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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 25, 2021 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines... queues at petrol stations as the government prepares to announce a temporary visa scheme to make it easierforforeign lorry drivers to work in the uk. two canadians are heading home after spending over 1,000 days in detention in china over spying charges. prince andrew's us lawyers accept he has been served with legal papers alleging that he sexually assaulted virginia giuffre. he denies all allegations. hundreds pay tribute to murdered primary school teacher sabina nessa at a candle—lit vigil. it's the final day of campaigning in germany, where voters will elect a new chancellor tomorrow.
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good afternoon. welcome to bbc news. the government is due to formally announce a visa scheme that will make it easier for foreign drivers to work in the uk. details of the plan will be set out tomorrow. it's expected the temporary plan will allow visas for about 5,000 drivers to tackle the hgv driver shortage, which has led to supply problems at some petrol stations and other businesses. the road haulage association estimates that the uk is short of about 100,000 hgv drivers in total — with existing shortages made worse by a number of factors, including the pandemic and brexit. here's our business correspondent, katy austin. people have been told not to panic buy, there is no shortage of fuel itself.
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but again this morning, there were queues at petrol stations. absolute mayhem, nobody can get past, nobody can get in. eg group, which operates 400 sites, has set a £30 per customer limit. the initial problems experienced by bp were due to a shortage of lorry drivers. it is thought the uk has a shortfall of tens of thousands. there's a range of factors. brexit is definitely one of them. the pandemic, as you mentioned, played its part. the change to the payroll, of payroll working regulations, ir35, that played a significant part. but the general problem has been around and known about for ten to 15 years or more, and the ageing driver workforce retiring, we are not replacing them with the younger workers. wages are rising as firms try to attract staff, but freight and retail groups say more action is needed to plug the gap while a bigger uk workforce is grown. for months, the government has resisted calls to introduce a temporary visa scheme forforeign drivers, but it is now expected
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to announce one tomorrow, with 5000 visas available. there will also be a raft of longer—term measures. while it is really good news from the government, we do have to realise as an industry that that is a very short—term fix, and with the view of getting eu drivers back into the uk to help the christmas retail season. beyond that, what are the government going to do? what are the industry also going to do to prevent this happening again? the business group — the cbi — says it was welcome but late. it is a big relief. hopefully it is going to happen, and it is a huge relief. we have been calling for it for three months. we could see this problem coming and more problems coming, and so it is a shame the government needed queues at the pumps to move, but move i hope they have, and it will help. the uk isn't the only country experiencing shortages. it is unclear how many overseas drivers will apply for a visa and how soon. businesses just want things to improve before the crucial christmas period.
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katy austin, bbc news. joining me now is shane brennan, who is the chief executive of cold chain federation. welcome. explain if you would want your federation does, who welcome. explain if you would want yourfederation does, who it represents, briefly. your federation does, who it represents, briefly. represent warehouse _ represents, briefly. represent warehouse and _ represents, briefly. represent warehouse and distribution - warehouse and distribution businesses.— warehouse and distribution businesses. ., , businesses. how is your second being acked at businesses. how is your second being packed at the — businesses. how is your second being packed at the moment? _ businesses. how is your second being packed at the moment? we _ businesses. how is your second being packed at the moment? we are - businesses. how is your second being i packed at the moment? we are under hue packed at the moment? we are under huge pressure. _ packed at the moment? we are under huge pressure, the _ packed at the moment? we are under huge pressure, the stress _ packed at the moment? we are under huge pressure, the stress on - packed at the moment? we are under huge pressure, the stress on supply l huge pressure, the stress on supply chains is happening at all levels and meaning businesses are struggling to meet their order requirements, we are looking at eight to ten being effected at the moment. shop floor managers are struggling to get through the day and that is leading to interruptions to supplying the shelves. who and that is leading to interruptions to supplying the shelves.— to supplying the shelves. who and what ou to supplying the shelves. who and what you normally _ to supplying the shelves. who and what you normally rely _ to supplying the shelves. who and what you normally rely on - to supplying the shelves. who and. what you normally rely on transport to get your goods out?— to get your goods out? number of businesses _ to get your goods out? number of
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businesses do _ to get your goods out? number of businesses do that _ to get your goods out? number of businesses do that job _ to get your goods out? number of businesses do that job and - to get your goods out? number of businesses do that job and they . to get your goods out? number of. businesses do that job and they are businesses do thatjob and they are providing that distribution into the market, supplying retailers and manufacturers, with lorries they need to get goods out and about and thatis need to get goods out and about and that is where we are seeing that shortage, we are really struggling with a number of drivers we need, food supply chain and the lack of drivers is causing the problems. were hearing a lot of reasons as to why there is a shortage of drivers and vehicles themselves take a fortune to buy. but what in your view is causing these shortages and the lack of haulage capacity? is started with a pandemic, which has massively dislocated the number of people working in our industry, massively changed supply patterns and beyond that, there are a number of issues to do in our resilience and our existing system and ability to retain national labour because of immigration controls voting at the brexit, and we have issues with
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people retiring and changing their lifestyles as a result of the pandemic. lifestyles as a result of the pandemic— lifestyles as a result of the pandemic. lifestyles as a result of the andemic. , , ., ., ., , pandemic. yes, it is a hard “ob, isn't it, pandemic. yes, it is a hard “ob, m it. being i pandemic. yes, it is a hard “ob, isn't it, being an i pandemic. yes, it is a hard “ob, isn't it, being an hgv�* pandemic. yes, it is a hard job, isn't it, being an hgv driver? it| pandemic. yes, it is a hard job, l isn't it, being an hgv driver? it is a vocation — isn't it, being an hgv driver? it is a vocation and — isn't it, being an hgv driver? it 3 a vocation and lifestyle and unfortunately those that are doing that have done it all their lives and they are exiting the industry and they are exiting the industry and is not a new generation coming up and is not a new generation coming up at the same pace we need and that is a long—term problem. there is an issue with how we society view those drivers. we must treat them more respect for the important role in play and think about the facilities we provide them in our service stations and roadsides and think about how we show the next—generation exciting role it can be there driving a lorry and logistics and feeding the nation. the road haulage association say we are 100,000 drivers short. how adequate, then, is this idea of 5000 temporary visas to allow people to come into the country who might have been those who would have been here
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prior to brexit? it is been those who would have been here prior to brexit?— prior to brexit? it is an important and hard-fought _ prior to brexit? it is an important and hard-fought concession, - prior to brexit? it is an important and hard-fought concession, but| prior to brexit? it is an important - and hard-fought concession, but 5000 and hard—fought concession, but 5000 will not be enough. i think it will have a lot of conditions as well, thatis have a lot of conditions as well, that is not the same as the freedom of movement there before. i'm pessimistic about how useful are specifically will be but it is a step in the right direction. we must not have any ideological barriers for how we go forward in the short term because it is about how we get reinforcements in the supply chain as we prepare for the christmas period, which is so crucialfor the supply chain. period, which is so crucial for the supply chain-— period, which is so crucial for the supply chain. because there are a lot of people _ supply chain. because there are a lot of people involved _ supply chain. because there are a lot of people involved in - supply chain. because there are a lot of people involved in the - supply chain. because there are a l lot of people involved in the supply chain in the run—up to christmas and it is even busier, and the governance has resisted changing these arrangements post—brexit until now. how likely is it that other sectors will say, if the hauliers can have it, why should we not? it might apply more widely than
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haulage, but it is important. the principal conceded around this issue is that it means there will be more flexibility, but it is going to be short—term relief for those who have been working very hard as an industry to keep the nation fed, and we as an industry need to look at how we pay and reward the next generation into the long—term in the industry. generation into the long-term in the indust . , ,., . generation into the long-term in the indust . , . ., industry. there is the pandemic and other factors _ industry. there is the pandemic and other factors that _ industry. there is the pandemic and other factors that have _ industry. there is the pandemic and other factors that have made - industry. there is the pandemic and other factors that have made us - other factors that have made us realise who we should be grateful to. thank you very much. thank you very much. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, is understood to have watered down his proposals to change the voting rules for future leadership elections. they would have given mps a greater say over who wins, but the plans have run into opposition from trades unions. the party is gathering in brighton for its annual conference. here's our political correspondent, ione wells. a crucial moment for sir keir starmer to set out his stall.
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this government is letting people down so badly. whether it is hammering working people on tax and universal credit, whether it is shortages of food and fuel. an embarrassing start on rule changes, though, sir keir? interrupting his pitch, though, are tensions within the party itself. he and his deputy leader, angela rayner, wanted to spend today talking about their plan to set minimum standards for pay and conditions for different sectors, starting with social care. it's about a fair day's pay for a fair day's work and about making sure that work does always pay and there is a minimum floor, so the unscrupulous employers who are undercutting those who are trying to do the right thing are taken out of the market. but there has been rain on their announcements. the leader was forced to withdraw his plans to give mps and unions more say than members in future leadership contest after he failed to persuade unions to back then and a backlash from the left of the party. the labour leadership should get real. people out there want us addressing the real issues
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that they are facing in their lives. the threat that they now have to their well—being and the quality of their life. an alternative package of reforms was put to the party's ruling committee, the nec, this morning and passed. the left are still likely to see these as further attempts to de—corbynise the party, but allies of sir keir see the changes as a way to prevent more internal rows and focus outwards as he faces the climb ahead to the next election. ione wells, bbc news. let's join our political correspondent helen catt, who's at the conference in brighton. hello, yes, so those reforms we talked about this morning went through the national executive committee, labour's ruling body, this morning, and the headline one is that they have changed the rules for labour leadership election so an mp would have to have the support of 20% of the parliamentary labour party rather than the current 10%. there has been quite a lot of controversy about this in the days
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approaching this discussion, certainly from the left of the party, jeremy corbyn had accused sir keir starmer this week of sidelining the grassroots, but i have the national campaigns coordinator with me labour. sir keir starmer says that these reforms, if they pass tomorrow, but you in a better position to win the next election. why? position to win the next election. wh ? ., , ., position to win the next election. wh ? ., ,., ., , , position to win the next election. wh? ., , ,., why? the labour leadership role seaks to why? the labour leadership role speaks to the — why? the labour leadership role speaks to the culture _ why? the labour leadership role speaks to the culture and - why? the labour leadership role speaks to the culture and values| why? the labour leadership role l speaks to the culture and values of our party— speaks to the culture and values of our party and the changes that passed — our party and the changes that passed through the nec this morning and will_ passed through the nec this morning and will go _ passed through the nec this morning and will go to conference tomorrow show_ and will go to conference tomorrow show we _ and will go to conference tomorrow show we are a serious vertical party under— show we are a serious vertical party under this— show we are a serious vertical party under this leadership and we are determined to be that serious political— determined to be that serious political party and when a mandate for change — political party and when a mandate for change from the people of this country_ for change from the people of this country to— for change from the people of this country to be the government of this country _ country to be the government of this country. saying things like you have to have _ country. saying things like you have to have the — country. saying things like you have to have the support of at least 50 of your— to have the support of at least 50 of your colleagues to be the leader of your colleagues to be the leader of the _ of your colleagues to be the leader of the labour party, that simply says— of the labour party, that simply says we — of the labour party, that simply says we want to always make sure the labour _ says we want to always make sure the labour party— says we want to always make sure the labour party is a function party in parliament." rule book commits us to be a political— parliament." rule book commits us to be a political party in parliament seeking — be a political party in parliament seeking to be the of this country
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and these — seeking to be the of this country and these will changes put us back on course — and these will changes put us back on course to make your that is always — on course to make your that is always the _ on course to make your that is always the case.— on course to make your that is alwa sthe case. , always the case. there will be those who see this — always the case. there will be those who see this as _ always the case. there will be those who see this as an _ always the case. there will be those who see this as an attempt - always the case. there will be those who see this as an attempt to - who see this as an attempt to squeeze out the left of the party and make your they do not have a candidate in future.— candidate in future. every candidate. _ candidate in future. every candidate, regardless - candidate in future. every candidate, regardless of. candidate in future. every - candidate, regardless of which candidate in future. every _ candidate, regardless of which group of the _ candidate, regardless of which group of the movement they come from need to persuade _ of the movement they come from need to persuade a fifth of their colleagues to persuade them to be a leader— colleagues to persuade them to be a leader of— colleagues to persuade them to be a leader of the party and that means at least _ leader of the party and that means at least you can run a functional shadow— at least you can run a functional shadow cabinet and front bench and anyone _ shadow cabinet and front bench and anyone who wants to be leader of the labour— anyone who wants to be leader of the labour party is also seeking to be the prime — labour party is also seeking to be the prime minister of this country, so having — the prime minister of this country, so having the support of your colleagues who will hopefully be your government is actually really important — your government is actually really important. that is why those changes are there. _ important. that is why those changes are there, the same rules for everybody, but i think it is a really important thing to have that threshold — really important thing to have that threshold and shows the country are interested _ threshold and shows the country are interested in being a serious force interested in being a serious force in parliament and hopefully one day a serious _ in parliament and hopefully one day a serious force in government as welt _ a serious force in government as well. ., ,., , ., , a serious force in government as well. , ., ., a serious force in government as well. ., ., ., well. proposal put forward earlier this week were _ well. proposal put forward earlier this week were tougher _ well. proposal put forward earlier this week were tougher than - well. proposal put forward earlieri this week were tougher than this. sir keir starmer wanted to change
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the way the voting system work once the way the voting system work once the name was on the ballot. he didn't get that through and are you worried people see it as a failure of his to get that through? he tabled a range of proposals, including those that passed the nec this morning, but he also put forward — this morning, but he also put forward a _ this morning, but he also put forward a discussion about the electoral— forward a discussion about the electoral college which will now go to a working group, so those reforms will be _ to a working group, so those reforms will be discussed by everybody across — will be discussed by everybody across our movement and put forward again— across our movement and put forward again it _ across our movement and put forward again it at _ across our movement and put forward again it at a _ across our movement and put forward again it at a later time. he did exactly— again it at a later time. he did exactly what he wanted to do. he opened _ exactly what he wanted to do. he opened up — exactly what he wanted to do. he opened up a discussion and we have been _ opened up a discussion and we have been able _ opened up a discussion and we have been able to pass a strong package of measures this morning i am confident— of measures this morning i am confident will pass tomorrow and the electoral— confident will pass tomorrow and the electoral college remains up for discussion and the discussions will continue — discussion and the discussions will continue. . , discussion and the discussions will continue. ., , ., ., , continue. that is not off the table and we could _ continue. that is not off the table and we could see _ continue. that is not off the table and we could see it _ continue. that is not off the table and we could see it come - continue. that is not off the table and we could see it come back. . continue. that is not off the table l and we could see it come back. the nec has said _ and we could see it come back. the nec has said that'll go a working group _ nec has said that'll go a working group and — nec has said that'll go a working group and it will therefore be discussing the electoral college, but the —
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discussing the electoral college, but the package of reforms today, as sir keir_ but the package of reforms today, as sir keir starmer has said, is a very strong _ sir keir starmer has said, is a very strong package and sent a clear signal— strong package and sent a clear signal to— strong package and sent a clear signal to the country that we are serious — signal to the country that we are serious about being your government. this is— serious about being your government. this is your— serious about being your government. this is your first in—person conference, your shop window and opportunity to show the country what your policies are. some might ask, why have this now and risk overshadowing that? in why have this now and risk overshadowing that? why have this now and risk overshadowin: that? ., ., ., ,, overshadowing that? in order to make sure we are — overshadowing that? in order to make sure we are a — overshadowing that? in order to make sure we are a party — overshadowing that? in order to make sure we are a party with _ overshadowing that? in order to make sure we are a party with working - sure we are a party with working people _ sure we are a party with working people at — sure we are a party with working people at our heart, these changes were necessary, so we have had to start— were necessary, so we have had to start with — were necessary, so we have had to start with an — were necessary, so we have had to start with an internal debate, but the point — start with an internal debate, but the point of it is to make sure we are always — the point of it is to make sure we are always facing voters. this is a party— are always facing voters. this is a party founded by working people and what we _ party founded by working people and what we are doing with this leadership is making short work of people _ leadership is making short work of people at— leadership is making short work of people at the heart of everything we do. . ~' , ., ~ people at the heart of everything we do. ., ,, i. . ., people at the heart of everything we do. ., . ., people at the heart of everything we do. thank you. we will hear some of labour do. thank you. we will hear some of labour party — do. thank you. we will hear some of labour party policies _ do. thank you. we will hear some of labour party policies on _ do. thank you. we will hear some of labour party policies on working - labour party policies on working people. the deputy leader angela rayner is set to give a speech this afternoon talking about a new deal for workers which she says a labour government would enact within 100 days of forming a government, including a fair pay agreement, starting with those in the social
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care sector. starting with those in the social care sector-— starting with those in the social care sector. ., ,, , ., care sector. thank you, helen. in the rift care sector. thank you, helen. in the gift shop _ care sector. thank you, helen. in the gift shop no _ care sector. thank you, helen. in the gift shop no less! _ care sector. thank you, helen. in the gift shop no less! you're - the gift shop no less! you're watching bbc news, it is quarter past two. prince andrew's us lawyers have accepted he has been served with legal papers alleging that he sexually assaulted virginia giuffre in 2001. it follows a dispute over whether the prince had been formally notified of the civil claim against him.ms giuffre is seeking unspecified damages. ——ms giuffre is seeking unspecified damages. prince andrew has consistently denied the allegation. a tense diplomatic and legal standoff between the united states, china and canada has come to an abrupt conclusion. the huawei executive meng wanzhou is flying back to china after being released from home detention in canada, following the temporary resolution of a us legal case against her. in return, china has released two canadians it had imprisoned on espionage charges. david willis reports. leaving her home in vancouver for the last time after nearly
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three years of house arrest, meng wanzhou, a key figure in one of china's biggest companies, was facing extradition on charges of helping to evade us economic sanctions on iran. she was freed suddenly after striking a deal with us prosecutors, which saw her admit in a virtual appearance before a new york courtroom to lying to banks on huawei's behalf. in return, the usjustice department dropped its extradition request. over the past three years, my life has been turned upside down. it was a disruptive time for me as a mother, a wife, and as a company executive. but i believe every cloud has a silver lining. it really was an invaluable experience in my life. huawei is the largest telecom
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equipment manufacturer in the world, but its success unnerved the trump administration, which accused the company of using its technology to spy on the us. meng wanzhou's detention was all the more controversial given she is the daughter of huawei's founder, and it prompted the arrest of two canadian citizens in china — diplomat michael kovrig coverage ——diplomat michael kovrig and businessman michael spavor — in what the canadian government branded an act of hostage diplomacy. to the delight of the canadian prime minister, they have now been released as well. about 12 minutes ago, the aircraft carrying michael kovrig and michael spavor left chinese airspace and they are on their way home. they boarded at about 7:30 0ttawa time, along with dominic barton, canada's ambassador to china. meng wanzhou left canada on an air china flight bound for shenhzen, but any prospect
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of a thaw in the adversarial relationship between the united states and china may prove to be short lived. huawei remains on a trade blacklist here and still faces charges of corporate espionage. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. the headlines on bbc news... queues at petrol stations as the government prepares to announce a temporary visa scheme to make it easierforforeign lorry drivers to work in the uk. two canadians have arrived home after spending over 1,000 days in detention in china over spying charges. we understand they have been met and received by the canadian prime minister. prince andrew's us lawyers accept he has been served with legal papers alleging that he sexually assaulted virginia giuffre. he denies all allegations.
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a book of condolence has been opened in south london in memory of the 28—year—old primary school teacher sabina nessa, who was attacked and killed a week ago. hundreds of mourners gathered for an emotional candle—lit vigil in kidbrooke last night. more than 500 people gathered at pegler square, not far from where a wanted suspect was captured on cctv. 0ur correspondent, megan paterson, is in south london where the vigil took place last night. meghan. as he can see behind me, the flowers, candles, _ meghan. as he can see behind me, the flowers, candles, cards, _ meghan. as he can see behind me, the flowers, candles, cards, balloons - flowers, candles, cards, balloons left behind me at the site where sabina nessa's body was found here last week, people continue to come here to pay tribute to sabina nessa. many did not know her until this week, but feel compelled to come down here and share their grief, sorrow and shock and show support for herfamily. last night, as you
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say, the vigils held, a significant point of the police investigation, significant because it was the place where sabina was headed last week, a five—minute journey from across the park to the pub to meet her friend, but we know she was the tachometer journey. hundreds of people turning out last night on the square to show solidarity and listen to powerful speeches, one from her sister telling people who had gathered how beautiful and kinda soul her sister was and how her family has been shattered by sabina nessa cosmic death. just behind me is the community centre, shut for most of the week because it has been inside the week because it has been inside the police and the investigation continuing around it. —— shattered by sabina's death. this is a shared community space and people are always out walking their dogs, playing with children, walking through here and carrying on their daily business and this week it has
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been majorly disrupted and a major shock to people living here. the community centre welcoming people in and giving people a space to reflect, chat and speak about their concerns. as well as the shock and grief, there is worry about how safety streets are, and how confident women can go and be meeting friends as sabina nessa did last week. there is still a police cordoned in place and the police are still saying they are very keen to identify a man in cctv footage to was seen last friday evening around the time of sabina nessa's attack and they want the public to try and help identify him and they say he is key to the investigation, as is a silver car they believe he has access to. the police investigation continuing not far away from here and people coming throughout the morning and afternoon to leave their own tributes and read those left, driven by school children, parents,
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candles, all focusing on sabina nessa, a journey which should have taken her five minutes nessa, a journey which should have taken herfive minutes which nessa, a journey which should have taken her five minutes which we nessa, a journey which should have taken herfive minutes which we know she was not able to complete, sadly. thank you very much, meghan. a special memorial service has been announced for colleagues to remember metropolitan police sergeant matt ratana. 54—year—old sergeant ratana was killed a year ago today, while working at a custody centre in croydon. met commissioner dame cressida dick said november's memorial service will allow the force to "come together in matt's memory". a minute's silence will be held later this morning. the design has been revealed for the platinumjubilee medal, which will be awarded to mark the queen's 70—year reign next year. it features a portrait of the queen with a latin inscription and on the back is the royal crest. the medals will be awarded to living recipients of the victoria and george crosses, as well as members of the emergency and prison services, and the armed forces. tomorrow marks the end
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of a political era in germany, as elections take place for a new leader to replace angela merkel as chancellor after 16 years. climate change has been a big issue during the campaign, with activists holding rallies in cities across the country. 0ur europe editor, katya adler, sent this report from berlin. applause. relaxing on a friday evening after 16 years at the helm of the eu's most powerful country, angela merkel is relieved, perhaps, that it is almost all over. the migrant crisis, the euro crisis, four us presidents, five uk prime ministers, 100 eu summits and more during her time in office. hers will be a tough act to follow at home and on the world stage. many germans say they will miss the stoic, pragmatic politician nicknamed �*mummy�*. merkel is going to be strongly missed, i think so. i will miss merkel very much. why? because i am a fan of her.
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i think it will be very hard _ for every candidate who comes next, or the next chancellor to fulfil - this role, because there will always be this comparison to merkel. and at eu hq in brussels, there will also be a big merkel—sized hole. 0n the global landscape, i mean, it really matters and i think merkel was a very well respected leader, so everybody is looking at who is going to follow in her footsteps. of course, there is the potential for germany to take a dramatic new direction after 16 years of angela merkel, and that would be felt here and abroad. this is the eu's most influential country. but in the end, most germans are stability—hungry, and so the calls for radical change, while loud, are limited. what we're probably looking at here is �*change' but with a small c. this is the frontrunner to replace angela merkel,
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a centrist social democrat, currently germany's finance minister, seen as a safe pair of hands. his closest rival is a europhile conservative from angela merkel�*s cdu party. and the green party candidate is tipped to win a powerful position in the next german government. the environment is a big issue in sunday's election and in crowds like these, you find a fair few merkel critics. nojustice! no peace! tens of thousands gathered in front of the german parliament today demanding change and accusing chancellor merkel of failing to prepare germany for the challenging future ahead. but climate concerns are now for the in—tray of angela merkel�*s successor. this photo went viral this week after she visited a bird sanctuary, appearing far more
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relaxed than usual. the merkel era in german politics is drawing to a close. katya adler, bbc news, berlin. one of the key moments in the fight for kabul was when the taliban freed thousands of prisoners from the city's main jail. now some of those released prisoners have become caretakers of the pul—e—charki prison. jeremy bowen was given access by the taliban to their former cells in the jail, notorious since the time of the russian occupation in the 1980s. the guards ran for their lives through the gates of pul—e—charkhi jail as the taliban advanced on kabul. now the jail is empty. when the taliban reached it, they freed all the prisoners — notjust their own men, but criminals and supporters of their rival, islamic state. some of the taliban here now are caretakers of the cells where they spent years as prisoners.
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so this is part of the main taliban cell block, and you can see they've tried to make themselves fairly comfortable — it was obviously very cold in the winter. and these spaces had to be rented from the authorities for quite a lot of money, you're talking about $100 or something like that. the taliban in this place, i have been talking to some of the guys here who are former inmates, ran their own affairs. they tried to keep some cohesion, sometimes they say the prison authorities boarded criminals or people with big drug addictions, and they say that they tried to talk them out of it. there was also a lot of heroin for sale within the prison, and a great deal of corruption as well. this man took me to where he was chained and tortured in ten years behind bars. hejoined the taliban after a raid on his village.
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he keeps photos of his whipped back. translation: they attacked us and killed children, _ all the muslims were suffering. i saw it with my own eyes. they came to my house, they took the koran, they tore it up, threw it away. my soul could not accept they had done. they were afghan commandos and us forces. the taliban themselves have inflicted savage violence on civilians, as well as men in uniform. there is a long history of guerilla and insurgent movements, strengthening their ties as a unit during long spells of imprisonment, giving them a strong identity, perhaps, as well a stronger will to win. and that, i suspect, is what was happening here. prisoners were warehoused, sometimes killed at the jail right through afghanistan's a0 year war. it won't be empty for long.
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this was harsh imprisonment, the place is full of cockroaches, it is filthy. they left, you can see, in a hurry. all of their possessions, there is even still laundry on the lines that they have set up here to dry things. when the gates opened, these guys just ran for it. this prison has been a feared symbol of state power since the 1980s. how the taliban use it will answer some of the questions about the way they want to rule afghanistan. jeremy bowen, bbc news, kabul. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris. yes, good afternoon to you. we are slowly seeing the weather brighton up slowly seeing the weather brighton up after what has been a cloudy start to the day. it is a slow process, but we have seen sunshine in the last half—an—hour into eastbourne in east sussex and many places will see brighter skies for a time before the weather gets cooler
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over the next few days. temperatures into the 20s, but big drop on the way and it will feel more autumnal. 0vernight, cargillagain way and it will feel more autumnal. 0vernight, cargill again and there will be mist and fog patches around the western and southern coasts and hills. temperatures 13 to 15 degrees. tomorrow, after a bright start in northern ireland, this rain is a cold front that will bring heavy rain and gusty winds, gusts into a0 mph and that will push into western scotland, whereas eastern scotland, england and wales, the winds are more strong, but it will be a brighter day with temperatures reaching a high of 23 degrees. that is your latest weather.

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