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tv   Click  BBC News  September 25, 2021 3:30pm-4:00pm BST

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but, conference, whatsapp. applause. but, conference, i do whatsapp. applause. but, conference, ido romise whatsapp. applause. but, conference, i do promise you — whatsapp. applause. but, conference, i do promise you this. _ whatsapp. applause. but, conference, i do promise you this. we _ whatsapp. applause. but, conference, i do promise you this. we will. - whatsapp. applause. but, conference, i do promise you this. we will. the - i do promise you this. we will. the dodgy deals handing public money to ministers' mates. it is bad news for my pub landlord but it is good news for the public. my pub landlord but it is good news for the public— my pub landlord but it is good news for the public._ and - my pub landlord but it is good news for the public._ and let l my pub landlord but it is good news l for the public._ and let me for the public. applause. and let me tell ou for the public. applause. and let me tell you this- — for the public. applause. and let me tell you this. as _ for the public. applause. and let me tell you this. as the _ for the public. applause. and let me tell you this. as the minister - for the public. applause. and let me tell you this. as the minister for - tell you this. as the minister for procurement, i won't sign a single penny that goes to a company that exploits its workers or doesn't pay its taxes. �* �* ,, exploits its workers or doesn't pay its taxes._ conference, | exploits its workers or doesn't pay i its taxes._ conference, we its taxes. applause. conference, we will stand out — its taxes. applause. conference, we will stand out the _ its taxes. applause. conference, we will stand out the tory _ its taxes. applause. conference, we will stand out the tory sleaze - its taxes. applause. conference, we will stand out the tory sleaze that. will stand out the tory sleaze that has polluted our politics and corrupted our democracy. the racket
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is over, their time is up. a labour government will sweep away the failed system. our integrity and ethics commission will do what it says on the tin. put integrity and ethics back into government. and, conference, i cannot think of anyone better to lead that change then our shadow cabinet office team and cat smith, ourshadow shadow cabinet office team and cat smith, our shadow ministerfor democracy. just imagine, conference... democracy. just imagine, conference. . ._ democracy. just imagine, - conference. . ._just democracy. just imagine, _ conference. . ._ just imagine conference... applause. just imagine a minister conference. .. applause. just imagine a ministerfor— conference... applause. just imagine a minister for democracy _ conference... applause. just imagine a minister for democracy who - conference... applause. just imagine a minister for democracy who is - a ministerfor democracy who is actually for democracy. and we have got another who brings a lifetime of experience in the labour movement, and fleur anderson, who won putney from the tories and has never shied
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away from a fight.— from the tories and has never shied away from a fight._ and | from the tories and has never shied . away from a fight._ and who away from a fight. applause. and who can for: et away from a fight. applause. and who can forget our— away from a fight. applause. and who can forget our diane _ away from a fight. applause. and who can forget our diane hayter, _ away from a fight. applause. and who can forget our diane hayter, who - away from a fight. applause. and who can forget our diane hayter, who has i can forget our diane hayter, who has beaten the tories in the lords countless times, and floris, who is one of our brightest rising stars of our movement? and it will be led from the top. and what a contrast, conference. what a contrast our leader is to the current prime minister. ours has a lifetime of public service. there's has a lifetime of self service. conference, in 1945, our party put forward a manifesto called let us face the future. and i believe that
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is our task this week. then, as now, our country stood together in the face of a global crisis. crisis that survived through shared values of collectivism, community and public service. labourvalues, british service. labour values, british values. service. labourvalues, british values. then, as now, we were proud of our country and our communities and, yes, working people were proud of our class as well. then, as now, we want it better. in 1945, the country faced a choice between the tory government who sought the credit for the shared achievement, but long for the status quo that preceded it, where the state would step back and the market would rule
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again, where people knew their place and took what was given, or a labour government that would harness the values saved a nation and make a country fit for those who fought for at too. our country chose to face that future and now, conference, let us face the future again. thank you. applause. a standing ovation there for the deputy leader of the labour party, angela rayner, formally kicking off this year's annual conference in brighton. and true to form, announcing that plan for a so—called fair pay agreement. our political
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correspondent is in brighton and she was listening to that speech and we can talk about it with her now. trying to make working life fairer for everyone, helen, is really the thrust of that policy idea? yes. thrust of that policy idea? yes, there was _ thrust of that policy idea? yes, there was quite _ thrust of that policy idea? yes, there was quite a _ thrust of that policy idea? yes, there was quite a lot _ thrust of that policy idea? yes, there was quite a lot of - thrust of that policy idea? 1913 there was quite a lot of different elements in there, wasn't there? so, he will talk about the fair pay agreement which is the flagship element of this green paper that angela rayner talked about. she is of course the shadow secretary for the future of work, not just the deputy leader, this is why it fills on her remit to do. she talked about the fair pay agreement, about how it was already enacted in new zealand, about how it would bring together employers and workers to come up with his binding agreements on conditions across sectors. she also talked about increasing statutory sick pay, and giving people the right to parental leave and sick pay
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from day one of their working life, creating a new worker status so you are either a worker or self—employed that there are no grey areas within that, she took about banning zero—hours contracts. about writing common decency and fairness into the law to allow people to do things, to be able to work around their child together, that sort of thing. she talked about not letting bad employs hold all the cards so it was about a whole range of measures designed to reinforce and boost the rights of workers. she was also careful to say that this didn't mean the party was anti—business by being pro—worker. she said lots of small businesses play by the rules and this is about stopping from other employers undercutting those that do. what a lot of speech from her detailing all the number of policy points in a green paper that she says would be enacted by a labour government within a hundred days of them coming to power. within a hundred days of them coming to ower. �* _, within a hundred days of them coming to ower. ~ . ., within a hundred days of them coming
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to ower. ~ ., ., to power. also criticism of the government. _ to power. also criticism of the government, criticism - to power. also criticism of the government, criticism of- to power. also criticism of the government, criticism of the l government, criticism of the conservatives in so many different ways but couldn't quite resist talking about how they dealt with covid and in her view too many contracts going to too many friends of ministers. contracts going to too many friends of ministers— of ministers. yes, that refrain that we have heard _ of ministers. yes, that refrain that we have heard from _ of ministers. yes, that refrain that we have heard from labour- we have heard from labour consistently throughout the pandemic, this idea the cabinet having one rule for them and one wool for the others as you imagine a few of the incidents that have come up few of the incidents that have come up that have levelled that criticism. for example, the prime minister and, when he tried to take part in a scheme that would allow him to not self—isolate when he was pinned to self—isolate, she recognised dominic rob going on holidays, counselling leave for the forces, there was, as you would expect a lot of lines flagging up there. she described it as tory sleaze and talked about labour bringing integrity and ethics back into government. certainly, she did
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bring up political attacks, bring out these issues that we have seen throughout the pandemic, again reinforcing the idea that labour has levels at the government consistently that one rule for them and one rule for everybody else. helen, thank you very much. a book of condolence has been opened in south london to pay tribute to the teacher who was killed in south—east london in kid broke, sabina nessa. a candlelit vigil was held for her last night, people in a community wanting to pay tribute to the 28—year—old who was killed last week. our correspondent is there, many more floral tributes even than yesterday. many more floral tributes even than esterda . ~ , ,., , many more floral tributes even than esterda . ~ , ,
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yesterday. absolutely, candle still burnina yesterday. absolutely, candle still burnin: for yesterday. absolutely, candle still burning for sabina _ yesterday. absolutely, candle still burning for sabina nessa - yesterday. absolutely, candle still burning for sabina nessa this - burning for sabina nessa this afternoon, the site from where her body was found last saturday by a member of the public walking their dog. the candlelit vigil took place about two or three minutes walk from here, hundreds of people attended it, it is when she was headed last friday night, she was expected to take a five minute walk from home to pegler square to go and meet a friend, she cut through the park and thatis friend, she cut through the park and that is where police say she was attacked and murdered. last night, hundreds of people were listening to speeches from community leaders and from sabina nessa's sister, who described a caring, beautiful kind soul, her death shattering her family. the candlelit vigil last night, today a book of condolence open at the local community centre, it has been closed for much of this week because it was within the police cordon which was behind me, it was lifted on thursday evening. the body of sabina nessa was found
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near the community centre and today, staff tell me they felt it was really important that they opened up the whole —— the whole there, then let people come and record their thoughts, their condolences for sabina nessa's family, in a book that will be given to them later on this month. they say this is a place that would normally be full of people, people taking their children out, playing football, having picnics, crossing the park and going out in their daily life, just as sabina nessa was last friday. on this a very different now, it has been a lot quieter, staff say people have been going out as much on their own, people have been going out in twos and threes, there is a lot of concern here about public safety. a murder investigation obviously still continuing, the metropolitan police are keen, we know, to and identify a man who was seen on cctv footage which therefore is released yesterday, that man was seen in pegler square round about the time of sabina nessa perfect murder. he
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is believed to have access to a silver car, we are told. he is key to the investigation at this stage. the metropolitan police were at the vigil last night, they were talking to people, they were handing out leaflets with sabina nessa's picture on them, they are trying to read —— and reassure people it is safe to go out and that people should not be worried but obviously there is concerned. although the police have said women should not alter their behaviour or change the way they lead their lives, some people already are, and the victim was �*s commissionerfor already are, and the victim was �*s commissioner for england and wales has said that women shouldn't be expected to change the way they behave, they shouldn't have to carry safety alarms, there should be better monitoring of offenders. she says there is such monitoring in place for drug dealers and burglars but there is a mechanism in case thatis but there is a mechanism in case that is sufficient to protect women. she is calling on an urgent change to be made now. the police investigation continuing today, police still can —— appealing for
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information from the public and people in the community still coming down to leave cards, flowers, poems, pictures drawn by schoolchildren, still lots of people coming down here remembering sabina nessa, trying to come to terms with what has happened here this last week and trying to look ahead to the future, how do we guarantee people's safety, how do we guarantee people's safety, how do we make sure we are all safe and we go ourfriends, something that wasn't afforded to sabina nessa. ., .. that wasn't afforded to sabina nessa. ., ~' ,, a nessa. thank you. a tense _ nessa. thank you. j a tense diplomatic nessa. thank you. - a tense diplomatic kill nessa. thank you. _ a tense diplomatic kill stand-off a tense diplomatic kill stand—off has come to conclusion. the huawei executive meng wanzhou is flying back to china after being released from home detention in canada, following the temporary resolution of a us legal case against her. in return, china has released two canadians it had imprisoned on espionage charges. david willis reports.
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leaving her home in vancouver for the last time after nearly three years of house arrest, meng wanzhou, a key figure in one of china's biggest companies, was facing extradition on charges of helping to evade us economic sanctions on iran. she was freed suddenly after striking a deal with us prosecutors, which saw her admit in a virtual appearance before a new york courtroom to lying to banks on huawei's behalf. in return, the usjustice department dropped its extradition request. over the past three years, my life has been turned upside down. it was a disruptive time for me as a mother, a wife, and as a company executive. but i believe every cloud has a silver lining. it really was an invaluable experience in my life. huawei is the largest telecom equipment manufacturer in the world, but its success unnerved
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the trump administration, which accused the company of using its technology to spy on the us. meng wanzhou's detention was all the more controversial given she is the daughter of huawei's founder, and it prompted the arrest of two canadian citizens in china — diplomat michael kovrig and businessman michael spavor — in what the canadian government branded an act of hostage diplomacy. to the delight of the canadian prime minister, they have now been released as well. about 12 minutes ago, the aircraft carrying michael kovrig and michael spavor left chinese airspace and they are on their way home. they boarded at about 7:30 ottawa time, along with dominic barton, canada's ambassador to china. meng wanzhou left canada on an air china flight bound for shenhzen, but any prospect of a thaw in the adversarial
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relationship between the united states and china may prove to be short lived. huawei remains on a trade blacklist here and still faces charges of corporate espionage. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. now on bbc news, it's time for click. in the middle of the otherworldly landscape of iceland, something strange is going on. 130,000 barley plants are slowly making their way from one end of this greenhouse to the other.
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and what's even stranger is what this barley is going to be used for. it is in the food chain but it's not food for us and it's not food for animals. no, this is something much, much weirder than that. this grass is a host. it's been genetically modified to carry a special protein called a growth factor in its seeds. once the plants reach the end of their journey these seeds are harvested, milled and purified and the resulting growth factor protein can be used to help produce something very unexpected — meat, in a lab, without the animals. i think we will reach the point where it's not, like, nice to have, i think we have to have it. the earth is not going to grow, we're not going to get more agriculture area, the population is rising, and we
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have to feed all of the people. the argument for growing meat in labs without living animals is that the process will eventually require less land, less energy and produce less harmful waste. and it takes more agricultural land to grow feed for the animals that we eat. we are are essentially bypassing that. so we don't have to kill all these animals, we just have to take the stem cell from them and i think this is a more viable and more environmental, much better option. companies using cow stem cells to make lab—grown beef burgers and even lab—grown steak are already trying out growth factors made here in iceland. and although the first—ever growth factors came from animals, it's hoped that this barley plant method will be cheaper and scalable
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because nature can do a lot of the heavy lifting. but at the moment, research is still ongoing to come up with the barley that produces the very best growth factors, which is why the volcanic and geothermal peculiarities of iceland are an ideal place to experiment with different growing conditions. they're growing the barley in this, which is volcanic pumice from mount hekla, which is somewhere over there. the good thing about pumice is it is inert so it doesn't really release any nutrients into the plants itself and that means these guys can completely control the nutrient mix that the barley gets. we are here in a high—tech greenhouse that is using geothermal energy for heating and for the electricity. we are using hydroponic cultivation. the computer decides when to open windows, when to turn off lights, went to pump in c02, what nutrition to feed these plants and so forth.
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but eventually these carefully programmed plants will have to be harvested in regularfields to produce enough growth factor for a global label lab grown meat industry, and barley specifically has been chosen because it can grow in many different climates and it also doesn't cross—pollinate with other plants around it. the typicalfarm in iceland, which is about 150 hectares, could actually produce about 10,000 tonnes of meat. that's if lab—grown meat is indeed the answer. after all, aren't we all supposed to be eating more greens? well, not too far away, another company is tapping into iceland's geothermal power to put us on an altogether different diet. this is food for us, or at least it will be one day. it's not something we're currently used to eating, mind you, but tastes change.
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it's algae. i know, sounds kind of ewww, doesn't it? but the microalgae growing in these test units are rich in protein and omega—3, much more so than traditional crops grown in a field, and they also consume way fewer natural resources too. in these systems, we can grow a tonne of protein and using 3—4—500 times less water and 14—1500 times less land than the best thing that we know today. and in fact, because algae is a plant, it has another environmental benefit — photosynthesis. we get the co2 from the power plant, we get into our system, we use algae to actually fix that co2 into biomass and they breathe out oxygen, so oxygen is actually our only byproduct of this product.
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which is not a bad byproduct, really. the health authorities don't seem to mind. laughs. so, right here in geothermal iceland where electricity and hot water are both essentially clean, green and on tap, growing this algae ends up being carbon negative. it pulls more co2 out of the environment than the electricity puts back in. but in order to feed the world, these algae farms would need to be placed around the globe. and not everywhere's on top of a volcano. the system itself is always carbon negative because we take in c02, we fix it in biomass and we breathe out oxygen. but if you're having to use electricity that's generated through coal... exactly. ..then the system is generating co2 as well... yes, yes. ..and can then you connect the pipe from the power station, straight back into the algae and suck it back in?
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that is actually a possibility. this is what we're doing right now. these guys, they need c02, so we could actually take whatever co2 into the system, theoretically. and in fact, vaxa is thinking even further ahead than improving the environment here on earth. growing food in small spaces with limited water and producing oxygen as a byproduct sounds like a pretty useful thing to be able to do, i don't know, in a moon base or on mars. if the colonists can stomach it, that is. all right, let me ask you a question — what does algae taste like? um, basically the medium it's in. so this algae is a cold seawater algae. salty then? so it's salty. the problem is, this one is fairly robust... by "fairly robust", you mean a tough chew? it's a tough chew, yeah, it is. laughs.
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ok, i've been made an offer that i can't refuse. kiti said, "would you like to drink some algae?" of course i would! oh, my life! for real, or...? 0k. i can do it first, if you want. you're not having a laugh? i can do it first. yeah, it's fishy. yeah. needs a little, um... what's it called? a lie—down afterwards, that's it. 0k. laughs. hmm, maybe it will take a more creative chef than me to be able to sell this straight onto the plate. the streets of san francisco are home to many self—driving cars
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so naturally the sky above the city is home to a self—flying plane. this is xwing, a company that has developed an autonomous flying system that handles everything from taxiing to take off to landing to parking. the system is similar to self—driving cars and uses a lot of the same tech like lidar cameras and sensors to navigate the skies. while a command centre on the ground helps the autonomous system communicate with the humans in air traffic control. and now that i'm suited and booted, let's see this thing in action. so this is basically a beta version of what they're working on, which means it will also make always require a safety pilot on board but the company is working to be entirely autonomous meaning none of these by the end of next year, and they're also hoping to get faa certification in 2024. all that the human pilot on board has to do is physically turn the plane on, check that all systems are go and press the button that activates the autonomous system. then it's up to the plane. it does have to liaise with a human
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in the ground control centre while it's making its way to the runway for takeoff but that's just to ensure it's safe to cross certain parts of the strip. during takeoff it's almost like an ghost is in control because all of the parts are still moving but i'm not seeing what's moving them. once you've trained a robot once, you can build as many robots as you want, they all do the same thing, right? yeah. some of what the sensors and cameras are picking up is augmented over a realtime view of three cameras mounted on the exterior of the plane. the purpleish bits off to the side are other planes that are in the area, while the bluish coloured lines in front of the plane are the flight path. on our way back to base, the team decided to let me fly the plane. so we're taking control of the aeroplane. so he's out of the loop because he doesn't know what you are doing. all right. i don't know what i'm doing. perfect. after a quick lesson on an xbox controller, i was flying a plane for the first time ever.
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sure, i was just controlling the direction and the altitude but it was a lot of fun. they even let me go as far as a 45—degree tilt. aeroplanes have been equipped with autopilot systems for years already but the system xwing has developed takes that to the next level. if i was just a passenger in this plane, i would have never known it was being flown autonomously. the ride, takeoff and landing were as smooth as any other flight i've been on. i've always wanted to get a pilots licence but may be tech like this means i won't ever need to. but it's still likely a ways off before we see widespread adaptation and faa approval of unmanned aircrafts. that's all we have time for the short version. the full version is available on bbc iplayer. and we live on youtube, twitter, facebook and instagram. thank you for
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watching. the cloud completely cleared in eastbourne through this afternoon to give as the sunny skies. overnight tonight, the cloud will tend to reform and they can, becoming quite murky with mist and fog patches. the cloud could be thick enough for an odd spot of drizzle. temperatures around 13 to 15 degrees, very similar to last night. tomorrow, after a bright start in northern ireland, we get a cold front come in with gusty winds. the wet and windy
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weather will spread to western scotland. in scotland, england and wales, stronger winds blowing holes into the clouds so a brighter day overall. make the most of the warmth because into next week, autumn arrives, unsettled, rain and showers, strong winds and feeling much cooler. us face the future again. thank you. applause.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at four... queues at petrol stations as the government prepares to announce a temporary visa scheme to make it easierforforeign lorry drivers to work in the uk. keir starmer heads for a showdown with labour's left over changes to the way the party chooses its mps and leaders. a book of condolence is opened for people to pay respects to teacher sabina nessa, who was killed in south—east london. two canadians arrive home after spending over 1,000 days in detention in china over spying charges. it's the final day of campaigning in germany, where voters will elect a new chancellor.

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