it is difficult to get this system in place, so where do you draw the line on the number of care workers and how do they identify themselves?— identify themselves? nobody is su . . estin . identify themselves? nobody is suggesting this _ identify themselves? nobody is suggesting this is _ identify themselves? nobody is suggesting this is the _ identify themselves? nobody is suggesting this is the easiest i identify themselves? nobody is i suggesting this is the easiest thing in the _ suggesting this is the easiest thing in the world to do but it can't be beyond — in the world to do but it can't be beyond the government with all of their resources to be able to work with local— their resources to be able to work with local government and with the fuel companies in order to get the
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system _ fuel companies in order to get the system in — fuel companies in order to get the system in place. they should be able to do— system in place. they should be able to do that _ system in place. they should be able to do that we need it to happen quickly — to do that we need it to happen cuickl . ,, ., ., ,, ., quickly. keir starmer was talking to unions and business _ quickly. keir starmer was talking to unions and business leaders - quickly. keir starmer was talking to unions and business leaders and i quickly. keir starmer was talking to | unions and business leaders and the cbi, i don't know if you were involved in those talks, but what would you want the labour leader to do? i would you want the labour leader to do? . . would you want the labour leader to do? . , ., would you want the labour leader to do? ., , ., ., .,, do? i was not involved in those talks directly — do? i was not involved in those talks directly but _ do? i was not involved in those talks directly but the _ do? i was not involved in those talks directly but the labour. do? i was not involved in those i talks directly but the labour party should _ talks directly but the labour party should be — talks directly but the labour party should be piling on the pressure on the government to get this done quickly — the government to get this done quickly. that political pressure can help so _ quickly. that political pressure can help so let's get an answer quickly from _ help so let's get an answer quickly from government. we help so let's get an answer quickly from government.— from government. we are talking about things _ from government. we are talking about things like _ from government. we are talking about things like green _ from government. we are talking about things like green pledges, | from government. we are talking i about things like green pledges, up to 2030, and money might come on stream if labour were elected but there seems to be real problems hitting the country now. some of the mps and the front bench as he should spend more of their time talking about that may be and spending less time on internal rule changes? i have no problem with labour party people _ have no problem with labour party people coming to a labour party conference, but you only have to look. _ conference, but you only have to look, driving down here, look at the
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problems— look, driving down here, look at the problems at— look, driving down here, look at the problems at the fuel pumps, so those problems— problems at the fuel pumps, so those problems need to be sorted out. labour— problems need to be sorted out. labour party politicians are aware of this _ labour party politicians are aware of this and — labour party politicians are aware of this and they need to pile the pressure — of this and they need to pile the pressure on government.- pressure on government. gavin edwards from _ pressure on government. gavin edwards from unison, - pressure on government. gavin edwards from unison, the - pressure on government. (z: “i edwards from unison, the biggest union in the country, representing a lot of public services in the — public service employees in the health sector and the care sector, for example, and he said members have been in touch with him to say they are having problem getting fuel to get to theirjobs, and unison have been in touch with the government on the subject. government on the sub'ect. thanks for “oininu government on the sub'ect. thanks forjoining h government on the sub'ect. thanks forjoining us. the _ government on the subject. thanks forjoining us. the bakers- government on the subject. thanks forjoining us. the bakers union - forjoining us. the bakers union have been involved with labour policies for a long time, at least since the 1920s. 0ne policies for a long time, at least since the 1920s. one of the candidates successfully won in staffordshire in the 1930s. small union as they would admit but one
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that has been involved with the labour party for a very long time. they have now this affiliated from the party as a result which means it will stop giving money to the party as a result of the decision by the leadership to oppose the plan for a £15 per hour national minimum wage. broadband customers will be able to switch their suppliers more easily, under new plans which have just been announced by the regulator 0fcom. the watchdog said that under the new rules it will be possible to switch in a single day and the process will no longer involve households liaising with more than one company. across the uk, house prices have gone up by 8% in the last year — but in some coastal and rural areas, price increases are almost triple that. the office for national statistics warned that in some areas rising property prices and increasing rents risked pricing locals out of the market. north devon is one of the most affected areas, and our correspondentjon kay reports on the impact
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there on people desperately needing accommodation. north devon, more popular than ever since the pandemic started. in the last year, house prices here have gone up by 22%, mainly fuelled by outsiders moving down. it is just a really horrible feeling to be made to feel like, yeah, a second—class citizen, really. emma is a cleaner. she's got little chance of buying a place, and now she is even struggling to rent. people i know have been living in converted sheds because they can't find anywhere to rent. living in a shed?! a converted shed, yeah. i'm not being funny, but at one point my parents were talking about, you know, whether they could put a bed in their garage for me. there's only two that's available... sarah—jane and lauren don't need official statistics to tell them there's a problem. it's a little bit - depressing, isn't it? they've been hunting for a flat to rent in bideford for six months. but landlords can make more money by renting to holiday—makers or short—term lets.
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got an alert yesterday at 9:43 for a property via e—mail, i phoned up at half past one on my lunch break and it had been taken off the market. in four hours, it had gone. how do they expect working people to find a house? - covid has effectively caused the perfect storm. we've got the urban—rural lifestyle concept, which has forced people from the cities into the coastal and rural areas, we have a shortage of stock, and we have a high demand for that stock. which means prices are going up and up. according to the property website zoopla, this year there are half as many rental properties available in the south—west of england compared with the five year average, but demand is up by more than 80%. 0ne local artistjoking that soon the only place to let will be the public toilets.
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jon kay, bbc news, north devon. england's other star striker of 1966. sir geoff hurst goals might have won the world cup final, but it was roger hunt's that helped get them there. hunt's ability first emerged at liverpool. after making his debut in 1959, he went on to become the club's record scorer, helping liverpool to two league titles, and in 1965, to their first—ever victory in the fa cup.
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at the same time, his international career was also blossoming. by the 1966 world cup he was an england regular, and he soon showed why. he scored three goals in the group stage, but with jimmy greaves returning from injury, hunt was unsure of his place in the final until manager sir alf ramsey broke the news. we went to the cinema on the friday night, and when we were getting off the coach at the cinema, alf took me on one side and told me i'd be playing the next day, which was fantastic news. fa cup final really was all my dreams as a professional, but the world cup final was something you don't imagine. in that final it was sir geoff hurst that grabbed the headlines... ..but it was hunt that had a close—up view of its crucial moment.
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the question of whether hurst's second goal crossed the line was one of the game's enduring controversies, but hunt following in and starting to celebrate had no doubt. so many people come to me and say, one thing they say, was it over the line? the other one is, why did you not knock in? i turned away. i thought it was over the line and bouncing into the roof of the net. i'm still certain it was over the line. hunt continued playing for liverpool and england until 1969. he eventually left anfield with some 286 goals, and after retiring from the game he took on a very differentjob, joining his family's haulage company. his exploits for england were eventually recognised in 2000, when he was one of five world cup winners to receive mbes,
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but liverpool fans gave him their own unofficial title, sir roger, one of the most prolific strikers english football has ever seen. studio: roger hunt, the liverpool and england footballer who has died at the age of 83. john aldridge, former liverpool striker and republic of ireland international footballer, joins me now. thanks forjoining us. what are your memories of him? i thanks forjoining us. what are your memories of him?— memories of him? i first went to anfield at the _ memories of him? i first went to anfield at the age _ memories of him? i first went to anfield at the age of _ memories of him? i first went to anfield at the age of seven - memories of him? i first went to anfield at the age of seven or i anfield at the age of seven or eight, mid 60s, and i was in the paddock with mike uncles and the cup kop were revering this player, roger hunt. it was like a demigod at anfield, it was that good. he was a workaholic on the pitch, a great goal—scorer and a great creator of
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goals and he was just as nice off the pitch, when i got to know him. but as a kid, and thousands of kids at anfield in those days, you wanted to be roger hunt. my ambition was to play for liverpool and wear number eight on my back in honour of the great roger hunt and i did that and i'm very proud to have done that. he wasjust a top i'm very proud to have done that. he was just a top man. absolute gentleman. wasjust a top man. absolute gentleman-— wasjust a top man. absolute gentleman. wasjust a top man. absolute centleman. ~ i. ., gentleman. when you look at those ictures gentleman. when you look at those pictures from _ gentleman. when you look at those pictures from the _ gentleman. when you look at those pictures from the 60s, _ gentleman. when you look at those pictures from the 60s, he - gentleman. when you look at those pictures from the 60s, he was - gentleman. when you look at those pictures from the 60s, he was a - pictures from the 60s, he was a good—looking man. it was very conscious of his appearance. he was an idol forfans? he conscious of his appearance. he was an idol for fans?— an idol for fans? he was. he was erfect an idol for fans? he was. he was perfect in — an idol for fans? he was. he was perfect in every _ an idol for fans? he was. he was perfect in every man _ an idol for fans? he was. he was perfect in every man on - an idol for fans? he was. he was perfect in every man on the - an idol for fans? he was. he wasj perfect in every man on the pitch an idol for fans? he was. he was i perfect in every man on the pitch in the way they used to dress, the lads in the 60s, and bill shankly made them dress really smart. he said, look sharp, and roger was no different. i can't emphasise what a lovely man who was. i was in or of
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him, i really was. isat lovely man who was. i was in or of him, i really was. i sat down with him, i really was. i sat down with him on a few occasions and he was grounded. very humble. it him on a few occasions and he was grounded. very humble.— him on a few occasions and he was grounded. very humble. it has been a tou~h 18 grounded. very humble. it has been a tough 18 months _ grounded. very humble. it has been a tough 18 months for _ grounded. very humble. it has been a tough 18 months for those _ grounded. very humble. it has been a tough 18 months for those who - grounded. very humble. it has been a tough 18 months for those who have i tough 18 months for those who have memories of in particular the 1966 world cup winning side having lost so many, jimmy greaves as well, he did not play in that match, but and the fact he did not play was partly because roger hunt was in the final. everyone knows jimmy greaves because roger hunt was in the final. everyone knowsjimmy greaves and his exploits, what a great striker, but it shows you, roger kept him out of the side. alf ramsey was true to his word because he deserved it. he helped get them to the final with his goals and his creative ability on the pitch. everyone questioned,
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was it over the line, but the fact he turned away, he knew it had and thatis he turned away, he knew it had and that is because he is a very honourable man. it that is because he is a very honourable man. . honourable man. it underlines the fact, honourable man. it underlines the fact. maybe _ honourable man. it underlines the fact. maybe the — honourable man. it underlines the fact, maybe the fact _ honourable man. it underlines the fact, maybe the fact that - honourable man. it underlines the fact, maybe the fact that you - honourable man. it underlines thej fact, maybe the fact that you can't say that about the england team this time, who played absolutely as a team, but this idea of that a football team is more than the sum of its parts, something extra by having all of those people together. it is a collective. it is like making a cake, you need the right ingredients. you can't have too much icing. you have to have the hod carrier, the likes of nobby stiles, alan ball, terrific team. roger went unnoticed probably because of the hat of geoff hurst and bobby charlton scoring a few goals. —
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patrick. may a bit underrated but with liverpool he was never under the radar. , ., ., ., ., the radar. john, thanks for “oining us. a real pleasure * the radar. john, thanks for “oining us. a real pleasure to h the radar. john, thanks forjoining us. a real pleasure to speak - the radar. john, thanks forjoining us. a real pleasure to speak to i the radar. john, thanks forjoining i us. a real pleasure to speak to you. john aldridge on roger hunt, the man they called knighthood—macro roger hunt. looks like the chances are i should keep the umbrella out for the rest of the week? umbrella is at the ready. i of the week? umbrella is at the read . ., ., . of the week? umbrella is at the read . ., ., , ., of the week? umbrella is at the read. ., ., , ., , ready. i do not bring mine today but i should ready. i do not bring mine today but i should have _ ready. i do not bring mine today but i should have done _ ready. i do not bring mine today but i should have done because - ready. i do not bring mine today but i should have done because i- ready. i do not bring mine today but i should have done because i got i i should have done because i got caught. shower is a bit hit and miss and that will be the pitcher threw the rest of the week. slightly drier window through tomorrow but for the rest of today, showers surround, longer spells of rain, all down to the fact we have these weather fronts moving their way, so we have already had a fair bit of heavy rain in parts of wales, northern england and into the midlands, and it will
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continue to beat some showers to the south—east of england ahead of the main rain band as it moves east and then further showers pushing into parts of scotland and northern ireland, western parts of england and wales overnight. a lot of clear skies between the showers so a chilly night with temperatures into single figures for many. a fresh start to wednesday morning but tomorrow will prove to be a drier day than today. a few scattered showers moving in on the north—westerly breeze but most places avoiding them. not especially warm with temperatures around 12—16. hello, this is bbc news, the headlines... the army is put on standby to help ease the fuel crisis but the transport secretary says there are signs the worst might soon be over. there are now the first very tentative signs of stabilisation in forecourt storage, which will not be
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reflected in the queues as yet, but it is the first time we have seen more petrol in the petrol stations itself. the murder of the london teacher sabina nessa — a 36 year old man appears in court charged with her murder. delegates at the labour conference will vote on a minimum wage of £15 pounds an hour. the bakers union has this affiliated saying just travelled away from the aims in the hopes of working class organisations. let's get more from a correspondent in brighton. tats organisations. let's get more from a correspondent in brighton.— correspondent in brighton. as you were saying. _ correspondent in brighton. as you were saying. the _ correspondent in brighton. as you were saying, the bakers _ correspondent in brighton. as you were saying, the bakers union, i correspondent in brighton. as you. were saying, the bakers union, one of the oldest unions associated with the labour party, they are in its founding days, is this affiliated. in other words, effectively wrapped up in other words, effectively wrapped up its membership card and decided to walk out of the labour party this
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afternoon and i am joined by the president of the bakers union. can you tell me why we decided to end this long relationship with labour? today we have held a recall of confidence, — the attendance of the conference — confidence, — the attendance of the conference think the labour party no longer— conference think the labour party no longer represents their needs and aspirations. there was a lot upset that the _ aspirations. there was a lot upset that the labour party this week, despite — that the labour party this week, despite telling the trade unions on friday. _ despite telling the trade unions on friday, that it was open on the issue _ friday, that it was open on the issue of— friday, that it was open on the issue of £10. as minimum wage. has decided _ issue of £10. as minimum wage. has decided that — issue of £10. as minimum wage. has decided that they would accept andy mcdonald's resignation for his attempt — mcdonald's resignation for his attempt to secure a better liver of standard — attempt to secure a better liver of standard and a better living wage for working people up and down this country— for working people up and down this country of— for working people up and down this country of 15. that suggest to us they were — country of 15. that suggest to us they were not being honest with us on friday— they were not being honest with us on friday and they have not been honest— on friday and they have not been honest in— on friday and they have not been honest in relation to their
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commitment to raising people's living _ commitment to raising people's living standards. in 2019 kier starmer— living standards. in 2019 kier starmer address some of our striking members _ starmer address some of our striking members and called for the support for those _ members and called for the support for those members in 2019 for £15 an hour _ for those members in 2019 for £15 an hour and _ for those members in 2019 for £15 an hour and he — for those members in 2019 for £15 an hour. and he seems to have backtracked since he stood with us in solidarity and holding a banner that said — in solidarity and holding a banner that said fight for 15 on it. your own personal _ that said fight for 15 on it. your own personal position - that said fight for 15 on it. your own personal position as - that said fight for 15 on it. your own personal position as you i that said fight for 15 on it. gm;- own personal position as you are facing potential expulsion in any case from the liberal party because you are alleged to have supported groups have subsequently been banned by the labour party. groups have subsequently been banned by the labour party-— by the labour party. that's correct. into 2016 by the labour party. that's correct. into 2016 they _ by the labour party. that's correct. into 2016 they suspended - by the labour party. that's correct. into 2016 they suspended our- by the labour party. that's correct. i into 2016 they suspended our general secretary _ into 2016 they suspended our general secretary. he was quickly re—stated but the _ secretary. he was quickly re—stated but the campaign was launched and that campaign was aimed at ensuring suspended _ that campaign was aimed at ensuring suspended members had the right to know why— suspended members had the right to know why they were being suspended and the _ know why they were being suspended and the right to a fair hearing and the right— and the right to a fair hearing and the right to representation and
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following due process that everybody was aware _ following due process that everybody was aware of. for others, is a trade union. _ was aware of. for others, is a trade union, because it was our executive that said _ union, because it was our executive that said we — union, because it was our executive that said we support the aims of that said we support the aims of that campaign, that people should be free treated fairly and consistently and we _ free treated fairly and consistently and we offered our support to those people _ and we offered our support to those people who found themselves being suspended from the party because we really believed it was about making sure they _ really believed it was about making sure they could not take part in a leadership— sure they could not take part in a leadership election. and sure they could not take part in a leadership election.— sure they could not take part in a leadership election. and you are now facin: leadership election. and you are now facing disciplinary _ leadership election. and you are now facing disciplinary action _ leadership election. and you are now facing disciplinary action for- leadership election. and you are now facing disciplinary action for that - facing disciplinary action for that supportyes, for something we did in 2017, to call forjustice for people... sorry. how do you feel that leaves kier starmer�*s leadership, someone you say has campaign and various pledges you mention? . . campaign and various pledges you mention? , , ,., ., , mention? this is the point. it does not feel mention? this is the point. it does rrot feel like _ mention? this is the point. it does not feel like unity _ mention? this is the point. it does not feel like unity in _ mention? this is the point. it does not feel like unity in the _ mention? this is the point. it does not feel like unity in the labour- not feel like unity in the labour party — not feel like unity in the labour party we — not feel like unity in the labour party. we are seeing lots and lots of people —
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party. we are seeing lots and lots of people expelled, it seems to come from a _ of people expelled, it seems to come from a particular faction of the party~ — from a particular faction of the party... this week what we should have _ party... this week what we should have been— party... this week what we should have been discussing is about the issues _ have been discussing is about the issues and — have been discussing is about the issues and the crisis we are facing in our— issues and the crisis we are facing in our communities, the queues at the petrol— in our communities, the queues at the petrol station because we are running _ the petrol station because we are running out of petrol, the fact that during _ running out of petrol, the fact that during this — running out of petrol, the fact that during this pandemic we keep the nation _ during this pandemic we keep the nation fed, our members dead, but 7% of them _ nation fed, our members dead, but 7% of them relied on food banks, found himself— of them relied on food banks, found himself relying on goodwill and charity— himself relying on goodwill and charity of friends and family. — found — charity of friends and family. — found themselves. charity of friends and family. - found themselves.— charity of friends and family. - found themselves. you're pointing out the needs _ found themselves. you're pointing out the needs of _ found themselves. you're pointing out the needs of your _ found themselves. you're pointing out the needs of your members i found themselves. you're pointing | out the needs of your members but surely we should have done inside the labour party stay and fight. they've got the option, these, being the alternative government, a range of people likely to be passing a motion today actually backing your £15 demand for a minimum wage. surely this is somewhere where people are going to consistently walk out, all you're doing is undermining labour�*s chances of forming the next government and advertising disunity when you could
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of, behind closed doors, tried to exert your influence as other unions are doing? to exert your influence as other unions are doinu ? ., , ., , exert your influence as other unions are doinu? ., , ., , are doing? to be honest with you, we may deliver — are doing? to be honest with you, we may deliver party _ are doing? to be honest with you, we may deliver party aware _ are doing? to be honest with you, we may deliver party aware of _ are doing? to be honest with you, we may deliver party aware of the - may deliver party aware of the position— may deliver party aware of the position we were in in november last year _ position we were in in november last year in _ position we were in in november last year. injune— position we were in in november last year. injune of this position we were in in november last year. in june of this year position we were in in november last year. injune of this year — the labour— year. injune of this year — the labour party. after the survey results — labour party. after the survey results were announced the labour party— results were announced the labour party contacted us, we agreed meet with the _ party contacted us, we agreed meet with the labour party and agreed that a _ with the labour party and agreed that a meeting would take place, which _ that a meeting would take place, which at — that a meeting would take place, which at that time would have included — which at that time would have included jenny chapman, and kier starmer— included jenny chapman, and kier starmer f — included jenny chapman, and kier starmer f available... what happened was they— starmer f available... what happened was they never followed up on any of those _ was they never followed up on any of those meetings. we was they never followed up on any of those meetings.— those meetings. we are running out of time, those meetings. we are running out of time. one — those meetings. we are running out of time, one final _ those meetings. we are running out of time, one final question. - those meetings. we are running out of time, one final question. this - of time, one final question. this week we have seen andy mcdonald go and a big row over internal rules, senior goes well, some are saying this is a concerted attempt to try and undermine kier starmer. absolutely nothing to do it on the reigning _ absolutely nothing to do it on the reigning kier starmer, he is undermining himself. as faras reigning kier starmer, he is undermining himself. as far as two members _ undermining himself. as far as two members feel, they labour party are
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supposed _ members feel, they labour party are supposed to represent the ambitions and aspirations of working class people — and aspirations of working class --eole. 1. .. f and aspirations of working class --eole. 1, ,, ,�* ., people. bakers' union ending their time in the — people. bakers' union ending their time in the labour _ people. bakers' union ending their time in the labour party, - people. bakers' union ending their time in the labour party, partly i people. bakers' union ending their. time in the labour party, partly one of the first unions to try and set “p of the first unions to try and set up a political labour party, i was told, back in 1902 and have tried to disaffliate range of issues, lack of support for a raise minimum wage, disciplinary action against members and lack of support for kier starmer. it comes as labour are trying to get a message out into the country in a range of noises going up country in a range of noises going up this week, although kier starmer�*s people are effectively putting a very brave face on this, none the less he will probably find it very frustrating that labour's actual policy and national minimum wage has been overshadowed by an argument aboutjust how much it should be increased by. time for the sport.
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the england test captainjoe root has not confirmed whether he will lead the side in december. the tour is up in the air due to restrictions and some players reluctant to travel without families. a decision could come later this week. the ecb have been in dialogue with cricket australia about the exact quarantine protocols england would have to adhere to. i don't think it's fair for me to say what i personally... we've got to wait until we get the information, and decisions will be made off the back of that. it's really important that that is respected and that the guys get the opportunity to think that through and do what is best for them, their mental well—being. and a number of other factors they will have to figure in.
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joe root has been named men's player of the year by the professional cricketer�*s association. the award rounds—off a brilliant summer, he scored 661 runs, including hundreds in three successive tests against india. england's winter though is still uncertain, also at those pca awards, central sparks and birmingham phoenix batter evejones has become the first domestic player to win the women's award, they've previosuly been won by england players. liverpool players will wear black arm bands during three's match in tribute to former and feel great, roger hunt, the world cup winner dying at the age of 83 after a long illness. the england striker also scored 244 league goals for liverpool, which is still a club record. he won the first division title with them twice in 64 and 66 and also the
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fa cup in 65. he was never honoured to the extent of some of his england team—mates, two liverpool fans he was known as sir roger. the current maangerjurgen klopp, says hunt "comes second to no one in his importance in the history of liverpool fc." here's our sports correspondent andy swiss. liverpool are in portugal, manchester city at psg in the pick—up tonight was my champions league group games. those are eight o'clock kick—offs. chelsea have travelled to italy where they will be without kante for the match in juventus tomorrow. the frenchman midfielder has tested positive for
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covid. gareth bale will miss next month's world cup qualifiers against czech republic and estonia with a hamstring tear. the welsh captain hasn't played since the last international break and picked up the injury on his return to real madrid. he was due to win his 100th cap against the czechs. the wales boss robert page has described the injury as significant but hopes that he will be back for their final qualifiers in november. go to the bbc sport website for the full wales squad, as well as scotland and northern ireland, named today. it is the first day of the bob willis trophy at lord's, the finality of the domestic cricket season of the blanks were bowled out in their first innings for 78 runs against the county champions warwickshire, who already have a lead and have not lost any wickets year, the last time i looked. i'll have an update on that and the rest of the sport in the next hour. i want to bring you an update on the
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fuel situation. want to bring you an update on the fuelsituation. coming want to bring you an update on the fuel situation. coming from government sources talking to the business deployment editor at bbc london. government sources confirmed reports 16% of all petrol stations are now fully supplied, compared to around 10% at the weekend. clearly an improvement. however the source added that 40% of petrol stations being supplied was a more normal figure. it gives you a sense of the gap that still has to be filled before the government's hope that this is going to be a problem that naturally dissipates as people get the message, if they are getting the message, that there is no shortage of fuel. if you're any petrol queue and you get to a pump and there's none left, it kinda feels like there is shortage. let's talk now to the general secretary of the licensed taxi drivers association, a london license cabbie. good to speak to you. whatever your members been
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experiencing as it is reported to you in london today? we experiencing as it is reported to you in london today?— you in london today? we don't recognise _ you in london today? we don't recognise what _ you in london today? we don't recognise what the _ you in london today? we don't| recognise what the government you in london today? we don't - recognise what the government are saying, that 16% stations have healed. that is not the in london. i have been speaking to cab drivers all day long, monitoring social media feeds, and at the moment we estimate we have probably 25% of cab drivers in london unable to work, they cannot find fuel. many have been driving out onto the motorway where highways england are trying to get the stations feel so people do not run out of the motorways, who had taxi drivers driving from the centre of london onto the m25 to get fuel if and when they can join a queue. you've seen the videos of arguments and fights at petrol stations, and those that have got fuel,... the panic, what we're hearing from the government is good enough. what is needed as they need
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to do exactly what was done in september 2000, the last fuel crisis, where the then secretary of state signed an order enabling emergency essential users, and the local authorities around the country and in london, transport for london... they designated a number of stations for essential workers. emergency workers, taxi drivers included stop— emergency workers, taxi drivers included sto ; . . ., included stop what impact did that ha en included stop what impact did that happen with _ included stop what impact did that happen with mac— included stop what impact did that happen with mac that _ included stop what impact did that happen with mac that pretty - included stop what impact did that i happen with mac that pretty resolved the anic. happen with mac that pretty resolved the panic- what _ happen with mac that pretty resolved the panic. what happened _ happen with mac that pretty resolved the panic. what happened then - happen with mac that pretty resolved the panic. what happened then and i | the panic. what happened then and i strongly suspect it will happen this week if things don't improve as you will start hearing stories of health workers not being able to get to work. we have taken a lot of calls from care agencies and people that provide care to those in the community, and they are saying to us can you provide a taxi and a driver because our caterers have got no fuel? we are saying possibly but possibly not because we have not got
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any. once those stories start to make their way into the mainstream media, and we start to hear doctors not being able to get hospitals and ambulance staff not being able to get to work, then it will be a real crisis. so what they need to do is alleviate that problem though, should this order, grant chaps could literally do it at the swipe of a pen. the london mayor, we know has asked, transport for london have asked, transport for london have asked, and they are holding on hoping it goes away. i'm no soldier but i've seen all the films, and read books, and what they see as you hope for the desperate plan for the worse, and that's what they should be doing, rather than the panic mantra we are seeing now. thank you very much- — mantra we are seeing now. thank you very much- staying — mantra we are seeing now. thank you very much. staying on _ mantra we are seeing now. thank you very much. staying on this _ mantra we are seeing now. thank you very much. staying on this story, - very much. staying on this story, let's talk to the treasurer of the doctors union. your union has already made a proposal along these
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lines. what exactly are you suggesting the government needs to do? it sounds like they are kind of hopeful the situation is almost writing itself? i hopeful the situation is almost writing itself?— hopeful the situation is almost writing itself? hopeful the situation is almost writin: itself? ., . ., ., , writing itself? i would echo what my colleaaue writing itself? i would echo what my colleague from _ writing itself? i would echo what my colleague from the _ writing itself? i would echo what my colleague from the london - writing itself? i would echo what my colleague from the london taxi - colleague from the london taxi drivers association was saying, really, that hoping for the best is not a great plan. i have driven past about a dozen petrol stations today on the a roads in yorkshire, and 60, 70% are completely shocked and the others have massive queues. doctors, nurses, health care workers, district nurses visiting patients... people trying to get onto their ships in hospitals. this is all going to come to a head very quickly. i rememberthat going to come to a head very quickly. i remember that solution of 2000 as well. designated petrol stations with priority tanker deliveries, police presence ensuring
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that only essential workers, nhs workers, emergency service workers and some other nominated groups of essential workers were able to feel satisfactory, and that is what needs to happen in the next 24 hours. in the end this is a problem because, at least according to the government... i understand why they responded in this way, caused by false perception there may not be enough petrol or diesel to go around at some point in the near future, the government says and the retailers say, the oil industry says as well, there enough at refineries. make your message not be better addressed to the members of the public? who have been and continue to queue forfuel who public? who have been and continue to queue for fuel who may be do not need as much as you and your colleagues too?— need as much as you and your colleagues too? need as much as you and your colleaaues too? ._ ., colleagues too? some may not need it, ou're colleagues too? some may not need it, you're absolutely _ colleagues too? some may not need it, you're absolutely right. _ colleagues too? some may not need it, you're absolutely right. in - colleagues too? some may not need it, you're absolutely right. in some i it, you're absolutely right. in some may have very fuel tanks now and won't need it for another week or two perhaps, but many of our members can be hundreds of miles a week,
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junior doctors rotate across very large region is going to different hospitals, and live nowhere near the place of work doctors and nursing shifts in hospital are currently under great stress from sickness with covid, self isolation, and this could be the straw that breaks the camel's back. you have to not worry about the cause, the cause has been and gone, whether it was the media, the public, brexit, lack of tanker drivers are a bit of everything. it does not really matter. we have a disease, a bunch of symptoms, and we now need to find solutions and find them fast. not worry about what happened four days ago. let me ask you, have you had arrested bma had any kind direct contact with government over this problem? contact with government over this roblem? , ._ contact with government over this roblem? . ., , contact with government over this roblem? , , . ., , problem? yesterday we very clearly called on the _ problem? yesterday we very clearly called on the government _ problem? yesterday we very clearly called on the government to - problem? yesterday we very clearly called on the government to take i problem? yesterday we very clearly | called on the government to take an action like this. i'm not aware we
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have had direct communication with ministers, but it is essential that ministers, but it is essential that ministers now act rather than hope things go away. this ministers now act rather than hope things go away-— things go away. this question has been addressed _ things go away. this question has been addressed in _ things go away. this question has been addressed in the _ things go away. this question has been addressed in the last - things go away. this question has been addressed in the last few. been addressed in the last few minutes by the prime minister, speaking to all broadcasters in an interview in downing street. listen to what he had to say.— to what he had to say. prime minister. _ to what he had to say. prime minister, is _ to what he had to say. prime minister, is it _ to what he had to say. prime minister, is it time _ to what he had to say. prime minister, is it time to - to what he had to say. prime minister, is it time to get i to what he had to say. prime i minister, is it time to get tough to what he had to say. prime - minister, is it time to get tough on panic— minister, is it time to get tough on panic virus? — minister, is it time to get tough on panic virus? tell them are acting selfishly— panic virus? tell them are acting selfishly endangering lives in the economy? is your message stop it? | economy? is your message stop it? i want economy? is your message stop it? want to say economy? is your message stop it? i want to say first about how much i sympathise with people who have been worried aboutjourneys, about worried about journeys, about whether they worried aboutjourneys, about whether they will be able to use their cars in the way to see loved ones or whatever it is. i know how frustrating and infuriating it must have been to worry about a shortage of petrol or fuel. we have been to worry about a shortage of petrol orfuel. we now have been to worry about a shortage of petrol or fuel. we now are starting to see the situation improve, we are hearing from industry that supplies are coming
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back onto the forecourts in the normal way. back onto the forecourts in the normalway. i back onto the forecourts in the normal way. i would just really urge everybody to just go about their business in the normal way and fill up business in the normal way and fill up in the normal way when you really need it. and things will start to... what we want to do is make sure we have all the preparations necessary to get through until christmas and beyond, notjust in the supplying the petrol stations, but all parts of our supply chain. you are seeing the global economy really sucking any huge amount of demand at the moment, for gas, for lorry drivers, and shortages around the world affecting countries across the world. but we've got to make sure we have everything in place as the recovery continues, and that's what we are doing. x�*t�*oli recovery continues, and that's what we are doing-— recovery continues, and that's what we are doing. you did say this would be short-term- _ we are doing. you did say this would be short-term. now— we are doing. you did say this would be short-term. now you _ we are doing. you did say this would be short-term. now you are - we are doing. you did say this would be short-term. now you are saying. be short—term. now you are saying that there could be problems until
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christmas and beyond. don’t that there could be problems until christmas and beyond.— that there could be problems until christmas and beyond. don't you put words into my _ christmas and beyond. don't you put words into my mouth _ christmas and beyond. don't you put words into my mouth here. - christmas and beyond. don't you put words into my mouth here. we - christmas and beyond. don't you put words into my mouth here. we want| christmas and beyond. don't you put i words into my mouth here. we want to make sure that as the economy continues to recover, that we see things, global recovery sucking demand of all kinds, whetherfor things, global recovery sucking demand of all kinds, whether for gas orfor lorry drivers, demand of all kinds, whether for gas or for lorry drivers, that the uk demand of all kinds, whether for gas orfor lorry drivers, that the uk is prepared. that is why we have done what we've done on relaxing the competition rules and making sure that we have more drivers available should we need them. i would just stress that on the forecourts the situation is stabilising and people should be confident and just go about their business in the normal way. about their business in the normal wa . ., .,, about their business in the normal wa . ., , . way. one of the most difficult asects way. one of the most difficult aspects of _ way. one of the most difficult aspects of this _ way. one of the most difficult aspects of this are _ way. one of the most difficult aspects of this are seeing - way. one of the most difficult - aspects of this are seeing reports of doctors, nurses, medics, struggling to get fuel to go about business. isn't it right they get a chance to jump the queue? i chance tojump the queue? i understand why people say that, but with the situation now is stabilising and things getting
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better in the forecourts, i think the best thing is if everybody just... we stabilise it in the normal way. just... we stabilise it in the normal way-— just... we stabilise it in the normalwa . . . ., , ., normal way. are all the solutions to the truck driver _ normal way. are all the solutions to the truck driver shortages _ normal way. are all the solutions to the truck driver shortages in - normal way. are all the solutions to the truck driver shortages in place i the truck driver shortages in place now? have you got any other contingencies in mind? are you preparing for the potential that it gets worse? i preparing for the potential that it gets worse?— preparing for the potential that it lets worse? ,, . ., , , gets worse? i think what happened with the fuel _ gets worse? i think what happened with the fuel issue, _ gets worse? i think what happened with the fuel issue, with _ gets worse? i think what happened with the fuel issue, with the - gets worse? i think what happened with the fuel issue, with the petrol| with the fuel issue, with the petrol pump a business, was a slightly misleading account of something which got leaked, and caused a big, totally understandable, surging public demand. we think the actual number of lorry driver stopped short in that particular sector very big. but generally there is a shortage in that profession around the world, and what we want to see is an emphasis on high wage, high skill, high productivity approach to our
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economy. what i don't think people in this country want to do is fix all our problems with uncontrolled immigration again. we tried that for a long time, 20 years or so, perhaps longer. in the end, people could see it was leading to a low—wage, low skill approach, without enough investment in people or any equipment in capital, and that is not the way we want the uk to develop and grow.— not the way we want the uk to develop and grow. shortages put up rices, develop and grow. shortages put up prices. energy _ develop and grow. shortages put up prices, energy costs _ develop and grow. shortages put up prices, energy costs up, _ develop and grow. shortages put up prices, energy costs up, inflation i prices, energy costs up, inflation is up, people will be hard pressed this autumn, for those worried about the cost of living, do you understand the pressure on families? is there any signal you can give that you are looking at the issue head of the autumn statement? itrui’hit2h head of the autumn statement? which is wh we head of the autumn statement? which is why we are — head of the autumn statement? which is why we are emphasising _ head of the autumn statement? which is why we are emphasising so - head of the autumn statement? tram an is why we are emphasising so much what we've done on the living wage, making sure we've increase that by a record amount, but while we are also... i'm pleased that after ten
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years or more, 12—13 years of which is flatlining, particularly for low—paid people, you're now starting to see an increase in wages. i think people in this country do deserve to be paid decently. it is one of the things we thought for and campaigned for, and you are now starting to see an increase in people's wages, of maybe 4%, above where we were before the pandemic. i think that is a good thing. what i don't want our country to do is to go back to, which is what i think some people would rather see... what i think some people would rathersee... some what i think some people would rather see... some people would rather see... some people would rather see... some people would rather see us suppress those wages with a huge amount of low—wage, low skill immigration. but with a huge amount of low-wage, low skill immigration.— skill immigration. but will government _ skill immigration. but will government help - skill immigration. but will government help for - skill immigration. but will- government help for hard-pressed government help for hard—pressed families in the coming weeks and months? element we will do whatever we can, as we've said dryly
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pandemic, to help people. but the best way we _ pandemic, to help people. but the best way we can — pandemic, to help people. but the best way we can help _ pandemic, to help people. but the best way we can help people - pandemic, to help people. but the best way we can help people is - pandemic, to help people. but the best way we can help people is to | best way we can help people is to get them into high wage employment. there you are starting to see real signs of progress. our plan forjobs is working. you are seeing growth in employment, huge falls in unemployment, and as i say, you are seeing wages considerably above where they were before the pandemic. we have a gas price hike, drug shortages, food shortages, the army on standby, you would call this a crisis of anyone else was in downing street — food shortages. you'll not we have an economy recovering from a once in its entry pandemic. that we have an economy recovering from a once in its entry pandemic.— once in its entry pandemic. that has caused some _ once in its entry pandemic. that has caused some particular _ once in its entry pandemic. that has caused some particular shortages. i caused some particular shortages. hgv drivers and gas. those are a function of huge global demand. we are meeting them. we have all sorts
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of plans in place to make sure that as we go forward into the new year, that we have everything necessary to protect our supply chains and keep things moving, but as i've said, what we are seeing their own healing now from industry is that the situation on the forecourts and in their petrol stations is stabilising.— their petrol stations is stabilisinu. ., , ., stabilising. en covid, you met bereaved _ stabilising. en covid, you met bereaved families _ stabilising. en covid, you met bereaved families today, - stabilising. en covid, you met bereaved families today, why| stabilising. en covid, you met. bereaved families today, why did stabilising. en covid, you met- bereaved families today, why did it take so long and what did you say to them? it take so long and what did you say to them? . . . take so long and what did you say to them? . , . , take so long and what did you say to them? ., . , ., ., ., them? it was a very emotional meeting. _ them? it was a very emotional meeting. and _ them? it was a very emotional meeting. and i— them? it was a very emotional meeting, and i listened - them? it was a very emotional meeting, and i listened to - them? it was a very emotional| meeting, and i listened to very them? it was a very emotional - meeting, and i listened to very sad stories that the have suffered in their own lives. there is also very little i could say to mitigate their own suffering, but what i did say is that we were determined to make sure
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that we were determined to make sure that the experience of the bereaved was something we took account of any public inquiry. i also said a bit about why we would set it up and said that we would be making sure we had a chair, of the inquiry nominated by the end of the year.
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this is bbc news, i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines. the prime minister says the situation at fuel pumps is stabilising as the industry reports an increase in the number of petrol stations supplied with fuel. brute number of petrol stations supplied with fuel. ~ ., ., , ., ., with fuel. we are now starting to see the situation _ with fuel. we are now starting to see the situation improve. - with fuel. we are now starting to see the situation improve. we i with fuel. we are now starting to . see the situation improve. we are hearing supplies are coming on the core courts in the normal way, and i would urge everybody to just go about their business in the normal way and fill up in the normal way when you really need it. that when you really need it. at the labour when you really need it. at the labour party — when you really need it. at the labour party conference - when you really need it. at the labour party conference in - when you really need it. at the - labour party conference in brighton, or keir starmer says winning a general election is more important than party unity.
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general election is more important than party unity-— than party unity. winning the aeneral than party unity. winning the general election. _ than party unity. winning the general election. i— than party unity. winning the general election. i didn't- than party unity. winning the i general election. i didn't come than party unity. winning the - general election. i didn't come into

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