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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  September 28, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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the army is put on standby to help ease the fuel crisis, but the transport secretary says there are early signs of improvement. after four days of cues and closures at petrol stations, grant shapps signals the worst might be over. there are now the first very tentative signs of stabilisation in the forecourt storage, which will not be reflected in the queues as yet, but it is the first time we have seen more petrol in the petrol stations itself. all the rules have gone out the window at the moment, i think. so... people are desperate. we will be looking at the plan to bring in 150 armoured drivers and
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examine the government strategy. also this lunchtime. a36 —year—old man appeared in court charged with the murder of sabina nessa. south—eastern is stripped of its franchise after £35,000,000 of historical payments were not paid to the department for transport. the former member of the 1966 world cup winning england team roger hunt has died aged 83.1643 winning england team roger hunt has died aged 81— died aged 83. we “ust did not get two ears died aged 83. we “ust did not get two years yet. — died aged 83. we just did not get two years yet. bond _ died aged 83. we just did not get two years yet. bond is _ died aged 83. we just did not get two years yet. bond is back, - died aged 83. we just did not get two years yet. bond is back, the l two years yet. bond is back, the much anticipated _ two years yet. bond is back, the much anticipated performance l two years yet. bond is back, the . much anticipated performance from daniel craig will premiere in cinemas tonight. coming up in the sport later in the hour on the bbc news channel, a brilliant start by warwickshire in the bob willis trophy as lancashire collapse at lord's.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the transpory secretary grant shapps says after days of fuel shortages at the pumps, there are indications the situation is stabilising. the petrol retailers association says anecdotal evidence from its members suggests demand on forecourts is still significantly higher than normal but not as high as it was this weekend. the government is still putting the army on standby to drive tankers, but mr shapps said the measures already put in place appeared to be having some effect. the surge in demand came because of fears that a shortage of drivers would hit fuel supply although there is plenty at refineries. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. day five and it is still a very long wait for petrol around telford. not
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every four has problems, urban areas are the worst affected. drivers hoping to fill up before the pumps run out, delivery is unable to keep up run out, delivery is unable to keep up with the panic buying. we run out, delivery is unable to keep up with the panic buying.— run out, delivery is unable to keep up with the panic buying. we are all wonderin: up with the panic buying. we are all wondering how— up with the panic buying. we are all wondering how long _ up with the panic buying. we are all wondering how long it _ up with the panic buying. we are all wondering how long it can - up with the panic buying. we are all wondering how long it can go - up with the panic buying. we are all wondering how long it can go on - up with the panic buying. we are all| wondering how long it can go on for. that is what every driver wants to know. ., ., , know. there are now the first tentative _ know. there are now the first tentative signs _ know. there are now the first tentative signs of _ know. there are now the first| tentative signs of stabilisation know. there are now the first. tentative signs of stabilisation in forecourt storage which will not be reflected in the queue is as yet. but it is the first time we have seen more petrol in the petrol stations itself. but i think is the industry said yesterday, the sooner we can return to our normal buying habits, the sooner this situation will return to normal. but habits, the sooner this situation will return to normal.— habits, the sooner this situation will return to normal. but it's not eas for will return to normal. but it's not easy for those — will return to normal. but it's not easy for those who _ will return to normal. but it's not easy for those who rely _ will return to normal. but it's not easy for those who rely on - will return to normal. but it's not easy for those who rely on fuel. easy for those who rely on fuel to get to work. emma �*s carer struggled to reach last night. get to work. emma 's carer struggled to reach last night.— to reach last night. without my carers, to reach last night. without my carers. my _ to reach last night. without my carers, my situation _ to reach last night. without my carers, my situation is - carers, my situation is life—threatening. i require 24—hour carejust life—threatening. i require 24—hour care just to survive and to go about
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my day—to—day life. eventually, she was able to get to a petrol station to fill up but that was after many hours of trying. to fill up but that was after many hours of trying-— hours of trying. more calls today for health and care _ hours of trying. more calls today for health and care workers - hours of trying. more calls today for health and care workers to i hours of trying. more calls today | for health and care workers to get priority for fuel. we for health and care workers to get priority for fuel.— priority for fuel. we have had no su ort, priority for fuel. we have had no support. no _ priority for fuel. we have had no support, no messaging - priority for fuel. we have had no support, no messaging from - support, no messaging from government about this, things will ease later in the week, this is a problem today, colleagues have got limited amounts of fuel. as i said, we cannot wait two or three hours when we have patients at home needing care and attention. petrol retailers think— needing care and attention. petrol retailers think that _ needing care and attention. petrol retailers think that is _ needing care and attention. petrol retailers think that is easier - needing care and attention. petrol retailers think that is easier said i retailers think that is easier said than done. it retailers think that is easier said than done-— than done. it is a very complex and confrontational _ than done. it is a very complex and confrontational system _ than done. it is a very complex and confrontational system which - than done. it is a very complex and confrontational system which i - than done. it is a very complex and confrontational system which i am | confrontational system which i am sure ministers and indeed industry would be lowth to see because who is an emergency worker? {iii would be lowth to see because who is an emergency worker?— an emergency worker? of course, it is not 'ust an emergency worker? of course, it is notjust key _ an emergency worker? of course, it is not just key workers _ an emergency worker? of course, it is notjust key workers being - is notjust key workers being impacted, the knock—on effects are starting to be felt for many businesses. just think about all the
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vans we rely on these days or a host of goods and services. like this dry cleaning businesses in north west london. it’s cleaning businesses in north west london. �* , , , london. it's been extremely difficult. out— london. it's been extremely difficult. out of— london. it's been extremely difficult. out of the - london. it's been extremely difficult. out of the 15 - london. it's been extremely difficult. out of the 15 vans l london. it's been extremely i difficult. out of the 15 vans that would normally operate, we are only able to get six or seven on the road. which has meant in the last week, a 35% drop in operations. which obviously has had a knock—on effect to our bottom line. the which obviously has had a knock-on effect to our bottom line.— effect to our bottom line. the uk has plenty _ effect to our bottom line. the uk has plenty of _ effect to our bottom line. the uk has plenty of fuel. _ effect to our bottom line. the uk has plenty of fuel. the _ effect to our bottom line. the uk has plenty of fuel. the hope - effect to our bottom line. the uk has plenty of fuel. the hope is i effect to our bottom line. the uk | has plenty of fuel. the hope is the demand will soon fall to normal levels because the longer all of this goes on, the wider the ripple effects will be. emma simpson, bbc news. 0ur defence correspondent jonathan beale is here. up up to 150 army drivers, when might they be brought in and what difference could this make? it’s a difference could this make? it's a familiar reaction, _ difference could this make? it's a familiar reaction, calling - difference could this make? it's a familiar reaction, calling the - difference could this make? it�*s —. familiar reaction, calling the army in when there is a crisis like this. the army and the military have made
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a difference in issues like the pandemic, in the olympics in 2012. i think there is a limit to what they can do so 150 is not an awful lot but there are 150 personnel on standby who qualify to drive lorries which carry fuel. another 150 personnel are also on standby to be their buddies in the cab, they would still have to be trained to drive those fuel company lorries, they would not drive military lorries, that might take 2— five days the earliest we would see them, if they are required, it would be the end of the in addition to that, i should say also remember 150, the shortage of fuel driver lorries is about 1,000, that's about one tenth but in addition to that, there are going to be 20 military personnel who are qualified to test hgv drivers, this is the wider issue of a shortage of
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hgv drivers. who will be made available to the department for transport to push through people through those tests and again, this is a small unlimited response and this is as much about politicians showing that they are doing something to assuage the public frustration. jonathan, thank you. 0ur political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster. just picking up from whatjonathan said, what is being said about the government strategy around this? for the government strategy around this? er?" the past couple of days the government has essentially been hoping that this would peter out, that many people who thought they need to panic buy would have already filled up their tanks, the message from the fuel industry would get through, that there is more than enough petrol to go around if people stick to their normal habits. that is why we have been hearing ministers emphasising that message in the last couple of days. and there is some cautious optimism in government this afternoon that it is starting to work. that the fuel
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supply around the country is picking up, that is why you heard grant shapps talking about tentative signs that the worst may be passed. now that the worst may be passed. now thatis that the worst may be passed. now that is not an overnight fix, it does not mean that this afternoon queues will disappear from around the country, it is likely to take a couple of days before that situation fully stabilises. if that pattern continues. and we have heard from some in the industry who say they are still seeing significantly increased demand today. so ministers are keeping other options in reserve. as you heard jonathan describe, the idea of the army deploying petrol around the country, grant shapps also was not ruling out the idea that key workers could be prioritised for petrol although i have to say, there is a lot of scepticism in whitehall about the practicalities of doing that. but the main thing ministers are hoping this afternoon is that none of that is needed and that this situation may be on the mend.
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nick, thank you. a 36—year—old man is to appear in court charged with the murder of the primary school teacher sabina nessa in south—east london. koci selamaj from eastbourne was arrested in the early hours of sunday morning. our home affairs correspondent june kelly is outside willesden magistrates court is north west london for us now. what happened in court this morning? koci selamaj was detained in eastbourne, the town where he lives, about 3am on sunday. he is an albanian national and before he came into court this morning, there was discussion about whether he would need an interpreter to follow the proceedings. in fact, need an interpreter to follow the proceedings. infact, his need an interpreter to follow the proceedings. in fact, his lawyer indicated his english was good enough to follow what was happening. he appeared in the dock wearing a grey tracksuit and had a face mask on. he is accused of killing sabina nessa on friday the 17th of september in cater park in kidbrooke in south—east london. sabina nessa
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had made her way to the park because she was on her way to meet a friend at a nearby bar. she never arrived. this morning, the lawyerfor the defendant indicated he would be pleading not guilty to the murder charge but this is not a formal plea, that will come later in the court proceedings. the next hearing in this case will be on thursday at the old bailey. june, thank you. delegates at the labour conference in brighton are to vote on a motion proposing a minimum wage of £15 an hour. it comes after andy mcdonald quit his shadow cabinetjob in protest at the leadership's opposition to the proposal. the party leader, sir keir starmer, thanked him for his service but said his own focus was on "winning the next general election". from brighton, here's our political correspondent iain watson. after lockdowns, this week was to have been the opportunity for keir starmer to get out and about communicating labour's message. he began his conference laying down
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the law to his own party by changing its leadership rules and braving resistance from the left. and now the plan was to move away from procedures and onto policy with an announcement on community policing. there should be an extra 5,000 special constables, it is because i think that is a number that could be recruited very quickly. but this party conference has been a law unto itself. last night, the shadow minister for employment rights gave up hisjob in the shadow cabinet. he refused to argue against union demands for a £15 an hour minimum wage, even though the current policy is for a wage of at least £10 an hour. i cannot in all conscience stay in a shadow cabinet that can't make that commitment. keep going, andy! chanting: andy, andy, andy! his departure has created a storm, emboldening supporters of the former leadership and, indeed, the former leader. to win an election, we need to raise minimum wages and have socialist
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policies forjustice in our society. and today, the conference delegates will now debate the call for a £15 minimum wage. keir starmer wants to portray himself as a strong leader. his aides say he is moving the party away from thejeremy corbyn era. but facing likely defeat, the leadership has decided neither to support nor to reject a higher minimum wage. policies passed here by the membership and binding on the leadership, but they can certainly cause a distraction. keir starmer had promised to reform and unite his party. he may be able to do one or the other, but not both. iain watson, bbc news, brighton. the government has stripped the rail operator southeastern of its franchise because of what it called "a serious breach of good faith." the company's services between london, kent and east sussex will now be publicly run. the decision was made after more than £25 million of historical payments due to the department for transport were not paid.
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0ur transport correspondent caroline davies reports. it's not unusual for train lines to be renationalised. what is rare is when it's about trust. this morning, the government announced it would be taking over running lser's services after it found that £25 million had not been declared by the operator. the company itself is taking a large number of steps, and i'm sure they will be saying more about it. as far as i was concerned, no matter what steps they took, to breach the confidence of the public, to deliberately conceal payments due back to the taxpayer, is entirely unacceptable. the operator of last resort will take over the services from the 17th of october, but the government has ensured passengers and the railway�*s employees that the service and theirjobs will not change. the company that runs lser, go—ahead, has said that they have now repaid the £25 million.
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this morning, they said they were naturally disappointed with the decision, and that although the independent review is ongoing and the contracts concerned are highly complex, the group acknowledges that errors have been made in relation to the franchise. its stock price fell by more than 12% this morning. these issues go back to 2014. some have asked why they are only coming to light now, and could this be a bigger problem? if this matter is serious enough that it isjust beyond somebody getting it wrong in terms of accounting, and actually there is evidence of wrongdoing on a criminal nature, then of course that must be looked into. it's really important that there is integrity in the railway system, and if there's wrongdoing, then i'm sure the criminal bodies will be involved. other operators, like northern and virgin east coast main line, have previously been renationalised, but it is rare for the government to strip a company its franchise. very, very unusual. you have to go back to 2003, and you find that it was the strategic rail authority
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doing the stripping, and it was the operators of southeastern that lost their franchise back then, so in some ways, history is repeating itself. the way the trains are run has changed dramatically during the pandemic, and today the government has shown they are following a different track. and caroline is here. what will the impact be on passengers?— what will the impact be on passengers? that is the key question. — passengers? that is the key question, just _ passengers? that is the key question, just as _ passengers? that is the key question, just as people - passengers? that is the key question, just as people are starting to come back in city centres and south—eastern run a lot of commuter routes between kent and sussex and london but the government reassured the public that there will be no change to services or fairs, tickets, the schedule, in effect this is just a tickets, the schedule, in effect this isjust a change of tickets, the schedule, in effect this is just a change of management. there will also be concerns from people who are employees of south—eastern as well, and for them, the government has also said front line staff will not have any changes, that their salaries will remain the same, they will not be impacted by this. they have stressed the decision is not a reflection on
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them. for now, the operator of last resort will take over the operation, they already run in northern and lner services as well but in the future, the government says it intends to retender this line. caroline, thank you. our top story this lunchtime... the army is put on standby to help ease the fuel crisis, but the transport secretary says there are early signs of improvement and the worst might soon be over. there are now the first — worst might soon be over. there are now the first very _ worst might soon be over. there are now the first very tentative - now the first very tentative signs of stabilisation of forecourt storage, which will not be reflected in the queues as yet but it is the first time we have seen more petrol in the petrol stations itself. in the sport in the next 15 minutes on the sport in the next 15 minutes on the bbc news channel, just six games into the season the cotton hotspur supporters trust demand answers from the board after a hat—trick of derby
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defeats. —— the tottenham hotspur supporters trust. across the uk house prices have gone up by 8% in the last year — but in some coastal and rural areas price increases are almost triple that. today the office of national statistics warned that in some areas rising property prices and increasing rents risked pricing locals out of the market. north devon is one of the most affected areas, and our correspondent jon kay reports on the impact there on people desperately needing accomodation. north devon, more popular than ever since the pandemic started. in the last year, house prices here have gone up by 22%, mainly fuelled by outsiders moving down. it is just a really horrible feeling to be made to feel like, yeah, a second—class citizen, really. emma is a cleaner. she's got little chance of buying a place, and now she is even struggling to rent. people i know have been living in some converted sheds
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because they can't find anywhere to rent. living in a shed?! a converted shed, yeah. i'm not being funny, but at one point my parents were talking about, you know, whether they could put a bed in my garage for me. there's only two that's available... sarah—jane and lauren don't need official statistics to tell them there's a problem. it's a little bit - depressing, isn't it? they've been hunting for a flat to rent in bideford for six months. but landlords can make more money by renting to holiday—makers or short—term lets. got an alert yesterday at 9:43 for a property via e—mail, i phoned up at half past one on my lunch break and it had been taken off the market. in four hours, it had gone. how do they expect working people to find a house? - covid has effectively caused the perfect storm. we've got the urban—rural lifestyle concept, which has forced people from the cities into the coastal and rural areas, we have a shortage of stock, we have a high demand for that stock.
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which means prices are going up and up. according to the property website zoopla, this year there are half as many rental properties available in the south—west of england compared with the five year average, but demand is up by more than 80%. 0ne local artistjoking that soon the only place to let will be the public toilets. jon kay, bbc news, north devon. women and children who were sexually abused over decades by the singer r kelly have welcomed his conviction. a jury in new kelly have welcomed his conviction. ajury in new york have kelly have welcomed his conviction. a jury in new york have found kelly have welcomed his conviction. ajury in new york have found him guilty on all p after hearing that he used his fame to groom victims. he is due to be sentenced in may, when people find out whether he is to spend the rest of his life behind bars.
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the leaders of northern ireland's four main unionist parties have signed a joint declaration affirming their opposition to the northern ireland protocol. the protocol was agreed by the uk and eu in 2019 to prevent a hard border in ireland by keeping northern ireland in the eu single market for goods. the leaders say northern ireland must be an integral part of the united kingdom. the former liverpool and england striker roger hunt has died at the age of 83, the premier league club has announced. he was part of england's1966 world cup winning side at as liverpool's records league scorer with 244 goals. andy swiss looks back at his life. he was england's other star striker of 1966. sir geoff hurst's girls might have won the world cup final, but roger hunt's helped to get them back. his ability first emerged at
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liverpool. after making his debut in 1959 he became the club's record scorer, helping liverpool to two league titles, and in 1965 to their first ever victory in the fa cup. at the same time his international career was also blossoming. by the 1966 world cup he was an england regular and he soon showed why. he scored three goals in the group stage, but withjimmy scored three goals in the group stage, but with jimmy greaves returning from injury stage, but withjimmy greaves returning from injury hunt stage, but with jimmy greaves returning from injury hunt was unsure of his place for the final until manager sir alf ramsey broke the news. we until manager sir alf ramsey broke the news. ~ ., . ., ., the news. we went to the cinema on friday night — the news. we went to the cinema on friday night and _ the news. we went to the cinema on friday night and as _ the news. we went to the cinema on friday night and as we _ the news. we went to the cinema on friday night and as we were - the news. we went to the cinema on friday night and as we were getting l friday night and as we were getting off the coach, he took me to one side and said i would be playing the next day, which was fantastic news. fa cup final, really, was all my dreams as a professional, but the world cup final was something you don't imagine. iii
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world cup final was something you don't imagine-— don't imagine. in that final sir geoff hurst — don't imagine. in that final sir geoff hurst grabbed - don't imagine. in that final sir geoff hurst grabbed the - don't imagine. in that final sir- geoff hurst grabbed the headlines, but hunt had a close—up view of its crucial moment. the question of whether hurst's second goal but it is one of the great controversies, birch, following in, hunt had no doubts. ., , ., , , doubts. the two questions people ask me work, doubts. the two questions people ask me work. was — doubts. the two questions people ask me work. was it _ doubts. the two questions people ask me work, was it over— doubts. the two questions people ask me work, was it over the _ doubts. the two questions people ask me work, was it over the line? - doubts. the two questions people ask me work, was it over the line? and i me work, was it over the line? and also, why didn't you knock it in? i turned away because i was so certain it was over the line.— it was over the line. hunt continued -la in: for it was over the line. hunt continued playing for liverpool _ it was over the line. hunt continued playing for liverpool and _ it was over the line. hunt continued playing for liverpool and england i playing for liverpool and england until 1969. playing for liverpool and england until1969. he playing for liverpool and england until 1969. he eventually left anfield with some 286 goals, and after retiring from the game took on after retiring from the game took on a very differentjob, joining his
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family's haulage company. his exploits for england were eventually recognised in 2000 when he was one of five world cup winners to receive mbs. liverpool fans gave him their own individual title, to them, he was sir roger, one of the most prolific strikers england has ever seen. roger hunt, who has died at 83. south korea says a short range missile has been launched from north korea into the sea of japan. the united states has condemned the missile test. the launch came just before north korea's ambassador to the un urged the united states to give up its hostile policy towards pyongyang — and said no one could deny his country's right to self—defence and to test weapons. this week marks 80 years since one of the worst massacres of the second world war. nearly 31i,000 jews were killed by the nazis at babyn yar ravine in the ukrainian capital kyiv in the space ofjust two days. asjonah fisher reports, the country is continuing to grapple
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with how the atrocities should be remembered. this is larysa bahautdinova, visiting babyn yar in 1950. it's the place where she could have died. that she's alive now is down to extraordinary good fortune. larysa was just a year old in september 1941, when her mother obeyed a nazi announcement calling alljews to a checkpoint on the outskirts of town. translation: they didn't know they would go to babyn yar. - they were told they were going to germany. there was no deportation. thejews were marched into a ravine, made to undress, and shot dead. during two days, they killed 34,000 people, not using any machines, not using any automatics, not using the gas chambers etc — they simply killed by bullets. a nazi photographer took this picture of the bodies ofjewish men,
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women and children being covered over by sand. larysa is alive because at the last moment her mother gave her away. translation: my mother felt that something was wrong. _ so she handed me to a woman, a stranger, when the policeman looked away. so that was how i got home. but without my mother. babyn yar has now changed beyond all recognition, with the ravines replaced by a park. this place is very, like, intentionally cleared and kind of erased. soviet leaders didn't want a jewish tragedy remembered, and the ukrainians have argued about how best to mark what happened. this is the location where... it was only last year that a team used the nazi photos of the aftermath and 3d modelling to pinpoint the exact spot where the massacre took place.
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they say it's now a nearly completed apartment block. it's a weird situation when such an important site — for me, it's one of the most important sites in the history of the holocaust — is ignoring what happened here so much. the construction company say they have permission to build and have not seen official evidence that it's on a mass grave. babyn yar was not a one—off. between 2 and 2.5 millionjews were killed by the nazis in eastern europe. many of the locations and details are still being discovered by researchers. much of it by talking to elderly witnesses, like 89—year—old mariya. this is where mariya says the town's jews were shot and buried. translation: my father said to my mother, "you know -
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someone told me to go and dig a pit because they will be killing the jews." are there lots of other sites like this around ukraine? yeah. in almost every village. if there were some jews, anyjews, before the war, we have in almost all the villages the places like this one, without memorials, without anything. if the lady is not here tomorrow, nobody knows this place. 80 years on, the desire to move on is winning out over the need to remember. jonah fisher, bbc news, in ukraine. the volcano on the island of la palma in the canary islands is spewing lava again after a pause during the weekend. as you can see, the lava is pouring
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out and is now heading towards the sea. there are fears that when the lava does the reach the water, there could be explosions and noxious gases released as it begins to cool. researchers say levels of illegal drugs entering the soil at glastonbury festival are so high that they affect the life cycle of the european eel. public urination by festival—goers is suspected to have caused the increase. the scientists from bangor university have urged people to relieve themselves in the site toilets, and not in the fields. after lengthy delays, the latest james bond movie is finally here. no time to die was originally due for release in april last year, but faced repeated delays because of the pandemic. the world premiere takes place at the royal albert hall in londn later this afternoon, with a red carpet rolled out for a royal audience. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba reports. it has been almost six years since daniel craig last walked a bond red carpet. anticipation for his fifth 007 movie
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is perhaps even higher than usual because fans have had such a long wait... there's something i want to tell you. ..for the film to kick into gear. tyres squeal. no time to die is the first post—covid film whose advance bookings are at pre—covid highs. cinemas are hopeful that that momentum will help them with all films over the coming weeks and months. a bond film is a big film in any year. skyfall and spectre, the last two instalments, sit at number two and number three in the all—time uk box office. so i think there are great expectations that this will be another trigger to get people back into cinemas. i know there is a lot of things said about what i think about these films and all of those...and whatever, but i have loved every single second. one of the greatest honours of my life. the other big draw, of course, is that this is daniel craig's final bond movie. his tenure has so far been seen as a successful one,
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receiving praise from fans and from the family of the secret agent's creator. i think he would have particularly loved the way that daniel craig is playing bond, because he is bringing out the most sensitive side and the sort of back story, as it were, which is very much like ian's books. 00... cheers. the blockbusting series of course has a very special place in cinema history. whenever you watch a bond movie, for the moment you are watching it is the best film in the world at that moment. it is pure cinema. falling in love with cinema all over again is what everyone from movie executives to cinemagoers is hoping will soon be happening. lizo mzimba, bbc news. time for a look at the weather with sarah keith—lucas. i time for a look at the weather with sarah keith-lucas.— time for a look at the weather with sarah keith-lucas. i think the word changeable — sarah keith-lucas. i think the word changeable sums _ sarah keith-lucas. i think the word changeable sums up _ sarah keith-lucas. i think the word changeable sums up the _ sarah keith-lucas. i think the word changeable sums up the weather. sarah keith-lucas. i think the word i changeable sums up the weather at the moment. a bit of sunshine but quite a lot of showers. this is
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