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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 25, 2021 4:00pm-4:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at four... queues at petrol stations as the government prepares to announce a temporary visa scheme to make it easierforforeign lorry drivers to work in the uk. keir starmer heads for a showdown with labour's left over changes to the way the party chooses its mps and leaders. a book of condolence is opened for people to pay respects to teacher sabina nessa, who was killed in south—east london. two canadians arrive home after spending over 1,000 days in detention in china over spying charges. it's the final day of campaigning in germany, where voters will elect a new chancellor.
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good afternoon, welcome to bbc news. the government is due to formally announce a visa scheme that will make it easier for foreign drivers to work in the uk. details of the plan will be set out tomorrow. it's expected the temporary plan will allow visas for about 5,000 drivers to tackle the hgv driver shortage, which has led to supply problems at some petrol stations and other businesses. the road haulage association estimates that the uk is short of about 100,000 hgv drivers in total — with existing shortages made worse by a number of factors, including the pandemic and brexit. here's our business correspondent, katy austin. people have been told not to panic buy, there is no shortage of fuel itself. but again this morning, there were queues at petrol stations. absolute mayhem, nobody can get past, nobody can get in.
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eg group, which operates 400 sites, has set a £30 per customer limit. the initial problems experienced by bp were due to a shortage of lorry drivers. it is thought the uk has a shortfall of tens of thousands. there's a range of factors. brexit is definitely one of them. the pandemic, as you mentioned, played its part. the change to the payroll, of payroll working regulations, ir35, that played a significant part. but the general problem has been around and known about for ten to 15 years or more, and the ageing driver workforce retiring, we are not replacing them with the younger workers. wages are rising as firms try to attract staff, but freight and retail groups say more action is needed to plug the gap while a bigger uk workforce is grown. for months, the government has resisted calls to introduce a temporary visa scheme for foreign drivers, but it is now expected to announce one tomorrow, with 5000 visas available. there will also be a raft of longer—term measures.
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while it is really good news from the government, we do have to realise as an industry that that is a very short—term fix, and with the view of getting eu drivers back into the uk to help the christmas retail season. beyond that, what are the government going to do? what are the industry also going to do to prevent this happening again? the business group — the cbi — said it was welcome but late. it is a big relief. hopefully it is going to happen, and it is a huge relief. we have been calling for it for three months. we could see this problem coming and more problems coming, and so it is a shame the government needed queues at the pumps to move, but move i hope they have, and it will help. the uk isn't the only country experiencing shortages. it is unclear how many overseas drivers will apply for a visa and how soon. businesses just want things to improve before the crucial christmas period. katy austin, bbc news.
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there have been long queues of cars outside petrol stations in london, including in balham. i have been queueing now for about an hour. and i am only queueing because i'm in a hybrid car, so i'm actually predominantly electric, but obviously, if there's going to be any shortage of petrol, i do use the petrol back—up. it is like, during lockdown, do you remember? we were missing the toilet paper. it is the same thing — it'sjust panic. i have a gig in somerset today, i i'm on red and i need to get petrol asap and i've been sat in this queue for 15 minutes and i didn't _ want to risk getting petrol anywhere else en route. madeleine sumption is the director of the migration 0bservatory at oxford university. she says a temporary visa regime would represent a reversal of the government's migration policy. last year, as the government was preparing to end free
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movement from the eu, they took a hard line on migration into lower—wagejobs and effectively said, you are not in a highly skilled, highly paid position, people have to adapt and there will be no carve outs for industries like social care, hospitality and construction etc. what is interesting about this is this is perhaps the first and and maybe the only case, we will see, but this is obviously a reversal of the position where the government is saying, well, maybe we need a special programme to bring people in in this case. we have the latest government figures for coronavirus which we can bring you now. the uk has recorded 122 deaths in the last 24—hour
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period. that is people who have died within 28 days of positive thing to test. 0n within 28 days of positive thing to test. on friday, the number was 180, but as we know, over the weekend, the figures can seem artificially low. in terms of the number of cases recorded, the uk has a new set of 31,348 cases reported in the last 24 hours. that is down byjust over 4000, from 35,623 on friday, that is according to current data. sir keir starmer is heading for a conference showdown with labour's left over changes he wants to make to the way the party chooses mps and leaders. earlier, he was forced to drop plans to scrap one member—one vote for leadership elections. but other measures will go to a conference vote on sunday after they were backed by labour's ruling body. ione wells reports. a crucial moment for sir keir
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starmer to set out his stall. this government is letting people down so badly. whether it is hammering working people on tax and universal credit, whether it is shortages of food and fuel. an embarrassing start on rule changes, though, sir keir? interrupting his pitch, though, are tensions within the party itself. he and his deputy leader, angela rayner, wanted to spend today talking about their plan to set minimum standards for pay and conditions for different sectors, starting with social care. it's about a fair day's pay for a fair day's work and about making sure that work does always pay, and there's a minimum floor, so the unscrupulous employers that are undercutting those that are trying to do the right thing are taken out of the market. but there has been rain on their announcements. the leader was forced to withdraw his plans to give mps and unions more say the members in future leadership contest after he failed to persuade unions
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to back them and a backlash from the left of the party. the labour leadership should get real. people out there want us addressing the real issues that they are facing in their lives. the threat that they now have to their well—being and the quality of their life. an alternative package of reforms was put to the party's ruling committee, the nec, this morning and passed. the left is still likely to see these as further attempts to de—corbynise the party, but allies of sir keir see the changes as a way to prevent more internal rows and focus outwards as he faces the climb ahead to the next election. ione wells, bbc news. let's join our political correspondent helen catt, who's at the conference in brighton. yes, it has been among morning of two halves, really. this morning before the conference opened, we had the further discussion of the changes to the rules for electing the next labour leader. what came out of that in the end was a change to the number of mps who would have to the number of mps who would have to nominate a labour mp to then get
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on the ballot from 10% of the parliamentary party and that would go parliamentary party and that would 9° up parliamentary party and that would go up to 20%. that was passed by the nec this morning and will go to the conference floor tomorrow. we have since then have some policy with angela rayner setting out what she said was a new deal for workers, saying labour government would enact it within the first 100 days. jonathan reynolds is with me, the shadow secretary of state for work and pensions. let's start with the rule changes. this looks like a climb—down from what sir keir starmer suggested earlier in the week. i would disagree and as a member of the nec i am happy with where we have got to. i member of the nec i am happy with where we have got to.— where we have got to. i hope conference — where we have got to. i hope conference will _ where we have got to. i hope conference will back - where we have got to. i hope conference will back them. . where we have got to. i hope - conference will back them. there was a need _ conference will back them. there was a need terms of the decisions over the last_ a need terms of the decisions over the last few years mean to many parts _ the last few years mean to many parts of — the last few years mean to many parts of the labour party were too inward _ parts of the labour party were too inward facing, and that is definitely true of how we select parliamentary candidates. we are looking _ parliamentary candidates. we are looking at — parliamentary candidates. we are looking at a set of proposals people can get _ looking at a set of proposals people can get behind, improvement in how we do— can get behind, improvement in how we do things, and they will be real benefits— we do things, and they will be real benefits if— we do things, and they will be real benefits if we do it, so i'm personally very pleased and i would
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recommend conference adopted. you say everyone — recommend conference adopted. wm. say everyone will get behind them but this will cause division tomorrow, wanted?- but this will cause division tomorrow, wanted? , ., , tomorrow, wanted? they will always be stron: tomorrow, wanted? they will always be strong discussion _ tomorrow, wanted? they will always be strong discussion about _ tomorrow, wanted? they will always be strong discussion about the - tomorrow, wanted? they will always be strong discussion about the rules| be strong discussion about the rules of parliamentary selection and many conferences start like this. but we will stiii— conferences start like this. but we will still have a vaster member -based — will still have a vaster member —based democracy and more people participating in labour leadership elections — participating in labour leadership elections in all of the party elections in all of the party elections put together on numbers, and it— elections put together on numbers, and it is— elections put together on numbers, and it is the — elections put together on numbers, and it is the minimum required in the parliamentary labour party and professional as we have set it this morning. — professional as we have set it this morning, we are talking about the -et morning, we are talking about the get -- _ morning, we are talking about the get -- we're — morning, we are talking about the get —— we're talking about other changes— get —— we're talking about other changes about how we are evolving from affiliated members from unions and reflect— from affiliated members from unions and reflect the new devolved structures, the reality of the uk, and that— structures, the reality of the uk, and that involve those elected representatives. i think this will come _ representatives. i think this will come and — representatives. i think this will come and support.— representatives. i think this will
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come and support. representatives. i think this will come and su -ort. ., ., , come and support. labour wanted this to be about policy _ come and support. labour wanted this to be about policy and _ come and support. labour wanted this to be about policy and what _ come and support. labour wanted this to be about policy and what we - come and support. labour wanted this to be about policy and what we have i to be about policy and what we have done so far as talk about the internals. how does that come across to voters? irate internals. how does that come across to voters? ~ ., , ., , internals. how does that come across tovoters? ., , ., , to voters? we always start this way and we are — to voters? we always start this way and we are aware _ to voters? we always start this way and we are aware of— to voters? we always start this way and we are aware of the _ to voters? we always start this way and we are aware of the criticism i and we are aware of the criticism that comes — and we are aware of the criticism that comes across, but the labour party— that comes across, but the labour party is— that comes across, but the labour party is a — that comes across, but the labour party is a big federation of different constituent parts, and it is right— different constituent parts, and it is right we — different constituent parts, and it is right we come together and have these _ is right we come together and have these democratic decisions and decide — these democratic decisions and decide how we do things. we are inviting _ decide how we do things. we are inviting for— decide how we do things. we are inviting for the weekend have cracking — inviting for the weekend have cracking announcements coming from cabinet _ cracking announcements coming from cabinet speeches and from conference, it is a great event and a great _ conference, it is a great event and a great way — conference, it is a great event and a great way to engage with members and affiliates, so there is a huge benefit — and affiliates, so there is a huge benefit to— and affiliates, so there is a huge benefit to this. it is lovely to be here _ benefit to this. it is lovely to be here in— benefit to this. it is lovely to be here in person and we have missed it, herein person and we have missed it. even— here in person and we have missed it, even though we say we haven't, it, even though we say we haven't, it is lovely— it, even though we say we haven't, it is lovely to — it, even though we say we haven't, it is lovely to have a conference atmosphere, and for a party in opposition, huge moment to get the attention— opposition, huge moment to get the attention of the country and get across— attention of the country and get across what we are about. we had olicies across what we are about. we had policies on — across what we are about. we had policies on word, _ across what we are about. we had policies on word, keir— across what we are about. we had policies on word, keir starmer- policies on word, keir starmer mentioned on the steps of the hotel earlier that the government were hammering people on universal credit. you are shadow secretary for
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work and pensions, will be here what you will do this week? yes. work and pensions, will be here what you will do this week?— you will do this week? yes, all alcoholics _ you will do this week? yes, all alcoholics will _ you will do this week? yes, all alcoholics will talk _ you will do this week? yes, all alcoholics will talk about - you will do this week? yes, all alcoholics will talk about that. | you will do this week? yes, all. alcoholics will talk about that. we want _ alcoholics will talk about that. we want to _ alcoholics will talk about that. we want to get across that we understand the country needs to learn _ understand the country needs to learn from — understand the country needs to learn from the best of how we have come _ learn from the best of how we have come together to respond to covid. the government are not building on any of— the government are not building on any of the _ the government are not building on any of the achievements of how people — any of the achievements of how people have had to respond to this massive _ people have had to respond to this massive challenge, whether it is cutting _ massive challenge, whether it is cutting universal credit or recognising we can all work in a different— recognising we can all work in a different way based on how things have been done for the past 18 months — have been done for the past 18 months. we will see the labour party respond _ months. we will see the labour party respond to— months. we will see the labour party respond to the spirit of how we have come _ respond to the spirit of how we have come together, and we have seen people _ come together, and we have seen people come together to get through it and that _ people come together to get through it and that is what you want to build — it and that is what you want to build on — it and that is what you want to build on this week.— it and that is what you want to build on this week. promise of some real alternatives _ build on this week. promise of some real alternatives and _ build on this week. promise of some real alternatives and those _ build on this week. promise of some real alternatives and those rule - real alternatives and those rule changes go to full conference floor tomorrow. . ~ changes go to full conference floor tomorrow. ., ,, , ., a book of condolence has been opened in south london in memory of the 28—year—old primary school teacher sabina nessa, who was attacked and killed a week ago.
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hundreds of mourners gathered for an emotional candlelit vigil in kidbrooke last night. more than 500 people gathered at pegler square, not far from where a wanted suspect was captured on cctv. 0ur correspondent, megan paterson, is in south london where the vigil took place last night. candles still burning here for sabina nessa this afternoon. this site not far from where her body was found last saturday by a member of the public walking their dog. that candlelit vigil last night took place in pegler square, about two to three minutes' walk from here, hundreds of people, as you say, attended that. that a significant place because that is where sabina was headed last friday night. she was expecting to take a five—minute walk from her home to pegler square to go and meet a friend. she cut through the park and that is where police say she was attacked and murdered. last night, hundreds of people listening to speeches from faith
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leaders, community leaders and from sabina nessa's sister, who described a caring, beautiful, kind soul, her death shattering her family. so the candlelit vigil last night, today a book of condolence opened at the local community centre here, the open space centre. it has been closed much of this week because it was within that police cordon which was behind me, it was lifted on thursday evening. the body of sabina nessa was found near that community centre and today staff telling me they felt it was really important that they opened up the hall, they let people come and record their thoughts, condolences for sabina nessa's family. in a book, it will be given to them later on this month. they say this is a place that is normally full of people, people taking their children out, playing football, having picnics, picnics, crossing the park, going about their daily life, just as sabina nessa was last friday. obviously very different here this week, it has been a lot quieter, staff saying people have not been going out as much on their own,
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people had been going out in twos and threes, and there is a lot of concern here about public safety. a murder investigation obviously still continuing. the metropolitan police are keen, we know, to talk to and identify a man who was seen in cctv footage, which the force released yesterday. that man seen in pegler square around the time of sabina nessa's murder. the police asking people to take a look at that footage to help them identify him. and a car he is believed to have access to, a silver car, we are told he is key to this investigation at this stage. the metropolitan police were at the vigil last night talking to people, handing out leaflets with sabina nessa's picture on them. they're trying to reassure people that it is still safe to go out here and people shouldn't be worried, but obviously there is concern. although the met police have said women shouldn't be altering their behaviour, they shouldn't have to change the way they lead their lives, some people already are. the victims commissioner for england
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and wales, dame vera baird, has said today that shouldn't be expected to change the way they behave, they shouldn't have to carry safety alarms, there should be better monitoring of offenders. she says there is such monitoring in place for drug dealers, burglars, but there is not a mechanism in place which is sufficient for women, to protect women, and she is calling on that urgent change to be made now. so police investigation continuing today, police still appealing for information from the public and people here in the community, they are still coming down to leave their cards, flowers, poems, pictures drawn by schoolchildren. still lots of people coming down here remembering sabina nessa, trying to come to terms with what has happened here this last week and trying to look ahead to the future, how do we guarantee people's safety and make sure we are all safe when we go out to meet our friends? something that was not afforded to sabina nessa. the headlines on bbc news... queues at petrol stations as the government prepares to announce a temporary visa scheme to make it easierforforeign lorry drivers to work in the uk. keir starmer heads for
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a showdown with labour's left over changes to the way the party chooses its mps and leaders a book of condolence is opened for people to pay respects to teacher sabina nessa, who was killed in south—east london. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's chethan. good afternoon. we'll have the latest from the ryder cup injust a moment, but let's start in the premier league, where chelsea's unbeaten start to the season has come to an end as manchester city avenged last season's champions league final defeat with a 1—0 victory at stamford bridge. ben croucher was watching. here we are, home of the champions of europe. chelsea's champions league win over manchester city in may is a win still healing in guardiola's squad. if chelsea want domestic honours, they will have to prise it from
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manchester city's grasp. two of the best defences and a first half that wasn't the easiest of watches. the second had more to catch pi, and even though cancelo didn't quite catch his shot, it fell to a team—mate who knewjust where the goal was. team-mate who knew 'ust where the coal was. , team-mate who knew 'ust where the uoalwas. , g , , team-mate who knew 'ust where the uoalwas. g , , ., goal was. gabrieljesus for manchester _ goal was. gabrieljesus for manchester city _ goal was. gabrieljesus for manchester city fc - goal was. gabrieljesus for manchester city fc change goal was. gabrieljesus for i manchester city fc change of momentum _ manchester city fc change of momentum early _ manchester city fc change of momentum early in - manchester city fc change of momentum early in the - manchester city fc change of i momentum early in the season. manchester city fc change of - momentum early in the season. some might say city should have scored more, they had control and chances, but converting them into anything more concrete remained a challenge. chelsea, though, were having an off day. no shots on target, nothing to celebrate. for guardiola, though, 22ist celebrate. for guardiola, though, 221st win as city boss, more than any before him. the champions of england looking very much at home once again. ben crouch, bbc news. and in today's other early game, bruno fernandes missed a 93rd minute penalty as aston villa beat manchester united 1—0
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for theirfirst win at old trafford in 12 years. kourtney hause headed villa into the lead with only two minutes to play, and then gave away the penalty that fernandes skied over the bar. the result means united's unbeaten start to the season has come to an end whilst villa are up to seventh for now. they have had lots of little chances, where we got in really good blocks, the penalty was going to be a chance for them, but i thought we deserved the win today and filled we were aggressive and brave today and were aggressive and brave today and we have to be sometimes. i have seen it back and i think it was a very harsh penalty. i'm not sure where he is meant to put his arm, it has flashed across and it has hit is arm, which is at his side, but justice was done when he missed it. four three o'clock kick offs in the premier league. andros townsend has given everton the lead against norwich city. leeds are winning against west ham. jamie
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vardy has scored in both nets. burnley 2—1 up at leicester and newcastle looking for their first league win of the season and have the lead at watford. liverpool can go three points clear at the top — if they win at brentford tonight. next to the ryder cup, where there's no rory mciroy for europe. he's been dropped for today's foursomes with europe starting the day 6—2 down against the united states at whistling straits in wisconsin. they need to make up ground. these foursomes are more evenly poised. sergio garcia and his partner were forced back early but are one up. dustinjohnson and his partner three up dustinjohnson and his partner three up against paul casey and his partner. and the europeans one up againstjordan speith and justin thomas. there is live commentary
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over on bbc radio 5 live sports extra. britain's lando norris says he hopes the first pole position of his career for sunday's russian grand prix will be the "first of many". world champion lewis hamilton was dominating qualifying at sochi until he damaged his mercedes on the way to change on to slick tyres. he then spun as he tried desperately to set a good time on his final run. norris had no such troubles, claiming the top spot ahead of ferrari's carlos sainz and fellow briton george russell. hamilton will start from fourth. more on all of those stories on sports day at 6:30pm. for you, back to you, martin. —— for now, back to you. a tense diplomatic and legal standoff between the united states, china and canada has come to an abrupt conclusion. the huawei executive meng wanzhou is flying back to china after being released from home detention in canada, following the temporary resolution of a us legal case against her. apparently, in return,
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china has released two canadians it had imprisoned on espionage charges. david willis reports. leaving her home in vancouver for the last time after nearly three years of house arrest, meng wanzhou, a key figure in one of china's biggest companies, was facing extradition on charges of helping to evade us economic sanctions on iran. she was freed suddenly after striking a deal with us prosecutors, which saw her admit in a virtual appearance before a new york courtroom to lying to banks on huawei's behalf. in return, the usjustice department dropped its extradition request. over the past three years, my life has been turned upside down. it was a disruptive time for me as a mother, a wife, and as a company executive. but i believe every cloud
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has a silver lining. it really was an invaluable experience in my life. huawei is the largest telecom equipment manufacturer in the world, but its success unnerved the trump administration, which accused the company of using its technology to spy on the us. meng wanzhou's detention was all the more controversial given she is the daughter of huawei's founder, and it prompted the arrest of two canadian citizens in china — diplomat michael kovrig and businessman michael spavor — in what the canadian government branded an act of hostage diplomacy. to the delight of the canadian prime minister, they have now been released as well. about 12 minutes ago, the aircraft carrying michael kovrig and michael spavor left chinese airspace and they are on their way home. they boarded at about 7:30 0ttawa
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time, along with dominic barton, canada's ambassador to china. meng wanzhou left canada on an air china flight bound for shenhzen, but any prospect of a thaw in the adversarial relationship between the united states and china may prove to be short lived. huawei remains on a trade blacklist here and still faces charges of corporate espionage. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. a 12—year—old boy has died at an indoor ski centre in the west midlands. ambulance crews were called to the snowdome in tamworth yesterday evening following reports that a child had been hurt, but they were unable to save him. police say a man is also being treated for injuries. prince andrew's us lawyers have accepted he has been served with legal papers alleging that he sexually assaulted virginia giuffre in 2001. it follows a dispute over
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whether the prince had been formally notified of the civil claim against him. ms giuffre is seeking unspecified damages. prince andrew has consistently denied the allegation. tomorrow marks the end of a political era in germany, as elections take place for a new leader to replace angela merkel as chancellor after 16 years. climate change has been a big issue during the campaign, with activists holding rallies in cities across the country. 0ur europe editor, katya adler, sent this report from berlin. applause. relaxing on a friday evening after 16 years at the helm of the eu's most powerful country, angela merkel is relieved, perhaps, that it is almost all over. the migrant crisis, the euro crisis, four us presidents, five uk prime ministers, 100 eu summits and more during her time in office. hers will be a tough act to follow
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at home and on the world stage. many germans say they will miss the stoic, pragmatic politician nicknamed �*mummy�*. merkel is going to be strongly missed, i think so. i will miss merkel very much. because? because i am a fan of her. i think it will be very hard _ for every candidate who comes next, or the next chancellor to fulfil - this role, because there will always be this comparison to merkel. and at eu hq in brussels, there will also be a big merkel—sized hole. 0n the global landscape, i mean, it really matters and i think merkel was a very well respected leader, so everybody is looking at who is going to follow in her footsteps. of course, there is the potential for germany to take a dramatic new direction after 16 years of angela merkel, and that would be felt here and abroad. this is the eu's most influential country. but in the end, most germans
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are stability—hungry, and so the calls for radical change, while loud, are limited. what we're probably looking at here is �*change' but with a small c. this is the frontrunner to replace angela merkel, a centrist social democrat, currently germany's finance minister, seen as a safe pair of hands. his closest rival is a europhile conservative from angela merkel�*s cdu party. and the green party candidate is tipped to win a powerful position in the next german government. the environment is a big issue in sunday's election and in crowds like these, you find a fair few merkel critics. nojustice! no peace! tens of thousands gathered in front of the german parliament today demanding change and accusing chancellor merkel of failing to prepare germany for the challenging future ahead.
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but climate concerns are now for the in—tray of angela merkel�*s successor. this photo went viral this week after she visited a bird sanctuary, appearing far more relaxed than usual. the merkel era in german politics is drawing to a close. katya adler, bbc news, berlin. the volcanic eruption on la palma has led to the closure of the airport on the spanish island. the authorities said the accumulation of ash had made it impossible to operate, but that clean—up work was under way. la palma airport mainly handles tourist charter flights, and connections to other islands in the canaries. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello. after a pretty cloudy start to the day, the weather did its best to try and brighten up. many of us, at least, saw some glimpses of sunshine, but the cloud completely cleared in eastbourne through the afternoon to give us these sunny skies. now, overnight tonight, the cloud
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will tend to reform and thicken, becoming quite murky with some mist and fog patches around our southern and western coasts. the cloud could be thick enough for the odd spot of drizzle just about anywhere in the west and temperatures around 13 to 15 degrees, very similar to last night. into tomorrow, after a bright start in northern ireland, outbreaks of rain will push in here. this is a cold front. the rains are going to be quite heavy and the winds gusting at 40 miles an hour and that wet and windy weather will then spread to western scotland. eastern scotland, england and wales, the winds a bit stronger but the stronger winds should blow a few more holes into the cloud, so a brighter day overall, a bit more sunshine, highs up to 23 degrees. make the most of that relative warmth because into next week, autumn arrives. an unsettled—looking whether pattern. ——weather pattern. rain and showers, some strong winds and feeling much cooler. hello this is bbc news. and feeling much cooler. the headlines... and feeling much cooler. keir starmer heads for a showdown with labour's left
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over changes to the way the party chooses its mps and leaders. a book of condolence is opened for people to pay respects to teacher sabina nessa, who was killed in south—east london. two canadians arrive home after spending over 1,000 days in detention in china over spying charges. now on bbc news, it's the media show. hello. i met ros atkins, and welcome to the media show. and i'm delighted to sate my guest today is one of the best—known and most influentialfigures in the uk media. he has his own production company, a new game show on itv, over eight million followers on twitter, a role in one of the best—known advertising campaigns of the last 25 years, a regular presenting slot on saturday nights on bbc one that he has had since 1999, and before all of that of course he was pretty good
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at football as well. gary lineker, welcome to the show.

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