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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 25, 2021 6:00am-10:00am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: queues at petrol stations as the government considers allowing foreign lorry drivers to work in the uk. we ask the motorist to be sensible. don't alter your refuelling patterns. there is plenty of fuel around, and people shouldn't panic by. the temporary plans are being drawn up after a shortage of hauliers has caused major disruption to deliveries of fuel, food and other goods. hundreds pay tribute to murdered primary school teacher sabina nessa at a candlelit vigil.
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words cannot describe how we are feeling. this feels like we are stuck in a bad dream and can't get out of it. our world is shattered. metldown on michigan for team europe in the ryder cup, as the united states opened up a 6—2 lead on day one at whistling straits — the biggest advantage they've ever enjoyed at this stage of the competition. we had 25 degrees yesterday and parts of southern england and while the warmth continues for many this weekend, there are changes ahead. i will have the full details your breakfast. it's saturday, the 25th of september. our top story: a temporary visa scheme allowing foreign lorry drivers to work in the uk could be introduced to ease the current problem with fuel deliveries. a shortage of uk tanker drivers has caused major disruption at petrol stations, leading to long queues and some closures. our transport correspondent caroline davies reports.
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chicken, milkshakes, and our petrol. a shortage of lorry drivers continues to bite across the uk. and as the problem grows, there is more pressure on the government to make changes. bp reported they were having trouble getting their petrol to sometimes. there is enough fuel, just not enough drivers to take it to the petrol stations. although the problem only affected a small number of sites, people worried that they could run out and began to buy more than they normally would, leading to huge queues despite government reassurances. now one firm, eg group, who run 400 petrol stations, have said they are limiting each customer to £30 of fuel, excluding hdv drivers and emergency services. there is plenty of fuel. the issue is obviously the leadtime of getting it from terminal to forecourt. and we ask the motorist to be sensible. don't alter your refuelling patterns. if you have a need to refuel, obviously go and get fuel, but bear in mind that some of the
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sites, you might be in a cucumber so keep a bit of fuel in your vehicle in order to drive to an alternative site if you have to do. but there is plenty of fuel around and people shouldn't panic by. lintiii plenty of fuel around and people shouldn't panic by.— plenty of fuel around and people shouldn't panic by. until now, the government _ shouldn't panic by. until now, the government has _ shouldn't panic by. until now, the government has resisted - shouldn't panic by. until now, the government has resisted calls - shouldn't panic by. until now, the government has resisted calls to. government has resisted calls to provide temporary visas to eu drivers to help fill the gap, as it has argued it doesn't want to uk lorry drivers to drop out because they are undercut by cheaper eu labour. however, last night the government said it was looking at temporary measures, but it stressed fees would be strictly time limited. although there is no official confirmation, this is thought to include temporary visas. there is increasing pressure to take some action, particularly to stop the prices getting worse in the run—up to christmas. —— stop the crisis. a book of condolence will be opened in south london this morning in memory of the 28—year—old primary school teacher, sabina nessa, who was attacked and killed a week ago. hundreds of mourners gathered for an emotional candlelit vigil in kidbrooke last night,
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as simonjones reports. say her name, sabina nessa. we will never forget. say her name, sabina nessa. we will neverforget. that say her name, sabina nessa. we will never forget. that was a request from the organisers of the vigil and hundreds answered the call. sabina nessa. sabina _ hundreds answered the call. sabina nessa. sabina nessa. _ hundreds answered the call. sabina nessa. sabina nessa. sabina - hundreds answered the call. sabina | nessa. sabina nessa. sabina nessa. the ublic nessa. sabina nessa. sabina nessa. the public coming _ nessa. sabina nessa. sabina nessa. the public coming together - nessa. sabina nessa. sabina nessa. the public coming together to - the public coming together to support a family struggling to comprehend. support a family struggling to comprehend-— support a family struggling to comprehend. support a family struggling to comrehend. , ., ., ., , comprehend. sabina loved her family. we have lost — comprehend. sabina loved her family. we have lost our— comprehend. sabina loved her family. we have lost our sister, _ comprehend. sabina loved her family. we have lost our sister, my _ comprehend. sabina loved her family. we have lost our sister, my parents . we have lost our sister, my parents have lost their daughter, and my girls have lost such a brilliant, loving, caring auntie who dearly loved her. words cannot describe how we are feeling. this feels like we are stuck in a bad dream and can't get out of it. our world is shattered.— get out of it. our world is shattered. , ., , ~ shattered. on friday last week, sabina had _ shattered. on friday last week, sabina had been _ shattered. on friday last week, sabina had been heading - shattered. on friday last week, sabina had been heading to - shattered. on friday last week, sabina had been heading to thej sabina had been heading to the square to meet a friend. she never arrived. she thought she was attacked as she was walking through
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attacked as she was walking through a nearby park. her death has once again brought to the fore the question of women's safety on our streets. those who attended the vigil said they felt compelled to be there. to vigil said they felt compelled to be there. ., _ , vigil said they felt compelled to be there. ., , ,, ., ., ., there. to pay my respects to sabina and to the thousands _ there. to pay my respects to sabina and to the thousands of _ there. to pay my respects to sabina and to the thousands of other- there. to pay my respects to sabina l and to the thousands of other women that have' attacked, sexually assaulted, and just stand together with all the women and men who are here. we don't want to accept this anymore. figs here. we don't want to accept this an more. �* , . here. we don't want to accept this an more. a . .,, here. we don't want to accept this an more. a . ., here. we don't want to accept this anmore. . ., _ anymore. as much as i am deeply saddened by _ anymore. as much as i am deeply saddened by the _ anymore. as much as i am deeply saddened by the event _ anymore. as much as i am deeply saddened by the event and - anymore. as much as i am deeply saddened by the event and how . anymore. as much as i am deeply - saddened by the event and how tragic it is, i_ saddened by the event and how tragic it is, i am _ saddened by the event and how tragic it is, i am also enraged. i'm also quite _ it is, i am also enraged. i'm also quite angry— it is, i am also enraged. i'm also quite angry at the fact that so many young _ quite angry at the fact that so many young women have become more and more _ young women have become more and more frightened. | young women have become more and more frightened.— more frightened. i questioned about whether i should _ more frightened. i questioned about whether i should come _ more frightened. i questioned about whether i should come as _ more frightened. i questioned about whether i should come as a - more frightened. i questioned about whether i should come as a man, i more frightened. i questioned about whether i should come as a man, or| whether i should come as a man, or whatever_ whether i should come as a man, or whatever should _ whether i should come as a man, or whatever should be _ whether i should come as a man, or whatever should be a _ whether i should come as a man, or whatever should be a female - whether i should come as a man, orj whatever should be a female space, but it _ whatever should be a female space, but it seemed — whatever should be a female space, but it seemed everyone _ whatever should be a female space, but it seemed everyone was - whatever should be a female space, j but it seemed everyone was invited. a candle _ but it seemed everyone was invited. a candle was — but it seemed everyone was invited. a candle was lit _ but it seemed everyone was invited. a candle was lit in— but it seemed everyone was invited. a candle was lit in downing - but it seemed everyone was invited. a candle was lit in downing street. a candle was lit in downing street and the duchess of cambridge wrote on twitter, "i am saddened by the loss of another innocent young woman on our streets. my thoughts are with sabina because my family and friends and all those who have been affected
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by this tragic event". shortly before the vigil began, the police cordoned off the road next to the square in their hunt for information. 0fficers square in their hunt for information. officers are still trying to trace this man, captured on cctv, whom they believe could be vital to the case. it is thought he had access to the silver car. vigil also took place elsewhere. this was also took place elsewhere. this was a gathering in newcastle, and candles were lit in brighton. and in kidbrooke, a minutes silence. applause. and a song for a community united in grief and anger. simon jones, bbc news. simon is in kidbrooke for us this morning. good morning, simon. very interesting that you said, of course there is grief, but the anger as well. because yet again a woman has been attacked, and it brings up the safety of women in our streets. that
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anuer safety of women in our streets. that an . er was safety of women in our streets. that anger was very _ safety of women in our streets. twat anger was very evident at the vigil that took place last nightjust down the road from here. in the past week people have been saying, some of them, but they were scared to leave their homes, they didn't want to walk anywhere on their own, but last night, hundreds of people did come out tojoin together as night, hundreds of people did come out to join together as a community, partly to discuss and remember sabina's life. this is really a community saying enough is enough when it comes to violence against women, at the vigil they were saying that things have to change, i think the most poignant moment was when sabina's sister spoke. she spoke of her sister as being beautiful, kind and caring, but the message from her family was they don't want other families to have to go through what they are going through. the police say they cannot solve this issue alone and it has to be something wider in society, all organisations that work with the public have to
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take a stand against this. in terms of the police they spoke to the vigil, they say the community is very much in their thoughts and they are relying on people in this area to come forward with information to help them solve this murder, the murder investigation now entering its second week. in terms of memories today, but will continue, a book of condolence will be opened and the community centre just along from here, another chance for people to reflect and take a quiet moment of contemplation to remember her wife and the wider —— who the wider implications of it. —— her life and the wider implications. prince andrew's us lawyers have accepted he has been served with legal papers alleging that he sexually assaulted virginia giuffre in 2001. it follows a dispute over whether the prince had been formally notified of the civil claim against him. ms giuffre is seeking unspecified damages. prince andrew has consistently denied the allegation. final campaiging is taking place
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in germany before voters decide who will follow angela merkel�*s 16—year tenure as chancellor. ms merkel is due to appear at a rally alongside the man she hopes will succeed her. polls suggest her centre—right cdu party is fighting an unusually tight battle against the social democrats. weeks of coalition negotiations are expected to follow once results are in tomorrow night. an executive from the chinese technology firm, huawei, who had been held in canada on fraud charges for three years, is on her way home. meng wanzhou was allowed to leave after her lawyers reached a deal with the us prosecutors who originally requested her arrest. two canadians who were being held in china have also been freed. the design has been revealed for the platinumjubilee medal, which will be awarded to mark the queen's 70—year—reign next year. it features a portrait of the queen with a latin inscription and on the back is the royal crest. the medals will be awarded to living recipients of the victoria and george crosses, as well as members of the emergency
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and prison services and the armed forces. how is your latin? i did one year of latin at school. _ how is your latin? i did one year of latin at school. matt _ how is your latin? i did one year of latin at school. matt will— how is your latin? i did one year of latin at school. matt will be - how is your latin? i did one year of latin at school. matt will be here . latin at school. matt will be here later, latin at school. matt will be here later. yeah? _ latin at school. matt will be here later, yeah? three _ latin at school. matt will be here later, yeah? three words - latin at school. matt will be here later, yeah? three words and - latin at school. matt will be here | later, yeah? three words and one year more than i did. 6:10am. let's take a look at today's papers. the front pages are dominated by reports of the lorry driver shortage. the mirror writes that there are only "10 days to save xmas", quoting one retail boss who warns there will be "significant disruption" unless new drivers are found within that timeframe. according to the guardian, ministers are set to agree a short—term visa scheme, which would allow foreign lorry drivers to work in britain. the i says number 10 has been left
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reeling after the panic buying of petrol, but a government source has told the newspaper the ministry of defence is prepared to send in troops to fuel depots if needed. "chaotic" is how the times describes britain's wider transport network, with panic buying at petrol stations, 4—hour passport queues at airports and protests which blocked the port of dover. stick to normal, is the message. are ou auoin stick to normal, is the message. jija you going to stick to normal, is the message. ska you going to go serious, or can i just go not serious? {as you going to go serious, or can i just go not serious?— just go not serious? go silly. sill , just go not serious? go silly. silly. 0k. — just go not serious? go silly. silly, ok. biggest— just go not serious? go silly. silly, ok. biggest worry - just go not serious? go silly. silly, ok. biggest worry you | just go not serious? go silly. - silly, ok. biggest worry you have ever seen? _ silly, ok. biggest worry you have ever seen? no _ silly, ok. biggest worry you have ever seen? no idea. _ silly, ok. biggest worry you have ever seen? no idea. how- silly, ok. biggest worry you have ever seen? no idea. how about l silly, ok. biggest worry you have i ever seen? no idea. how about this one? good — ever seen? no idea. how about this one? good grief! _ ever seen? no idea. how about this one? good grief! we _ ever seen? no idea. how about this one? good grief! we had _ ever seen? no idea. how about this one? good grief! we had a -
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ever seen? no idea. how about this one? good grief! we had a massive| one? good grief! we had a massive beetroot the _ one? good grief! we had a massive beetroot the other _ one? good grief! we had a massive beetroot the other day... _ one? good grief! we had a massive beetroot the other day... not - one? good grief! we had a massive beetroot the other day... not that l beetroot the other day... not that bi ! the beetroot the other day... not that big! the beetroot _ beetroot the other day... not that big! the beetroot was _ beetroot the other day... not that big! the beetroot was something l beetroot the other day... not that i big! the beetroot was something like 16 kilos. big! the beetroot was something like 16 kilos- this — big! the beetroot was something like 16 kilos. this is _ big! the beetroot was something like 16 kilos. this is 225 _ big! the beetroot was something like 16 kilos. this is 225 pounds, - big! the beetroot was something like 16 kilos. this is 225 pounds, 50 - 16 kilos. this is 225 pounds, 50 pounds heavier then any marrow ever seen. this is at the worcestershire event, the more than awesome show. a record—breaking marrow, 255 pounds, when he kneels down it is bigger than him. do you want another silly picture? it than him. do you want another silly icture? . . . , , than him. do you want another silly icture? , . , , , ., ., picture? it is a pretty ugly marrow. don't shame _ picture? it is a pretty ugly marrow. don't shame the _ picture? it is a pretty ugly marrow. don't shame the marrow. - picture? it is a pretty ugly marrow. don't shame the marrow. marrow. don't shame the marrow. marrow shamina. don't shame the marrow. marrow shaming- can _ don't shame the marrow. marrow shaming- can you _ don't shame the marrow. marrow shaming. can you figure - don't shame the marrow. marrow shaming. can you figure out... i don't shame the marrow. marrow. shaming. can you figure out... well, too late. shaming. can you figure out... well, too late- can — shaming. can you figure out... well, too late- can you _ shaming. can you figure out... well, too late. can you figure _ shaming. can you figure out... well, too late. can you figure out - shaming. can you figure out... well, too late. can you figure out what - too late. can you figure out what that is? if you look really closely... there is obviously a boy eating ice cream. but as you go holds, aged 11. —— that is hugo haltzer, aged 11. that is a seagull, diving into have a taste of the ice cream. michael emond was taking a picture. but that, i mean, hugo's tongue is on the ice cream, right? i
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don't know, ijust... i would tongue is on the ice cream, right? i don't know, ijust... iwould be petrified. but good on hugo, because hugo did finish the ice cream. good on you. hugo did finish the ice cream. good on ou. ., , ., ., ., ., on you. hugo should have had a marrow instead. _ on you. hugo should have had a marrow instead. this _ on you. hugo should have had a marrow instead. this is - on you. hugo should have had a marrow instead. this is the - marrow instead. this is the guardian. apparently this book is going crazy in belgium, it is a book celebrating what it calls the weirdness and whimsy of belgian properties from a website called ugly belgian houses. can you imagine living in one of the houses which is then printed, described as ugly. someone's ugly as somebody else's beautiful. ' :: :: :: :: , ., ., beautiful. 150,000 instagram followers on _ beautiful. 150,000 instagram followers on this _ beautiful. 150,000 instagram followers on this account. - beautiful. 150,000 instagram. followers on this account. they beautiful. 150,000 instagram - followers on this account. they will now be a flemish tv show where he goes around apologising to the households he has offended. should i say something? _ households he has offended. should i say something? i _ households he has offended. should i say something? i love _ households he has offended. should i say something? i love the _ households he has offended. should i say something? i love the weird - households he has offended. should i say something? i love the weird and l say something? i love the weird and wonderful architecture. yeah. and i remember going to berlin, and i used
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to buy a pack of playing cards, i love playing cards, used to buy a pack of playing cards at one of my favourite packs, i have given to a friend because she also has a similar thing, friend because she also has a similarthing, is friend because she also has a similar thing, is weird and wonderful lampposts in berlin. are wonderful lampposts in berlin. are there enough for a pack of cards? yeah. brilliant lampposts in berlin. you thought i was boring. i bring out a new, i bring it to a new level. matt always knew i was boring, didn't you, lovely? holidays are a riot with you, naga. that week in berlin you will never forget. that week in berlin you will never foriet. ., , , that week in berlin you will never foriet. ., _ . that week in berlin you will never foriet. ., , , . ., forget. honestly, check out the lampposts _ forget. honestly, check out the lampposts in — forget. honestly, check out the lampposts in berlin. _ forget. honestly, check out the lampposts in berlin. check- forget. honestly, check out the l lampposts in berlin. check them forget. honestly, check out the - lampposts in berlin. check them out. i will lampposts in berlin. check them out. i will be _ lampposts in berlin. check them out. i will be looking later. good morning to you both and very good morning to you at home as well. it is the weekend and a weekend in which once again we see temperatures above where they should be by this time of year. plenty of cloud around
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but whether sunshine breakthrough, thatis but whether sunshine breakthrough, that is when we will see the temperatures are sore quite markedly. temperatures compare with the average, read colours on the chart above normal for the time of year. warmest across europe. four or five degrees for some but notice big changes ahead. we switch red to blue as we go to next week was up temperatures will drop the low normal for the time of year. autumn will be with us. a few days away. i said it will be warm. warm out there at the moment in fact. these other temperatures we expect by the afternoon. what we have at the moment is 14—18 across many areas. silliest across the north—east. clear skies with sunshine and rain to the north of scotland. patchy light rain and drizzle across other western areas that will come and go a little bit with large amounts of cloud. probably more cloud than we saw yesterday but they will be sunny breaks developing. best of which parts of wales. also across the
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murray firth. 22— 24 degrees across some parts of central and eastern england. a warm one out there and another warm and humid night to come tonight was not clear skies across tonight was not clear skies across to the south and east. a bit of a breeze across the west and it still could bring in one or two showers but many places will be dry, unlike this morning, temperatures above where they should be by this time of the year. we start on a warm note and that is because ahead of his approaching weather front which will start to bring changes late in the date of the west, we are dragging air to the south which is bringing extra humidity. more cloud breaks with a few showers here and there, mainly across the west. one or two in the east but more in the way of sunshine. later in the day northern ireland contains increasingly wet and windy as will the far west of scotland but before that arise we could to 22 degrees across the northern highlands. 0nce could to 22 degrees across the northern highlands. once again 23 or maybe 24 across some parts of england and wales. another warm day for many on sunday but that rain in the west is about to push its way east and as we go through sunday
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night into monday, a band of heavy rain and gusty winds will work across all parts of the country. clearing up a little bit towards the west later on so monday a wet start for those in the east and then turning dry and bright with plenty of showers in the west. some of those could be heavy and boundary at times. temperatures generally around the mid— high—teens. but it is as we go through the west of the week when we start to see the bigger changes. it turns windier and wetter at times and temperatures, as i said, a little bit lower than we normally expect. more on that later. i little bit lower than we normally expect. more on that later. i know i should have — expect. more on that later. i know i should have been _ expect. more on that later. i know i should have been listening - expect. more on that later. i know i should have been listening but- expect. more on that later. i know i should have been listening but i - expect. more on that later. i know i | should have been listening but i was just booking a holiday. a couple of weeks, yeah? we will lip over —— nip over to berlin. hopefully it is better in berlin and we can spend three days looking at lamp post. john, you are invited, too. i’m john, you are invited, too. i'm really busy. — john, you are invited, too. i'm really busy, thanks. i'm really, really— really busy, thanks. i'm really, really busy. really busy, thanks. i'm really, really busy-—
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really busy. we will discuss it while you _ really busy. we will discuss it while you watch _ really busy. we will discuss it while you watch click - really busy. we will discuss it while you watch click with - really busy. we will discuss it - while you watch click with spencer kelly. in the middle of the otherworldly landscape of iceland, something strange is going on. 130,000 barley plants are slowly making their way from one end of this greenhouse to the other. and what's even stranger is what this barley is going to be used for. it is in the fern —— food chain but it is not food for us and it is not food for animals, no, this is something much, much weirder than that. this grass is a host. it's
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been genetically modified to carry a special protein called a growth factor in its seeds. 0nce special protein called a growth factor in its seeds. once the plants reach the end of theirjourney these seeds are harvested, milled and purified and the resulting growth factor protein can be used to help produce something very unexpected. meat, in a lab, without the animals. we will get to a point where it is not nice to have. the earth is not going to go, we're not going to get more agriculture area and the population is rising. and we have to feed all of the people. the argument for rurowin feed all of the people. the argument for growing meat _ feed all of the people. the argument for growing meat in _ feed all of the people. the argument for growing meat in labs _ feed all of the people. the argument for growing meat in labs without - for growing meat in labs without living animals is that the process will eventually require less land, less energy and produce less harmful waste. it less energy and produce less harmful waste. . .. . less energy and produce less harmful waste. . ,, , ., less energy and produce less harmful waste. as , ., ., . ., waste. it takes more agricultural land to no waste. it takes more agricultural land to go feed _ waste. it takes more agricultural land to go feed -- _ waste. it takes more agricultural land to go feed -- grove -- -
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waste. it takes more agricultural. land to go feed -- grove -- grove land to go feed —— grove —— grove feed stock we are essentially bypassing that. we don't have to kill all the animals, we just have to take the stem cell from them and i think this is a more viable and more environmental, much better option. more environmental, much better otion. ., , more environmental, much better o.tion_ ., , , more environmental, much better otion. ., , , , option. companies using cow stem cells to grow _ option. companies using cow stem cells to grow lab _ option. companies using cow stem cells to grow lab grown _ option. companies using cow stem cells to grow lab grown beef- option. companies using cow stem i cells to grow lab grown beef burgers and even lab grown steak are already trying out in iceland. and although —— although the first—ever growth bracket is came from animals, it is hoped that this will be cheaper and scalable because nature can do a lot of the heavy lifting. at the moment, research is still ongoing to come up with the barley that produces the very best growth factors which is why the volcanic and geothermal peculiarities of iceland are an ideal place to experiment with different growing conditions. they
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growing the barley in this which is volcanic promise from mount heckler which is somewhere over there. the good thing about thomas is it is inert so it doesn't really release any nutrients into the plant itself and that means these guys can completely control the nutrient mix that the barley gets. taste completely control the nutrient mix that the barley gets.— completely control the nutrient mix that the barley gets. we are here in a high-tech — that the barley gets. we are here in a high-tech greenhouse _ that the barley gets. we are here in a high-tech greenhouse that - that the barley gets. we are here in a high-tech greenhouse that is - that the barley gets. we are here in | a high-tech greenhouse that is using a high—tech greenhouse that is using geothermal energy for heating and for the electricity. we are using hydroponic cultivation. computer decides when to open windows, went to turn lights, went to pump in, what nutrition to feed these plants and so forth. but what nutrition to feed these plants and so forth-— and so forth. but eventually these carefully programmed _ and so forth. but eventually these carefully programmed plants - and so forth. but eventually these carefully programmed plants will. carefully programmed plants will have to be harvested in regular fields to produce enough growth factor for it to label lab grown meat industry and barley specifically has been chosen because it can grow in many different climates and it also doesn't cross pollinate with other plants around it. , , .., pollinate with other plants around it. , , .. .,
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pollinate with other plants around it. , , ., . ., it. the typicalfarm in iceland which is about _ it. the typicalfarm in iceland which is about 150 _ it. the typicalfarm in iceland which is about 150 hectares, | it. the typicalfarm in iceland - which is about 150 hectares, could actually produce about 10,000 tons of meat. . . actually produce about 10,000 tons of meat. . , ., , ., ., of meat. that is if lab grown meat is indeed the _ of meat. that is if lab grown meat is indeed the answer. _ of meat. that is if lab grown meat is indeed the answer. after - of meat. that is if lab grown meat is indeed the answer. after all, i is indeed the answer. after all, aren't supposed to be eating far more greens? well, not too far away another company is tapping into iceland's geothermal power to put us on an altogether different diet. this is a food for us or at least it will be one day. not something we are currently used to eating, mind you, but tastes change. it's algae. i know, sounds kind of yuk, doesn't it? but the microalgae growing in these test units are rich in protein and omega three, much more so than traditional crops grown in a field, and they also consume way fewer natural resources, too. in these
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systems, natural resources, too. in these systems. ..._ natural resources, too. in these systems, -- in the systems we can grow — systems, -- in the systems we can grow a — systems, -- in the systems we can grow a ton _ systems, -- in the systems we can grow a ton of _ systems, -- in the systems we can grow a ton of protein - systems, -- in the systems we can grow a ton of protein and - systems, -- in the systems we| can grow a ton of protein and using three orfour times less can grow a ton of protein and using three or four times less water and 14- 15005 three or four times less water and 14— 1500s times less land than the best thing we know today. and 14- 1500s times less land than the best thing we know today.- best thing we know today. and of course because _ best thing we know today. and of course because algae _ best thing we know today. and of course because algae is - best thing we know today. and of course because algae is a - best thing we know today. and of course because algae is a plant . best thing we know today. and of course because algae is a plant itj course because algae is a plant it has another environmental benefit, photosynthesis. taste has another environmental benefit, photosynthesis.— has another environmental benefit, hotos nthesis. ~ ., photosynthesis. we get the c02 from, we photosynthesis. we get the co2 from, we aet into photosynthesis. we get the co2 from, we get into our— photosynthesis. we get the co2 from, we get into our system _ photosynthesis. we get the co2 from, we get into our system and _ photosynthesis. we get the co2 from, we get into our system and we - photosynthesis. we get the co2 from, we get into our system and we use - we get into our system and we use algae to actually fix that —— fix that c02 algae to actually fix that —— fix that co2 and they breathe out oxygen so oxygen is actually our only byproduct... so oxygen is actually our only byproduct- - -_ so oxygen is actually our only byproduct... which is not a bad byproduct- _ byproduct... which is not a bad byproduct- they _ byproduct... which is not a bad byproduct. they don't - byproduct... which is not a bad byproduct. they don't seem - byproduct... which is not a bad byproduct. they don't seem to | byproduct... which is not a bad - byproduct. they don't seem to mind. laughs. byproduct. they don't seem to mind. laughs- so — byproduct. they don't seem to mind. laughs. so right — byproduct. they don't seem to mind. laughs. so right here _ byproduct. they don't seem to mind. laughs. so right here in _ byproduct. they don't seem to mind. laughs. so right here in geothermal iceland where it is essentially clean, green and on tap, growing this algae ends up being carbon
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negative and pulls more c02 out of the environment than the electricity puts back in but in order to feed the world, these algae farms would need to be placed around the globe. not everyone is top of the volcano. the system itself is also —— always carbon negative because we take in c02, carbon negative because we take in co2, we fix it in biomass and c02, we fix it in biomass and breathe out oxygen. but co2, we fix it in biomass and breathe out oxygen.- co2, we fix it in biomass and breathe out oxygen. but if you are havin: to breathe out oxygen. but if you are having to use _ breathe out oxygen. but if you are having to use electricity _ breathe out oxygen. but if you are having to use electricity that - breathe out oxygen. but if you are having to use electricity that is - having to use electricity that is generated through coal... the system is generating c02 as well... yes. is generating co2 as well... yes, es. and is generating co2 as well... yes, yes- and then — is generating co2 as well... yes, yes. and then you _ is generating co2 as well. .. yes, yes. and then you suck— is generating co2 as well... yes, yes. and then you suck at - is generating co2 as well... yes, | yes. and then you suck at straight back into the _ yes. and then you suck at straight back into the algae? _ yes. and then you suck at straight back into the algae? that - yes. and then you suck at straight back into the algae? that is - back into the algae? that is actually a — back into the algae? that is actually a possibility. - back into the algae? that is actually a possibility. this l back into the algae? that is| actually a possibility. this is back into the algae? that is - actually a possibility. this is what we're doing right now. these need c02 so we could actually take whatever c02 into the system. theoretically. whatever co2 into the system. theoretically.— whatever co2 into the system. theoreticall . �* , ., theoretically. and in fact they are thinkin: theoretically. and in fact they are thinking even _ theoretically. and in fact they are thinking even further _ theoretically. and in fact they are thinking even further ahead - theoretically. and in fact they are thinking even further ahead than l thinking even further ahead than improving the environment here on earth. growing food in small spaces with limited water and producing oxygen as a byproduct sounds like a pretty useful thing to be able to
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do, i don't know, in a moon base or on mars. if the colonists can stomach it, that is. let me ask you a question, what does algae taste like? a, , a question, what does algae taste like? , a question, what does algae taste like? 1,, ., a question, what does algae taste like? ,., ., , a question, what does algae taste like? 1,, ., a question, what does algae taste like? ., like? basically this algae is a cold seawater algae _ like? basically this algae is a cold seawater algae so _ like? basically this algae is a cold seawater algae so it _ like? basically this algae is a cold seawater algae so it is _ like? basically this algae is a cold seawater algae so it is salty. - like? basically this algae is a cold seawater algae so it is salty. this| seawater algae so it is salty. this one is fairly robust... 50 seawater algae so it is salty. this one is fairly robust. . ._ seawater algae so it is salty. this one is fairly robust... so you mean it is a tough _ one is fairly robust... so you mean it is a tough chew? _ one is fairly robust... so you mean it is a tough chew? it _ one is fairly robust... so you mean it is a tough chew? it is _ one is fairly robust... so you mean it is a tough chew? it is a - one is fairly robust... so you mean it is a tough chew? it is a tough . it is a tough chew? it is a tough chew, it it is a tough chew? it is a tough chew. it is- _ it is a tough chew? it is a tough chew. it is- l — it is a tough chew? it is a tough chew, it is. i have _ it is a tough chew? it is a tough chew, it is. i have been - it is a tough chew? it is a tough chew, it is. i have been made l it is a tough chew? it is a tough | chew, it is. i have been made an offer i chew, it is. i have been made an offer i can't _ chew, it is. i have been made an offer i can't refuse. _ chew, it is. i have been made an offer i can't refuse. he _ chew, it is. i have been made an offer i can't refuse. he said - chew, it is. i have been made an. offer i can't refuse. he said would you like to drink some algae? 0f you like to drink some algae? of course i would! 0h, you like to drink some algae? of course i would! oh, my life! for real law? —— for real, or...? you are not having a laugh? i real law? -- for real, or...? you are not having a laugh?- real law? -- for real, or...? you are not having a laugh? i can do it
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first! yeah, _ are not having a laugh? i can do it first! yeah, it's _ are not having a laugh? i can do it first! yeah, it's fishy. _ are not having a laugh? i can do it first! yeah, it's fishy. yeah. - are not having a laugh? i can do it| first! yeah, it's fishy. yeah. needs a little... what's _ first! yeah, it's fishy. yeah. needs a little... what's it _ first! yeah, it's fishy. yeah. needs a little... what's it called? - first! yeah, it's fishy. yeah. needs a little... what's it called? a - first! yeah, it's fishy. yeah. needs a little... what's it called? a lie i a little... what's it called? a lie down afterwards, that's it. ok, laughs. maybe it would take a more creative chef than me to be able to sell this straight onto the plate. the streets of san francisco us —— are home to many self—driving car so naturally this is the city home to a self—driving plane. this is a company that has developed an autonomous flying system that handles everything from taxiing to take off to landing to parking. the system is similar to self—driving cars and uses a lot of the same tap like lidar cameras and sensors to navigate the skies. while a command centre on the ground autonomous
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system communicate with the humans in traffic control. and now that i'm suited and booted, let's see this thing in action. so this is basically a beta version of what they are working on which means it will also make always require a safety pilot on board but the company is aiming to be entirely autonomous which means none of these by the end of next year and they are also hoping to get faa certification in 2024. all that the human pilot on board has to do is physically turn the plane on, check that all systems are go and pressed the button that activates the autonomous system. then it is up to the plane. it does have to liaise with human and the ground control centre while it is making its way to the runway for takeoff but that's just to ensure it is safe to cross certain parts of the strip. during takeoff it is almost like an post is in control because all of the parts are still moving that i'm not saying what's moving them. you
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can build as — not saying what's moving them. ym. can build as many robots as you want, they all do the same thing, right? want, they all do the same thing, riuht? ., , ., want, they all do the same thing, riuht? ., ,., ., ., right? one of -- some of what the senses are — right? one of -- some of what the senses are picking _ right? one of -- some of what the senses are picking up _ right? one of -- some of what the senses are picking up is _ right? one of -- some of what thel senses are picking up is augmented reality from what is mounted on the exterior of the plane. the purple is what is an area where is the blue area is the flight path. 0n what is an area where is the blue area is the flight path. on our way back to base the team decided to let me fly the plane. he back to base the team decided to let me fly the plane-— me fly the plane. he is out of the loop because _ me fly the plane. he is out of the loop because he _ me fly the plane. he is out of the loop because he doesn't - me fly the plane. he is out of the loop because he doesn't know- me fly the plane. he is out of the l loop because he doesn't know what you are doing. i loop because he doesn't know what you are doing-— loop because he doesn't know what you are doing. i don't know what i'm doinu. you are doing. i don't know what i'm doing- perfect- _ you are doing. i don't know what i'm doing. perfect. i— you are doing. i don't know what i'm doing. perfect. iwas_ you are doing. i don't know what i'm doing. perfect. i was flying - you are doing. i don't know what i'm doing. perfect. i was flying a - you are doing. i don't know what i'm doing. perfect. i was flying a plane l doing. perfect. i was flying a plane for the doing. perfect. ! was flying a plane forthe first— doing. perfect. i was flying a plane for the first time _ doing. perfect. i was flying a plane for the first time ever. _ doing. perfect. i was flying a plane for the first time ever. sure - doing. perfect. i was flying a plane for the first time ever. sure i i doing. perfect. i was flying a plane for the first time ever. sure i was i for the first time ever. sure i was just controlling the direction and the altitude but it was a lot of fun. , ., ., , ., the altitude but it was a lot of fun. , ., .,, ., .,, ., fun. they even let me go as far as a 45 degrees — fun. they even let me go as far as a 45 degrees tilt- _ fun. they even let me go as far as a 45 degrees tilt. aeroplanes - fun. they even let me go as far as a 45 degrees tilt. aeroplanes have i 45 degrees tilt. aeroplanes have been equipped with autopilot systems for years already but the system this company has developed take that to the next level. if i was just a passenger in this plane i would have never known it was being flown autonomously stop the ride, takeoff and landing were smooth as any other
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light of enon. i've always wanted to get a pilot �*s license but maybe take like this means we won't even need to but it is also a long time before we see faa approval of unmanned aircraft. and that's all we have time for in the short version of click for this week. the full—length version is brilliant, check it out, please, it is on iplayer and waiting for you right now. don't forget you can catch up with our latest exploits on social media whenever you fancy. we live on facebook, youtube, instagram and twitter @bbcclick. thanks for watching and we will see you soon.
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hello, this is breakfast
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withjon kay and naga munchetty. tomorrow marks the end of a political era in germany, as elections take place for a new leader to replace angela merkel as chancellor after 16 years. climate change has been a big issue during the campaign, with activists holding rallies in cities across the country. 0ur europe editor katya adler sent this report from berlin. relaxing on a friday evening after 16 years at the helm of the eu's most powerful country, angela merkel is relieved perhaps that it is almost all over. the migrant crisis, the euro crisis, four us presidents, five uk prime ministers, 100 eu summits, and more, during hertime in office. hers will be a tough act
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to follow, at home and on the world stage. many germans say they will miss this delicate, pragmatic politician nicknamed mummy. michael is auoin to politician nicknamed mummy. michael is going to be — politician nicknamed mummy. michael is going to be strongly _ politician nicknamed mummy. michael is going to be strongly missed, - politician nicknamed mummy. michael is going to be strongly missed, i i is going to be strongly missed, i think so. i is going to be strongly missed, i think so. . . is going to be strongly missed, i think so. ,, ~ .. , think so. i will miss merkel very much. because? _ think so. i will miss merkel very much. because? because- think so. i will miss merkel very much. because? because i- think so. i will miss merkel very much. because? because i am. think so. i will miss merkel very| much. because? because i am a think so. i will miss merkel very i much. because? because i am a fan of her. i much. because? because i am a fan of her- i think _ much. because? because i am a fan of her- l think it— much. because? because i am a fan of her. i think it will— much. because? because i am a fan of her. i think it will be _ much. because? because i am a fan of her. i think it will be very _ much. because? because i am a fan of her. i think it will be very hard - her. i think it will be very hard for the candidature _ her. i think it will be very hard for the candidature comes i her. i think it will be very hard i for the candidature comes next, or the next _ for the candidature comes next, or the next chancellor. _ for the candidature comes next, or the next chancellor. to _ for the candidature comes next, or the next chancellor. to fulfil - for the candidature comes next, or the next chancellor. to fulfil this . the next chancellor. to fulfil this rolei _ the next chancellor. to fulfil this role, because _ the next chancellor. to fulfil this role, because they _ the next chancellor. to fulfil this role, because they will _ the next chancellor. to fulfil this role, because they will always i the next chancellor. to fulfil this| role, because they will always be this comparison— role, because they will always be this comparison to _ role, because they will always be this comparison to merkel. - role, because they will always be this comparison to merkel. find i role, because they will always be this comparison to merkel. and at eu hq in this comparison to merkel. and at eu h0 in brussels. _ this comparison to merkel. and at eu hq in brussels, they _ this comparison to merkel. and at eu hq in brussels, they will _ this comparison to merkel. and at eu hq in brussels, they will also - this comparison to merkel. and at eu hq in brussels, they will also be i this comparison to merkel. and at eu hq in brussels, they will also be a i hq in brussels, they will also be a big merkel sized hole. in hq in brussels, they will also be a big merkel sized hole.— hq in brussels, they will also be a big merkel sized hole. in the global landsca e, big merkel sized hole. in the global landscape. i — big merkel sized hole. in the global landscape, i mean, _ big merkel sized hole. in the global landscape, i mean, it— big merkel sized hole. in the global landscape, i mean, it really - landscape, i mean, it really matters. angela merkel was a very, very well respected leader, so everybody is looking at who is going to follow in her footsteps. {lit to follow in her footsteps. of course, to follow in her footsteps. of course, there is the potential for course, there is the potentialfor germany to take a dramatic new direction after 16 years of angela merkel, and that would be felt here and abroad. this is the eu's most
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influential country. but in the end, most germans are stability hungry, and so the calls for radical change, while loud, limited. what we are probably looking at here is change, but with a small c. this is the frontrunner to replace angela merkel, a centrist social democrat, currently germany's finance minister, seen as a safe pair of hands. his closest rival is a euro file conservative from angela merkel�*s cdu party. —— europhile. and the green party candidate is tipped to win a powerful position in the next german government. the environment is a big issue on sunday's election, and in crowds like these you find a fair few merkel critics. tic like these you find a fair few merkel critics.— like these you find a fair few merkel critics. no “ustice, no eace! merkel critics. no “ustice, no peace! tens h merkel critics. no “ustice, no peace! tens of i merkel critics. no justice, no peace! tens of thousands i merkel critics. nojustice, no i peace! tens of thousands gathered merkel critics. nojustice, no - peace! tens of thousands gathered in front of the german _ peace! tens of thousands gathered in front of the german parliament i front of the german parliament today, demanding change and accusing chancellor merkel of failing to
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prepare germany for the challenging future ahead. but climate concerns are now for the entree of angela merkel�*s successor. this photo went viral this week after she visited a bird sanctuary, appearing far more relaxed than usual. the merkel era in german politics is drawing to a close. katya adler, bbc news, berlin. we will keep across that, of course. results come through tomorrow evening. l results come through tomorrow evenina. .. ., .. . results come through tomorrow evenina. ,, . ,, , ., evening. i think it takes quite a while to come _ evening. i think it takes quite a while to come through - evening. i think it takes quite a while to come through from i evening. i think it takes quite a while to come through from all| evening. i think it takes quite a i while to come through from all the different states, but yes, full coverage across the bbc. a big weekend in germany had a big weekend engulfed, right? weekend in germany had a big weekend engulfed. right?— engulfed, right? yeah, already! you would have to _ engulfed, right? yeah, already! you would have to say, _ engulfed, right? yeah, already! you would have to say, talk _ engulfed, right? yeah, already! you would have to say, talk about i would have to say, talk about miracles, you're probably need more than they did not make it is fine, it is early days! you know that one day you can be brilliant and the next day absolutely terrible. 0f next day absolutely terrible. of course, you are never terrible. actually, i am, course, you are never terrible. actually, iam, many course, you are never terrible. actually, i am, many times. the bi est actually, i am, many times. the biggest gap _ actually, i am, many times. the biggest gap that _ actually, lam, many times. tia biggest gap that the actually, lam, many times. twa biggest gap that the americans actually, lam, many times. tia biggest gap that the americans have
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opened up after the first day. 61. opened up after the first day. 6-2, isn't it? we _ opened up after the first day. 6-2, isn't it? we had _ opened up after the first day. 6-2, isn't it? we had foursomes - opened up after the first day. 6—2, isn't it? we had foursomes and fourballs — isn't it? we had foursomes and fourballs. , ., ., fourballs. even in the year of medina there _ fourballs. even in the year of medina there were _ fourballs. even in the year of medina there were only i fourballs. even in the year of medina there were only two l fourballs. even in the year of i medina there were only two down after the first day. there are still 20 points to play for, but never has the gap been this big, after the first day of a ryder cup, with the usa 6—2 up already. while many of their players wowed the crowd with spectacular shots, too many of the europeans disappointed, and rory mclroy has paid the price — for the first time, he will sit out of the session this morning. andy swiss was there in wisconsin, watching the first day's action unfold. it was a day in which america's continent —— consonants proved to be entirelyjustified. europe had set out with high hopes, and early winterjohn rahman and sergio garcia, but it proved 13's early victory, as the favourite sassoon lived up to their billing. debutante zander shockley and patrick konrad
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thrashing awabakal roy and ian pulser, and their 3—1 leave soon grew as the us took control of the four balls, 23 now condemning mcilroy to his second defeat, before zander shockley and dustin johnson extended to their advantage, seeing off paul and avert bespoke. there was some compilation for europe. this gutsy pat on the final hole secured the first half, while tommy fleetwood under victor hubbard also finished all square against thomas count lance justin finished all square against thomas count lancejustin thomas. but the us have a commanding 6—to lead after an utterly dominant performance. well, europe knew would be tough, and that is exactly how it is proved. they now need a big second day fightback to keep their ryder cup hopes alive. andy swiss, bbc news, whistling straits. now the other huge story this weekend is the pivotal fight tonight for anthonyjoshua. he puts his reputation on the line, and his four world heavyweight belts, against the ukrainian challenger 0leksandr usyk, in front of 67,000 fans at the tottenham hotspur stadium. if you're not one of them, you can catch live commentary on bbc radio 5 live from 10pm.
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adey adedoyin looks ahead. no trash talking or tantrums, but big—time boxing is back. on saturday, anthonyjoshua will aim to produce a punch perfect performance of the biggest stadium fight in the uk since the pandemic. t’m of the biggest stadium fight in the uk since the pandemic. i'm feeling ha 0 n l uk since the pandemic. i'm feeling happy. i'm — uk since the pandemic. i'm feeling happy. l'm feeling _ uk since the pandemic. i'm feeling happy, i'm feeling blessed. - uk since the pandemic. i'm feeling happy, i'm feeling blessed. what i uk since the pandemic. i'm feeling. happy, i'm feeling blessed. what an opportunity this is. i'm one of the lucky ones, i get to go about there and perform. it is difficult, don't get me wrong, it comes with a lot of sacrifice, but as long as you apply yourself, you should have not too much to worry about. you can't predict the outcome, but leading up to it, you should be confident. so if he is the leading man in the show, a lot of his co—star, 0leksandr usyk? happy to play the joker, he turned up to thursday's is conference dressed in a suit inspired by the movie character, eccentric and zany, but behind the smiles, a fierce and fiery
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competitor. likejoshua, he has a gold—medallist from london 2012, and the former undisputed cruiserweight champion of the world. usyk is blessed with great footwork and hand eye co—ordination, though he is not the only one who can do that. joshua was nearly £20 heavier at yesterday's way in, but he would not favour? �* ._ , yesterday's way in, but he would not favour? �* , ., , ., favour? a'ay needs to exploit him as a favour? ajay needs to exploit him as a heavyweight. _ favour? ajay needs to exploit him as a heavyweight. he — favour? ajay needs to exploit him as a heavyweight, he needs _ favour? ajay needs to exploit him as a heavyweight, he needs to - favour? ajay needs to exploit him as a heavyweight, he needs to use i favour? ajay needs to exploit him as a heavyweight, he needs to use his. a heavyweight, he needs to use his size and strength and put it on him early, in my opinion, to get thejob done, because usyk is so good, so technically proficient. i have got ajay to force the stoppage or knock him out, otherwise we could be up to the cards. . him out, otherwise we could be up to the cards. , ., the cards. there is little margin for error of _ the cards. there is little margin for error of anthony _ the cards. there is little margin for error of anthony joshua. i the cards. there is little margin i for error of anthony joshua. blues, for error of anthonyjoshua. blues, and it is notjust his title is gone, but also a lucrative unification bout. ade adedoyin bbc news london. now, it'a tasty looking lunchtime menu in the premier league, as top of the table chelsea take on reigning champions manchester city. and there's been plenty of discussion about who's the greatest coach, with chelsea's thomas tuchel outwitting city's pep guardiola in their last three meetings —
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but all this is meaningless, he says. not so long ago there were, like, a lot of voices but told me i don't know how to be pep, so... anyway, it is not between me and him. we don't play a much of tennis or a game of chess tomorrow, we play with our teams and the clubs compete each other against each other on a very high level. t other against each other on a very hiuh level. ., ., ., other against each other on a very high level-— other against each other on a very hiuh level. ., ., ., , high level. i would love to see them -la high level. i would love to see them play chess. — high level. i would love to see them play chess, actually, _ high level. i would love to see them play chess, actually, to _ high level. i would love to see them play chess, actually, to be - high level. i would love to see them play chess, actually, to be fair. i play chess, actually, to be fair. two great minds, two great thinkers. it's congratulations to warwickshire, who are are county cricket champions, for the first time in nine yea rs. they needed to beat somerset to pip lancashire to the title. and liam norwell claimed the final wicket at edgbaston, to ensure victory by 118 runs. so that wrapped up the bears' first county championship title since 2012, and one that their captain says will take a while to sink in. there was a big surprise in the super league eliminator play—off, as hull kingston rovers, ended warrington's season with a 19—0 victory. rovers finished bottom of the table, last year but now are just one game away from the grand final. they play catalans dragons,
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in the semi finals, on thursday night for a place at old trafford. in union, george ford delivered the perfect response, to being left out of england's latest training squad, as leicester beat gloucester 33—26, in the premiership. ford, who's won 77 caps and played in two world cups, will miss an england camp that starts tomorrow. he kicked three penalties and two conversions as they secured a bonus—point win at kingsholm. rugby union's new united rugby championship got underway last night. it's the replacement for the pro 14 league. ulster held off glasgow warriors to win a 9—try thriller in belfast by 35—29. in the night's other match cardiff rugby overcame adversity — they lost two key players in the opening 21 minutes, but still beat connacht 33—21 at the arms park. the weather forecast in sochi for qualifying for the russian grand prix later today is looking so bad
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that the sport's governing body, the fia, has made contingency plans for it to be held tomorrow morning. whenever it's held it will be irrelevant for formula 1 championship leader max verstappen. the dutchman will start sunday's race from the back of the grid after being penalised for using too many engines, in his red bull car this season. valtteri bottas was quickest in friday practice, ahead of his mercedes team—mate lewis hamilton. qualifying is due to get underway at1:00pm. us open champion emma raducanu has split with the coach who helped guide her to a first major title earlier this month. andrew richardson, was hired for the summer tournaments in the united states, which ended with that amazing win 18—year—old raducanu became the first british woman to win a grand slam for 44 years and the first qualifier to win a major too. yesterday she was playing with royalty, the duchess of cambridge, making a guest appearance at an lta event
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to mark her achievement. i definitely want to keep just improving and being the best version of myself and on the court and off the court and maximising my potential and i still think i have a lot of room for development in terms of my tennis career and where it can 9°. of my tennis career and where it can go, so i am excited to start working on it. andy murray's impressive run at the moselle 0pen is over after being knocked out in the quarter—finals. murray is now ranked 113th in the world and was a wild card at the event. he did manage to force a first—set tie—break against poland's hubert hurkacz. but he lost in straight sets to the top seed. afterwards, he said he was happier with his consistency, but added he'll be more motivated if he can get nearer to the top of the rankings again. just briefly going back to emma raducanu, she said she was more nervous playing with the duchess in front of royalty than she was ahead of the us open final.—
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of the us open final. really! because i — of the us open final. really! because i suppose _ of the us open final. really! because i suppose all i of the us open final. really! because i suppose all the i of the us open final. really! i because i suppose all the focus of the us open final. really! - because i suppose all the focus was on her, it was a homecoming party, royalty turning up, the pressure is on a bit, isn't it? fiend royalty turning up, the pressure is on a bit, isn't it?— on a bit, isn't it? and the duchess is a massive _ on a bit, isn't it? and the duchess is a massive fan. _ on a bit, isn't it? and the duchess is a massive fan. and _ on a bit, isn't it? and the duchess is a massive fan. and also - on a bit, isn't it? and the duchess is a massive fan. and also plays i is a massive fan. and also plays very well. _ is a massive fan. and also plays very well, apparently. _ is a massive fan. and also plays very well, apparently. but i is a massive fan. and also plays very well, apparently. but if- very well, apparently. but if an bod very well, apparently. but if anybody can _ very well, apparently. but if anybody can handle - very well, apparently. but if. anybody can handle pressure... very well, apparently. but if- anybody can handle pressure... she has shown that in abundance. speaking of pressure, look at this which is building at the moment. have you seen this? this time of the morning is the perfect time to see it because of the light, obviously it because of the light, obviously it is dark. it it because of the light, obviously it is dark. . . it is dark. it is “ust extraordinary, i it is dark. it isjust| extraordinary, isn't it is dark. it isjust i extraordinary, isn't it? it it is dark. it isjust - extraordinary, isn't it? it is unbelievable. _ extraordinary, isn't it? it is unbelievable. well, - extraordinary, isn't it? it is unbelievable. well, it i extraordinary, isn't it? it is unbelievable. well, it is i extraordinary, isn't it? it 3 unbelievable. well, it is believable because it is happening. the canary island of la palma. it began on sunday and has intensified overnight leading to three more towns being evacuated. many of you will remember the pictures we have shown, many homes have been destroyed and people have been evacuated from their homes and moved from the area as well. it seems safety is being married —— managed, but this is a serious, serious geological event, but still a sight to behold. you know, you think of pompeii, you don't think of
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it happening in the modern day, but obviously it does. just it happening in the modern day, but obviously it does.— obviously it does. just shooting up into the sky- _ obviously it does. just shooting up into the sky. we _ obviously it does. just shooting up into the sky. we understand i obviously it does. just shooting up into the sky. we understand the l into the sky. we understand the activity, that a volcanic activity, has actually increased over the last 24 hours, and the spanish media are saying it is because a new event has opened up, which has allowed more of the lava to spray out. and flow. we will keep across those pictures throughout the morning. the unstoppable _ throughout the morning. the unstoppable power of nature. and thatis unstoppable power of nature. and that is matt taylor i'm talking about. good morning. you can keep your lampposts of berlin, but is far more entertaining to watch. not great for those living there at the moment, of course. look at this weather watch you shot behind me. it is not a volcano, it away in the distance. is sunrise, of course. that is approaching. today is the equilox, and night are roughly equal. sunset and night are roughly equal. sunset and sunrise in hull is around 5:50am and sunrise in hull is around 5:50am and this evening in belfast it is about 7:15 p.m., and it will be a fine day for many.
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autumn is not far away. temperatures will drop widely next weekend. the temperature drop for inverness. not far behind in leeds so it will feel much cooler and temperatures this morning are higher than they will be mid week. temperatures widely around 13 to 17 degrees. a very mild morning and a very cloudy morning. quite grey and misty over the hills. 0utbreaks quite grey and misty over the hills. outbreaks of rain in northern scotland and a few breaks of rain, particularly in the west. this will be some light showers especially through today. most places will stay dry and the cloud and break at times and then the rest of the sunshine, temperatures up to 21 degrees in the murray coast, maybe 20... maybe 22-24 in murray coast, maybe 20... maybe 22—24 in parts. through this evening
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and overnight, the breeze will pick up and overnight, the breeze will pick up and that is what is feeding in the humid air which will be another humid night. further light rain and drizzle and averages into the morning at around 12— 15 degrees, if not a little bit higher in one or two spots. it is the breeze that is strengthening ahead of this weather front. this is the weather fronts which will eventually bring the change to much more autumnal changes into the weekend and next week was up into the weekend and next week was up tomorrow approaching towards island and wind picks up here. western scotland and northern ireland seeing outbreaks of rain later in the day. the odd isolated shower but for many of you the bit more of sunshine through sunday is the reason picks up. 22—23 across some parts of central eastern england. the area of rain will sweep eastwards. gusty wind with it but it
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will clear most areas into the morning. lingering across eastern parts. sunshine out towards the east with a scattering of showers somehow every out to the west. temperatures 14. more wet weather next week and a drop in temperature. back to you both. �* . drop in temperature. back to you both. �* , ., ,. , both. autumn is here. thank you very much indeed- — paralympicjavelin thrower hollie arnold picked up her latest medal in tokyo earlier this month, and is keen to use her continued success to inspire the next generation of athletes. this week she was back in lincolnshire, visiting a primary school near grimsby and recieved a special surprise from one of the children, as gemma dawson reports. i can't believe this! hi, hollie! that is so! _ i can't believe this! hi, hollie! that is so! amazing, - i can't believe this! hi, hollie! that is so! amazing, just i i can't believe this! hi, hollie! - that is so! amazing, just brilliant! that is so! amazing, 'ust brilliant! the best time h
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that is so! amazing, 'ust brilliant! the best time of _ that is so! amazing, 'ust brilliant! the best time of my _ that is so! amazing, just brilliant! the best time of my life _ that is so! amazing, just brilliant! the best time of my life almost. l that is so! amazing, just brilliant! the best time of my life almost. i | the best time of my life almost. i 'ust the best time of my life almost. i just absolutely loved meeting hollie — just absolutely loved meeting hollie. , �* , just absolutely loved meeting hollie. m m ~ ,, hollie. cheering and applause. sometimes you — hollie. cheering and applause. sometimes you never _ hollie. cheering and applause. sometimes you never know - hollie. cheering and applause. sometimes you never know what i hollie. cheering and applause. i sometimes you never know what to expect, whether the kids know who you are or what you do and as soon as i walked in the kids were amazing. screaming and shouting. hattie, hollie! this amazing. screaming and shouting. hattie. hollie!— hattie, hollie! this has been organised — hattie, hollie! this has been organised by _ hattie, hollie! this has been organised by hattie - hattie, hollie! this has been organised by hattie and - hattie, hollie! this has been i organised by hattie and hollie's families because hattie's grandmother happens to be hollie's primary school teacher. is grandmother happens to be hollie's primary school teacher.— primary school teacher. is one for her to see — primary school teacher. is one for her to see her _ primary school teacher. is one for her to see her in _ primary school teacher. is one for her to see her in person - primary school teacher. is one for her to see her in person because| primary school teacher. is one for. her to see her in person because she has been watching her and inspired by her because she wants to do lots of sports herself.— of sports herself. eight-year-old hattie is a _ of sports herself. eight-year-old hattie is a rare _ of sports herself. eight-year-old hattie is a rare neuromuscular i hattie is a rare neuromuscular condition and has been following hollie's recent pallor olympic success in tokyo where she picked up is medal. success in tokyo where she picked up 1's medal. ~ ., ., , .,
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1's medal. well done, hollie, you are amazing- _ 1's medal. well done, hollie, you are amazing. you _ 1's medal. well done, hollie, you are amazing. you are _ 1's medal. well done, hollie, you are amazing. you are a _ 1's medal. well done, hollie, you. are amazing. you are a superhero! she has— are amazing. you are a superhero! she has been— are amazing. you are a superhero! she has been sending _ are amazing. you are a superhero! she has been sending me - are amazing. you are a superhero! she has been sending me lovely. she has been sending me lovely videos of lot —— via whatsapp and i have been getting them in tokyo and after tokyo and they have melted my heart, and just know that a young girl is also disabled as well, that looks up to me and that i can inspire somebody that way. hollie aaivin inspire somebody that way. hollie giving macro _ inspire somebody that way. hollie giving macro to — inspire somebody that way. hollie giving macro to one _ inspire somebody that way. hollie giving macro to one of— inspire somebody that way. hollie giving macro to one of her- inspire somebody that way. hollie giving macro to one of her training tops. —— hattie. giving macro to one of her training tops- -- hattie-— giving macro to one of her training tops. -- hattie. this medal belongs tops. -- hattie. this medal belongs to ou.i tops. -- hattie. this medal belongs to you- i need _ tops. -- hattie. this medal belongs to you- i need a _ tops. -- hattie. this medal belongs to you. i need a bit— tops. -- hattie. this medal belongs to you. i need a bit more _ tops. -- hattie. this medal belongs to you. i need a bit more practice. l to you. i need a bit more practice. she has inspired me a lot and even if she had a disability like —— even if she had a disability like —— even if you have a disability like me or hollie you can do anything. cheering and applause- _ you can win medals, obviously, and they are really aren't. when you see they are really aren't. when you see the impact you have on the next
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generation, i think that is the thing that makes you feel that was worth it. ., .., , worth it. you can see it in the kid's faces- — worth it. you can see it in the kid's faces. what _ worth it. you can see it in the kid's faces. what a _ worth it. you can see it in the kid's faces. what a special. worth it. you can see it in the | kid's faces. what a special day worth it. you can see it in the . kid's faces. what a special day at school. now it's time for the travel show, which this week catches up with an adventurer couple as they attempt to circumnavigate wales using only human power. they have crossed the length of the country on foot, bike and kayak and then there harbour of milford haven we saw the pickup there pedal boat and huff and puff their way around the south—east corner.
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they are meeting people who have devoted their life to animals. we join them at the midpoint of the sea leg which finds them. which finds them in aberystwyth. we leg which finds them. which finds them in aberystwyth.— them in aberystwyth. we are in aberystwyth- — them in aberystwyth. we are in aberystwyth- so _ them in aberystwyth. we are in aberystwyth. so far _ them in aberystwyth. we are in aberystwyth. so far we - them in aberystwyth. we are in aberystwyth. so far we have . them in aberystwyth. we are in - aberystwyth. so far we have cycled to milford haven and done about 100
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miles paddling to where we are in aberystwyth. miles paddling to where we are in aberystwyth— aberystwyth. basically all uphill. every single _ aberystwyth. basically all uphill. every single segment _ aberystwyth. basically all uphill. every single segment all - aberystwyth. basically all uphill. every single segment all uphill. l aberystwyth. basically all uphill. i every single segment all uphill. we have seen— every single segment all uphill. we have seen some amazing projects. every— have seen some amazing projects. every people we are meeting that i 'ust every people we are meeting that i just doing — every people we are meeting that i just doing their bit to live more sustainably and to combat climate change _ sustainably and to combat climate change. we sustainably and to combat climate chance. ~ ., ., ., sustainably and to combat climate chance. . ., ., ., ., , ., change. we are now going to pedal moksha about _ change. we are now going to pedal moksha about 36 _ change. we are now going to pedal moksha about 36 miles. _ change. we are now going to pedal moksha about 36 miles. a - change. we are now going to pedal moksha about 36 miles. a nice - moksha about 36 miles. a nice evening for it. we will probably pedal through the night. should be a nice relaxed, calm and pedal. it nice relaxed, calm and pedal. it should be! 0h! i'm pretty far out of my comfort zone right now! i didn't realise we were pedalling overnight. that was left out of the cliff notes. i did not want to tell you until now.
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it's making that sound again. i kind of know now what a hamster on a wheel feels like, going and going and going — and with the sound. i'm pretty tired but i did get a little bit of a nap. god. something hit me, likejet lag. toasty in there. i don't care. i'm so tired. i'll sleep anywhere right now, just for ten, 15 minutes, tam. we're getting too old for for the all—nighters. i don't think they were ever easy. god! like sleeping in a skip! it just feels like you're biking through mud. uphill.
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the llyn peninsula — that i'm really looking forward to — just a gorgeous stretch of coastline, the weather will be beautiful and lots of little inlets and coves on the way up. it's really beautiful and that's always the reward. it's just a total pay—off. the question then is once we're in holyhead and we've done all the bits and pieces there — like, the stories that we need to film there, whether or not we go clockwise. oh, tam. oh, shoot. i'm all right. god, i would kill for a coke zero or a pepsi max right now. perfectly good tortilla, that. hand it over. in a sick bag.
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i'm really looking forward to meeting gem. she's a woman i have been communicating with now for a year. thank you so much for agreeing to see us. what exactly is it that you do? we are basically- a research organisation. we know not very much - about seals on the north wales coast so the idea is to update our research, i track them, figure out - what they like and what habitat they prefer, where . they have their pups. what is it important for us to know about these animals? i think they're a really, really important part . of the ecosystem but also, l they have an incredibly high intrinsic value on the north wales coast — i welsh people love seals, l they want to protect them, they want to save them. i can see two. just off here. oh, yeah! oh, three, actually — one, two, three. - oh, i see — one, two, three! so because it's high tide, | they'll be doing a mixture probably of something called bottling, which is they float i vertical and they're -
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essentially sleeping but also foraging as well on the bottom. they pup in autumn — - that coincides with strong autumn storms - with climate change. so are humans the main detriment to the survival and the well—being of these seals? we're having more frequent. storms, we're having increased severity of storms as well. they can easily be swept off beaches in a storm surge, l away from mum. you see them trying to get back and it's really, - really heartbreaking to see. we need to ignite that passion for nature in our local- communities to encourage them to save nature - and to have a passion for marine wildlife. . it looks like the tide has already turned so i think we have a bit of a fight on our hands to get around the corner here. should've just left an hour earlier and then we wouldn't have had this, this crunch.
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ow! those last three miles are going to kick us in the ours, and they did. yeah. they totally kicked us in the ours and it could've — we could have lost everything. we could have lost the whole — could've lost the boat, we could've lost our lives.
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tammie yawns. look at you and what you've almost done. only 15.5 more miles... woo! ..to complete this journey. wow! thank you for an amazing opportunity. and thank you for keeping me alive in desperate, desperate circumstances. thank you. it's been a really grand adventure. a really hard, painful... she laughs. all right! let me at it! are we going to finish this trip, tammie? let me at it! i'm so close! come on.
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yeah, it's been an amazing — an amazing trip and i'm really glad. i think the tide's coming up for another ten minutes. yes, maybe a little bit slacker. there we go. thank you. come on, tammie. i'm gonna do my rocky run! come on. i feel kind of silly because it's probably not a big deal, but it's huge. it is huge — circumnavigating wales by human power. well done. well done! well done. ohh. amazing scenes. congratulations to jason and tammie. and i've got a feeling that's not the last time we're gonna hear about those two. right, that's it for this week. coming up next time — i'm in ireland, exploring from dublin to the south of the country in our all—electric travel show van,
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finding out how it's preparing to welcome back tourists after lockdown. innovative twists on old favourite. right at the end of the process, you retain— right at the end of the process, you retain all— right at the end of the process, you retain all of— right at the end of the process, you retain all of the flavours, you just remove _ retain all of the flavours, you just remove the — retain all of the flavours, you just remove the alcohol. you retain all of the flavours, you 'ust remove the alcohol. you genuinely wouldn't know. _ remove the alcohol. you genuinely wouldn't know. as _ remove the alcohol. you genuinely wouldn't know. as the _ remove the alcohol. you genuinely wouldn't know. as the irish - remove the alcohol. you genuinely l wouldn't know. as the irish prepared to welcome tourists back after lockdown. that was a real slacker. if you want to watch a longer version of this show you can find it on the bbc iplayer, and follow us on social media, we are in all the usual places. we have loads of inspiration on there the next time you're on the road was not in the meantime, though, keep planning your next trip and we'll see you very soon. goodbye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay, our headlines today: queues at petrol stations as the government considers allowing foreign lorry drivers to work in the uk. we ask the motorist to be sensible. don't alter your refuelling patterns. there is plenty of fuel around, and people shouldn't panic buy. the temporary plans are being drawn up after a shortage of hauliers has
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caused major disruption to deliveries of fuel, food and other goods. hundreds pay tribute to murdered primary school teacher sabina nessa at a candlelit vigil. words cannot describe how we are feeling. this feels like we are stuck in a bad dream and can't get out of it. our world is shattered. meltdown on michigan for team europe in the ryder cup, as they're spellbound by spieth and american magic, as the usa open up a record 6—2 opening day lead at whistling straits. we hit 25 degrees yesterday in parts of southern england, and while we wants continues for many this weekend, there are changes i had. —— while the warmth continues. i will have the details on breakfast. it's saturday, 25th september. our top story: a temporary visa scheme allowing foreign lorry drivers to work in the uk could be introduced, to ease the current problem
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with fuel deliveries. a shortage of uk tanker drivers has caused major disruption at petrol stations, leading to long queues and some closures. our transport correspondent caroline davies reports. chicken, milkshakes, and now petrol. a shortage of lorry drivers continues to bite across the uk. and as the problem grows, there's more pressure on the government to make changes. bp reported they were having trouble getting their petrol to some stations. there is enough fuel, just not enough drivers to take it to the petrol stations. although the problem only affected a small number of sites, people worried that they could run out and began to buy more than they normally would, leading to huge queues despite government reassurances. now one firm, eg group, who run 400 petrol stations, have said they're limiting each customer to £30 of fuel, excluding hgv drivers and emergency services. there's plenty of fuel. the issue is obviously the leadtime of getting it
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from terminal to forecourt. and we ask the motorist to be sensible. don't alter your refuelling patterns. if you have a need to refuel, obviously go and get fuel, but bear in mind that some of the sites, you might be in a queue, so keep a little bit of fuel in your vehicle in order to drive to an alternative site if you have to. but there's plenty of fuel around and people shouldn't panic buy. until now, the government has resisted calls to provide temporary visas to eu drivers to help fill the gap, as it's argued it doesn't want the uk lorry drivers to drop out because they're undercut by cheaper eu labour. however, last night the government said it was looking at temporary measures, although it stressed these would be strictly time limited. although there is no official confirmation, this is thought to include temporary visas. there is increasing pressure to take some action, particularly to stop the crisis getting worse in the run—up to christmas.
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caroline davies, bbc news. our reporter phil mccann is at a forecourt in stockport for us this morning. how is it working there? well, they have run out _ how is it working there? well, they have run out here. _ how is it working there? well, they have run out here. all _ how is it working there? well, they have run out here. all the - how is it working there? well, they have run out here. all the pumps, l have run out here. all the pumps, you can see, i covered up with these plastic bags and labels on things. every now and then we get drivers turning up, slowing down, i think one is about to do it now, noticing there isn't any fuel and driving off. this has actually happened quicker than they thought here. they thought they might run out of petrol later today. they sold, they normally cell 8000 litres of fuel per day here. they sold 28,000 yesterday, more than three times as much, so for all of those warnings that you don't need to panic buy, clearly people at places like this have done just that. they were told yesterday they would not be able to get another delivery between nine and ten days because of that shortage of drivers, but not of course because of a shortage of fuel. as we heard, the government
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relaxing the visa rules for foreign drivers is something they didn't want to do, but it seems like this is something they really wanted to avoid. just a handful of petrol stations run out yesterday, today, clearly, more of them have run out. this is very much just a temporary measure, it is not seen as a long—term solution. the long—term solution is seen as getting more british people to become lorry drivers and doing that means things like improving the working conditions for lorry drivers, it means potentially doing some being about the hours, but also the play. that will be a difficult and long—term want to solve, because of course be lorry drivers is often dictated by the prices of the stuff they deliver. —— of course the pay of lorry drivers. petrol stations and supermarkets aggressively compete with each other. but will be a long—term measure to solve, which is why the measure taken today will be a short—term measure to resolve, well, seems like this. be a short-term measure to resolve, well, seems like this.— well, seems like this. phil, thank ou ve well, seems like this. phil, thank you very much — well, seems like this. phil, thank you very much indeed. _ well, seems like this. phil, thank you very much indeed. that - well, seems like this. phil, thank you very much indeed. that is - you very much indeed. that is something we will be getting into all morning, trying to understand
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what is going on and what the solutions could be. haste what is going on and what the solutions could be.— what is going on and what the solutions could be. we will find out more about — solutions could be. we will find out more about the _ solutions could be. we will find out more about the temporary - solutions could be. we will find out i more about the temporary measures being finalised by the government to address the shortage of hgv drivers. we're joined now by our political correspondent, lone wells. we have heard, haven't we, there is no need to panic, it will all be fine, not a problem. no need to panic, it will all be fine, nota problem. but no need to panic, it will all be fine, not a problem. but action has forced borisjohnson's count? fine, not a problem. but action has forced boris johnson's count? that's rieht. the forced boris johnson's count? that's right. the government _ forced boris johnson's count? that's right. the government is _ forced boris johnson's count? that's right. the government is now - right. the government is now considering some kind of temporary visa scheme to basically make it easier for visa scheme to basically make it easierforforeign visa scheme to basically make it easier for foreign drivers to come and work here in the uk. now, official plans for this will be announced this weekend, but our understanding is that it is going to be temporary and they will also be a cap on the number of foreign drivers who will be able to come, with reports it would be around 5000 drivers. government ministers met yesterday to thrash out their response to some of the scenes we have been seeing over the last couple of days. to say the government themselves are pretty split about this, not least because, some of them argue, the whole point of the post—brexit immigration
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policy was to tell policies that they shouldn't be so reliant on cheaper foreign labour. there are also some arguing that it is not a long—term solution, we should focus on training apply domestic workforce, and also a worry that it could ask for other companies for special treatment, so they can foreign workers, and assist them as well. it is not clear how this temporary visa scheme would necessarily immediately tackle some the scenes we have in seeing over the scenes we have in seeing over the past couple of days, obviously visas would still need to be issued, drivers would still need to be recruited to come over and deliver some of the goods we are seeing shortages of at the moment. clearly there are a lot of issues at play here, but the government knows it needs to do something, but also that acting now might come with some political embarrassment, with opposition parties and their critics already pointing fingers and saying, we told you so. already pointing fingers and saying, we told you so— already pointing fingers and saying, we told you so. thank you very much. s-eeakin we told you so. thank you very much. speaking of — we told you so. thank you very much. speaking of opposition, _ we told you so. thank you very much. speaking of opposition, we _ we told you so. thank you very much. speaking of opposition, we will- we told you so. thank you very much. speaking of opposition, we will be - speaking of opposition, we will be speaking to angela rayner later in the programme. in
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speaking to angela rayner later in the programme-— the programme. in about five minutes. _ the programme. in about five minutes. in — the programme. in about five minutes, in fact. _ a book of condolence will be opened in south london this morning in memory of the 28—year—old primary school teacher, sabina nessa, who was attacked and killed a week ago. hundreds of mourners gathered for an emotional candlelit vigil in kidbrooke last night, as simonjones reports. "say her name: sabina nessa, we will neverforget." that was a request from the organisers of the vigil, and hundreds answered the call. sabina nessa, sabina nessa. crowd: sabina nessa. the public coming together to support a family struggling to comprehend. sabina loved her family. we have lost our sister, my parents have lost their daughter, and my girls have lost such a brilliant, loving, caring auntie who dearly loved them. words cannot describe how we are feeling. this feels like we are stuck in a bad dream and can't get
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out of it. our world is shattered. on friday last week, sabina had been heading to this square to meet a friend. she never arrived. it's thought she was attacked as she was walking through a nearby park. her death has once again brought to the fore the question of women's safety on our streets. those who attended the vigil said they felt compelled to be there. to pay my respects to sabina and to the thousands of other women that have been murdered, attacked, sexually assaulted, and just to stand together with all the women and men who are here, just to say that we don't want to — ifeel emotional — accept this anymore. as much as i'm deeply saddened by the event and how tragic it is, i'm also enraged. i'm also quite angry at the fact that so many young women are becoming more and more frightened. i questioned about whether i should come, as a man, orwhetherthis. should be a female space, - but it seemed like there were —
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everyone was invited. a candle was [it in downing street and the duchess of cambridge wrote on twitter: shortly before the vigil began, the police cordoned off the road next to the square in their hunt for information. officers are still trying to trace this man, captured on cctv, shortly before the vigil began, the police cordoned off the road next to the square in their hunt for information. officers are still trying to trace this man, captured on cctv, whom they believe could be vital to the case. it's thought he had access to this silver car. vigils also took place elsewhere. this was a gathering in newcastle, and candles were [it in brighton. and in kidbrooke, a minute's silence, applause, and a song for a community united in grief and anger. simon jones, bbc news. simon is in kidbrooke
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for us this morning. simon, it was a very clear from, you know, but individual, the sense of rage, sadness of course, but a sense of anger that we are still in the situation where, somebody put it eloquently, women are scared. you know, scared to go out on the streets, when absolutely adjust shouldn't even be a consideration for us. ~ , ,., , shouldn't even be a consideration forus. , , ., shouldn't even be a consideration forus. , ., , for us. absolutely, and people he out of the vigil _ for us. absolutely, and people he out of the vigil yesterday - for us. absolutely, and people he out of the vigil yesterday were . out of the vigil yesterday were saying this situation has to and, you can see down there are lots of the candles burning this morning that people bought, and there were signs, you are saying, and male violence, women deserve safety, that was very much the mood yesterday, but also that sense that things definitely have to change, and i think it was when sabina's sister spoke to the cloud yesterday you got
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a real sense of the suffering but the family were going through, they described her as kind, caring and beautiful. people have been saying over the past week that since her murder they have felt scared, they have felt they didn't want to leave their homes on their own, but hundreds came out yesterday to be part of the community, to take part in the service, the remembrance that was happening here, and this morning that continued a short time ago, i saw a man arriving a card clutching which simply said goodbye, he laid it among some of the flowers, he said he didn't know hobart he felt so touched by what had happened that he wanted to be part of it, and really, that is what we are getting from the police as well who spoke at the vigil, they say that their support is very much with the community but the community also needs to help them, and if you want to sense this is still very much ongoing as a police investigation, just over there is a police court and, that area has been cordoned
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off, searches have been taking place as this murder investigation goes into its second week.— as this murder investigation goes into its second week. simon, thank ou. it is into its second week. simon, thank you. it is 7:13am. _ into its second week. simon, thank you. it is 7:13am. matt— into its second week. simon, thank you. it is 7:13am. matt has- into its second week. simon, thank you. it is 7:13am. matt has the - you. it is 7:13am. matt has the weather. what a beautiful, beautiful sunrise or sunset? what a beautiful, beautiful sunrise orsunset? it what a beautiful, beautiful sunrise or sunset? it doesn't matter, it is just stunning. or sunset? it doesn't matter, it is just stunning-— just stunning. yes, a beautiful sunrise in _ just stunning. yes, a beautiful sunrise in cumbria _ just stunning. yes, a beautiful sunrise in cumbria this - just stunning. yes, a beautiful. sunrise in cumbria this morning, just reflecting off the altar cumulus clouds above it. it will be a sunny day for some of you, for others, a bit grey, but for everybody it will be quite warm for the stage in september. let me give you a quick look at what is happening over the next few hours. rain spreading across the far north of scotland. the worst of the heaviest rain will stay clear, it mightjust clip shetland in the late morning, but in its wake, still patchy rain and drizzle to come across other parts of western scotland, gloomy over the hills as it will be in northern ireland, lots of cloud around, temperatures a0 degrees in parts of aberdeenshire, ellsworth 13—17. right now it is incredibly mild but as you can see,
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plenty of cloud in place. a few spots of light rain or drizzle, potentially across western areas through today, but most places will stay dry, more sunshine breaking through the afternoon, north wales into parts of the northwest north wales, lincolnshire and midlands, and run very far south coast of england and the moderator. could get to 21 here, 22—2a, plus some parts of central and eastern england. the breeze we are picking up on the west as we go through this evening and overnight, still feeding on one or two showers, quickly pushing north, more cloudbreak 's tonight into tomorrow morning, but still a fairly muqqy tomorrow morning, but still a fairly muggy night to come, temperatures in the midteens as we start sunday, but a bit more sunshine for many on sunday, rain arriving across the of ireland through the day, but will bring a change next week and noticed a drop in temperature. more details on that injust a drop in temperature. more details on that in just half—an—hour. making sure that all employers follow a minimum standard for pay and working conditions will be
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at the top of the agenda, when labour launch their party conference in brighton today. it's an important moment for labour — as leader sir keir starmer tries to assert his position. his deputy angela raynorjoins us now. head of a busy weekend i'm sure. can we start on fuel, please? it will be in the minds of a lot of viewers this morning as we wake up and check how much petrol they have in their cars. it looks like the government will change the visa rules are so more foreign drivers can come over and help out with deliveries. do you welcome that, labour? i do and help out with deliveries. do you welcome that, labour?— welcome that, labour? i do but it is frustratin: welcome that, labour? i do but it is frustrating we _ welcome that, labour? i do but it is frustrating we have _ welcome that, labour? i do but it is frustrating we have got _ welcome that, labour? i do but it is frustrating we have got to _ welcome that, labour? i do but it is frustrating we have got to this - frustrating we have got to this point — frustrating we have got to this point that the government to having to do that _ point that the government to having to do that because of their policies creating _ to do that because of their policies creating this situation we've got in the first— creating this situation we've got in the first place and also i urge people — the first place and also i urge people to not panic by because that will people to not panic by because that wittiust_ people to not panic by because that willjust make the situation worse stop the _ willjust make the situation worse stop the government does have to address— stop the government does have to address this issue and make sure that people do have the fuel,
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especially those essential workers and people can go about their daily lives but _ and people can go about their daily lives but panic buying will not make the situation any easier, but the government have also failed in their policies _ government have also failed in their policies that have left us without those _ policies that have left us without those paid drivers. 30 policies that have left us without those paid drivers.— policies that have left us without those paid drivers. so what would ou be those paid drivers. so what would you be doing _ those paid drivers. so what would you be doing to — those paid drivers. so what would you be doing to try _ those paid drivers. so what would you be doing to try and _ those paid drivers. so what would you be doing to try and ease - those paid drivers. so what would| you be doing to try and ease this? some people are saying maybe bring in the army for a while to help with deliveries in the short term? melt deliveries in the short term? well if we have to _ deliveries in the short term? well if we have to bring _ deliveries in the short term? well if we have to bring in _ deliveries in the short term? well if we have to bring in the army in the short— if we have to bring in the army in the short term than that is what we have to _ the short term than that is what we have to do — the short term than that is what we have to do. we do need those essentiat— have to do. we do need those essential supplies but like i say panic— essential supplies but like i say panic buying won't make this situation any easier. so the government do need to address this issue _ government do need to address this issue but— government do need to address this issue but it — government do need to address this issue but it has been a long time coming — issue but it has been a long time coming. we know that lorries are skilled _ coming. we know that lorries are skilled workers and this was coming down _ skilled workers and this was coming down the _ skilled workers and this was coming down the tracks and the government haven't— down the tracks and the government haven't done anything to address it and now— haven't done anything to address it and now we face this crisis that people — and now we face this crisis that people are now worried about whether or not _ people are now worried about whether or not they _ people are now worried about whether or not they are going to have the fuel but— or not they are going to have the fuel but there is fuel there. it is 'ust fuel but there is fuel there. it is just that — fuel but there is fuel there. it is just that we have to make sure things— just that we have to make sure things calm down and that we do have the h _ things calm down and that we do have the h pv—
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things calm down and that we do have the h pv drivers that delivered the drivers— the h pv drivers that delivered the drivers and — the h pv drivers that delivered the drivers and supplies that we need across— drivers and supplies that we need across the — drivers and supplies that we need across the uk.— drivers and supplies that we need across the uk. talking about better conditions, better— across the uk. talking about better conditions, better pay _ across the uk. talking about better conditions, better pay for _ across the uk. talking about better conditions, better pay for lorry - conditions, better pay for lorry drivers, it leads us onto what you will be talking about at the labour party conference about improving and changing workers right as you would say. but increasing the minimum wage to £10 an hour, no zero hours contract, for some employers, if you run a care home or a cafe you are going to hear that and think my goodness, howl going to hear that and think my goodness, how i going to do that? that is going to put huge quick —— huge pressure on me. that is going to put huge quick -- huge pressure on me.— huge pressure on me. sure. and actually having _ huge pressure on me. sure. and actually having good _ huge pressure on me. sure. and| actually having good employment practices, and we see this in all parts of the sector, means that you have good staff retention, we have the skills there, they are retained within the organisation. people's sickness levels go down so actually the overall costs overheads are actually not dissimilar because actually not dissimilar because actually you save money by having good well—paid staff that have flexible contrast —— contracts. it
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means they can work around their lives and good employers are already doing this and we do think it is about time that we have these minimum standards because we've seen this epidemic of insecure work, low pay which is causing the crisis and vacancies in things like social care which is the sector that i come from and it delivers porous services and that those employers are now finding it incredibly difficult to retain the staff that they need and to skilled them up and this is part of that programme to enable employers to get the skills they need but also means that workers can have that guarantee and those reassurances. and it is about a fair day's pay for a fair day's work and it is about making sure that work always pays and that so that the unscrupulous employers that are undercutting those that are trying to do the right thing are taken out of the market and have to abide by the minimum standard that we think people should be able to guarantee that might be guaranteed in the workplace. that might be guaranteed in the worklace. . , that might be guaranteed in the worklace. ,, , ., ., ~
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workplace. sure but if a worker then loses the job — workplace. sure but if a worker then loses the job that _ workplace. sure but if a worker then loses the job that they _ workplace. sure but if a worker then loses the job that they rely - workplace. sure but if a worker then loses the job that they rely on - loses the job that they rely on because the employer can't afford to pay that higher wage bill because they are also dealing with higher energy costs and higher fuel costs and food costs and that kind of thing, that it completely backfires, doesn't it? it doesn't retain people but could potentially lose people theirjobs, does the opposite. iettet’eii. their 'obs, does the opposite. well, as i theirjobs, does the opposite. well, as i said before, _ theirjobs, does the opposite. well, as i said before, some _ theirjobs, does the opposite. well, as i said before, some of— theirjobs, does the opposite. well, as i said before, some of the - as i said before, some of the problems that we face other government's making on their policies. for example they lost the storage facility for gas. they have created this crisis within our energy companies, they knew this was a warning to them as they failed to respond to that but they have also created a double whammy for working families as well with the national insurance contribution hike, the cut to universal credit, so the money thatis to universal credit, so the money that is going into people's pockets have been significantly reduced. what we're saying is there should be a minimum floor. there are great employers out there now who are doing their best and are making profit are also giving their workers
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a minimum standard and minimum pay and they know the benefits of that because those staff are happier and retain them within their workforce and they don't have to re— skilled people again and skill people up so it actually has benefits for employers. what we don't want to see is a race to the bottom, we want to see a minimum floor that means people have guaranteed hours and they can go to work and, you know, enjoy family life and i think that is really important. we are behind other european countries, kind in the world on these protections that people have and we want to make sure that we have, that we bring that to the people. i that we have, that we bring that to the people-— the people. i say it is a big conference _ the people. i say it is a big conference and _ the people. i say it is a big conference and an - the people. i say it is a big l conference and an important conference and an important conference for labour this weekend, for keir starmer in particular, as your boss, as the leader. why aren't your boss, as the leader. why aren't you as a party doing better? you've had the conservatives in power of more than a decade, taxes going up, we're talking about prices going up. in the situation, and after this long of any party in power you would expect the opposition to be making
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hay you'll struggling still, aren't you? hay you'll struggling still, aren't ou? ~ .. �* ., hay you'll struggling still, aren't ou? . «' �* ., ., you? well, i think we're wait ad makine you? well, i think we're wait ad making progress _ you? well, i think we're wait ad making progress but _ you? well, i think we're wait ad making progress but we - you? well, i think we're wait ad making progress but we had - you? well, i think we're wait ad making progress but we had a l you? well, i think we're wait ad i making progress but we had a long way to go. we lost the general election in 2019 and i think people are starting to realise that iris johnson is all bluster and that he has failed to deliver on many of the promises that he made to the electorate. the problem with the labour party is we under promise and over deliver. the problem with the conservatives as they overpromise and under liveth —— under deliver. it is about setting out, it is the first time that me and keir starmer have been able to meet with delegates and meet the members and put our case forward and i think it's about putting that alternative forward. the future of work which i think is incredibly important, is about making sure that people's working lives are better. people go to work to leave they don't live to rebalance that so we can show actually we are a government in waiting that will improve the lives of working people. x�*t�*ou waiting that will improve the lives of working people.— waiting that will improve the lives of working people. you know, there are a lot of — of working people. you know, there are a lot of people _ of working people. you know, there are a lot of people higher _ of working people. you know, there are a lot of people higher up - of working people. you know, there
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are a lot of people higher up in - are a lot of people higher up in your party who question whether keir starmer is the right leader. i know it's been a difficult time with the pandemic, but face—to—face interaction hasn't been possible. theyjust interaction hasn't been possible. they just feel he interaction hasn't been possible. theyjust feel he is not cutting through. writing an 11,000 word essay this week maybe not the way to touch the public. x�*t�*ou essay this week maybe not the way to touch the public.— touch the public. you know, i have never been — touch the public. you know, i have never been to _ touch the public. you know, i have never been to a _ touch the public. you know, i have never been to a conference - touch the public. you know, i have never been to a conference where l never been to a conference where some members do question who is the right leader. i'm sure it happens in our political parties —— all political parties. but i think keir starmer is doing a greatjob. he is setting out his vision of the future. it is not unusual for people to do it in written form as well as verbally. he has been up and down the country. he has been speaking to people about what their struggles are in their lives and this conference is about keir starmer putting forward about those conversations he has been having with ordinary people of this
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country. with ordinary people of this count . ~ , ., with ordinary people of this count .~ ., country. why at a time when ordinary- -- _ country. why at a time when ordinary... crosstalk. - country. why at a time when ordinary... crosstalk. we | country. why at a time when - ordinary... crosstalk. we listened and we did that. _ ordinary... crosstalk. we listened and we did that. at _ ordinary... crosstalk. we listened and we did that. at a _ ordinary... crosstalk. we listened and we did that. at a time _ ordinary... crosstalk. we listened and we did that. at a time when - and we did that. at a time when ordinary people. _ and we did that. at a time when ordinary people, as _ and we did that. at a time when ordinary people, as you - and we did that. at a time when ordinary people, as you say, - and we did that. at a time when ordinary people, as you say, i l ordinary people, as you say, i dealing with all these pressures in the daily lives, the leader of the labour party has been putting hours of effort on the eve of the conference into reforming the rules of the way the labour party leader is elected in the future. that doesn't connect with the public, doesn't connect with the public, does it? that is not a battle for now. ~ ., , does it? that is not a battle for now. . . , ., ., does it? that is not a battle for now. . , ., ., now. what is important, and both m self now. what is important, and both myself and _ now. what is important, and both myself and keir _ now. what is important, and both myself and keir once _ now. what is important, and both myself and keir once re-elected, | myself and keir once re—elected, realise that things had to change. we lost the general election in 2019 so we have to look at ourselves and say what are we doing that is not connecting and therefore my programme about a new deal for working people, the things on dealing with the housing crisis, dealing with the housing crisis, dealing with the situation that we face is about looking outwards and talking to the public and saying "we recognise that many people who used
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to vote labour felt they couldn't vote labour, we are listening and we are also putting forward a plan that will be about us getting into government. we make no bones about that. that is what we're to do. because i have spent the last six years as an opposition mp and everything that i have proposed ever on the tv and everything else has never been able to go into former government because we're not in power so i'm not changing people's lives in the way that i want to as a member of parliament. i want to get into government and i'm not going to apologise for that because i think people deserve better than what we have currently got and that is what the programme is that we are setting out in the conference this time around. ~ , , ., out in the conference this time around. g , ., , ., ., , out in the conference this time around. g , ., , ., ., around. my question is how does an ar: ument, around. my question is how does an argument. a — around. my question is how does an argument, a painful, _ around. my question is how does an argument, a painful, high _ around. my question is how does an argument, a painful, high profile i argument, a painful, high profile argument, a painful, high profile argument about changing the government's leadership rules —— the labour party's leadership rules, how does that affect daily life? the kind of things people are wanting. that is once again the labour party looking inwards. rest
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that is once again the labour party looking inwards. that a that is once again the labour party looking inwards.— looking inwards. at a party conference _ looking inwards. at a party conference we _ looking inwards. at a party conference we always - looking inwards. at a party conference we always have looking inwards. at a party - conference we always have debate about things both internally and externally to our party policies and our rules on what goes forward. that has always been a tradition of the labour party. it is not us looking inwards, it is not a big issue within the labour party, it is exactly what we've always done. i have been a delegate to the labour party conference for many years as a trade union official as well. as a constituency delegate. these things, you know, we do talk about them and we do discuss them and that is the right thing to do in a democratic party but we will be coming together and setting out our programme. we have already set out a number of programmes about how we help first home buyers, how we help people needing to get on the housing ladder. i am setting out today how we help working people of this country. we help working people of this count . ., .. we help working people of this count . ., ~ i. we help working people of this count . . ~' ,, , we help working people of this count . ., ~ i. , . country. thank you very much indeed. it sounds like — country. thank you very much indeed. it sounds like the _ country. thank you very much indeed. it sounds like the builders _ country. thank you very much indeed. it sounds like the builders have - it sounds like the builders have just arrived and doing some scaffolding wait for the conference was that we will leave you there. thanks a lot. was that we will leave you there. thanks a lot-— thanks a lot. quite good timing, reall , thanks a lot. quite good timing, really. just _ thanks a lot. quite good timing, really. just at — thanks a lot. quite good timing, really, just at the _ thanks a lot. quite good timing, really, just at the end. _ every week, presenter ros atkins takes an in—depth look
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at one of the issues in the news. this week, it's the german election — here in germany the election is about who is going to win but it is also about who is leaving. angela merkel became chancellor in 2005. 16 years on her time as leader is most complete. she is involved in the campaign but she is not a contender. this matters because a majorfigure is exiting the global stage. chancellor merkel has helped set the course of european and global politics. she has worked with four us presidents. she has been central as the eu navigated the migration crisis, the eurozone crisis and covid—19. and the uk's prime minister borisjohnson has offered one of many tributes to leadership. i think over the last year, 18
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months in particular, your scientific expertise has been instrumental in guiding the global response to the pandemic. boris johnson response to the pandemic. boris johnson talks — response to the pandemic. boris johnson talks of— response to the pandemic. boris johnson talks of angela - response to the pandemic. boris johnson talks of angela merkel johnson talks of angela merkel guiding the world. and that sense that mrs merkel transcending politics comes out when you speak to politicians and many others, too. she has kept us in the same —— safe space for the past 16 years but it is now time for a change. stand space for the past 16 years but it is now time for a change. and that chan . e is now time for a change. and that change will — is now time for a change. and that change will be _ is now time for a change. and that change will be decided very - is now time for a change. and that change will be decided very soon i is now time for a change. and that i change will be decided very soon and will inevitably impact decisions on a range of vital issues on the european union, to global change, to climate change. my colleague katia adler puts it this way. the climate change. my colleague katia adler puts it this way.— adler puts it this way. the thing is, about these _ adler puts it this way. the thing is, about these german - adler puts it this way. the thing i is, about these german elections, they matter notjust inside the country but outside as well. this is all about change. you thought german politics might be predictable and boring, absolutely not. so if politics might be predictable and boring, absolutely not.— boring, absolutely not. so if you have et boring, absolutely not. so if you have yet to _ boring, absolutely not. so if you have yet to get _ boring, absolutely not. so if you have yet to get stuck _ boring, absolutely not. so if you have yet to get stuck into - boring, absolutely not. so if you have yet to get stuck into the i have yet to get stuck into the selection, give me a few minutes and i will take you through it. the
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candidates, the system and why this choice matters to all of us. let's start with the main players. first of all, the man angela merkel would like to be her replacement. he is a ready leader of angela merkel�*s christian democratic union, the cdu. its right of centre, its sister party in bavaria is the csu. he had been the favourite. that it is not going to plan. his polling was already wobbling when this happened. as germany's president dressed the devastating floods injuly, he was seen laughing. he is leader of one of the worst hit regions made the incident worst and the comparison with angela merkel�*s empathetic response was hard to avoid. but there are more to his problems than just that, though. deutsche welle tells us in this profile, throughout the campaign he had come across as vague. what many wondered does the
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candidate really stand for? in the latest tv debate, he tried to address that. ~ ,, ~ ,., . ~ address that. translation: back in these difficult _ address that. translation: back in these difficult times, _ address that. translation: back in these difficult times, a _ address that. translation: back in these difficult times, a climate - these difficult times, a climate mutual industry and above all a clear course for national security. mr lachet�*s challenges that some voters chose the cdu because they liked angela merkel, they lacked a pragmatic, centrist approach. liked angela merkel, they lacked a pragmatic, centristapproach. —— laschet�*s. she attracted people who might not normally vote right of centre, and now armin laschet has to try and do the same thing. but is struggling to do that, and because of that he's been getting help from mrs merkel herself. translation: i help from mrs merkel herself. translation:— translation: i ask you to do everything _ translation: i ask you to do everything that _ translation: i ask you to do everything that you _ translation: i ask you to do everything that you can - translation: i ask you to do everything that you can to - translation: i ask you to do - everything that you can to safeguard germany's prosperity in the coming years. to ensure germany's safety. and the person who can do this, he was campaigning to do this, and ready to fight passionately for this, is armin laschet.-
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ready to fight passionately for this, is armin laschet. that's the itch. this, is armin laschet. that's the pitch- but — this, is armin laschet. that's the pitch- but the — this, is armin laschet. that's the pitch. but the polls _ this, is armin laschet. that's the pitch. but the polls are _ this, is armin laschet. that's the pitch. but the polls are offering l pitch. but the polls are offering little comfort. look at what's happened. first of all, this is the result of the 2017 election. the cdu, csu, sometimes cold the union, reached 35%. it was actually its worst result in 70 years, but it was still top. then his polling from july still top. then his polling from july of this year, csu/ cdu are on 29%. now look at the latest polling. well, mr laschet and the cdu have been on the slide, and remarkably, having been third injuly, the spd, the social democrats, now find themselves in the lead. and the spd's themselves in the lead. and the spd�*s leader is this man, earl of schultz. —— olaf scholz. he is germany's finance minister at the moment, because germany's government is a grand coalition between the three parties. one political scientist says of him he is rational, stable, almost boring. this makes him very similar to mrs
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merkel. that's right. both candidates, in their own ways, want voters to see them as bringing more of what angela merkel offered. indeed, mr schultz seems very happy to encourage this comparison. —— scholz. in this magazine photo, he even deployed angela merkel�*s diamond hand position. they are not one of the same. he has centre—left, mrs merkel 's centre—right, they are different politicians from different parties. and this is mr scholz�*s pitch. translation: i parties. and this is mr scholz's pitch. translation:— pitch. translation: i will immediately _ pitch. translation: iwill immediately bring - pitch. translation: iwill immediately bring in - pitch. translation: iwill immediately bring in a - pitch. translation: iii-a" ii. immediately bring in a minimum wage of 12 euros, ensure stable pensions, and ensure that within the first year of government we will have the structure in place to build a renewable energy industry with good jobs that are climate neutral. hooter. jobs that are climate neutral. now, mr scholz and _ jobs that are climate neutral. now, mr scholz and mr— jobs that are climate neutral. now, mr scholz and mr laschet - jobs that are climate neutral. now, mr scholz and mr laschet are - jobs that are climate neutral. now, mr scholz and mr laschet are most likely to replace angela merkel. but there is one other candidate who has a chance. this is anna lena babcock.
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—— annalena baerbock, the leader of the green party. i -- annalena baerbock, the leader of the green party-— the green party. i sound for a new start that would _ the green party. i sound for a new start that would no _ the green party. i sound for a new start that would no longer - the green party. i sound for a new start that would no longer climate i start that would no longer climate policy is halfway, policies that would finally bring children and families to the centre, and a human rights led policy in the heart of europe. fin rights led policy in the heart of euroe. ., , , europe. on baerbock's leadership, time magazine _ europe. on baerbock's leadership, time magazine describes - europe. on baerbock's leadership, time magazine describes how - europe. on baerbock's leadership, time magazine describes how she| europe. on baerbock's leadership, i time magazine describes how she has bridged divides between the party's long feuding fundamentalist and realist wings, overseeing the green split was consolidation as a pro—business centrist party. that may be, but after briefly leading in the polls, the greens are now back in third. here is the polling from last week again, and we've talked about the cdu csu, about the social democrats and about the greens, but also note the far right afd, the far left the linker, and the liberal conservatives, the fdp. now, nobody will work in coalition with the afd, but all the other party matter. that is because german governments are always coalitions. this is how it works. are you ready? ok, here we
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go. germans cast two votes. one for a local mp, one for a political party. at least 598 members are elected by these two votes. then half of the bundestag is made up of local mps, half are elected from party lists, based on the percentage of the overall vote that the parties received. then the bundestag is set, and coalition talks begin. now, these collections in germany have all sorts of funny names, traffic light, jamaica, kiwi. they all refer to the different colours of the parties. and eventually, a coalition emerges which has over 50% of mps. that coalition then chooses chancellor. that process, as you can imagine, will take a while. last time it took months, five months. but when the coalition is settled, germany will have a new chancellor. a new government. in the new direction. that all matters for a range of reasons. here are three.
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germany most likely will continue to be the single most politically stable element in the european union and the single biggest economic power in the european union. that is why germany is going to remain important and probably grow in importance. the important and probably grow in importance-— important and probably grow in im ortance. , ., ,., , importance. the first reason this election matters _ importance. the first reason this election matters is _ importance. the first reason this election matters is germany's i importance. the first reason this i election matters is germany's role in the eu. jean—claudejuncker is the former president of the european commission, and he argues that angela merkel has helped set germany's path on this issue. she develo ed germany's path on this issue. she developed a _ germany's path on this issue. sue developed a kind of sense of germany's path on this issue. si.e developed a kind of sense of the world, european feeling. after angela merkel, there will be no other german chancellor not being pro—european. other german chancellor not being pro-european-_ pro-european. maybe, but that doesnt pro-european. maybe, but that doesn't mean _ pro-european. maybe, but that doesn't mean germany's - pro-european. maybe, but that i doesn't mean germany's approach to the eu is set in stone, and as with many elements of this election, germany and the eu is about the new
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leader, but it is also about the leader, but it is also about the leader who is leaving. because take the current european commission president ursula von der leyen. for many years, she served as a minister in angela merkel�*s cabinet. as politico writes, ursula von der leyenis politico writes, ursula von der leyen is losing more than a close ally, she is also losing a political mentor and someone who backs her evenin mentor and someone who backs her even in tough times. once again, we come back to borisjohnson's description of angela merkel being a guide during a pandemic, and that is true that the european union too. the new chancellor will need to decide what kind of guide he or she wants to be on issues for the eu like defence, climate, and monetary policy. big decisions on all await. so that is one reason why the election matters. he is a second. take a look at this chart. germany, seen here in red, remains by far the biggest co2 emitter in the european union. critics of angela merkel said germany has not done enough to phase out coal, and climate change is now
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definitely a key electoral issue. especially the younger voters. hooter especially the younger voters. now we have to stand _ especially the younger voters. now we have to stand up _ especially the younger voters. him we have to stand up and say, especially the younger voters. time" we have to stand up and say, ok, stop driving cars. stop flying to holiday, because we need to reduce the emissions, which is right. but we should have also already done this like 50 years ago, notjust now. this like 50 years ago, not 'ust now. ., ., now. the new government will now decide how — now. the new government will now decide how germany _ now. the new government will now decide how germany takes - now. the new government will now decide how germany takes on i now. the new government will now i decide how germany takes on climate change, and then my third reason this election matters is that germany is working out how it fits into the world. this week my colleague hugh schofield wrote how the french are pushing the germans to get over the 20th century complexes and act like the power they really are. the issue has been far from visible in the televised leadership debates. the three main candidates have met to debate several times, candidates have met to debate severaltimes, issues candidates have met to debate several times, issues like climate change, taxation and coronavirus vaccines have come up, but broader questions about germany's place in the world have not. and it didn't is a german correspondent based in london. she noted, another debate without a word on final defence
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policy. a whole country still in denial of its role as a global player and the responsibility that comes with it. that responsibility, though, is perhaps a well understood outside of germany. joe biden acknowledge as much when bidding farewell to angela merkel. thank you for s-eeakin farewell to angela merkel. thank you for speaking out _ farewell to angela merkel. thank you for speaking out the _ farewell to angela merkel. thank you for speaking out the what _ farewell to angela merkel. thank you for speaking out the what is - farewell to angela merkel. thank you for speaking out the what is right i for speaking out the what is right and the never failing to defend human dignity. i want to thank you for your continued support, for the long—standing goal of europe whole, free and at peace. long-standing goal of europe whole, free and at peace.— free and at peace. perhaps it is the nature of all— free and at peace. perhaps it is the nature of all elections _ free and at peace. perhaps it is the nature of all elections but - free and at peace. perhaps it is the nature of all elections but foreign l nature of all elections but foreign policy takes a backseat, but behind the urgency of domestic politics, a great unresolved question remains. what kind of global power does germany want to be? that is why, once the voting has happened, the collision has been agreed and the chancellor has been chosen, germany's next step matters for all of us. that is why i'll be watching.
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hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. we've got to talk a lot about sport. not the ryder cup! do we've got to talk a lot about sport. not the ryder cup!— not the ryder cup! do not like the r der not the ryder cup! do not like the ryder cup? _ not the ryder cup! do not like the ryder cup? i _ not the ryder cup! do not like the ryder cup? i quite _ not the ryder cup! do not like the ryder cup? i quite like _ not the ryder cup! do not like the ryder cup? i quite like it, - not the ryder cup! do not like the ryder cup? i quite like it, but i not the ryder cup! do not like the ryder cup? i quite like it, but not| ryder cup? i quite like it, but not a lot. ryder cup? i quite like it, but not a lot- don't _ ryder cup? i quite like it, but not a lot. don't you _ ryder cup? i quite like it, but not a lot. don't you just _ ryder cup? i quite like it, but not a lot. don't you just like - ryder cup? i quite like it, but not a lot. don't you just like really i a lot. don't you 'ust like really big sporting — a lot. don't youjust like really big sporting occasions? - a lot. don't youjust like really big sporting occasions? i i a lot. don't youjust like really big sporting occasions? i am i a lot. don't you just like really l big sporting occasions? i am not a lot. don't you just like really i big sporting occasions? i am not a massive football fan but any big football match, i would watch. you know, like, the olympics or whatever. anything big. tonto whatever. anything big. two continents _ whatever. anything big. two continents colliding, - whatever. anything big. tim continents colliding, you know, the fans, the passion and the history... i mean, if europe need theatre, they will need a miracle beyond all miracles now to rescue this. but it is another day, 20 points to play for. , , ._ ., is another day, 20 points to play for. , , ., ., for. only the first day out of three. for. only the first day out of three- we — for. only the first day out of three. we will _ for. only the first day out of three. we will see - for. only the first day out of three. we will see some i for. only the first day out of- three. we will see some ridiculous shots coming up in a moment, sojust watch this. after this record opening day, the usa leads europe at the ryder cup. the contrast between the teams couldn't have been more stark, with a0,000 americans
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roaring on the home side at whistling straits. their players rose to the occasion, summed up by the wizardry here ofjordan speith. down a cliff of grass, he magics the balll up onto the green, running down towards lake michigan, to get an idea of how good the shot is. that's how good! and while they had trickery they also had power, bryson de chambeau hitting a monster tee shot on the 5th hole — a whopping a17 yards, thats not far off a quarter of a mile, while in contrast european players like rory mclroy had a miserable day and he will now sit out the first session today, for the first time at a ryder cup. what were you saying, naga? in contrast to that, european players like rory michael rodd, he had a miserable day. he will be setting up the first session today. it is miserable day. he will be setting up the first session today.— the first session today. it is not a aood the first session today. it is not a good start- _ the first session today. it is not a good start- but — the first session today. it is not a good start. but there _ the first session today. it is not a good start. but there is - the first session today. it is not a good start. but there is still- the first session today. it is not a good start. but there is still a i the first session today. it is not a good start. but there is still a loti good start. but there is still a lot to play for. my team played well today. you know, just a few kinds of momentum, the output that can go in, you know, you need a bit of momentum, to go against us. hopefully, i think the last couple of matches there when it was really, really tired, the boys came true ——
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came through and it certainly felt like we couldn't, those two halves at the last and were crucial. terrell in particular, the birdie at the last, very important in those situations. the last, very important in those situations-— situations. the american captain sa ine situations. the american captain saying that _ situations. the american captain saying that complacency - situations. the american captain saying that complacency is i situations. the american captain saying that complacency is now. situations. the american captain i saying that complacency is now the biggest danger for them, saying that complacency is now the biggest dangerfor them, because if they think they are there across the line, they are not.— they think they are there across the line, they are not. momentum, those last few holes. _ line, they are not. momentum, those last few holes, with _ line, they are not. momentum, those last few holes, with europe _ line, they are not. momentum, those last few holes, with europe coming i last few holes, with europe coming back, it is about momentum. they will be encouraged by that.- will be encouraged by that. true. and the gap _ will be encouraged by that. true. and the gap going _ will be encouraged by that. true. and the gap going into _ will be encouraged by that. true. and the gap going into the - will be encouraged by that. true. and the gap going into the final i will be encouraged by that. true. and the gap going into the final day of that miracle at a diner was four shots. —— miracle at medina. it's the biggest fight in britain, in more than three years tonight, as anthonyjoshua, takes on the ukranian, oleksandr usyk, in their world heavy weight showdown, in front of 67,000 fans, at the tottenham hotspur stadium. joshua puts his four heavyweight belts, and his reputation on the line. he still has ambitions to become the undisputed world heavyweight champion, but defeat would wreck those hopes, as ade adedoyin reports.
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no trash talking or tantrums, but big—time boxing is back. on saturday, anthony joshua will aim to produce a punch—perfect performance in the biggest stadium fight in the uk since the pandemic. i'm feeling happy, i'm feeling blessed. what an opportunity this is. i'm one of the lucky ones, i get to go out there and perform. it is difficult, don't get me wrong, it comes with a lot of sacrifice, but as long as you apply yourself, you shouldn't have, you know, not too much to worry about. you can't predict the outcome, but leading up to it, you should be confident. so if he's the leading man in the show, what of his co—star, oleksandr usyk? happy to play the joker, he turned up to thursday's press conference dressed in a suit inspired by the movie character — eccentric and zany, but behind the smiles, a fierce and fiery competitor. likejoshua, he's a gold medallist from london 2012, and the former undisputed cruiserweight champion of the world. usyk is blessed with great footwork and hand eye co—ordination, though he's not the only one who can do that. joshua was nearly 20 pounds heavier at yesterday's weigh—in, but who would that favour? aj needs to exploit him
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as a new heavyweight, he needs to use his size and strength and put it on him early, in my opinion, to get the job done, because usyk is so good, he's so technically proficient. i've got a] to force the stoppage or knock him out, otherwise we could have an upset on the cards. there's little margin for error for anthonyjoshua. lose, and it's notjust his titles gone, but also a lucrative unification bout. ade adedoyin, bbc news, london. now, in the build—up to the lunchtime premier league clash between leaders chelsea and reigning champions manchester city, you'd be forgiven for thinking this is some kind of boxing match, with all the focus on the two managers and who's the best of the two great footballing minds, with chelsea's thomas tuchel, outwitting city's pep guardiola, in their last three meetings, but he says, that counts for nothing. not so long ago there were, like,
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a lot of voices that told me i don't know how to be pep, so... anyway, it's not between me and him. we don't play a match of tennis or a match of chess tomorrow, we play with our teams and the teams and clubs compete each other, against each other, on a very high level. unbelieveable, and it will take time to sink in. the words of the warwickshire, captain after they became county cricket champions for the first time in nine years. they needed to beat somerset to pip lancashire to the title and liam norwell claimed the final wicket at edgbaston, to ensure victory by 118 runs. so that wrapped up the bears' first county championship title since 2012. keep an eye on the weather forecast in sochi, russia today. qualifying for the grand prix there is due to take place but the rain is looking so bad that the sport's governing body, the fia, has made contingency plans for it to be held tomorrow morning. whenever it's held it will be irrelevant for formula 1 championship leader max verstappen. the dutchman will start sunday's
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race from the back of the grid after being penalised for using too many engines, in his red bull car this season. valtteri bottas was quickest in friday practice, ahead of his mercedes team—mate lewis hamilton. qualifying is due to get under way at 1:00. andy murray's impressive run at the moselle open is over after being knocked out in the quarter—finals. murray is now ranked 113th in the world and was a wild card at the event. he did manage to force a first—set tie—break against poland's hubert hurkacz. but he lost in straight sets to the top seed. afterwards he said he was happier with his consistency, but added he'll be more motivated if he can get nearer to the top of the rankings again. us open champion emma raducanu has split with the coach who helped guide her to a first major title earlier this month. andrew richardson was hired for the summer tournaments in the united states which ended with that amazing win in new york. 18—year—old raducanu became the first british woman to win a grand slam for aa years and the first qualifier to win a major, too. yesterday she was playing with royalty, the duchess of cambridge, making a guest
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appearance at an lta event to mark her achievement. i still feel like i'm the same person that i was three or four weeks ago but some things have changed in my schedule and i'm just adjusting to it right now but i'm having a lot of fun and enjoying it full up such an inspiration to so many teenagers. she it full up such an inspiration to so many teenagers— it full up such an inspiration to so many teenagers. she said she was more nervous _ many teenagers. she said she was more nervous about _ many teenagers. she said she was more nervous about that. - many teenagers. she said she was more nervous about that. ella i more nervous about that. ella mccauley attention was on her because it was her homecoming party. talking about the pressure. i love the pressure we put on matt in the morning. here he is, behind us. here
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he is. over here.— he is. over here. popping up all over the place! _ he is. over here. popping up all over the place! how _ he is. over here. popping up all over the place! how quickly i he is. over here. popping up all over the place! how quickly did | he is. over here. popping up all. over the place! how quickly did you have to dash _ over the place! how quickly did you have to dash to _ over the place! how quickly did you have to dash to find _ over the place! how quickly did you have to dash to find out _ over the place! how quickly did you have to dash to find out what i have to dash to find out what the weather was going to be like in sochi? l, �* weather was going to be like in sochi? a, �* a, , ~' a, sochi? i haven't moved but i know all about it- _ sochi? i haven't moved but i know all about it. a — sochi? i haven't moved but i know all about it. a disturbed _ sochi? i haven't moved but i know all about it. a disturbed eastern i all about it. a disturbed eastern black sea over the next 2a hours but the impact the rain can have, potential for flooding and that is why it has been postponed until tomorrow for the qualifying... potentially? it's not confirmed? i don't know, matt might know more than me. _ don't know, matt might know more than me. he — don't know, matt might know more than me, he usually does. i will stick to the _ than me, he usually does. i will stick to the weather. _ than me, he usually does. i will stick to the weather. i - than me, he usually does. i will stick to the weather. i will - than me, he usually does. i will stick to the weather. i will offerl stick to the weather. i will offer the compromise. _ stick to the weather. i will offer the compromise. if _ stick to the weather. i will offer the compromise. if it _ stick to the weather. i will offer the compromise. if it is - stick to the weather. i will offer i the compromise. if it is postponed to tomorrow morning, is that our time? works out perfect for the ryder cup. so it doesn't interfere with ryder cup. you don't have to worry! hopefully the european players won't
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be hoping foray into disturbed things. a bit of a misty start. one where the mist is nice and thin with the sunshine breaking through and this is a more typical, foggy on the tops and it is going to be plenty of cloud around with a chart showing the extent of the cloud with rain particular to the north of scotland. a few splashes of rain or drizzle in the west. very mild up there at the moment. the 10—17 the trees. as you go through the days, yes, still the chance of drizzle in the west. most will seize guys brighten with some sunny spells. parts of northern england around the murray coast and towards the very far south—east coast of england. these areas. maybe up to 2224 degrees through some parts of the midlands. a few more
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breaks in the cloud which averages around 12— breaks in the cloud which averages around i2— 15 degrees into the morning. and then tomorrow a bright day. one or two showers with the exception for northern ireland. wet and windy. the rain springing into western scotland to the end of the afternoon. after you both. matt, thank you so much. tell you what, the director is moving you all over the place! never doubt how much _ moving you all over the place! never doubt how much matt _ moving you all over the place! never doubt how much matt knows. - now it's time for newswatch with samira ahmed. hello and welcome to newswatch with me samira ahmed. does bbc news interviewing members of the taliban risk normalising their views? lyse doucet speaks to us from afghanistan about dealing with the taliban and how safe she feels reporting from
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there. first, borisjohnson went to there. first, borisjohnson went to the united states this week and so did the bbc�*s political editor laura kuenssberg. travelling is part of the westminster lobby on board the prime minister's plane where he personally reefed the journalists. on arrival in new york she spoke to him one—on—one asking him about the impact of energy price rises back home. if impact of energy price rises back home. , ., impact of energy price rises back home. i” impact of energy price rises back home. ,, ., ., home. if you look at our ten point lan. .. home. if you look at our ten point plan- -- it — home. if you look at our ten point plan... it really— home. if you look at our ten point plan... it really does... _ home. if you look at our ten point plan... it really does... forgive i plan... it really does... forgive me, plan... it really does... forgive me. prime _ plan... it really does... forgive me, prime minister, _ plan... it really does... forgive me, prime minister, i- plan... it really does... forgive me, prime minister, i think- plan... it really does... forgive me, prime minister, i think atl plan... it really does... forgive i me, prime minister, i think at the moment, — me, prime minister, i think at the moment, people would like to know how they're going to put food on the table in _ how they're going to put food on the table in the — how they're going to put food on the table in the next weeks and months rather— table in the next weeks and months rather than — table in the next weeks and months rather than a ten point plan. gn rather than a ten point plan. on that, ifi rather than a ten point plan. that, if i may, rather than a ten point plan. qt that, if i may, ifi rather than a ten point plan. qt that, if i may, if i may, i don't believe people will be short of food. .. . believe people will be short of food. ., ., , food. sandra hickman posed this ruestion. andrew nash also got in touch with
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us with a concern about laura kuenssberg's a line of questioning with the prime minister. truth? kuenssberg's a line of questioning with the prime minister.— kuenssberg's a line of questioning with the prime minister. why did she travel all the — with the prime minister. why did she travel all the way _ with the prime minister. why did she travel all the way across _ with the prime minister. why did she travel all the way across the - travel all the way across the atlantic to new york to ask him things that could have been dealt with by a minister back at home? shouldn't the bbc be doing this a lot better? ~ ., r' �* �* shouldn't the bbc be doing this a lot better? ~ . w �* �* , lot better? well, we asked bbc news for a reaponse _ lot better? well, we asked bbc news for a response on _ lot better? well, we asked bbc news for a response on this _ lot better? well, we asked bbc news for a response on this and _ lot better? well, we asked bbc news for a response on this and they - lot better? well, we asked bbc news for a response on this and they told l for a response on this and they told us... those problems with energy costs and other supply issues have dominated much of the week's news bulletins, but some viewers felt the bbc was making too much of the problems and doing real damage by doing so. sandra moran was one of them.
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monday saw the first major expansion of the london underground this century with the opening of two new stations. david walker saw the news on his phone and e—mails. now, the taliban addressed world
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leaders at the un general assembly. it seems unlikely to happen is no nation has formally recognised them as afghanistan's new government, however, the taliban are very much in power in the country and that presents a challenge to journalists working there. if they deal with the taliban and interview them, as normal politicians, did they risk legitimising terrorist? that's the concern of... well, the bbc�*s lyse doucet has received much praise from knew what dom mack newswatch was about her reporting. she spoke among others to a founding member of the taliban. she has been reporting from afghanistan on and off since 1988 and recently posted this photograph
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of her at work as soviet troops left the country in 1989. i'm joined now by our chief international correspondent lyse doucet in kabul. we have just shown a photograph of you reporting from afghanistan but in 1989. what was it like working there then? in1989. what was it like working there then?— in 1989. what was it like working there then? ~ ., , ., , there then? well, of course it was such a different _ there then? well, of course it was such a different time _ there then? well, of course it was such a different time at _ there then? well, of course it was such a different time at a - there then? well, of course it was such a different time at a very - there then? well, of course it was i such a different time at a very same place. those were the last days of the cold war, the battles between the cold war, the battles between the two big superpowers, the united states and the then soviet union and afghanistan found itself caught in the middle. i rememberso afghanistan found itself caught in the middle. i remember so vividly at that time how afghans would keep turning to me when they knew the last soviet soldier had left in 1999 and said do you think things will get better? what you think will happen next? remember that was a time when there was no social media, hardly any media at all in afghanistan. only three international telephone lines. out
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of afghanistan. they look to people like me to somehow give them a sense, an inkling. so it is breathtaking to think that this is a country which has managed to live through, and so many have died. afghans have still been asking me, is it going to get better? with every turning of the pagerjust seems to get worst. you every turning of the pager 'ust seems to get worst.�* seems to get worst. you have interviewed — seems to get worst. you have interviewed members - seems to get worst. you have interviewed members of- seems to get worst. you have interviewed members of the l seems to get worst. you have - interviewed members of the taliban to your recent podcast series. do you worry about people like that on air? that putting people like that on air? irate air? that putting people like that on air? ~ , air? that putting people like that onair?~ , , ., ., air? that putting people like that onair? , , ., ., ., on air? we put people on air all the time, as on air? we put people on air all the time. as you _ on air? we put people on air all the time, as you know, _ on air? we put people on air all the time, as you know, to _ on air? we put people on air all the time, as you know, to try _ on air? we put people on air all the time, as you know, to try to, - on air? we put people on air all the time, as you know, to try to, at - on air? we put people on air all the time, as you know, to try to, at to l time, as you know, to try to, at to use our expression, all sides of the story. we all have to understand, most of all afghans, who the taliban are, what their ideas are, again, have they really changed? it is true that leading members of the taliban, particularly earlier on what was the military wing of this movement which
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of course is now cabinet or government if you like, in islamic emirates, ahn —— are on the un nations and us sanctions list. we don't have much to do with them and they don't want to talk to western media, and of course, one of the ways definitely in which the taliban have changed is they're much more savvy about the media. remember this was a movement in the 1990s which smashed television sets, smashed cameras, didn't want any images and now they've got their own social media units, whenever i see taliban leaders, one of the first things i do is ask them to follow me on twitter. i've interviewed someone just yesterday and he said to me will you, why don't you take a photograph of me, will you put our interview on twitter? so they have a new language, a new way of communicating. ihla new language, a new way of communicating.— new language, a new way of communicating. no other country currently recognises _ communicating. no other country currently recognises the - communicating. no other country currently recognises the taliban l currently recognises the taliban government. many bbc viewers are concerned that the bbc�*s normalising
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their views by giving them airtime. what would you say? you their views by giving them airtime. what would you say?— their views by giving them airtime. what would you say? you know, this word "normal". _ what would you say? you know, this word "normal", there _ what would you say? you know, this word "normal", there is _ what would you say? you know, this word "normal", there is nothing - word "normal", there is nothing really normal about afghanistan right now, but whether we like it or not, asjournalists, we have to continue to cover what is happening in afghanistan. afghan journalists are covering it, afghan media, international media, have to keep an eye on the promises of the taliban, what they're doing on the ground. this is notjust an afghan story, it is our story and if it is our story we have to cover it too. can is our story and if it is our story we have to cover it too.- is our story and if it is our story we have to cover it too. can i ask how far you _ we have to cover it too. can i ask how far you know _ we have to cover it too. can i ask how far you know whether - we have to cover it too. can i ask how far you know whether local l how far you know whether local afghan journalists are still able to report and work?— afghan journalists are still able to report and work? well, many have left or are — report and work? well, many have left or are trying — report and work? well, many have left or are trying to _ report and work? well, many have left or are trying to leave. - report and work? well, many have left or are trying to leave. some i left or are trying to leave. some have had direct threats. i continue to meet them. last week i spent time with one afghan journalist who had said to me a month ago, he said, i am going to stay in afghanistan even though he saw most of his colleagues
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leaving or trying to leave. he said do you think i am stupid? he said i want to be here. and there are still journalists here, male and female, who say they want to be here, this is another turn of history.- is another turn of history. lyse, ou is another turn of history. lyse, you have _ is another turn of history. lyse, you have been _ is another turn of history. lyse, you have been in _ is another turn of history. lyse, you have been in kabul, - is another turn of history. lyse, you have been in kabul, what i is another turn of history. lyse, i you have been in kabul, what have you have been in kabul, what have you been able to report on what the new media savvy taliban are doing away from the cameras in the rest of the country?— the country? this is a time when it has become _ the country? this is a time when it has become a _ the country? this is a time when it has become a lot _ the country? this is a time when it has become a lot easier— the country? this is a time when it has become a lot easier to - the country? this is a time when it has become a lot easier to travel l has become a lot easier to travel outside of kabul. it is a lot easier in many ways to work in kabul. the streets are calmer, the roads are open, they are bad roads, potholes, oil —— some of them are almost not navigable. but you can go to many provinces now. i have been focusing on couple but many colleagues have gone to the provinces, many are heading out now or have just come back was not the roads are safer and they can move it so people are feeling now, afghans and non— afghans, now is the time to travel a
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bit more. because the future still remains deeply uncertain. i bit more. because the future still remains deeply uncertain.- bit more. because the future still remains deeply uncertain. i think it is fair to say _ remains deeply uncertain. i think it is fair to say that _ remains deeply uncertain. i think it is fair to say that newswatch - remains deeply uncertain. i think it is fair to say that newswatch you i is fair to say that newswatch you is, are particularly concerned about the safety of journalists and particularly of women journalists like yourself. can i ask how you feel personally about staying up there? ., ., ., there? you have to make calculations. _ there? you have to make calculations. you - there? you have to make calculations. you have i there? you have to make calculations. you have to | there? you have to make i calculations. you have to be cautious. we never take security lightly. you have to basically draw on your resources, draw on what you know, draw on past experience, talk to a lot of people stop most of all talk to afghans, and take calculated risks. there is always going to be a risks. there is always going to be a risk when the taliban took over in power. in the same way there was a risk when the last soviet soldier left in 1989 when i was here and everyone predicted dire consequences, said to me, you are mad to stay in kabul, and nothing happened. they were rocket attacks but it was relatively, relatively
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safe. it certainly didn't collapse, it didn't do that until a few years that i was here in 1992 when again there was another training page and concerns about really chaotic and very risky situation. it wasn't at the moment and it became later. similarly in this time there was a concern that kabul could descend into absolute chaos. it didn't. and we are still here. a lot of journalists have come and gone so you make these decisions, you do what you can to prepare, you hope for the best and you prepare for the worst. and since i'm talking to you, i think i'd love to be able to say notjust on my behalf, of the cameraman robbie wright, everyone who is here to for many weeks, we were very touched that so many of our viewers sent us messages on e—mail or on social media and they were worried about our safety so i think i would like to use this opportunity to thank everyone for their concern and their care. lyse
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doucet, their concern and their care. lyse doucet. thank — their concern and their care. lyse doucet, thank you. _ their concern and their care. lyse doucet, thank you. take - their concern and their care. lyse doucet, thank you. take you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions about what you see or hear on bbc news, on tv, radio, online and social media, e—mail... oryou can radio, online and social media, e—mail... or you can find us on twitter... you can call us on... and do have a look at our website for previous interviews. that's all from us. we will be packed to hear your thoughts about bbc new coverage again next week. goodbye. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today... queues at petrol stations as the government considers making it easier for foreign lorry drivers to work in the uk.
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we ask the motorist to be sensible, don't alteryour refuelling patterns. there's plenty of fuel around and people shouldn't panic buy. the temporary plans are being drawn up after a shortage of hauliers has caused major disruption to deliveries of fuel, food and other goods. hundreds pay tribute to murdered primary school teacher sabina nessa at a candle—lit vigil. words cannot describe how we are feeling. this feels like we're stuck in a bad dream and cannot get out of it. our world is shattered. team europe look to fight back in golf�*s ryder cup after being spellbound by spieth and american magic, as the usa open up a record 6—2 opening day lead at whistling straits. we hit 25 degrees yesterday in parts of southern england, and whilst the warmth continues for many this weekend, there are changes ahead. i'll have the full details here on breakfast.
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good morning. it's saturday 25th september. our top story: a temporary visa scheme allowing foreign lorry drivers to work in the uk could be introduced to ease the current problem with fuel deliveries. a shortage of uk tanker drivers has caused major disruption at petrol stations, leading to long queues and some closures. our transport correspondent, caroline davies, reports. chicken, milkshakes, now petrol. a shortage of lorry drivers continues to bite across the uk, and as the problem grows, there is more pressure on the government to make changes. bp reported they were having trouble getting their petrol to some pumps. there is enough fuel, just not enough drivers to take it to the petrol stations. although the problem only affected a small number of sites, people worried that they could run out, began to buy more than they normally would, leading to huge queues, despite the government reassurances. now one firm, eg group, who run 400 petrol stations, have said they are limiting each customer to £30 of fuel,
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excluding hgv drivers and emergency services. there is plenty of fuel and the issue is obviously the lead time of getting it from terminal to forecourt, and we ask the motorist to be sensible, do not alter your refuelling patterns. if you have a need to refuel, obviously go and get fuel, but bearing in mind that some of the sites, you might be in a queue, so keep a little bit of fuel in your vehicle in order to drive to an alternative site if you have to. but there's plenty of fuel around and people should not panic buy. until now, the government has resisted calls to provide temporary visas to eu drivers to help fill the gap as it has argued it does not want the uk at lorry drivers to drop out because they are undercut by cheaper eu labour. however, last night, the government said it was looking at temporary measures, though it stressed these would be strictly time—limited. although there is no official confirmation, this is thought to include temporary visas. there is increasing pressure
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to take some action, particularly to stop the crisis getting worse in the run—up to christmas. caroline davies, bbc news. let's find out more about the temporary measures being finalised by the government to address the shortage of hgv drivers. we're joined now by our political correspondent, lone wells. lone, has borisjohnson been forced into action? good morning. we were told there is no need to panic and there would be no need to panic and there would be no shortages, yet action has been forced. , ., , forced. yes, that is right, the government _ forced. yes, that is right, the government are _ forced. yes, that is right, the government are now- forced. yes, that is right, the i government are now considering a temporary visa scheme, essentially making it easier for foreign drivers to come and work in the uk, plans for this asset to be announced this weekend but we understand it would be a temporary scheme and there would be a cap on the number of drivers able to come, report suggesting it would be around 5000. ministers yet yesterday to thrash out their response to this crisis and it is fair to say there was disagreement in government itself
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about this, some arguing the whole point of post—brexit immigration rules was to tell companies they should not be reliant on foreign labour and concerns about the precedent this could set with other industries asking for temporary visas to fix shortages in their labour markets as well. also some ministers concerned this may not tackle the longer—term issue and that they would rather see the focus on training a domestic workforce as well. meanwhile government opposition and critics are already lining up to criticise them for making a u—turn on this, with angela rayner saying earlier that the government should have seen this coming. irate government should have seen this cominr. ~ ~' ., government should have seen this cominr. ~ ~ ., ., ., , ., government should have seen this cominr. ~ ,, ., ., ., , ., , coming. we know that lorry and hgv drivers are skilled _ coming. we know that lorry and hgv drivers are skilled workers _ coming. we know that lorry and hgv drivers are skilled workers and i coming. we know that lorry and hgv drivers are skilled workers and this l drivers are skilled workers and this was coming — drivers are skilled workers and this was coming down the tracks and the government has lots and anything to address— government has lots and anything to address it _ government has lots and anything to address it and we've now face this crisis _ address it and we've now face this crisis that— address it and we've now face this crisis that people are now worried about— crisis that people are now worried about whether on not they will have the fuel~ _ about whether on not they will have the fuel. but there is fuel there, it isjust — the fuel. but there is fuel there, it isjust that the fuel. but there is fuel there, it is just that we need to the fuel. but there is fuel there, it isjust that we need to make sure
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that things — it isjust that we need to make sure that things calm down and those hgv drivers— that things calm down and those hgv drivers are _ that things calm down and those hgv drivers are there to deliver the goods— drivers are there to deliver the goods and services and supplies we need across the uk.— need across the uk. some of the government's — need across the uk. some of the government's critics _ need across the uk. some of the government's critics already i need across the uk. some of the. government's critics already lining up government's critics already lining up to say, we told you so, and the government are aware this move to introduce temporary visas would come with some political embarrassment, but are also aware that with the queues we have been seeing over the last couple of days, the shortages in food and fuel as well, it is becoming increasingly difficult for the government to not do anything. rank you very much. it is seven minutes past eight. it is seven minutes past eight. a book of condolence will be opened in south london this morning in memory of the 28—year—old primary school teacher sabina nessa, who was attacked and killed a week ago. hundreds of mourners gathered for an emotional candlelit vigil in kidbrooke last night. our reporter simonjones is there for us. simon, it looked like it was a huge
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event last night, a desperate need for people to get out and express what they are feeling. yes. for people to get out and express what they are feeling. yes, hundreds of --eole what they are feeling. yes, hundreds of people gathered _ what they are feeling. yes, hundreds of people gathered here _ what they are feeling. yes, hundreds of people gathered here yesterday i of people gathered here yesterday evening, during the past week, some people said they did not feel safe coming out onto the streets, but despite that, people wanted to be part of the community and that is when we heard from sabina's sister addressing the crowd here, she described her as beautiful, kind and caring, you really felt the emotion. but also a sense of anger that once again we are talking about violence against women and the safety of women. let's talk now to the deputy leader of greenwich council. tell us first of all, you spoke yesterday to the crowd, how was it and how was the crowd, how was it and how was the mood?— the mood? very moving and very emotional— the mood? very moving and very emotional and _ the mood? very moving and very emotional and incredibly - the mood? very moving and very i emotional and incredibly supportive. i was _ emotional and incredibly supportive. i was touched by how many people turned _ i was touched by how many people turned up — i was touched by how many people turned up and they laid flowers, they lit —
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turned up and they laid flowers, they lit candles, it was very moving and supportive and it was a wonderful feeling, and supportive and it was a wonderfulfeeling, because and supportive and it was a wonderful feeling, because we pull it together for a tragic moment, our community— it together for a tragic moment, our community is experiencing its right now _ community is experiencing its right now. we _ community is experiencing its right now. ~ ., ., ~' community is experiencing its right now. . . ., ~ ., community is experiencing its right now. ~ . ., ~ ., ., community is experiencing its right now. . ., ~ ., ., now. we are talking a lot about safety and _ now. we are talking a lot about safety and the _ now. we are talking a lot about safety and the safety _ now. we are talking a lot about safety and the safety of - now. we are talking a lot about| safety and the safety of women, now. we are talking a lot about i safety and the safety of women, as the council, what can you do for people in this area who say, given what has happened, they do not deal safe at all? has what has happened, they do not deal safe at all? �* , ., what has happened, they do not deal safe at all? ~ , ., . ., safe at all? as a council, we have integrated _ safe at all? as a council, we have integrated enforcement, - safe at all? as a council, we have integrated enforcement, so i safe at all? as a council, we have integrated enforcement, so we i safe at all? as a council, we have i integrated enforcement, so we work with police _ integrated enforcement, so we work with police and community safety, and in _ with police and community safety, and in the — with police and community safety, and in the immediate short—term, the police _ and in the immediate short—term, the police have _ and in the immediate short—term, the police have been here, the community safety— police have been here, the community safety team _ police have been here, the community safety team has been here and our council _ safety team has been here and our council colleagues have been on the ground _ council colleagues have been on the ground talking to a residence in hearing — ground talking to a residence in hearing from them and hearing closely, — hearing from them and hearing closely, working closely with them to find _ closely, working closely with them to find out — closely, working closely with them to find out what the immediate things— to find out what the immediate things are we can do. but it will not stop— things are we can do. but it will not stop there, it must work more long-term — not stop there, it must work more long—term and we must continue this conversation — long—term and we must continue this conversation is to make sure greenwich is a safe place, whether we are _ greenwich is a safe place, whether we are talking about here or across the borough, that is one of our
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number— the borough, that is one of our number one priorities. you talk about greenwich, _ number one priorities. you talk about greenwich, but - number one priorities. you talk about greenwich, but this i number one priorities. you talk about greenwich, but this has i about greenwich, but this has affected people across the country, that debate sadly once again about how safe women are. yes. that debate sadly once again about how safe women are.— that debate sadly once again about how safe women are. yes, the thing with safety. — how safe women are. yes, the thing with safety. a _ how safe women are. yes, the thing with safety, a set _ how safe women are. yes, the thing with safety, a set of— how safe women are. yes, the thing with safety, a set of things - how safe women are. yes, the thing with safety, a set of things have i how safe women are. yes, the thing with safety, a set of things have to i with safety, a set of things have to happen _ with safety, a set of things have to happen. first, the education of men and boys, _ happen. first, the education of men and boys, some of the speakers brought— and boys, some of the speakers brought that out last night and we in greenwich, we are doing a piece of work— in greenwich, we are doing a piece of work with— in greenwich, we are doing a piece of work with some schools that we have already started, and we also work _ have already started, and we also work with — have already started, and we also work with local businesses, we also work— work with local businesses, we also work with— work with local businesses, we also work with the health centre, who go into companies and businesses and talk about— into companies and businesses and talk about how to talk to women and things— talk about how to talk to women and things like _ talk about how to talk to women and things like that and behaviour. behaviour change is really important. it is a cultural shift, it will_ important. it is a cultural shift, it will take _ important. it is a cultural shift, it will take time, but work is going on. it will take time, but work is going on we're — it will take time, but work is going on. we're also looking at places of safety _ on. we're also looking at places of safety and — on. we're also looking at places of safety and some people have said they do— safety and some people have said they do not feel safe over here, a place _ they do not feel safe over here, a place over— they do not feel safe over here, a place over there with lots of overgrown bushes where they don't feel safe, _ overgrown bushes where they don't feel safe, so we are those conversations about places and
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education, and we are also doing work— education, and we are also doing work with— education, and we are also doing work with perpetrators too, escalating that work in the borough. we started — escalating that work in the borough. we started a while ago but will continue — we started a while ago but will continue to do that because it is really— continue to do that because it is really important.— continue to do that because it is really important. yesterday some ersonal really important. yesterday some personal safety — really important. yesterday some personal safety alarms _ really important. yesterday some personal safety alarms were i really important. yesterday some| personal safety alarms were being given out to the crowd and advice to people saying to stick to places where it is well lit. but we are again asking women to alter their behaviour rather than men. yes. again asking women to alter their behaviour rather than men. yes, it is controversial, _ behaviour rather than men. yes, it is controversial, and _ behaviour rather than men. yes, it is controversial, and first - behaviour rather than men. yes, it is controversial, and first i - behaviour rather than men. yes, it is controversial, and first i want i is controversial, and first i want to say— is controversial, and first i want to say something about the safety alarm _ to say something about the safety alarm the — to say something about the safety alarm. the community where very receptive — alarm. the community where very receptive about it and welcomed it and we _ receptive about it and welcomed it and we head on the ground level but they welcomed what we did as a councit — they welcomed what we did as a council. we don'tjust emit for women, — council. we don'tjust emit for women, men, anybody who lives in greenwich— women, men, anybody who lives in greenwich who wants a safety alarm, we give _ greenwich who wants a safety alarm, we give that — greenwich who wants a safety alarm, we give that out. but you are right, it does— we give that out. but you are right, it does not— we give that out. but you are right, it does not stop there, it is about changing — it does not stop there, it is about changing behaviour.— it does not stop there, it is about changing behaviour. thank you for talkin: to changing behaviour. thank you for talking to us- _ changing behaviour. thank you for talking to us. in _ changing behaviour. thank you for talking to us. in the _ changing behaviour. thank you for talking to us. in the short-term i talking to us. in the short—term
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there, but as we have heard, a long—term goal, to change of use in society, something that will not be achieved overnight and it may take a matter of years. achieved overnight and it may take a matter of years-— political parties in germany are campaigning for a final day, before voters elect a new chancellor to succeed angela merkel. our berlin correspondent, jenny hilljoins us now — this is a change of the guard, jenny. this is a change of the guard, jenn . , , ., , this is a change of the guard, jenn. ,, ., this is a change of the guard, jenn. ,, . , jenny. yes, germans are preparing for a new political— jenny. yes, germans are preparing for a new political era. _ jenny. yes, germans are preparing for a new political era. it _ jenny. yes, germans are preparing for a new political era. it is - jenny. yes, germans are preparing for a new political era. it is early i for a new political era. it is early here but i can already see the parties out and about handing out leaflets. they know every vote counts because it looks as though tomorrow's election will be a tight race between angela merkel�*s conservatives under the leadership of armin laschet and the democrats, who many germans say reminds them of angela merkel with his understated
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style and manners. in third place, the greens are not doing as well as they would hope, the climate change has been a huge election issue here. they are looking at their place. possible they will still end up in a government because unlike germany, britain —— unlike britain, germany is often run by a coalition. all manner of combinations are possible. we are looking at protracted negotiations. regardless of what happens tomorrow, it could be weeks or months before this country gets a new government and angela merkel stands aside for a new german chancellor. stands aside for a new german chancellor-— stands aside for a new german chancellor. , ., ,, , ., chancellor. new times. thank you, jenn . the design has been revealed for the platinumjubilee medal, which will be awarded to mark the queen's 70—year—reign next year. it features a portrait of the queen with a latin inscription and on the back is the royal crest. the medals will be awarded to living recipients of the victoria and george crosses,
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as well as members of the emergency and prison services, and the armed forces. that latter inscription, you said you did latin at school, naga. do note it means?— you did latin at school, naga. do note it means? between elizabeth, what was the _ note it means? between elizabeth, what was the other _ note it means? between elizabeth, what was the other thing _ note it means? between elizabeth, what was the other thing miss i note it means? between elizabeth, what was the other thing miss -- i note it means? between elizabeth, i what was the other thing miss -- the what was the other thing miss —— the queen elizabeth. thank you,... i don't know. queen elizabeth. thank you,... i don't know-— queen elizabeth. thank you,... i don't know. ., , _ don't know. no, it says by the grace of god, we — don't know. no, it says by the grace of god, we defend _ don't know. no, it says by the grace of god, we defend our— don't know. no, it says by the grace of god, we defend our faith. - don't know. no, it says by the grace of god, we defend our faith. it i don't know. no, it says by the grace of god, we defend our faith. it is i of god, we defend ourfaith. it is 14 minutes past eight. as we've been hearing this morning, the issue of delivering fuel supplies, caused by a shortage of tanker drivers, has led to long queues at petrol stations across the country. a number of garages have closed and one group — which owns 400 stations in the uk — has placed a cap on the amount of fuel customers can buy.
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our reporter, phil mccann, is at a forecourt in stockport this morning. still no fuel. no fuel at here -- no fuel here at _ still no fuel. no fuel at here -- no fuel here at all. _ still no fuel. no fuel at here -- no fuel here at all. they _ still no fuel. no fuel at here -- no fuel here at all. they weren't i fuel here at all. they weren't expecting it to run out until midday today, but such was the panic buying today, but such was the panic buying today, all of the pumps are covered with plastic bags labels. every now and again, we will have a car turning up, looking around, noticing there's no fuel and driving on, there's no fuel and driving on, there we go, dragging on through and trying to go and find the next petrol station. they normally sell 8000 litres of petrol a day and yesterday it was 28,000 litres, more than three times. so all the warnings you do not need to panic buy, clearly people did panic buy and yesterday they were told here they will not be able to get enough delivery for nine or ten days. normally, if they think they will need a delivery, they can get on in
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about 24 hours because of that —— and that is because of that shortage of tanker drivers. petrol station down the road does have petrol and yesterday when i was driving around, there were some queues but the petrol stations didn't seem that much busier. very important to mention this is not a shortage of fuel but a shortage of to deliver better fuel to places like this. it is scenes like this that the government wanted to avoid. headlines like this, panic at the pumps, from the newspaper stand over there, that the government wanted to avoid, which has pushed them to their decision that they will finalise over the weekend to relax those visa rules for foreign drivers. ., ., those visa rules for foreign drivers. ., ,, , ., ., ., those visa rules for foreign drivers. ., ,, ., ., , ., so what should motorists be doing? let's speak now to edmund king, who's president of the aa. good to have you winners on the programme this morning, what is your view on this? we programme this morning, what is your view on this?— view on this? we were in discussions with government _ view on this? we were in discussions with government ministers _ view on this? we were in discussions with government ministers last i view on this? we were in discussions with government ministers last nightj with government ministers last night and we talk to the major fuel
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companies and we can reiterate, there is not a problem with supply at the source. so there is plenty fuel at the source, but earlier in the week, there were some problems with the supply chain, as we know, due to the shortage of some lorry drivers. but that was only localised as a problem, and frankly, what has exacerbated it is people going out and filling up when they really don't need to, because if you think about it, 30 million cars out there, if they all have half a tank and rushed out to fill up the rest of the tank, the tank is about 60 litres, that will put a strain on the system. the good news is you can only really fill up once and then have got to use the fuel, so this should be a short—term thing. it is not like the fuel crisis in the past, when actually the supply was
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hit by strikes etc. once people have built up, they will not travel more than they normally travel, so the strain on the system should ease up in the next few days and one major oil company talking last night, they said they are still delivering. so if the garage is low on stocks, they estimated within 24 hours 48—hour is, it will be restocked. just emphasise to people, if you have half a tank of fuel, you probably do not need a full—time of fuel. who; not need a full-time of fuel. why are we hearing _ not need a full-time of fuel. why are we hearing that _ not need a full—time of fuel. why are we hearing that the government will bring in plans to improve the situation? you had this meeting and were talking yesterday evening, if it is only a 24—hour to 48—hour problem? it is only a 24-hour to 48-hour problem?— it is only a 24-hour to 48-hour roblem? , . , , problem? there is a wider issue, thou . h, problem? there is a wider issue, though. with _ problem? there is a wider issue, though, with lorry _ problem? there is a wider issue, though, with lorry drivers, i problem? there is a wider issue, though, with lorry drivers, hgv l though, with lorry drivers, hgv drivers, and we even know at the aa, we are looking at some recovery
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drivers, and the market is stretched. that is a broader issue thatis stretched. that is a broader issue that is affecting the supply chain, not just with that is affecting the supply chain, notjust with petrol and diesel, but for retail as well. so, yes, the government will be taking action, they have already freed up a number of driving tests for lorry drivers and they tell us they are going to be taking more action. haste and they tell us they are going to be taking more action.— and they tell us they are going to be taking more action. have you had any specifics — be taking more action. have you had any specifics miss _ be taking more action. have you had any specifics miss now, _ be taking more action. have you had any specifics miss now, they - be taking more action. have you had any specifics miss now, they said i any specifics miss now, they said announcements _ any specifics miss now, they said announcements would _ any specifics miss now, they said announcements would be - any specifics miss now, they said i announcements would be imminent. so possibly over the weekend. i think we will hear more detail on that. 0k, we will hear more detail on that. ok, president of the aa, edmund king, thank you for your time this morning. for your time this morning. the government is working on plans to improve the situation, including introducing a temporary visa scheme to make it easierforforeign lorry drivers to work in the uk.
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we're joined now by tony danker, director—general of the confederation of british industry. thanks forjoining us on breakfast this morning. shall we start with that visa scheme to get more foreign workers to come and drive our lorries? what you make of it? big relief, lorries? what you make of it? big relief. and — lorries? what you make of it? e: ; relief, and hopefully it will happen and the huge relief. we have been called for it for three months and could see it coming and more problems coming, so it is a shame government needed queues at the pumps to move, but move i hope they have. it will help. there are no perfect answers to these things, we have labour shortages notjust in hgv drivers, but across the economy, we have energy problems, and we need government to grip this with business and get ahead of them rather than behind them. we did that with the scientific community with the pandemic, working together and fast. this is very late and it has
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taken a crisis to force their hand, but i hope to follow through on what we are hearing because that would get us started again. has we are hearing because that would get us started again.— get us started again. has this affected your _ get us started again. has this affected your members? i get us started again. has this| affected your members? lorry get us started again. has this - affected your members? lorry driver issue is not — affected your members? lorry driver issue is not just _ affected your members? lorry driver issue is notjust about _ affected your members? lorry driver issue is notjust about fuel _ affected your members? lorry driver issue is not just about fuel but i issue is notjust about fuel but about every part of the economy and it is not also just about lorry drivers. we do not have skilled butchers, skilled welders, chefs, electrical engineers, so there are labour shortages across the economy and i think what we are saying to government is, look, do not please wait for another three months or until christmas for things to go wrong, let's get ahead of them. we learn thatjoan covid and we need to take action now and solve these things because, yes, the problem this morning we are focusing on is fuel all part of the economy are suffering from a pile of problems that are stopping us get the economy moving, so we must roll our sleeves and solve them. 50 moving, so we must roll our sleeves and solve them.— and solve them. so what is causing this? i know _ and solve them. so what is causing
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this? i know it's _ and solve them. so what is causing this? i know it's complicated i and solve them. so what is causing this? i know it's complicated and l this? i know it's complicated and things are interrelated, but what do you think is to blame here? we must recounise you think is to blame here? we must recognise that _ you think is to blame here? we must recognise that there _ you think is to blame here? we must recognise that there is _ you think is to blame here? we must recognise that there is just _ you think is to blame here? we must recognise that there isjust a - you think is to blame here? we must recognise that there isjust a huge i recognise that there is just a huge surge in global demand for everything having been huge collapse in the demand for everything. that is what people describe as the vichy recovery, everybody in the world —— v shaped recovery. they need local solutions. there is a little bit of brexit hangover and we have several thousand drivers go home that we wouldn't have wanted to go home and there is this bigger question of the immigration system, which is a complicated one, but the government have said that after brexit, we need an immigration sector that only lets in the skills we need. we are realising we need some skills in the short—term, not forever, but we must change our labour market over time. but hopefully this represents the government being more practical about, we need to solve some
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short—term problems, whilst we also work on a different pattern going forward. but work on a different pattern going forward. �* ~' ., work on a different pattern going forward. �* ~ ., ., forward. but we know the government have been looking _ forward. but we know the government have been looking to _ forward. but we know the government have been looking to change - forward. but we know the government have been looking to change the - forward. but we know the government have been looking to change the visa | have been looking to change the visa rules because as soon as they do this for lorry drivers now, they might have care home manager saying, we need urgently need staff, the nhs saying we urgently need nurses, and all of a sudden, you get more visas issued and we are back to the whole debate about immigration and whether brexit solves it. but debate about immigration and whether brexit solves it. elm debate about immigration and whether brexit solves it.— brexit solves it. but i do not think we need to _ brexit solves it. but i do not think we need to return _ brexit solves it. but i do not think we need to return to _ brexit solves it. but i do not think we need to return to that - brexit solves it. but i do not think we need to return to that debate | we need to return to that debate because everybody accepts that what we need to do is change our skills system, think about the structure of the workforce in these industries, build a pipeline of workers on good wages over time, but you cannot turn around when there are shortages, and then say, put up wages and it'll sort it. it will not, you cannot turn baggage handlers into overnight. over three to five years may be, but not overnight. the
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government has realised, if you need to run the economy and get it moving and growth going, you must be able to, on a temporary basis, affix and manage basis, bringing skills we need now, but turn around your industry and the education system and training system and say, in the long run, we will not keep doing this, we need to build new capabilities in britain. we welcome that. . ~ capabilities in britain. we welcome that. ., ~ , ., capabilities in britain. we welcome that. ., ~ ., capabilities in britain. we welcome that. ., ., ., , that. thank you for 'oining us. it is 25 minutes h that. thank you for 'oining us. it is 25 minutes past _ that. thank you forjoining us. it is 25 minutes past eight, - that. thank you forjoining us. it is 25 minutes past eight, 24 -- l is 25 minutes past eight, 2a —— eight. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. it is misty, two waterfront shots. one is with mist blake are in devon to the west of the country and to the east, a la good deal brighter. the sunshine trying to break through, the common theme being how mild it is. the red colours show
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temperatures above—average, but big changes ahead. the blue indicates low average temperatures, automobile arriving. at the moment, very mild, the exception being in aberdeenshire, three degrees. most places in temperatures higher than they should be by date, never mind vesting the morning. mist and fargo in the hills and the west, patches of rain and drizzle. —— mist and filed in the hills. skies are brighter. but central and eastern parts of the uk single sunshine. perhaps 2a degrees in parts of england and wales. plenty of card in place tonight, but the breeze picks up, the odd shower, most places dry and another mild night. —— plenty of cloud in place. mustn�*t chime
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tomorrow, but one or two showers. in northern ireland, heavy rain and gusty winds push their way in bringing change, but before it arrives, very warm day for many. thank you, matt. 26 and its past eight on saturday morning, thank you forjoining us. -- 26 morning, thank you forjoining us. —— 26 minutes past eight. 7,000 people in the uk are currently waiting for an organ transplant and last year, only around half that number managed to find a donor. 47—year—old mark piotr died suddenly from a brain bleed in 2017. his organs saved the lives of eight people. mark's wife, karen, joins us now. good morning. how are you? and good toda . pi good morning. how are you? and good today- pity i — good morning. how are you? and good today- pity i didn't— good morning. how are you? and good today. pity i didn't bring _ good morning. how are you? and good today. pity i didn't bring the _ today. pity i didn't bring the weather with me. tell today. pity i didn't bring the weather with me.— today. pity i didn't bring the weather with me. , ., ~ weather with me. tell us about mark. he was such — weather with me. tell us about mark. he was such an _ weather with me. tell us about mark. he was such an amazing, _ weather with me. tell us about mark. he was such an amazing, joyful, - weather with me. tell us about mark. he was such an amazing, joyful, fulli he was such an amazing, joyful, full of life, caring, compassionate man.
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tell us what happened when this brain bleed occurred. he tell us what happened when this brain bleed occurred.— tell us what happened when this brain bleed occurred. he had had a few headaches, _ brain bleed occurred. he had had a few headaches, one _ brain bleed occurred. he had had a few headaches, one particular- brain bleed occurred. he had had a - few headaches, one particular monkey collapse, did not wake up, we got rushed to our local hospital, they tried to relieve the pressure but unfortunately he never woke up from the coma. —— particular morning he collapsed. the coma. -- particular morning he collased. ., ,. ,, the coma. -- particular morning he collased. ., h ,, c, c, collapsed. had un he discussed organ donation before _ collapsed. had un he discussed organ donation before -- _ collapsed. had un he discussed organ donation before -- had _ collapsed. had un he discussed organ donation before -- had you _ collapsed. had un he discussed organ donation before -- had you and - collapsed. had un he discussed organ donation before -- had you and he - donation before —— had you and he discussed organ donation before this happened? we discussed organ donation before this ha ened? ~ ., , ., discussed organ donation before this ha--ened? ~ ., , ., , happened? we regularly gave blood, and he said anything _ happened? we regularly gave blood, and he said anything that _ happened? we regularly gave blood, and he said anything that happens i happened? we regularly gave blood, and he said anything that happens toj and he said anything that happens to me, they can have the lot. i drew on that experience and i knew what he wanted. i was so happy to do that. it was something he had mentioned on his driving licence or told his doctor. 50 his driving licence or told his doctor. , .,
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his driving licence or told his doctor, , ., ., his driving licence or told his doctor. , ., ., ., doctor. so you are dealing with losina doctor. so you are dealing with losing him _ doctor. so you are dealing with losing him and _ doctor. so you are dealing with losing him and that _ doctor. so you are dealing with losing him and that is - doctor. so you are dealing with losing him and that is a - doctor. so you are dealing with | losing him and that is a terrible thing, so sudden, but i guess you were told, look, he saved other people's lives. how much weight you told about those people he saved? you are given a nurse who tells you what the timeline for retrieval will be and there are tests that determine that his organs could save eight people. eight people! we determine that his organs could save eight people. eight people!— eight people. eight people! we told ou would eight people. eight people! we told you would ever _ eight people. eight people! we told you would ever meet _ eight people. eight people! we told you would ever meet them? - eight people. eight people! we told you would ever meet them? you i eight people. eight people! we told | you would ever meet them? you are encouraged — you would ever meet them? you are encouraged and _ you would ever meet them? you are encouraged and asked _ you would ever meet them? you are encouraged and asked if _ you would ever meet them? you are encouraged and asked if you - you would ever meet them? you are encouraged and asked if you would l encouraged and asked if you would like to hear from a encouraged and asked if you would like to hearfrom a recipient encouraged and asked if you would like to hear from a recipient and encouraged and asked if you would like to hearfrom a recipient and i never imagined i would meet them. so there is one moment, out of the blue, you kind of realise that you might know who has received one of mark's organs. talk us through what
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you discovered. i mark's organs. talk us through what you discovered.— you discovered. i had a letter from this man and _ you discovered. i had a letter from this man and he _ you discovered. i had a letter from this man and he appeared - you discovered. i had a letter from this man and he appeared on - you discovered. i had a letter from this man and he appeared on our. this man and he appeared on our local yorkshire look north, and i thought, his story is very similar to the story i have received from the letter. he to the story i have received from the letter-— to the story i have received from the letter. ., . the letter. he said he had received a liver, the letter. he said he had received a liver. that _ the letter. he said he had received a liver, that is _ the letter. he said he had received a liver, that is right, _ the letter. he said he had received a liver, that is right, and _ the letter. he said he had received a liver, that is right, and his - the letter. he said he had received a liver, that is right, and his life i a liver, that is right, and his life had been saved? and you are thinking... had been saved? and you are thinking- - -— had been saved? and you are thinkina... . , , ., ., thinking... that is similar to the information _ thinking... that is similar to the information in _ thinking... that is similar to the information in the _ thinking. .. that is similar to the information in the letter- thinking... that is similar to the information in the letter i i thinking... that is similar to the i information in the letter! received information in the letter i received and there he was on television. {line and there he was on television. one of mark's organs was donated to a man called peter mackay. look at the smile on your face! man called peter mackay. look at the smile on yourface! it man called peter mackay. look at the smile on your face!— smile on your face! it fills me with ride. one of mark's organs was donated to pete mckee, who was waiting for a liver transplant and joins us now. you are looking fit and well met is wonderful to see and what do you say to this lady? i wonderful to see and what do you say to this lady?— to this lady? i keep saying thank ou all to this lady? i keep saying thank you all the _ to this lady? i keep saying thank you all the time. _ to this lady? i keep saying thank you all the time. the _ to this lady? i keep saying thank you all the time. the gift - to this lady? i keep saying thank you all the time. the gift of- to this lady? i keep saying thank you all the time. the gift of life | you all the time. the gift of life that mark— you all the time. the gift of life that mark gave me is immeasurable,
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really~ _ that mark gave me is immeasurable, really~ you _ that mark gave me is immeasurable, really. you wake up after the operation _ really. you wake up after the operation and you realise you are alive _ operation and you realise you are alive again. — operation and you realise you are alive again, and it feels so much different— alive again, and it feels so much different as well, because when your liver starts _ different as well, because when your liver starts failing, your whole life fails — liver starts failing, your whole life fails around you. it takes so much _ life fails around you. it takes so much energy and so much of yourself sellmut— much energy and so much of yourself sell—out view. but then mark's liver came _ sell—out view. but then mark's liver came inside — sell—out view. but then mark's liver came inside me and we have this partnership now and he has given me so much _ partnership now and he has given me so much of— partnership now and he has given me so much of a — partnership now and he has given me so much of a lease of life, it is incredible _ so much of a lease of life, it is incredible.— incredible. what was the situation with ou? incredible. what was the situation with you? why — incredible. what was the situation with you? why was _ incredible. what was the situation with you? why was your _ incredible. what was the situation with you? why was your mother i incredible. what was the situation i with you? why was your mother not functioning? ! with you? why was your mother not functioning?— functioning? i had a genetic condition. _ functioning? i had a genetic condition, we _ functioning? i had a genetic condition, we have - functioning? i had a genetic l condition, we have something functioning? i had a genetic i condition, we have something in functioning? i had a genetic - condition, we have something in our liver that _ condition, we have something in our liver that is — condition, we have something in our liver that is produced in our liver and is _ liver that is produced in our liver and is sent— liver that is produced in our liver and is sent around body and fights infections, — and is sent around body and fights infections, and mine blocked up and normally, _ infections, and mine blocked up and normally. if— infections, and mine blocked up and normally, if someone has this, they can refer— normally, if someone has this, they can refer you — normally, if someone has this, they can refer you to a lung transplant and occasionally it will also affect
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the liver— and occasionally it will also affect the liver as well. it was my liver that— the liver as well. it was my liver that got— the liver as well. it was my liver that got damaged from that and i didnt— that got damaged from that and i didn't realise that until a lot later, — didn't realise that until a lot later, when you start getting the obvious— later, when you start getting the obvious symptoms of liver disease, i realised _ obvious symptoms of liver disease, i realised i_ obvious symptoms of liver disease, i realised i had this condition. it was from — realised i had this condition. it was from there, from diagnosis to transplant. — was from there, from diagnosis to transplant, that was about two and a half years _ transplant, that was about two and a half ears. ~ ., , ., ,, ., half years. apologies, i mark and meant to call— half years. apologies, i mark and meant to call you _ half years. apologies, i mark and meant to call you pete. _ half years. apologies, i mark and meant to call you pete. great i half years. apologies, i mark and meant to call you pete. great to l half years. apologies, i mark and l meant to call you pete. great to be seeing that a smile on your face this morning. but your smile is nothing compared with karen's smile, because watching you watching him on the screen there, just talking through it. the screen there, 'ust talking through rah the screen there, 'ust talking through hh the screen there, 'ust talking throuhhit.~ , . , , ~ through it. when icy recipients like pete there. — through it. when icy recipients like pete there, full _ through it. when icy recipients like pete there, full of _ through it. when icy recipients like pete there, full of light _ through it. when icy recipients like pete there, full of light and - through it. when icy recipients like pete there, full of light and joy, i pete there, full of light and joy, the sparkle in his eyes. i'm so proud know that knowing what mark wanted and honouring that wish, pete is testament to that. igrate wanted and honouring that wish, pete is testament to that.— is testament to that. we will show the moment _ is testament to that. we will show the moment you _
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is testament to that. we will show the moment you met _ is testament to that. we will show the moment you met pete, i is testament to that. we will show the moment you met pete, talk. is testament to that. we will show| the moment you met pete, talk us through what that was like the u. really emotional because at that point, we had exchanged photographs and talk, and then i got taken to the hospital, was stood outside the room and could see him looking out of the window, and my friend left me and went to the toilet and i'm stuck there, and i remember, you turned around and gave me a big hug and whispered in my ex, thank you. and we spent hours talking.— we spent hours talking. absolutely. good 'ob we spent hours talking. absolutely. good job they _ we spent hours talking. absolutely. good job they had _ we spent hours talking. absolutely. good job they had lots _ we spent hours talking. absolutely. good job they had lots of _ we spent hours talking. absolutely. good job they had lots of biscuits. l good job they had lots of biscuits. how important was it for you to know what mark was like? it how important was it for you to know what mark was like?— what mark was like? it wasn't the curiosity of _ what mark was like? it wasn't the curiosity of who _ what mark was like? it wasn't the curiosity of who the _ what mark was like? it wasn't the curiosity of who the donor - what mark was like? it wasn't the curiosity of who the donor was, . what mark was like? it wasn't the i curiosity of who the donor was, but rather— curiosity of who the donor was, but rather wanting to acknowledge what they had _ rather wanting to acknowledge what they had done and it wasn't for nothing — they had done and it wasn't for nothing i_ they had done and it wasn't for nothing. i wanted to let them know what it _ nothing. i wanted to let them know what it meant for me to have this transplant — what it meant for me to have this transplant and to know that they saved _ transplant and to know that they saved nry— transplant and to know that they saved my life, iwould transplant and to know that they saved my life, i would have died if i didn't— saved my life, i would have died if i didn't have the transplant and a
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friend _ ididn't have the transplant and a friend was— i didn't have the transplant and a friend was going through the same situation _ friend was going through the same situation as me and unfortunately did not— situation as me and unfortunately did not get to that point where they had a _ did not get to that point where they had a transplant liver and they lost their life _ had a transplant liver and they lost their life. that brought it home to me even— their life. that brought it home to me even more about how important and valuable _ me even more about how important and valuable it— me even more about how important and valuable it was that i had this transplant. i was convinced to make sure i_ transplant. ! was convinced to make sure i wasn't— transplant. i was convinced to make sure i wasn't wasting it in a sense and try— sure i wasn't wasting it in a sense and try to — sure i wasn't wasting it in a sense and try to do _ sure i wasn't wasting it in a sense and try to do everything i can to prove _ and try to do everything i can to prove that— and try to do everything i can to prove that in some way, work very hard _ prove that in some way, work very hard and _ prove that in some way, work very hard and do — prove that in some way, work very hard and do what i can to support the donor— hard and do what i can to support the donor scheme. but it is kind ofm _ the donor scheme. but it is kind ofm i_ the donor scheme. but it is kind ofm i have _ the donor scheme. but it is kind of... i have lost track now. don't ou of... i have lost track now. don't you worry- _ of... i have lost track now. don't you worry- i— of... i have lost track now. don't you worry. i think _ of... i have lost track now. don't you worry. i think you _ of... i have lost track now. don't you worry. i think you have i of... i have lost track now. don't i you worry. i think you have answered all of our questions beautifully this morning and it is great for you to share your story. i'm sure you will inspire a lot of people to do the same as you as a family. talking is the key here, isn't it? so if the moment comes, you are totally aware. would you know? weekly we know
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everything about our loved ones, but do you know what they would want in that situation? tell your family what your organ donation decision is. pete is testament to the power of it, and another recipient is celebrating his second wedding anniversary today.— celebrating his second wedding anniversary today. fantastic. pete, sta well, anniversary today. fantastic. pete, stay well, karen, _ anniversary today. fantastic. pete, stay well, karen, so _ anniversary today. fantastic. pete, stay well, karen, so lovely - anniversary today. fantastic. pete, stay well, karen, so lovely to i anniversary today. fantastic. pete, stay well, karen, so lovely to see i stay well, karen, so lovely to see you as mates and thank you for joining us. i think you have brought the sun from yorkshire. it is 8:34am. today marks a year since 54—year—old sergeant matt ratana was shot and killed while on police duty at a custody centre in croydon. in the weeks following his death, his passion for rugby was one of the things that was often talked about. today, a special memorial is taking place at his local club in east grinstead. we're joined now by its vice chairman matt marriott.
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max, good morning to you. it's a poignant day, isn't it?— poignant day, isn't it? good morning- — poignant day, isn't it? good morning. yes, _ poignant day, isn't it? good morning. yes, it _ poignant day, isn't it? good morning. yes, it certainly . poignant day, isn't it? good| morning. yes, it certainly is. poignant day, isn't it? good i morning. yes, it certainly is. i hopeifs morning. yes, it certainly is. i hope it's going to be a great day, edgeley. i hope it's going to be a day full of smiles rather than tears. is day full of smiles rather than tears. , ., , , tears. is really interesting, we were just _ tears. is really interesting, we were just having _ tears. is really interesting, we were just having a _ tears. is really interesting, we l were just having a conversation they're remembering who was an organ donation who has brought life to other people and i think today, you will be remembering the joy that police are matt ratana brought to those around him as well. yes. those around him as well. yes, absolutely- _ those around him as well. yes, absolutely- i— those around him as well. yes, absolutely. i think _ those around him as well. yes, absolutely. i think this - those around him as well. yes, absolutely. i think this year i those around him as well. yes, j absolutely. i think this year has been, you know, a year ago today that the president of the club and i gathered in my kitchen amongst floods of tears, as we heard the news, and it has been a tough, tough yearfor news, and it has been a tough, tough year for others news, and it has been a tough, tough yearfor others a club news, and it has been a tough, tough year for others a club and i news, and it has been a tough, tough yearfor others a club and i think todayis yearfor others a club and i think today is the first game for our first team, playing ourfirst league game since he died and we are determined that today will be a
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celebration. matt would be delighted about today and we are determined to enjoy it to the full. what about today and we are determined to enjoy it to the full.— enjoy it to the full. what position did matt play. — enjoy it to the full. what position did matt play, what _ enjoy it to the full. what position did matt play, what kind - enjoy it to the full. what position did matt play, what kind of- enjoy it to the full. what position did matt play, what kind of team | did matt play, what kind of team make was he and what inspiration did he bring to the team when you were on the pitch?— he bring to the team when you were on the pitch? matt was our coach. he coached all — on the pitch? matt was our coach. he coached all our _ on the pitch? matt was our coach. he coached all our senior _ on the pitch? matt was our coach. he coached all our senior men, - on the pitch? matt was our coach. he coached all our senior men, but i on the pitch? matt was our coach. he coached all our senior men, but he i coached all our senior men, but he was bigger than that, he was a massive part of our club. he came in like a kiwi bouncing ball, full of vim and vigour. he was very difficult to contain. he always wanted the very best for his boys. he was like a dad to many of us. and he was also an exceptional rugby coach. he lived and breathed rugby and that legacy really lives on. the boys have taken that to heart and, you know, ithink boys have taken that to heart and, you know, i think they're going to give it their all formats. i'm
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actually putting my boots on today for the first time in a long time, so i do not know how i got roped into that, but i will be remembering him today. tell]! into that, but i will be remembering him toda . ., ., him today. tell me about peter pan. matt used a — him today. tell me about peter pan. matt used a commie _ him today. tell me about peter pan. matt used a commie peter _ him today. tell me about peter pan. matt used a commie peter pan i him today. tell me about peter pan. i matt used a commie peter pan because yosay to ci looked too young for my age and i used to dance around. we played against each other, if i danced around him, he would always shout peter pan after me. i do not think i will be much like peter pan after today's game, i can tell you, more like captain hook, i think! tell me about the events that are going to happen. we tell me about the events that are going to happen-— going to happen. we are going to have a great _ going to happen. we are going to have a great day _ going to happen. we are going to have a great day today. _ going to happen. we are going to have a great day today. at i going to happen. we are going to have a great day today. at matt's! have a great day today. at matt's funeral, we were absolutely blessed to have a maori contingent turn up with their new in dan brooke who led them and they took us to after the funeral some of the kiwi spiritual, maori staff and it was a really,
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really good time. they taught us a little bit about what the haka means and they have become part of our family and they are launching today at 11am, family and they are launching today at "am, an official maori welcome and hopefully they will have something for us afterwards. we have a couple of warm up games for spectators to watch and then we have a really exciting thing, we have a wonderful classical soprano singer called joanna forrest and after matt died, she asked if she could record a song for us and so she recorded the world in union the rugby union and them and replaced that and all the proceeds that go from that go to the proceeds that go from that go to the matt ratana rugby foundation and she is coming to sing live on the pitch today and then our first team will go onto the field and hopefully
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bring glory to east grinstead. ! see bring glory to east grinstead. i see our smile bring glory to east grinstead. i see your smile and _ bring glory to east grinstead. i see your smile and i _ bring glory to east grinstead. i see your smile and i know _ bring glory to east grinstead. i see your smile and i know that - bring glory to east grinstead. i see your smile and i know that today, with this conversation we're having, you really wanted to make sure that matt's life was celebrated, but you have had a year of grief a year of mourning and you will always miss him, of course, he was a massive part of so many people's lives, but does today kind of allow you to move on and to put the memory of him in a happy place and a good place and kind of live as he would want you to our live? ! kind of live as he would want you to our live? ., , .,, ,., kind of live as he would want you to ourlive? ._ , , our live? i really hope so because i know that is _ our live? i really hope so because i know that is what _ our live? i really hope so because i know that is what he _ our live? i really hope so because i know that is what he would - our live? i really hope so because i know that is what he would have i know that is what he would have wanted. he was a very happy and smiley man and, as i say, it has been tough. he meant a lot to a lot of our players and our coaching staff, so i am not saying we should put him behind us because that is not what it is about, but i hope there will be more smiles than tears going forwards, certainly. ! there will be more smiles than tears going forwards, certainly.— going forwards, certainly. ithink it's hhoin going forwards, certainly. ithink it's going to _ going forwards, certainly. ithink
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it's going to be _ going forwards, certainly. ithink it's going to be a _ going forwards, certainly. ithink it's going to be a brilliant - going forwards, certainly. ithink it's going to be a brilliant day. i it's going to be a brilliant day. you have sold it. it is going to be one full ofjoy and you have sold it. it is going to be one full of joy and contemplation you have sold it. it is going to be one full ofjoy and contemplation as well, but i wish you all well, i wish you a fun game full stop don't worry about not being peter pan on the pitch, just enjoy it and stay safe. obviously do not get injured and look after yourself. thank you so much, hope it's a really good day for you all. so much, hope it's a really good day for you all-— for you all. thank you, naga. god bless. do for you all. thank you, naga. god bless- do you _ for you all. thank you, naga. god bless. do you know? _ for you all. thank you, naga. god bless. do you know? it— for you all. thank you, naga. god bless. do you know? it is- for you all. thank you, naga. god bless. do you know? it is the i for you all. thank you, naga. god i bless. do you know? it is the power of sort. bless. do you know? it is the power of sport- mike _ bless. do you know? it is the power of sport. mike is _ bless. do you know? it is the power of sport. mike is with _ bless. do you know? it is the power of sport. mike is with us _ bless. do you know? it is the power of sport. mike is with us now, i bless. do you know? it is the power of sport. mike is with us now, it i bless. do you know? it is the power of sport. mike is with us now, it is l of sport. mike is with us now, it is just the joy, that team atmosphere and people touchy in ways that you would never imagine when you play sports. we have heard how many times, haven't we, that team spirit and the support you get when you don't expect it in the game? so important to be there for one another. it is so important on a day like that and, as you say, trying to see the positive and celebration of life through sport and the way it brings people together and you have a team behind you on days like this. and they canjust look,
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behind you on days like this. and they can just look, they know why they are there, they know what they are doing and they are moving forward and remembering a brilliant man who must have touched them so much. absolutely. let's talk about the importance of teams and working together. what a day for team europe. you can imagine the team talk. they have been in this position as well. we are talking about the ryder cup, obviously. team usa completely dominant against team europe. bit of momentum that they will build on and we have to liberate is only day one. there are still 20 points to play for in golf�*s ryder cup, as europe look for a way back after the usa team built a record opening day lead. the best ever for them. 6—2 is how it stands, as the americans gave the 40,000 fans at whistling streets just what they wanted, summed up by the wizardry here ofjordan speith. down a cliff of grass, he magics the ball up onto the green, and then almost loses his balance as he tries to find his footing on the banks
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of lake michigan. he will enjoy watching back where the ball lands. what a shot that was. so while they had trickery, they also had power. bryson de chambeau hitting a monster tee shot, on the fifth hole, a whopping a17 yards — that's not far off a quarter of a mile. in contrast, european players like rory mcilroy had a miserable day, and he will now sit out the first session today, for the first time at a ryder cup. so a huge task for europe heading into the second day, but their captain remains hopeful that there is still plenty of time, to turn this around. it isn't a good start, but there's still a lot to play for. my team played well today. you know, just a few times, the momentum, the output didn't go in. you know, you need a bit of momentum. things went against us, but hopefully, you know, i just think the last couple of matches there, it was really, really tight. the boys came through and it certainly felt like we couldn't afford it. those two halves at the very end were crucial for us at the very end and tyrrell in particular,
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birdie in the last, yeah, very, very important in those situations. as if that's not enough to get as excited and worked out, how about this? the biggest fight in britain for three years with a full house at the tottenham hotspur stadium in london tonight as anthonyjoshua puts his four heavyweight belts and indeed reputation on the line. aj revealed a slimmed down figure at the weigh—in yesterday, perhaps mindful of the agile opponent he is facing in the form of the ukrainian former cruiserweight champion oleksandr usyk. to give us the big build—up, as if there's one needs it, steve will be covering it tonight. thank you for joining us now from london. how pivotal is this fight forjoshua? is now 31, he has a master plan to eventually fight tyson fury and be the undisputed heavyweight champion. it is a massive fight forjoshua, a massive fight for british sport, for global boxing, but more than that, it is a massive fight for the 70,000
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people that have been waiting, as you say, two or three years. this is joshua's fifth fight in a stadium and listen to this, this is a statistic, 380,000 people have paid to watch him lie. i'm not sure if thatis to watch him lie. i'm not sure if that is a record, but i know one thing, i cannot think of a heavyweight, including mohamed ali in the 70s, who has been watched by more people, more eyes on him. band more people, more eyes on him. and he is so excited, he said he would fight king kong this week, is mean so much to be back in front of a crowd because we asked him in december in front ofjust 1000. but it has in so worked up, so eager to get going. i it has in so worked up, so eager to net choin. , . it has in so worked up, so eager to het hhoin. , . , it has in so worked up, so eager to hhhetoin. , . , ., get going. i expect better of you, kinh konh get going. i expect better of you, king kong is _ get going. i expect better of you, king kong is a — get going. i expect better of you, king kong is a cartoon _ get going. i expect better of you, king kong is a cartoon character, | king kong is a cartoon character, 0k? king kong is a cartoon character, ok? i will throw that out there, ok? i cannot believe you have known king kong at me in the morning on tv. what it means is he will fight anybody and he will. if you look at what the americans call his resume, i collared a boxing record which is old—fashioned, but this is his 11th
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consecutive world heavyweight title fight. he will fight anybody, but i tell you another thing, so will oleksandr usyk. he is the backyard document to berlin and beat the germans for a world title, went to latvia for a world title, went to poland for a world title, coming out to tottenham in front of 70,000, as he said the other day to me, no problem. he he said the other day to me, no hroblem. ., , ,, problem. he loves upsetting the odds, as problem. he loves upsetting the odds. as you _ problem. he loves upsetting the odds, as you say. _ problem. he loves upsetting the odds, as you say. but _ problem. he loves upsetting the odds, as you say. but he - problem. he loves upsetting the odds, as you say. but he is i problem. he loves upsetting the i odds, as you say. but he is stepping up odds, as you say. but he is stepping up a weight division from cruiserweight even though joshua up a weight division from cruiserweight even thoughjoshua has slimmed down, he is still over one stone lighter. this must be joshua's. why are we worried about this? he has a box of tricks but he does not have the power to beat joshua, does he? he does not have the power to beat joshua, does he?— does not have the power to beat joshua, does he? he has a box of tricks within _ joshua, does he? he has a box of tricks within asterix, _ joshua, does he? he has a box of tricks within asterix, a _ joshua, does he? he has a box of tricks within asterix, a lot - joshua, does he? he has a box of tricks within asterix, a lot of i tricks within asterix, a lot of tricks within asterix, a lot of tricks inside the box. he does not have the power but he has the stamina, the smarts, the skill and though he is small, three inches smaller thanjoshua and £19, he is still taller and heavier than the man ijust mentioned, the great
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mohamed ali. he is not small. some people seem to be operating under the belief that he is tiny, but he is not. joshua is a giant! he is a man mountain. this guy is big enough, he isjust notjoshua proportions, but who is? enough, he isjust not joshua proportions, but who is? steve, it's naha proportions, but who is? steve, it's naga here. — proportions, but who is? steve, it's naga here. give _ proportions, but who is? steve, it's naga here, give morning. _ proportions, but who is? steve, it's naga here, give morning. i- proportions, but who is? steve, it's naga here, give morning. i was- proportions, but who is? steve, it's! naga here, give morning. i wasjust naga here, give morning. iwasjust looking at the pictures of those meeting and greeting each other in the press staff... greeting! i say greeting because there was no argy—bargy, they should count, attacked each other�*s arms, smiling, what is going on? i attacked each other's arms, smiling, what is going on?— what is going on? i think that might have something _ what is going on? i think that might have something to _ what is going on? i think that might have something to do _ what is going on? i think that might have something to do with - what is going on? i think that might have something to do with the i what is going on? i think that might have something to do with the factl have something to do with the fact that 70,000 seats have already sold and everyone is excited about it. joshua, unless you have someone in front of him who really gets under his skin and the guy from bulgaria did that last december, he does not mind. as for oleksandr usyk, he is the calmest guy out there. as long as he can draw his eyes in the opposite direction, and do fun things and dress like a cartoon,
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hanna barbara character like he does in the mad suit with the clown shoes, as long as he can do that, he is happy but they exchanged backstage after the way in a couple of glances that sent a chill up my spine. of glances that sent a chill up my shine. . ., of glances that sent a chill up my shine. ~ ., , of glances that sent a chill up my shine. . ., , ., spine. wow! very quickly, we are in for such a treat, _ spine. wow! very quickly, we are in for such a treat, the _ spine. wow! very quickly, we are in for such a treat, the 70,000 - spine. wow! very quickly, we are in for such a treat, the 70,000 fans i spine. wow! very quickly, we are in j for such a treat, the 70,000 fans in the stadium tonight because on the undercard, ricky hatton's son campbell, we have a picture from the way in and, my goodness, it is like father, like son. it is way in and, my goodness, it is like father, like son.— father, like son. it is mini me and he fihhts father, like son. it is mini me and he fights like _ father, like son. it is mini me and he fights like his _ father, like son. it is mini me and he fights like his dad _ father, like son. it is mini me and he fights like his dad and - father, like son. it is mini me and he fights like his dad and is i he fights like his dad and is exciting like his dad. if i close my eyes, i am exciting like his dad. if i close my eyes, iam hearing his dad exciting like his dad. if i close my eyes, i am hearing his dad 20 years ago. campbell hatton will get the greatest reception any three bouts novice has had in history because 70,000 people will be channelling his father, cheering like crazy when he walks out. what a night. has his father, cheering like crazy when he walks out. what a night.- he walks out. what a night. has an joshua, he walks out. what a night. has an joshua. you — he walks out. what a night. has an joshua, you reckons— he walks out. what a night. has an joshua, you reckons an _ he walks out. what a night. has an joshua, you reckons an eight? i he walks out. what a night. has an i joshua, you reckons an eight? ayane not 'okinh , joshua, you reckons an eight? ayane notioking. i— joshua, you reckons an eight? ayane not joking. i am _ joshua, you reckons an eight? ayane not joking, i am saying _ joshua, you reckons an eight? ayane not joking, i am saying joshua i joshua, you reckons an eight? ayane not joking, i am saying joshua is i joshua, you reckons an eight? ayane not joking, i am saying joshua is in i notjoking, i am saying joshua is in for a really hard night. he will win but it will not be easy and everyone
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will leave happy. we but it will not be easy and everyone will leave happy-— will leave happy. we will listen to it all unfold. — will leave happy. we will listen to it all unfold. thank _ will leave happy. we will listen to it all unfold. thank you. - and a reminder you can listen to buncey and the rest of the team covering the big fight on bbc radio 5live this evening. the build—up is good enough for him, isn't it? there is so much going on this weekend. i'm so excited now, it's ridiculous! can you be as excited about the weather, please? matt is offering us the weather, and is it on the edge, matt, heading into autumn? farfrom far from the farfrom the edge, far from the edge, really. farfrom the edge, really. i'm sure people will be disappointed, but though it is a bit grey for many, quite murky in places, there are brighter skies behind me in cumbria just a short while ago. as i said, it will be pretty warm. temperatures across the uk are well above where they should be for the time of year, a little example of some of the temperatures experienced through the weekend, especially in some sunnier spots into the high teens and the low 20s quite widely but it is on
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the edge to a certain degree in that things will change to the end of the weekend into next week and it will feel like autumn has returned, a 10 degrees drop there in inverness by the time we get towards midweek, so thatis the time we get towards midweek, so that is coming our way and at the moment, temperatures widely around 13 to 17 degrees so very mild for the stage of september. rain to come across shetland mid—morning, patchy rain and drizzle from the low cloud sitting across of the hills and coasts in the west which will come and go through the day. many places will see the grey brighton in colour but some will see more sunshine, particularly across this wave of north wales to central england into northern england, around the moray firth and in those areas, you can see temperatures between 20 and 2a degrees. another warm and humid night to come tonight, winds becoming more southerly but it will bring more clad breaks here and there. the shower possible, mostly dry and temperatures will start tomorrow again in the mid—teens for the vast majority a one start but we mentioned the change, autumn is
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hiding behind this weather front and here it comes, pushing into the west as we head into the start of sunday for topmost restarting dry, some isolated showers around through the day, more showers around in scotland and east wales but turning wet through late morning northern ireland and into western scotland as well, notjust wet ireland and into western scotland as well, not just wet with heavy ireland and into western scotland as well, notjust wet with heavy rain but also increasingly windy. 22 possible in the north highlands, 23 and maybe 2a across some parts of eastern england. the weatherfront will push its way eastwards, changing almost the season overnight as we go to sunday into monday. heavy rain at times as we start the monday morning commute, still there in eastern parts, some train coming out, centring on showers throughout the day on the west, some of them heavy and thundery and temperatures instead of in the low 20s, sitting instead of in the low 20s, sitting in the mid—teens and it will get colder still for low pressure dominating the charts to reducing wednesday, bouts of heavy rain, gusty winds sweeping across the uk and to bridges will take a noticeable dip, so quick look into
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next week highs in the low to mid—teens. back to you both. you still deliver it with a smile. well, it keeps me in a job. just! and with a chuckle. thank you, matt. we have been talking about big diary events, the boxing, the ryder cup, the german election but that is just the german election but that is just the warm up, right? just the warm up. it's all sequins and sparkle as strictly come dancing starts tonight, with the first live show. all 15 celebrities will be performing with their partners to begin their bid for the glitterball trophy. and, of course, ourvery own dan will be among them. let's take a look at the group dance from last week's show. # i wanna dance # the music's got me going # ain't nothing that can stop how we move, yeah # let's break our plans # and live just like we're golden # and roll in like we're dancing fools # we don't need to worry
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# cos when we fall, we know how to land # don't need to talk the talk # just walk the walk tonight # cos we don't need permission to dance # da—na—na—na—na—na—na, da—na—na—na—na—na—na # da—na—na—na—na—na—na # no, we don't need permission to dance # da—na—na—na—na—na—na, da—na—na—na—na—na—na # da—na—na—na—na—na—na # well, let me show ya # that we can keep the fire alive # cos it's not over # till it's over, say it one more time, say # i wanna dance, the music's got me going # ain't nothing that can stop how we move, yeah...# you were feeling a bit of a buzz.
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former strictly professional kristina rihanoffjoins us now in the studio. back on the sofa, it has been so long, hasn't it? you are just injecting that some excitement. i just want to be there, i want to dance again!— just want to be there, i want to dance ahain! ~ ., ,, ., ,, ., dance again! what you make of them? it is early days. _ dance again! what you make of them? it is early days, the _ dance again! what you make of them? it is early days, the first _ dance again! what you make of them? it is early days, the first proper - it is early days, the first proper night tonight but from what you have seen so far? i night tonight but from what you have seen so far?— seen so far? i think it is a really wonderful— seen so far? i think it is a really wonderful cast _ seen so far? i think it is a really wonderful cast and _ seen so far? i think it is a really wonderful cast and i _ seen so far? i think it is a really wonderful cast and i think- seen so far? i think it is a really wonderful cast and i think the i wonderful cast and i think the pairings are great. they have really matched them well personality —wise i'm looking forward to the show. band i'm looking forward to the show. and that is important, isn't it? you need a partner who will bring out certain parts of your personality and everyone will be petrified because it is so new.- and everyone will be petrified because it is so new. yes, it is a ve full because it is so new. yes, it is a very full on _ because it is so new. yes, it is a very full on show _ because it is so new. yes, it is a very full on show and _ because it is so new. yes, it is a very full on show and very i very full on show and very emotional, very stressful sometimes, so you really want to feel that someone is there for you, that teamwork is the important. there is a lot of pressure _ teamwork is the important. there is a lot of pressure on _ teamwork is the important. there is a lot of pressure on the _ a lot of pressure on the professionals to do that as well because you are more than just teaching, you are like an emotional support. we teaching, you are like an emotional su ort. ~ . teaching, you are like an emotional su- -ort. ~ ., ., teaching, you are like an emotional su ort. ~ . ., ., support. we are sort of there to uuide, support. we are sort of there to
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guide. to _ support. we are sort of there to guide. to help. _ support. we are sort of there to guide, to help, to _ support. we are sort of there to guide, to help, to nurture - support. we are sort of there to guide, to help, to nurture and, | support. we are sort of there to i guide, to help, to nurture and, of course, people feel very vulnerable, so we see who they really are quite early on and you kind of guide people through it and usually one them to enjoy the process. that's what i always say to my partners, remember this experience very stressful, but you want them to feel good about themselves.— stressful, but you want them to feel good about themselves. watching the warm u- good about themselves. watching the warm up show — good about themselves. watching the warm up show last _ good about themselves. watching the warm up show last week, _ good about themselves. watching the warm up show last week, oti - good about themselves. watching the warm up show last week, oti and - good about themselves. watching the warm up show last week, oti and ugoj warm up show last week, oti and ugo looks like mates already, this is when they first met and you could tell from that first second that there was a special connection and i guess that translates onto the dance floor as well. guess that translates onto the dance floor as well-— floor as well. that's what i was sa inc , i floor as well. that's what i was saying. i think _ floor as well. that's what i was saying, i think they _ floor as well. that's what i was saying, i think they paired - floor as well. that's what i was saying, i think they paired the | saying, i think they paired the professionals and the celebrities really well. personalities, i think we will see some really, really great... i know it is a cliche, but journeys this year because, yeah, it will be a real treat. haifa will be a realtreat. how competitive _ will be a realtreat. how competitive were - will be a realtreat. how competitive were you i will be a realtreat. how competitive were you in | will be a realtreat. how- competitive were you in the
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will be a real treat. how competitive were you in the rankings among the dancers?— among the dancers? competitive! don't ou among the dancers? competitive! don't you remember? _ among the dancers? competitive! don't you remember? six - among the dancers? competitive! don't you remember? six years . among the dancers? competitive! i don't you remember? six years on, i'm very competitive. _ don't you remember? six years on, i'm very competitive. mike - don't you remember? six years on, i'm very competitive. mike was - i'm very competitive. mike was partnered _ i'm very competitive. mike was partnered with _ i'm very competitive. mike was partnered with catcher - i'm very competitive. mike was partnered with catcher on - i'm very competitive. mike was i partnered with catcher on strictly and apparently mike is the only one that she did not make right. —— katya. i that she did not make right. -- ka a. ., �* , that she did not make right. -- ka a. , katya. i don't remember anyone c in: for katya. i don't remember anyone crying for i _ katya. i don't remember anyone crying for i cried. _ katya. i don't remember anyone crying for i cried. katya - katya. i don't remember anyone crying for i cried. katya is - katya. i don't remember anyone crying for i cried. katya is now i crying for i cried. katya is now partnered _ crying for i cried. katya is now partnered with _ crying for i cried. katya is now partnered with adam - crying for i cried. katya is now partnered with adam pd - crying for i cried. katya is now partnered with adam pd was i crying for i cried. katya is now - partnered with adam pd was made no secret of being competitive. what do you think of that pairing? i secret of being competitive. what do you think of that pairing?— you think of that pairing? i think it is the best, _ you think of that pairing? i think it is the best, they _ you think of that pairing? i think it is the best, they definitely - it is the best, they definitely click. it could go against them as well because they will be that competitive and maybe they will push each other, but i think there is a lot of pressure on adam to do well, to be good and i think the sportsmen always do well because theyjust know how to be trained, they know how to take instructions. find know how to be trained, they know how to take instructions.— how to take instructions. and they want to win- _ how to take instructions. and they want to win. they _ how to take instructions. and they want to win. they want _ how to take instructions. and they want to win. they want to - how to take instructions. and they want to win. they want to win, - how to take instructions. and they want to win. they want to win, i l how to take instructions. and they i want to win. they want to win, i am sure he wants _ want to win. they want to win, i am
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sure he wants to _ want to win. they want to win, i am sure he wants to win, _ want to win. they want to win, i am sure he wants to win, but _ want to win. they want to win, i am sure he wants to win, but i - want to win. they want to win, i am sure he wants to win, but i think- sure he wants to win, but i think everyone is like, adam, you must win, so i think it is a lot of pressure. win, so i think it is a lot of pressure-— win, so i think it is a lot of ressure. , . . , , pressure. he is also a big bloke which is more _ pressure. he is also a big bloke which is more difficult, - pressure. he is also a big bloke which is more difficult, isn't - pressure. he is also a big bloke which is more difficult, isn't it? | which is more difficult, isn't it? katya is going to make into all sorts of lifts, throw her in the air and all of that, i think it is a good thing. and all of that, i think it is a good thing-— good thing. 0k. there _ good thing. 0k. there has - good thing. 0k. there has been| good thing. ok. | there has been a good thing. 0k. - there has been a lot of good thing. 0k. _ there has been a lot of chatter about partnerships and we should address this, about vaccines. there are reports that a couple of professional dancers have not been vaccinated and that is causing some friction and some reluctance by some to be partnered with them. what do you make of this? i to be partnered with them. what do you make of this?— you make of this? i said on another show that i — you make of this? i said on another show that i do _ you make of this? i said on another show that i do not _ you make of this? i said on another show that i do not think _ you make of this? i said on another show that i do not think the - you make of this? i said on another show that i do not think the story . show that i do not think the story is true. i think the bbc said yesterday that it is not true, no one is refusing to dance with anyone, but we do not know the truth because they might not be vaccinated but maybe it is a vaccine that is not recognised here like the russian one, so you cannot ask people coming to the show, you ask them to be
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double vaccinated again just because we do not recognise another vaccine from another country? weeding on all the truth behind the story. what the truth behind the story. what does that do _ the truth behind the story. what does that do for _ the truth behind the story. what does that do for for _ the truth behind the story. what does that do for for the - the truth behind the story. what does that do for for the atmosphere in the cab, knowing these negative stories are around which do happen. kind of, i rememberwhen stories are around which do happen. kind of, i remember when anything like that about the show, maybe the professionals being harsh on celebrities or something like that, we kind of become even tighter as a group, we support one another, because we have a massive show to put on in front of millions of people, so we always... naga, i do not know if you remember, but i always felt that the professionals and celebrities were behind me because we know we have to deliver a big show. ii because we know we have to deliver a bi show. , ., , ., big show. if you were in the show this ear big show. if you were in the show this year as _ big show. if you were in the show this year as a _ big show. if you were in the show this year as a professional - big show. if you were in the show this year as a professional and i big show. if you were in the show| this year as a professional and you are partnered with a celebrity and you suspected that celebrity was not vaccinated,... or vaccinated, . . . or they just vaccinated,... or theyjust said vaccinated, . . . or they just said they vaccinated,... or they just said they were not. would you be ok without? i am
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or theyjust said they were not. would you be ok without? i am double vaccinated and — would you be ok without? i am double vaccinated and it _ would you be ok without? i am double vaccinated and it was _ would you be ok without? i am double vaccinated and it was choice _ would you be ok without? i am double vaccinated and it was choice to - would you be ok without? i am double vaccinated and it was choice to do - vaccinated and it was choice to do so, but we know it does not give you 100% protection anyway. i can go to ioo% protection anyway. i can go to tesco and do my shopping and still get the virus, so there is no 100% guarantees ever in life or with vaccination, so i think they always do checks, the bbc said they do thorough checks and testing and all that, so i think as long as that is in place, we have to trust the bbc and believe that it will all be well. ~ . , , and believe that it will all be well. . , well. which partnership you most excited about? _ well. which partnership you most excited about? for _ well. which partnership you most excited about? for me? - well. which partnership you most excited about? for me? giovannij well. which partnership you most - excited about? for me? giovanni and rose. i excited about? for me? giovanni and rose- i think — excited about? for me? giovanni and rose- i think it— excited about? for me? giovanni and rose. i think it is— excited about? for me? giovanni and rose. i think it is amazing _ excited about? for me? giovanni and rose. i think it is amazing that - excited about? for me? giovanni and rose. i think it is amazing that she i rose. i think it is amazing that she is on the show. i am really rooting for her. �* , , is on the show. i am really rooting forher.�* ,, , , is on the show. i am really rooting forher.�* , , , . ., for her. because she is hard of hearin: , for her. because she is hard of hearing. she — for her. because she is hard of hearing, she is _ for her. because she is hard of hearing, she is deaf, - for her. because she is hard of hearing, she is deaf, so i for her. because she is hard of hearing, she is deaf, so she i for her. because she is hard of. hearing, she is deaf, so she will for her. because she is hard of- hearing, she is deaf, so she will be feeling the music and being taught the music in a very different way. we need to see a very special thing happen on the show. i know a little bit about that because i danced with ben who is partially deaf. and there were a lot of challenges because
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even though he loved ballroom, he could not hear the melody, so he was kind of dancing and not knowing what is going on, where the strong beats of the jive and the charleston were better for him, of the jive and the charleston were betterfor him, so being fully of the jive and the charleston were better for him, so being fully deaf, it will be a big challenge. find better for him, so being fully deaf, it will be a big challenge.— it will be a big challenge. and a lot of pressure _ it will be a big challenge. and a lot of pressure on _ it will be a big challenge. and a lot of pressure on giovanni i it will be a big challenge. and a i lot of pressure on giovanni because he will be leading, particularly involving cold, he will be physically... involving cold, he will be physically- - -_ involving cold, he will be -h sicall ,, . , , physically... signalling, pushing, workinu , physically... signalling, pushing, working, making _ physically... signalling, pushing, working, making sure _ physically... signalling, pushing, working, making sure she - physically... signalling, pushing, i working, making sure she understands where the beat is, but i am so excited and i think it will be wonderful to see. [30 excited and i think it will be wonderful to see.— excited and i think it will be wonderful to see. excited and i think it will be wonderfulto see. . wonderful to see. do you have your snacks in? — wonderful to see. do you have your snacks in? yes _ wonderful to see. do you have your snacks in? yes expects _ wonderful to see. do you have your snacks in? yes expects next - wonderful to see. do you have your snacks in? yes expects next in, i snacks in? yes expects next in, read to snacks in? yes expects next in, ready to watch. _ snacks in? yes expects next in, ready to watch. great _ snacks in? yes expects next in, ready to watch. great stuff. i'mj ready to watch. great stuff. i'm sure we will _ ready to watch. great stuff. i'm sure we will speak _ ready to watch. great stuff. i'm sure we will speak to _ ready to watch. great stuff. i'm sure we will speak to you i ready to watch. great stuff. i'm| sure we will speak to you during this series. thank you very much. much more coming up on breakfast. see you shortly.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: queues at petrol stations as the government considers making it easier for foreign lorry drivers to work in the uk. we ask the motorist to be sensible, don't alteryour refuelling patterns. there's plenty of fuel around and people shouldn't panic buy.
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the temporary plans are being drawn up after a shortage of hauliers has caused major disruption to deliveries of fuel, food and other goods. hundreds pay tribute to murdered primary school teacher sabina nessa at a candle—lit vigil. words cannot describe how we are feeling. this feels like we're stuck in a bad dream and cannot get out of it. our world is shattered. after their meltdown on michigan, and being spellbound by spieth and american magic, team europe are looking to fight back from 6—2 down on the second day of golf�*s ryder cup. we hit 25 degrees yesterday in parts of southern england, and whilst the warmth continues for many this weekend, there are changes ahead. i'll have the full details here on breakfast. it's saturday 25th september. our top story:
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a temporary visa scheme allowing foreign lorry drivers to work a temporary visa scheme allowing in the uk could be introduced to ease the current problem with fuel deliveries. a shortage of uk tanker drivers has caused major disruption at petrol stations, leading to long queues and some closures. we're joined now by our political correspondent, lone wells. good morning to you. there has been pressure on the government to do something, hasn't there? we have been told, no need to panic or be concerned, but there is some action on the cards. concerned, but there is some action on the cards-— concerned, but there is some action on the cards. good morning, yes, the government — on the cards. good morning, yes, the government is — on the cards. good morning, yes, the government is now _ on the cards. good morning, yes, the government is now considering i on the cards. good morning, yes, the government is now considering some | government is now considering some kind of temporary visa scheme to allow more foreign drivers to come and work in the uk, and they are set to announce more details about how the scheme will work this weekend, but the expectation is, it will be temporary and there will be a cap on the number of drivers allowed to come, reports suggesting in the region of around 5000 drivers. government ministers met yesterday to thrash out some of the details
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around their response to this crisis, the shortages we are seeing at stations and queues at stations too, fed to say there is some disagreement within government itself about how the scheme could work, not least because some ministers argue the whole point of post—brexit immigration rules was to tell companies they should not be as reliant on cheaper foreign labour. also some concerns among some ministers that this will not tackle theissue ministers that this will not tackle the issue long—term and there is the issue of tackling the uk workforce long—term, and the precedent this could set, concerns about other industries asking for new rules as well. we are expecting an announcement later today, but it is already leading to accusations of a u—turn, with labour's deputy leader angela rayner saying the government should have seen this earlier. we know that and hgv drivers are skilled — know that and hgv drivers are skilled workers and this was coming down _ skilled workers and this was coming down the _ skilled workers and this was coming down the tracks, and the governor
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and has _ down the tracks, and the governor and has not — down the tracks, and the governor and has not done anything to address it and _ and has not done anything to address it and now— and has not done anything to address it and now we face this crisis that people _ it and now we face this crisis that peopie are — it and now we face this crisis that people are now worried about whether they wili— people are now worried about whether they will have the fuel. there is fuel there. _ they will have the fuel. there is fuelthere, it isjust they will have the fuel. there is fuel there, it isjust that they will have the fuel. there is fuel there, it is just that we they will have the fuel. there is fuel there, it isjust that we need to make — fuel there, it isjust that we need to make sure things calm down and we have those _ to make sure things calm down and we have those hgv drivers that can deliver— have those hgv drivers that can deliver the goods and services and supplies— deliver the goods and services and supplies we need across the uk. critics— supplies we need across the uk. critics already lining up to essentially tell the government, well, we told you so. the government now seem to be taking some kind of action to address this issue with the queues and shortages we have seen over the last couple of days making it increasingly difficult for the government not to act, even if it comes with political embarrassment. what is still not clear is even if they introduce this visa scheme, how it will tackle the immediate crisis we are seeing in the last couple of days, given drivers will still need to get their visas processed if they come from overseas and also they will need to be recruited in the first place. thank you very much. let's get the
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situation at one garage forecourt in stockport, where our reporter phil mccann is there, and one person on twitter suggesting your name is not the best for a reporter there. as you cannot fill your can. nominative determinism. _ you cannot fill your can. nominative determinism, isn't _ you cannot fill your can. nominative determinism, isn't that _ you cannot fill your can. nominative determinism, isn't that what - you cannot fill your can. nominative determinism, isn't that what it i you cannot fill your can. nominative determinism, isn't that what it is i determinism, isn't that what it is called? there we go, i would never fill a can with petrol in the back of my car, which is what some people have done. panic buying very much discouraged, but look at these pumps here, they are covered in plastic bags because they have run out of labels that say all of these pumps are empty. here we go, a steady stream of people turning up, saying they are empty and driving on through. the reason for this, 28,000 litres is what this placeholder yesterday. on average they sell 8000
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litres of fuel, and yesterday the people running this filling station were told it would take between nine and ten days for them to get another delivery. it usually comes within 2a hours. we know that the main petrol supplies have said that these kind of scenes are still at a small percentage of petrol stations around the country, and they shall garage down the road still has petrol. and also the deliveries and how they work, it is not the same for different types of filling stations. those owned by bigger companies and supermarkets, it is easier for them to get deliveries of fuel. the situation will not all be as desperate as it is here, but these are the kind of scenes that are politically embarrassing for the scenes and these are the headlines that are politically embarrassing for the government that they are desperate to avoid, and that is why they have announced overnight they are considering this temporary relaxation of these rules, so they can sort out the longer—term reasons
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that people have not been going into the lorry driving game which has been causing the shortage of drivers, causing the shortages at places like this.— places like this. thank you very much indeed. _ places like this. thank you very much indeed. apparently- places like this. thank you very much indeed. apparently phili places like this. thank you very i much indeed. apparently phil mccann is currently trending on twitter. your story. thank you.- the time now is seven minutes past nine. the time now is seven minutes past nine. a book of condolence will be opened in south london this morning in memory of the 28 year old primary school teacher, sabina nessa, who was attacked and killed a week ago. hundreds of mourners gathered for an emotional candlelit vigil in kidbrooke last night, as simon jones reports. say her name — sabina nessa, we will neverforget. that was a request from the organisers of the vigil and hundreds answered the call. sabina nessa. all: sabina nessa. the public coming together
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to support a family struggling to comprehend. sabina loved her family. we have lost our sister, my parents have lost their daughter, and my girls have lost such a brilliant, loving, caring auntie who dearly loved them. words cannot describe how we are feeling. this feels like we are stuck in a bad dream and can't get out of it. our world is shattered. on friday last week, sabina had been heading to this square to meet a friend. she never arrived. it's thought she was attacked when she was walking through a nearby park. her death has once again brought to the fore the question of women's safety on our streets. those who attended the vigil said they felt compelled to be there. to pay my respects to sabina and to the thousands of other women that have been murdered, attacked, sexually assaulted and just to stand together with all women and the men that
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are here to say that we are not... i feel emotional. ..going to accept this any more. as much as i'm deeply saddened by the event and how tragic it is, i'm also enraged, i'm also quite angry at the fact that so many young women are becoming more and more frightened. i questioned about whether i should come, as a man, whether this - should be a female space, but it seemed like - everyone was invited. a candle was lit in downing street and the duchess of cambridge wrote on twitter: shortly before the vigil began, the police cordoned off the road next to the square in their hunt for information. officers are still trying to trace this man, captured on cctv, whom they believe could be vital to the case. it is thought he had access to this silver car. vigils also took place elsewhere —
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this was a gathering in newcastle, and candles were lit in brighton. and in kidbrooke, a minute's silence, applause and a song for a community united in grief and anger. simon jones, bbc news. simon is in kidbrooke for us this morning. good morning to you. you have had some really interesting conversations about how to tackle theissue conversations about how to tackle the issue of women's safety and why we are talking about this yet again. yes, a lot of upset here, and a lot of anger and a lot of people asking, how do we address this problem? and currently in the local community centre, sabina's body was found pretty close to here a week ago and they want to know what they can do, so today they are opening a book of condolence, the first people are due in here surely and can take a quiet
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moment of contemplation and write a message to the family, the book will be given to the family in a few weeks' time. but the emotion really at the vigil yesterday was that questioning of, why only talking about this again? we heard from sabina's family, the emotion they were feeling, but overriding feeling from them was that they did not want any other family to go through this in the future. but we have had vigils before after women have been killed, we have been talking about this before, but it seems little has changed. and when you talk to the experts, they will tell you, this not something that can be fixed quickly and easily. it is about trying to bring about change society, and the fact the police watchdog said, this is not something the police can solve their own accord, it needs to be every organisation that deals with people, men and women, have to address this as an issue. in terms of the police,
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they addressed the vigil last night, saying their thoughts were very much with the family and the community here who are struggling. the police still very much want help from the public here, any information, because their murder investigation is now entering the second week here. the family want answers, the local community want answers, a lot of people have been telling us they simply do not feel safe leaving their homes, going out alone, walking on the streets around here whilst this investigation is ongoing. hundreds of people, though, did leave their homes and took part individual yesterday and we are expecting it to be here at the community centre today as people come and write those thought in that book of condolence, and a lot of thoughts going through people's mines. that emotion, but also that questioning, why is this happening, while talking about this again? thank you, simon.
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political parties in germany are campaigning for a final day before voters elect a new chancellor to succeed angela merkel. our berlin correspondent, jenny hill, joins us now. jenny, it is an end of an area, the merkel era, so what happens next? you are quite right and i think, actually, a great number of germans still cannot imagine germany without angela merkel, but tomorrow they go to the polls to come in effect, choose her successor. the parties are out and about this morning canvassing last minutes. they know every vote counts because this looks like it'll be a very tight race indeed between angela merkel�*s conservatives led by armin laschet, and the social democrats under the candidacy of olof scholz, currently the finance minister and a lot of germans say his understated manner reminds them of angela merkel. the green party looked to be in third
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place, it is not what they had hoped for but they may still end up as part of the government. that is because unlike britain, germany is usually ruled by coalition governments, but also to coalition combinations are possible. very long and difficult negotiations lie ahead on that front and it could be weeks if not months, regardless of what happens tomorrow night, before germany actually gets a new coalition government and angela merkel finally stepped aside for a new german chancellor. ok. merkel finally stepped aside for a new german chancellor. 0k, jenny, thank ou new german chancellor. ok, jenny, thank you for— new german chancellor. 0k, jenny, thank you for talking _ new german chancellor. 0k, jenny, thank you for talking us _ new german chancellor. 0k, jenny, thank you for talking us through i new german chancellor. 0k, jenny, thank you for talking us through it. | thank you for talking us through it. we also need to watch the weather. a little bit milder perhaps than we have experience of late. yes, unusually warm for the stage in september. temperatures above where they should be. nothing extreme at they should be. nothing extreme at the moment, a bit murky in places, as this shot in worcester shows. a similar picture in western parts and
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the further east, more like skies like this. we could get to 21 degrees through this afternoon. and whether it is cloud or sunshine, temperatures above average. warmer than normal when you see the red colour, by around three — 6 degrees at the moment. fast forward that mid week next week, and the blues are on the chart, colder autumnal conditions are on the way. it will feel like autumn at long last. does not feel like it out there, murky in places but the temperatures higher than they should be. chilly and aberdeenshire, but temperatures on the rise here, a bright start with sunshine. overall this morning, lots of cloud, wet for a time across shetland mid—morning, but light rain and drizzle going from that they can cloud in the west, hugging the hills
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and coast all day long. in the best of the sunshine, 23, 2a possible, and could get to 21 in scotland as well. we have the winds going in a more southerly direction, that will bring in the real tropicalfeel to things. it will feel quite humid, it will be denied into tomorrow, clear skies around, helping temperatures dip for to skies around, helping temperatures dipforto you, skies around, helping temperatures dip for to you, but temperatures in the teens as we start sunday morning. into sunday, signs of change is waiting in the winds, this is the weather front bringing change from some bulimic summer to autumn, waiting behind. —— the change from summer to autumn. a bright start in northern ireland attending wet and windy late morning onwards, the same in western scotland. some rain will be heavy. more sunshine for england and wales with more of a breeze and that helps temperatures up to 22 in
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the highlands, 23 and 2a in some eastern parts of england. the wet weather on that weather front i mentioned will work its way eastwards, heavy rain for all of us, gusty winds. the eastern coastal counties on monday morning before clearing away for a sunny afternoon, plenty of showers on the west on monday. note temperatures have dropped, 13 to 18 instead of high teens and low 20s. the middle part of the week, high—pressure throwing longer spells of rain, strong winds as well, a mixture of sunshine and showers for the next week, but the temperatures are the big thing, annual notice it will feel substantially cooler than it does this weekend. —— and you won't notice. a bit wet but buries some sunshine. —— but there is some sunshine.
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it's time now to discuss this week's latest coronavirus developments with our regular saturday panel, virologist dr chris smith and professor of public health, linda bauld. good morning to you both. good morninu. good morning to you both. good morning- did _ good morning to you both. good morning. did you _ good morning to you both. good morning. did you say _ good morning to you both. good morning. did you say you - good morning to you both. good morning. did you say you are i good morning to you both. good morning. did you say you are a i good morning to you both. good i morning. did you say you are a real sunshine, chris? _ morning. did you say you are a real sunshine, chris? i— morning. did you say you are a real sunshine, chris? i said _ morning. did you say you are a real sunshine, chris? i said we - morning. did you say you are a real sunshine, chris? i said we are i morning. did you say you are a real sunshine, chris? i said we are your| sunshine, chris? i said we are your real sunshine. _ sunshine, chris? i said we are your real sunshine. 0k, _ sunshine, chris? i said we are your real sunshine. ok, if— sunshine, chris? i said we are your real sunshine. ok, if you _ sunshine, chris? i said we are your real sunshine. ok, if you say i sunshine, chris? i said we are your real sunshine. ok, if you say so. i sunshine, chris? i said we are your. real sunshine. ok, if you say so. we have had lots _ real sunshine. ok, if you say so. we have had lots of _ real sunshine. ok, if you say so. we have had lots of questions _ real sunshine. ok, if you say so. we have had lots of questions coming . real sunshine. ok, if you say so. wej have had lots of questions coming in for you guys and there has been quite a lot going on this week intent of vaccinations, double vaccinations, so... intent of vaccinations, double vaccinations, so... a question from tony... because so many because so many are now because so many are now double vaccinated and we are now coming into that autumn period where people are worried about contagion. to
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start on the positive, it is good to see the _ start on the positive, it is good to see the public health agencies around — see the public health agencies around the uk are reporting this data, _ around the uk are reporting this data. so— around the uk are reporting this data. so a — around the uk are reporting this data, so a good question from tony, you can _ data, so a good question from tony, you can find — data, so a good question from tony, you can find that in public health england's— you can find that in public health england's technical report, and public— england's technical report, and public health scotland also produce those _ public health scotland also produce those figures. what you see, particularly for the risk of going into hospital and the risk of death from _ into hospital and the risk of death from covid—19, the breakdown by one dose, _ from covid—19, the breakdown by one dose. no _ from covid—19, the breakdown by one dose, no dose or two doses of the vaccine, _ dose, no dose or two doses of the vaccine, and — dose, no dose or two doses of the vaccine, and just to give tony an example — vaccine, and just to give tony an example of— vaccine, and just to give tony an example of somebody in my age group in their— example of somebody in my age group in their 50s. _ example of somebody in my age group in their50s, we example of somebody in my age group in their 50s, we look at the whole month— in their 50s, we look at the whole month of— in their 50s, we look at the whole month of august to the beginning of september, the risk of hospitalisation for somebody who is unvaccinated per 100,000 people is about— unvaccinated per 100,000 people is about 40. _ unvaccinated per 100,000 people is about 40, someone in their 50s. and it is about _ about 40, someone in their 50s. and it is about three per 100,000 people if you _ it is about three per 100,000 people if you are _ it is about three per 100,000 people if you are double vaccinated. the population — if you are double vaccinated. the population level, it is far lower for the — population level, it is far lower for the double vaccinated. however,
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because _ for the double vaccinated. however, because so— for the double vaccinated. however, because so many people who are very elderly— because so many people who are very elderly have _ because so many people who are very elderly have had both doses of the vaccine, _ elderly have had both doses of the vaccine, looking at the figures in the brought numbers, there are still more _ the brought numbers, there are still more people sadly dying, who are double _ more people sadly dying, who are double vaccinated who are very elderly — double vaccinated who are very elderly with covid, because the vaccines— elderly with covid, because the vaccines are really good at preventing severe disease and death but not _ preventing severe disease and death but not 100% protection. in a situation _ but not 100% protection. in a situation lots of people with the vaccine, — situation lots of people with the vaccine, sadly, some will still have covid _ vaccine, sadly, some will still have covid and — vaccine, sadly, some will still have covid and not be with us any more. but the _ covid and not be with us any more. but the protection is very clear at the population level and you can find that— the population level and you can find that data. it is the population level and you can find that data.— find that data. it is interesting, chris, find that data. it is interesting, chris. how _ find that data. it is interesting, chris, how many _ find that data. it is interesting, chris, how many more - find that data. it is interesting, | chris, how many more different find that data. it is interesting, i chris, how many more different ways we can analyse the impact of the infection now and the consequences of who is being infected because we are getting so much more information.— are getting so much more information. . . ., information. yes, and to me, the most reassuring _ information. yes, and to me, the most reassuring thing _ information. yes, and to me, the most reassuring thing is - information. yes, and to me, the most reassuring thing is that i i information. yes, and to me, the| most reassuring thing is that i am increasingly seeing cases and helping to deal with cases in
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hospitals and care homes where you seek big groups of people who are in the sort of age range where, where they too have caught throwing a virus this time last year in the pre—vaccine era, there would have been a disaster. and almost always now, we have seen people with the infection and they don't even know, most have no symptoms whatsoever, telling us that even though the infection may have broken vaccine in some cases, that is only happening third of the time, when it does break through, most of the time people have no symptoms of very few symptoms at all, so it is doing a brilliantjob. we think it is about 95% effective. the rate at which you end up in hospital catching coronavirus now having been vaccinated is about 20 times lower than in the pre—vaccine era for the same sort of person. that is a brilliant success story and it sort of helps us to go into winter with a lot more confidence then we would have. ifeela lot more confidence then we would have. ifeel a lot more lot more confidence then we would have. i feel a lot more optimistic as each week goes by, actually. that
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is uuite as each week goes by, actually. that is quite sunny. _ as each week goes by, actually. that is quite sunny, chris. _ as each week goes by, actually. that is quite sunny, chris. that sounds good. i don't know if either of you have had a cold in the last week or two, but it seems like everyone make it back at school, also took nasty colds going around, but i am really struck from our inbox about the confusion that causes the people thinking, is this a cold? could it be covid? i have been vaccinated, must i check? an interesting question here. i think this is really common, certainly— i think this is really common, certainly in my household. i know when _ certainly in my household. i know when i _ certainly in my household. i know when i go — certainly in my household. i know when i go to the supermarket now, i will pick— when i go to the supermarket now, i will pick up — when i go to the supermarket now, i will pick up some cold and flu tablets. — will pick up some cold and flu tablets, some aspirin for a fever, some _ tablets, some aspirin for a fever, some paracetamol, because i know it
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is inevitable — some paracetamol, because i know it is inevitable someone in the household catch a cold at this time of year— household catch a cold at this time of year and — household catch a cold at this time of year and we are seeing that. the symptoms— of year and we are seeing that. the symptoms people must still look for are the _ symptoms people must still look for are the three main ones, and with the delta — are the three main ones, and with the delta variant there is a range of symptoms, but people will have one of— of symptoms, but people will have one of these three symptoms if they have covid, — one of these three symptoms if they have covid, and work rate them. i knew, _ have covid, and work rate them. i knew, continuous car, a high temperature or loss of taste and smelt _ temperature or loss of taste and smelt if— temperature or loss of taste and smell. if any of those symptoms are present, _ smell. if any of those symptoms are present, go— smell. if any of those symptoms are present, go and get the test. —— continuous — present, go and get the test. —— continuous cough. a good piece of advice _ continuous cough. a good piece of advice is _ continuous cough. a good piece of advice is to— continuous cough. a good piece of advice is to use lateral flow test available — advice is to use lateral flow test available and you can get it at home, — available and you can get it at home, and that will give you some indication— home, and that will give you some indication that if one comes up positive, — indication that if one comes up positive, they are good at finding a higher— positive, they are good at finding a higher viral— positive, they are good at finding a higher viral load, positive, they are good at finding a higherviral load, seekthe pcr confirmation test. in many cases, it will not _ confirmation test. in many cases, it will not be — confirmation test. in many cases, it will not be covid and we do not want to overwhelm the testing system, but we want _ to overwhelm the testing system, but we want to _ to overwhelm the testing system, but we want to follow—up if somebody is genuinely— we want to follow—up if somebody is genuinely concerned. hopefully it is 'ust genuinely concerned. hopefully it is just a _ genuinely concerned. hopefully it is just a cold — genuinely concerned. hopefully it is just a cold. one final point on
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that — just a cold. one final point on that. sometimes after having a vaccine, — that. sometimes after having a vaccine, including younger people, we can— vaccine, including younger people, we can feel— vaccine, including younger people, we can feel unwell and i already have _ we can feel unwell and i already have -- — we can feel unwell and i already have -- if— we can feel unwell and i already have —— if you already have a cold coming _ have —— if you already have a cold coming on. — have —— if you already have a cold coming on, you might feel that even more _ current guidance is that regardless of what people received as their first loss of vaccination, they will probably be offered either pfizer or moderna's vaccine as their booster. so in other words, you get an rna booster dose, but what will it do to your community? different things to different people, because some people will be younger or older and younger people will probably make more agile, faster response than
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older person, but everybody should make some response. when you boost the underlying immune response, you consolidated and make it bigger than it was before. the idea is we push everybody up to a level of antibody in the bloodstream that will have the effect of doing two things. in the effect of doing two things. in the short—term, a sufficiently high antibody level that they will not be able to be infected at all, and then with time, we expect levels of antibody to dwindle and fall because thatis antibody to dwindle and fall because that is how the immune system works and it is what happens with the flu vaccine, example. despite that, the level of antibody will remain high and people will not be able to get severely unwell, even if they do catch coronavirus, which could happen towards the tail end of winter, because it will continue to circulate. but either way, winter, because it will continue to circulate. but eitherway, everyone is well protected and will not become a victim of coronavirus, ending up in hospital with any more likelihood than they would already. an interesting question from dave in
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bromley. i was walking past an office block, people were smoking from a vapour pen, and dave wants to know... what do we know about that? just to say thank you to dave, how many— just to say thank you to dave, how many months have chris and i been coming _ many months have chris and i been coming on — many months have chris and i been coming on these and answering these questions? _ coming on these and answering these questions? as somebody who has done a lot of— questions? as somebody who has done a lot of studies on vaping and smoking, _ a lot of studies on vaping and smoking, finally something that connects— smoking, finally something that connects these topics. we have looked — connects these topics. we have looked at — connects these topics. we have looked at modelling of air transmission of those droplets when you are _ transmission of those droplets when you are vapour. it is very way to quit— you are vapour. it is very way to quit smoking, so if you'll be exhaling _ quit smoking, so if you'll be exhaling cards of vapour, that will mean _ exhaling cards of vapour, that will mean there are droplets. most use
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iow-power— mean there are droplets. most use low— power devices mean there are droplets. most use low—power devices with mean there are droplets. most use low— power devices with low battery power. _ low— power devices with low battery power. and — low— power devices with low battery power, and if they exhale, it will increase — power, and if they exhale, it will increase the risk of transmission by about— increase the risk of transmission by about i%~ _ increase the risk of transmission by about 1%. but if you are using a high—powered device, which produces plumes _ high—powered device, which produces plumes of— high—powered device, which produces plumes of clouds are that, people can do— plumes of clouds are that, people can do tricks with it, what we call cloud _ can do tricks with it, what we call cloud chasing, that will increase the risk— cloud chasing, that will increase the risk of— cloud chasing, that will increase the risk of transmission by 17%. my advice _ the risk of transmission by 17%. my advice to— the risk of transmission by 17%. my advice to those people is do not go back to _ advice to those people is do not go back to smoking, that is much worse and will_ back to smoking, that is much worse and will put — back to smoking, that is much worse and will put you at significantly increased risk of severe covid—19 hospitalisation and death. if you are vaping, be discreet and considerate of others, do it outdoors _ considerate of others, do it outdoors or only in your own home and do _ outdoors or only in your own home and do not — outdoors or only in your own home and do not blow part of plumes all over everybody. it is not small, it is not _ over everybody. it is not small, it is not zero. — over everybody. it is not small, it is not zero, and we need to keep that in— is not zero, and we need to keep that in mind. so is not zero, and we need to keep that in mind-— that in mind. so if you can smell it, ou that in mind. so if you can smell it. you are _ that in mind. so if you can smell it, you are potentially _ that in mind. so if you can smell it, you are potentially inhaling . that in mind. so if you can smell. it, you are potentially inhaling it? yes, and the vast majority of those who vape _ yes, and the vast majority of those
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who vape would only be vaping at home _ who vape would only be vaping at home or— who vape would only be vaping at home or not around many people. avoid _ home or not around many people. avoid exhaling and inhaling that, especially when people vape. the other point _ especially when people vape. tue: other point that is useful especially when people vape. ti9: other point that is useful to especially when people vape. ti9 other point that is useful to bear in mind here is while the vape itself might not be infectious, because the particles of vape are small, what it does do is show us how broadly it can spread. when a person breathes out one of these vapes and it is flavoured, you can smell it a long way away, and you are literally breathing in molecules that were in that person's lungs so it shows you where the air currents are going. there will be other stuff in among that plume and you would therefore be wandering into it and bring some of it in when you are downwind of that person. it is a useful guide also aware currents go and how ugly they can carry rings
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from one person to another. == and how ugly they can carry rings from one person to another. -- and how they can _ from one person to another. -- and how they can carry _ from one person to another. -- and how they can carry things. - from one person to another. -- and how they can carry things. thank i from one person to another. -- and | how they can carry things. thank you both, avoid the common cold, stay well and we will see you again next week. .. , :. well and we will see you again next week. ,, y:, well and we will see you again next week._ goodbye! it i well and we will see you again nextj week._ goodbye! it is week. see you soon. goodbye! it is cominu week. see you soon. goodbye! it is coming up — week. see you soon. goodbye! it is coming up to _ week. see you soon. goodbye! it is coming up to half— week. see you soon. goodbye! it is coming up to half past _ week. see you soon. goodbye! it is coming up to half past nine. - matt tebbutt takes over in the saturday kitchen. matt — what's on the menu for us? our special guest today is gary kemp! nice to see you. last time iso uu were filming the documentary. yes, promoting something, which... i have since _ yes, promoting something, which... i have since been arrested for that and because of hgv drivers, it is no longer— and because of hgv drivers, it is no longer on _ and because of hgv drivers, it is no longer on the shelves. we and because of hgv drivers, it is no longer on the shelves.— longer on the shelves. we can talk about your — longer on the shelves. we can talk about your latest _ longer on the shelves. we can talk about your latest album _ longer on the shelves. we can talk about your latest album in - longer on the shelves. we can talk about your latest album in just i longer on the shelves. we can talk about your latest album in just a l about your latest album in just a bit on the show, for now, food heaven, food hell, what should i do on food heaven? i
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heaven, food hell, what should i do on food heaven?— on food heaven? i like clean food, i am art on food heaven? i like clean food, i am part of— on food heaven? i like clean food, i am part of the _ on food heaven? i like clean food, i am part of the liberal _ on food heaven? i like clean food, i am part of the liberal elite, - on food heaven? i like clean food, i am part of the liberal elite, i i am part of the liberal elite, i suppose. _ am part of the liberal elite, i suppose, clean fish, vegetables... when _ suppose, clean fish, vegetables... when does — suppose, clean fish, vegetables... when does that happen in the rock star's life? ~ , , star's life? well these bowls were ha enin: star's life? well these bowls were happening in _ star's life? well these bowls were happening in m — star's life? well these bowls were happening in m a _ star's life? well these bowls were happening in la a few— star's life? well these bowls were happening in la a few years i star's life? well these bowls were happening in la a few years ago i star's life? well these bowls were i happening in la a few years ago and it was— happening in la a few years ago and it was a _ happening in la a few years ago and it was a nice — happening in la a few years ago and it was a nice way of presenting food — it was a nice way of presenting food but— it was a nice way of presenting food. but when does it happen in the rock star's _ food. but when does it happen in the rock star's life? yeah. but i hate sharing — rock star's life? yeah. but i hate sharing food. i'm sorry, especially now, _ sharing food. i'm sorry, especially now. so— sharing food. i'm sorry, especially now, so sharing i'm not into, i don't — now, so sharing i'm not into, i don't like _ now, so sharing i'm not into, i don't like pork unless it is in a sausage — don't like pork unless it is in a sausage probably. i don't like the texture _ sausage probably. i don't like the texture and i never got the texture, it never— texture and i never got the texture, it never felt — texture and i never got the texture, it never felt right. sweet and sour is the _ it never felt right. sweet and sour is the enemy as far as i am concerned. it is like a comedy horror— concerned. it is like a comedy horror film. concerned. it is like a comedy horrorfilm. it concerned. it is like a comedy horror film. it is the mixture of these — horror film. it is the mixture of these two _ horror film. it is the mixture of these two strange things. i like my savoury— these two strange things. i like my
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savoury to — these two strange things. i like my savoury to be savoury and my sweet _ savoury to be savoury and my sweet i _ savoury to be savoury and my sweet- - -_ savoury to be savoury and my sweet... . . . ., sweet... i understand and i read that ou sweet... i understand and i read that you used — sweet... i understand and i read that you used to _ sweet... i understand and i read that you used to enjoy _ sweet... i understand and i read that you used to enjoy a - sweet... i understand and i read that you used to enjoy a raw- sweet... i understand and i read i that you used to enjoy a raw sausage as a kid delete mac —— as a kid? these were the dark days, when we went shopping as a kid, yes, and... did you _ went shopping as a kid, yes, and... did you run — went shopping as a kid, yes, and... did you run off with it like a comedy dog? we did you run off with it like a comedy dog?— did you run off with it like a comedy dog? did you run off with it like a comed do 2 a a, a, comedy dog? we came from a poor background — comedy dog? we came from a poor background so _ comedy dog? we came from a poor background so couldn't _ comedy dog? we came from a poor background so couldn't afford - background so couldn't afford flames — background so couldn't afford flames. ~ , background so couldn't afford flames. ~ ., ., . , background so couldn't afford flames. ., ., . , . , flames. we had two incredible chefs or others as — flames. we had two incredible chefs or others as well. _ flames. we had two incredible chefs or others as well. what _ flames. we had two incredible chefs or others as well. what have - flames. we had two incredible chefs or others as well. what have you - flames. we had two incredible chefs| or others as well. what have you got for us? i or others as well. what have you got for us? , ., ., ., , for us? i fish flavoured aubergine, and a sweet _ for us? i fish flavoured aubergine, and a sweet and _ for us? i fish flavoured aubergine, and a sweet and sour— for us? i fish flavoured aubergine, and a sweet and sour dish, - for us? i fish flavoured aubergine, and a sweet and sour dish, and i for us? i fish flavoured aubergine, i and a sweet and sour dish, and there is no_ and a sweet and sour dish, and there is no fish _ and a sweet and sour dish, and there is no fish in— and a sweet and sour dish, and there is no fish in it — and a sweet and sour dish, and there is no fish in it. an — and a sweet and sour dish, and there is no fish in it.— is no fish in it. an interesting name for _ is no fish in it. an interesting name for a — is no fish in it. an interesting name for a dish. _ is no fish in it. an interestingi name for a dish. traditionally fishes used _ name for a dish. traditionally fishes used in _ name for a dish. traditionally fishes used in it, _ name for a dish. traditionally fishes used in it, perhaps - name for a dish. traditionally fishes used in it, perhaps a i name for a dish. traditionally l fishes used in it, perhaps a fish sauce, — fishes used in it, perhaps a fish sauce, hut— fishes used in it, perhaps a fish sauce, but it _ fishes used in it, perhaps a fish sauce, but it is _ fishes used in it, perhaps a fish sauce, but it is really— fishes used in it, perhaps a fish sauce, but it is really the - fishes used in it, perhaps a fish sauce, but it is really the taste| sauce, but it is really the taste that_ sauce, but it is really the taste that goes— sauce, but it is really the taste that goes weti— sauce, but it is really the taste that goes well with _ sauce, but it is really the taste that goes well with fish. - sauce, but it is really the taste that goes well with fish. 0k. . sauce, but it is really the taste that goes well with fish.- sauce, but it is really the taste that goes well with fish. 0k. a new face to saturday _
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that goes well with fish. 0k. a new face to saturday kitchen, _ that goes well with fish. 0k. a new face to saturday kitchen, welcome| that goes well with fish. 0k. a new. face to saturday kitchen, welcome to the show. you will teach us about syrian food, something i know nothing about. you have the most amazing, incredible story that we will talk about on the show in just a bit. tell us what dish you are doing. a bit. tell us what dish you are doinu. ., ., ., , ., a bit. tell us what dish you are doing. falafel, flatbread and tahini sauce. doing. falafel, flatbread and tahini sauce- very _ doing. falafel, flatbread and tahini sauce. very nice. _ doing. falafel, flatbread and tahini sauce. very nice. washing - doing. falafel, flatbread and tahini sauce. very nice. washing it - doing. falafel, flatbread and tahini sauce. very nice. washing it down | doing. falafel, flatbread and tahini i sauce. very nice. washing it down we have helen- — sauce. very nice. washing it down we have helen. how— sauce. very nice. washing it down we have helen. how are _ sauce. very nice. washing it down we have helen. how are you, _ sauce. very nice. washing it down we have helen. how are you, helen? - sauce. very nice. washing it down we have helen. how are you, helen? i i sauce. very nice. washing it down we l have helen. how are you, helen? i am ve well. have helen. how are you, helen? i am very well- i _ have helen. how are you, helen? i am very well- i had — have helen. how are you, helen? i am very well- i had a _ have helen. how are you, helen? i am very well. i had a lot _ have helen. how are you, helen? i am very well. i had a lot of— have helen. how are you, helen? lam very well. i had a lot of fun researching the lines for this week, as always — researching the lines for this week, as always -- — researching the lines for this week, as always. —— the wines. some gorgeous— as always. —— the wines. some gorgeous wines. as always. -- the wines. some gorgeous wines.— as always. -- the wines. some gorgeous wines. have you finished the birthday _ gorgeous wines. have you finished the birthday celebrations? - gorgeous wines. have you finished the birthday celebrations? just - the birthday celebrations? just about. i managed to drag it out quite _ about. i managed to drag it out quite sometime so we are over it in this house — quite sometime so we are over it in this house it— quite sometime so we are over it in this house-— this house. it is going on and on and on! rights, _ this house. it is going on and on and on! rights, all— this house. it is going on and on and on! rights, all about- this house. it is going on and on and on! rights, all about fun, i this house. it is going on and on | and on! rights, all about fun, we and on! rights, allabout fun, we will see matt 10am. and on! rights, all about fun, we will see matt 10am.— and on! rights, all about fun, we will see matt 10am. gary, have you ever been out _ will see matt 10am. gary, have you
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ever been out for— will see matt 10am. gary, have you ever been out for tap _ will see matt 10am. gary, have you ever been out for tap as? _ will see matt 10am. gary, have you ever been out for tap as? i - will see matt 10am. gary, have you ever been out for tap as? i have . will see matt 10am. gary, have you ever been out for tap as? i have a i ever been out for tap as? i have a feelin: i ever been out for tap as? i have a feeling i did _ ever been out for tap as? i have a feeling i did guard _ ever been out for tap as? i have a feeling i did guard the _ ever been out for tap as? i have a feeling i did guard the food, - ever been out for tap as? i have a | feeling i did guard the food, never have your— feeling i did guard the food, never have your back to the restaurant. laughter. have your back to the restaurant. laughter-_ have your back to the restaurant. laughter-— have your back to the restaurant. laughter. ., ~ ., ., , laughter. you don't know who is cominu at laughter. you don't know who is coming at it! _ laughter. you don't know who is coming at it! so _ laughter. you don't know who is coming at it! so you _ laughter. you don't know who is coming at it! so you have - laughter. you don't know who is coming at it! so you have never i coming at it! so you have never taken a chip _ coming at it! so you have never taken a chip off _ coming at it! so you have never taken a chip off someone - coming at it! so you have never taken a chip off someone else's plate? taken a chip off someone else's late? . , ' taken a chip off someone else's late? ., , ' ., �* plate? that is different, i don't mind sharing — plate? that is different, i don't mind sharing their— plate? that is different, i don't mind sharing their food. - i know his type! it's your type. a tricky customer there, quite fussy, but matt is on at 10am. relaxing visa requirements for foreign lorry drivers is among the temporary measures being discussed by ministers as they try to solve the disruption to fuel deliveries. the current tanker driver shortage has meant a number of petrol stations have had to close, leading to long queues at garages across the country.
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we have seen that live this morning. but industry leaders say temporary visas are only "part of the solution". we're joined now by the chair of the transport select committee, huw merriman. conservative mp, thank you for joining us. so, this visa change to get more foreign drivers in, is that the answer?— get more foreign drivers in, is that the answer? ~ �* ., , the answer? well, i'm not so sure it is because — the answer? well, i'm not so sure it is because mainland _ the answer? well, i'm not so sure it is because mainland europe - the answer? well, i'm not so sure it is because mainland europe has - the answer? well, i'm not so sure it is because mainland europe has its| is because mainland europe has its own shortage of about 400,000. poland, were quite a lot of drivers come from, is about 100,000 short, so they are also improving their wages, so to a certain extent, why would those people leave their families, their homes to come over here? it is less attractive, so there is a long—term problem here, but i do agree that we have a short—term fix which must be delivered on, so we will have to see if we can attract people over for a short period of time, but the industry needs to just wake up. this is not the solution. looking out of the workforce that they have got in
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the workforce that they have got in the uk is what they really need to do. ., , , , , ., do. you see the industry needs to wake u - , do. you see the industry needs to wake up. but _ do. you see the industry needs to wake up, but maybe _ do. you see the industry needs to wake up, but maybe the - do. you see the industry needs to i wake up, but maybe the government should have been more awake at the wheel on this and forced some action sooner. ~ , , ., , ., sooner. well, this is a private industry- _ sooner. well, this is a private industry. there _ sooner. well, this is a private industry. there is _ sooner. well, this is a private industry. there is a _ sooner. well, this is a private industry. there is a ways i sooner. well, this is a private industry. there is a ways this | industry. there is a ways this temptation to say the government should fix everything. the government does not put food in the supermarkets, tesco and other companies do that, and five years ago, the select committee that i now chair looked at this issue when there were 20,000 hgv drivers short and it was no surprise when we listened to the conditions that only i% listened to the conditions that only i% of the workforce were female, 2% were under 25, the average age of a lorry driver is 55 years old. it has been a way of life, but it is not a way of life that others are willing to join, way of life that others are willing tojoin, so the industry, the private industry, needs to fix its conditions. people are not willing to sleep in a cab overnight and people are finding more attractive jobs, is a private industry has to step up and look after its workforce in a different way. not every
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problem is a solution for government to find. . ,., problem is a solution for government to find. ., ,., ., to find. having said that, the government _ to find. having said that, the government is _ to find. having said that, the government is now - to find. having said that, the government is now stepping | to find. having said that, the i government is now stepping in and doing this having said it would not change the visa rules and it now looks like that is almost certainly going to happen. drivers are being told not to panic, but it looks like ministers are panicking.— ministers are panicking. well, i recret ministers are panicking. well, i regret what _ ministers are panicking. well, i regret what we _ ministers are panicking. well, i regret what we are _ ministers are panicking. well, i regret what we are seeing i ministers are panicking. well, i regret what we are seeing at i ministers are panicking. well, i l regret what we are seeing at the four courts. i was out on my bike working in the constituency and came past a garage and it was chaos in an otherwise quiet place i have to say, as soon as word gets out that there might be a fuel shortage, people understandably react we need to calm things down and hopefully this news will give more confidence. there is noissue will give more confidence. there is no issue with the overall fuel supplies we have, it is just a question of getting it through into the forecourts, so we cannot let incy get off the hook on this one for years they have been talking about a driver shortage, they have not revised the way that drugs are looked after, paid, there has been a dash to the bottom to find people from abroad who will tolerate those conditions. we have a millionjob
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vacancies in this country, so this industry will have to compete and if we all have to pay more than our food, then i'm afraid that is a cost we will have to bear because things have got to change. this we will have to bear because things have got to change.— have got to change. as you say, artl have got to change. as you say, partly there _ have got to change. as you say, partly there is — have got to change. as you say, partly there is no _ have got to change. as you say, partly there is no shortage i have got to change. as you say, partly there is no shortage of i have got to change. as you say, i partly there is no shortage of fuel, people are being told that they should not worry about this, but in the short—term, to stop those queues and reassure the public, should the army start driving some tankers around and get dull mystic make deliveries back on track? the government _ deliveries back on track? the government have _ deliveries back on track? the: government have said deliveries back on track? t'ta: government have said that deliveries back on track? tt9 government have said that they will look at all options. i think the problem is that when people see the army taking action, they might panic even more. i think some of the measures brought in such as price caps in terms of only £30 worth of fuel will probably help matters. we tend to find that we see this panic for a little period of time and then things calm down once people see that fuel supplies are getting through. we had this week ago with driver shortages but we did not have the forecourts absolutely jammed, driver shortages but we did not have the forecourts absolutelyjammed, so i think we just have a bit of a panic going on at the moment. people
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need to not panic in the ways that they are. we do need to get the fuel through. i think the government's announcement will give a little more confidence and hopefully things will settle down, but as i say, the real answer in this, because it has been going on for years, is to change the terms and conditions that this workforce has had to endure for too long and that quite frankly they are not willing to put up with it. why is it that only i% of that workforce in female? in any other industry, that would be regarded as absolute shocking and that perhaps tells you everything as to what has been going on. :, , , everything as to what has been going on, :, , , , everything as to what has been going on. :, , , , :, , , on. you see it is up to the industry to do more — on. you see it is up to the industry to do more and — on. you see it is up to the industry to do more and that _ on. you see it is up to the industry to do more and that they - on. you see it is up to the industry to do more and that they should i on. you see it is up to the industry i to do more and that they should have seen it coming, but last year, lots of diving tests for lorry drivers had to be cancelled. that is not up to the industry, that is something the government could have sorted, knowing that there could be a problem later. t knowing that there could be a problem later.— knowing that there could be a problem later. i certainly accept the oint problem later. i certainly accept the point that _ problem later. i certainly accept the point that the _ problem later. i certainly accept the point that the agencies, i problem later. i certainly accept the point that the agencies, so l problem later. i certainly accept i the point that the agencies, so the dvla and the dv essay have, for some time, had difficulties in terms of getting the training of drivers
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through promptly. the government has now changed the testing mechanism so rather than having to do too over arts —based period, you can now do one. i also... arts -based period, you can now do one- iatso---_ arts -based period, you can now do one. i also...- delegated i arts -based period, you can now do | one. i also...- delegated back one. ialso... audio. delegated back to the industry— one. ialso... audio. delegated back to the industry testing _ one. ialso... audio. delegated back to the industry testing rather - one. ialso... audio. delegated back to the industry testing rather than i to the industry testing rather than it being centralised, so there is more that could be done. the wages and terms and conditions provided by the private industry need to speak changed so the industry is more attractive to new recruits. thank ou ve attractive to new recruits. thank you very much — attractive to new recruits. thank you very much indeed _ attractive to new recruits. thank you very much indeed for - attractive to new recruits. thanki you very much indeed for talking attractive to new recruits. thank i you very much indeed for talking to us. . ~' you very much indeed for talking to us. . ~ , :, you very much indeed for talking to us. :, .. ,, 21 you very much indeed for talking to us._ 21 minutes - you very much indeed for talking to us._ 21 minutes to i you very much indeed for talking to us._ 21 minutes to ten i you very much indeed for talking to us._ 21 minutes to ten is | us. thank you. 21 minutes to ten is the time. us. thank you. 21 minutes to ten is the time- how— us. thank you. 21 minutes to ten is the time. how many _ us. thank you. 21 minutes to ten is the time. how many hours - us. thank you. 21 minutes to ten is the time. how many hours have i l us. thank you. 21 minutes to ten is i the time. how many hours have i got? until the ryder cup begins again? 0nly until the ryder cup begins again? only a few. get your snacks in! it is so one—sided after the first day. the team talks will probably be quite similar. wipe the slate clean, start a new day, the americans cannot be complacent that europe cannot be complacent that europe cannot allow it to change their mental state for top the momentum is slightly with europe, though.
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it is still a mountain for team europe to climb on the banks of lake michigan. but they've performed miracles on american soil before, and so will be looking to show fighting spirt on the second day, with team usa leading the ryder cup by a record opening day score of 6—2. rory mcilroy has paid the price for his poor showing and, for the first time, he will sit out of the session this morning. andy swiss is there in wisconsin, and watched the first day's action unfold. it was a day in which america's confidence proved to be entirelyjustified. europe had set out with high hopes — an early win forjohn rahm and sergio garcia — but it proved their team's only victory, as the favourites soon lived up to their billing. debutante xander schauffele and patrick cantlay thrashing rory mcilroy and ian poulter, and their 3—1 lead soon grew as the us took control of the four—balls. tony finau condemning mcilroy to his second defeat,
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before schauffele and dustinjohnson extended to their advantage, seeing off paul casey and and bernd wiesberger. there was some late consolation for europe. tyrell hatton's gutsy putt on the final hole secured a half, while tommy fleetwood and viktor hovland also finished all square against cantlay and justin thomas. but the us have a commanding 6—2 lead after an utterly dominant performance. well, europe knew this would be tough, and that's exactly how it's proved. they now need a big second day fightback to keep their ryder cup hopes alive. andy swiss, bbc news, whistling straits. now it's the biggest fight in britain for three years and one that will define anthony joshua's career, as he builds towards the much anticipated heavyweight showdown with tyson fury. tonight though, in front of 67,000 fans, he will first have to overcome the ukrainian former cruiserweight champion 0leksandr usyk, known for his box of tricks and spoiling the party for home crowds.
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we'rejoined now by promoter eddie hearn. good morning, thank you for your time for greatest evils of i do not want to do you out of a job, but some fights do not need much promoting. a sell—out crowd, we have waited so long to seejoshua in the ring in such a pivotal fight for him. :, , , . ring in such a pivotal fight for him. .y ': ring in such a pivotal fight for him. :_ m , him. really difficult fight. usyk is the undisputed _ him. really difficult fight. usyk is the undisputed cruiserweight i him. really difficult fight. usyk is i the undisputed cruiserweight world champion. the worst thing is that i spend all these weeks hyping the fight and selling the fight and actually by the time fight day comes around, i am so nervous myself that i don't know what is going to happen tonight. so much is on the line, to tremendous heavyweights, like you said, the first time we have had a massive crowd out through the pandemic and with joshua massive crowd out through the pandemic and withjoshua fighting for the first time since three years ago, but we'd anticipate a tremendous fight. 50 ago, but we'd anticipate a tremendous fight. ago, but we'd anticipate a tremendous fiuht. : ., , tremendous fight. so much 'eopardy for joshua. tremendous fight. so much 'eopardy forloshua- the i tremendous fight. so much 'eopardy forjoshua. he has i tremendous fight. so much 'eopardy forjoshua. he has four i tremendous fight. so much jeopardy forjoshua. he has four belts - tremendous fight. so much jeopardy forjoshua. he has four belts on i tremendous fight. so much jeopardy forjoshua. he has four belts on the | forjoshua. he has four belts on the line and his reputation, if the worst happens, what would it mean
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for him going forward? you worst happens, what would it mean for him going forward?— for him going forward? you never want to lose- _ for him going forward? you never want to lose. we _ for him going forward? you never want to lose. we remember i for him going forward? you never want to lose. we remember that l want to lose. we remember that horrible night at madison square garden where he lost to andy rees, he came back after that defeat, but this is as close to a 50—50 fight as you can get. like i said, joshua is the unified heavyweight world champion, usyk the undisputed cruiserweight world champion, never been beaten, both of them captured gold in the london 2012 games and usyk has that kind of scary air of confidence about him and it is quite disturbing, to be honest with you, so a really tough job. the atmosphere, the stadium in tottenham is looking absolutely superb. it will be a special night for british boxing and we have everything crossed that anthonyjoshua does the business tonight. tar crossed that anthony joshua does the business tonight.— business tonight. for those who do not follow sport _ business tonight. for those who do not follow sport that _ business tonight. for those who do not follow sport that closely, i not follow sport that closely, people might be surprised that it can be so close given that usyk is stepping up a weight, he is lighter, shorter, but he is known for this unpredictable box of tricks and as steve bunce said earlier, he is a backyard dog who loves going to
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cities away from home and spoiling the party. he cities away from home and spoiling the -a . :, , ., , cities away from home and spoiling thea . ._ :, the party. he went to germany to firht the the party. he went to germany to fight the german _ the party. he went to germany to fight the german mark _ the party. he went to germany to fight the german mark or - the party. he went to germany to fight the german mark or hook. the party. he went to germany to fight the german mark or hook to the party. he went to germany to i fight the german mark or hook to win his first world title, then he went to russia, then he went to latvia and beat the latvian champion to become undisputed. remember, he popped over to manchester to beat tony bell you, then he came back to the uk, so he is not afraid of going into the backyard, the lions den of an opponent. it is a different lions den with anthonyjoshua. the crowd is very special, it is very intense and ajay is a huge, huge man, great athlete with huge punching power, speed and variety, but usyk is arguably the better boxer, the more skilled boxer in this fight and he has had over 200 amateurfights, never been beaten, so technically, a really tough fight. we want aj to impose himself early in this fight, and i think if he can do that, if you can showcases power, i think you
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can stop him inside the distance. eddie, it's naga, good morning for what i was the fight on? the eddie, it's naga, good morning for what i was the fight on?— what i was the fight on? the fight will be 10pm _ what i was the fight on? the fight will be 10pm sharp _ what i was the fight on? the fight will be 10pm sharp uk _ what i was the fight on? the fight will be 10pm sharp uk time. i what i was the fight on? the fight will be 10pm sharp uk time. be l will be 10pm sharp uk time. be there! so tell me, strictly is on tonight, the ryder cup on tonight, there will be lots of people who will not watch boxing or do not normally watch boxing. why should they stay up there saturday night to watch this fight? to they stay up there saturday night to watch this fight?— they stay up there saturday night to watch this fight? to be honest, that would be a huge _ watch this fight? to be honest, that would be a huge mistake _ watch this fight? to be honest, that would be a huge mistake because . would be a huge mistake because boxing is, for me, one of the most thrilling sports around. anthony joshuais thrilling sports around. anthony joshua is a man who has transcended the sport. it does not matter if you are a young boys, young girl, young adults, mum or dad, grandma or auntie or uncle, you love anthony joshua because he dedicates himself for the sport for this is an iconic moment in british boxing, british sport, with all due respect to strictly, it looks like we are in trouble in the ryder cup and so there is only one thing to watch
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tonight. is there is only one thing to watch toniaht. , ~ .,, ., there is only one thing to watch toniaht. , ~ ., , tonight. is it like hosting a party, a big party. _ tonight. is it like hosting a party, a big party. you _ tonight. is it like hosting a party, a big party. you are _ tonight. is it like hosting a party, a big party, you are on _ tonight. is it like hosting a party, l a big party, you are on tenterhooks the whole time to make sure everyone is having a good time, running here, serving them here, there and everywhere, being everywhere at once. parties going on up the road! once. parties auoin on u- the road! , parties going on up the road! yes, it is always — parties going on up the road! yes, it is always difficult _ parties going on up the road! yes, it is always difficult on _ parties going on up the road! use: it is always difficult on fight night because you want to make sure everyone is having a great time, we have a great undercard as well and aj is very close to as well, so it is a real nail—biting thing, but it will be one we should all remember. you mentioned the undercard there and we have been amazed by this, the shot of ricky hatton�*s son campbell who is on the undercard tonight. it is like a photo from two decades ago, it is incredible. l is like a photo from two decades ago, it is incredible.— is like a photo from two decades ago, it is incredible. i know, and oor ago, it is incredible. i know, and poor campbell— ago, it is incredible. i know, and poor campbell who _ ago, it is incredible. i know, and poor campbell who is _ ago, it is incredible. i know, and poor campbell who is just - ago, it is incredible. i know, and. poor campbell who is just starting his journey with limited amateur experience getting solid all these massive fights and massive shows, yaxley has a really tough fight tonight —— exe has a really tough fight. it will be a packed night.
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good luck with the hosting. the particles well. thank you very much indeed. everyone is hoping to ca tough contest that will go the distance, 10pm and there will be billed up with steve bunce before that. i'm imagining the tree of canapes going around. going around a boxing try out? good luck! this is a day to have multiple radios and tvs on. not the night and also a 50th birthday party. is that what you are doing tonight? i'm sure there will be a tv somewhere. just have your earpiece in. thank you, mike. let's find out what's happening with the weather. have you made a decision on what you are watching tonight? i'm with you, something on everywhere, to be honest. you have to keep an eye on everything. i'm glad i'm not the person whose 50th birthday at is! anyway, very good morning to you. i've been getting lost in this picture while i was
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waiting on the west coast ofjersey. something overhead, the lighthouse in the distance, a fine start today for greyer elsewhere but wherever you are through today, one day. this weekend will see temperatures reaching the low 20s, just a selection of towns and cities for you, but look what happens by the time we get to the middle part of next week. alton will be with us, a big temperature drop on the way, really happening through monday and tuesday but by wednesday, it will be much, much cooler. that's on the way, as i said, out there at the moment it is incredibly mild but as you can see from the church, plenty of cloud on it full stops and breaks here and there, those injersey as well but some more breaks will appear in north wales, the midlands, parts of the north—east of scotland and towards the very far south—east of england. the rain in shetland during the mid—part of this morning were clear, cloud and the west remaining quite stubborn through the coasts and hills, patchy rain and drizzle but even here, temperatures 17 to 19 degrees down eastern areas, could see 20 to 21! celsius possible.
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through this evening and overnight, breezes with us, a bit more humid out there and tonight as well, more cloud breaks in the nightjust gone, one or two isolated showers particularly towards the east of northern ireland, temperatures sitting in the mid—teens as we start tomorrow morning, so another one starts, southerly winds ahead of this, the weather front that brings the change. think of this summer before it, autumn after it and we have to wait for that to sweep its way through to start to feel the it arrives through the day across ireland, eventually western scotland, bursts of rain, some heavy at times, gusty winds as well but across the east of scotland, much of england wales, other than one or two a slater showers, dry day on sunday and some sunshine around, more than today, highs of 22 in the north highlands, 23 and 21! in some parts of eastern england. the weather front will sweep its way through this we go through sunday night and into monday, heavy rain at times, gusty winds as well, monday morning commute across eastern england could still be wet, the same in eastern
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scotland but it will clear, the afternoon looking drier and brighter year with sunshine on monday, saturday the showers throughout, some heavy infantry, temperatures already starting to dip between 13 and they will dip further as we got accused in wednesday, low pressure in the north, ringing even wetter and windier conditions at times, and just take a look at some of the capital city forecasts into next week, i think the symbols tell it all. change your conditions, rain at times, some sunshine but cooler between 13 and i7 times, some sunshine but cooler between 13 and 17 degrees in the second half of the week. enjoy your day. thank you very much indeed. enjoy your multiple screening day, matt. the newjames bond film, no time to die, is the last time daniel craig will don the 007 tux and to mark his exit, bond is reunited with his iconic aston martin db5. now an 0xfordshire firm has come up with a miniature replica of the car for bond wannabes. david lumb has been to take a look.
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why would i betray you? we all have our secrets. with no time to die likely to be daniel craig's final bond film, they're going to need someone new. someone suave, someone dynamic, someone... whoa, q, what's happened to the car? it's actually meant to be this big. this is our no time today special edition of the dbsjunior launched in celebration of the new film release. it doesn't get any bigger? no. it's made by the little car company in bicester. well, this car is about two thirds of the size of the actual aston martin db5. it has a top speed of 45 miles an hour and a range of 80. and a list of gadgets that even 007
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would be proud of, like smoke, changing number plates and head lamps that turn into machine guns. the idea came about when we were in discussions with aston martin about doing the dbsjunior and then we thought what better present for a bond fan out there? the biggest engineering challenge we had was actually having to make things in miniature, for example, trying to fit mini guns to headlights is no small feat and also where the movie cars, they might need it for a couple of hours on set and they carry big battery packs and everything else, these cars have to work on their 100th, 200,th 1000th cycle. a full—sized dbs could set you back about £1 million. this one is about 90,000. our client base is a mixture of aston martin enthusiasts looking to add to their collection and, of course, bond fans around the world. we believe that these are going to be collectors' items that hopefully will be cherished and passed down through generations of bond fans. only 125 will be made
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and they won't be sold road legal. ok, so on balance today, probably wasn't my day, but when her majesty does call, i'll be ready. love it! that's great. can you imagine yourself in that car? i do not think i would fit in that car, to be brutally honest. film critic ali plumbjoins us now. does that get you all excited, seeing the car and hearing the music? , ., ., , ., , music? yes, no, i really, really want one- _ music? yes, no, i really, really want one- i— music? yes, no, i really, really want one. i will— music? yes, no, i really, really want one. i will be _ music? yes, no, i really, really want one. i will be googling - music? yes, no, i really, really| want one. i will be googling that immediately. want one. i will be googling that immediately-— want one. i will be googling that immediately. what about the film itself? are you _ immediately. what about the film itself? are you ready _ immediately. what about the film itself? are you ready for - immediately. what about the film itself? are you ready for that? - immediately. what about the film itself? are you ready for that? i i itself? are you ready for that? i think i am. it is six now is, nearly six years since spectre came out, so it has been a long time coming for originally it was april 2020 when we were meant to see it and it feels important for bond fans and film fans generally that this is the big
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crowd pleasing blockbuster that has finally made it into cinemas. remember, this is the first one, i think, where we heard in the press, in the news, we are delaying a movie because of the pandemic, because of covid. ~ ., , ., , . because of the pandemic, because of covid. ., , ., , . ., covid. what should we expect from this film? i — covid. what should we expect from this film? | think _ covid. what should we expect from this film? i think this _ covid. what should we expect from this film? i think this potentially i this film? i think this potentially could be one — this film? i think this potentially could be one of _ this film? i think this potentially could be one of his _ this film? i think this potentially could be one of his best - this film? i think this potentially could be one of his best for - this film? i think this potentially l could be one of his best for daniel craig. we have seen sky fault, quantum of solace may be not so good, but this will wrap up hold their plot threads and you have a great new character in the form of rami makik, the oscar winner, and i want to see more gadgets. you mentioned the mini guns in their head lamps, i want more of that. this seems to have everything we have been looking for. it is two hours and 43 minutes, so there is a whole lot of bond to be watching when it comes out in the uk on september 30. when it comes out in the uk on september30. it when it comes out in the uk on september 30.— when it comes out in the uk on september 30. it is interesting you said wrapping _ september 30. it is interesting you said wrapping it — september 30. it is interesting you said wrapping it up. _ september 30. it is interesting you said wrapping it up, because - september 30. it is interesting you said wrapping it up, because this . september 30. it is interesting you said wrapping it up, because this is daniel craig's last movie, last film
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as bond, that has been widely said in interviews and i know you have spoken to him but we will talk about him another time, but for anyone who has been following bond, though you can watch them severally, this feels like the end of a particular bond era so there will be an fresh start next time. era so there will be an fresh start next time-— era so there will be an fresh start next time. , ., �* ., ., next time. yes, i don't want to give an one next time. yes, i don't want to give anyone any — next time. yes, i don't want to give anyone any more — next time. yes, i don't want to give anyone any more homework. - next time. yes, i don't want to give anyone any more homework. like l next time. yes, i don't want to give l anyone any more homework. like you said, lots of tvs and radios on today, but i would advise may be re—watching the previous daniel craig outings because it seems to me like everything is going to knit together. this is the end of an era. he brought it out of the 905. die another day was 2002, but it felt daniel craig reinvented the role. he started out before he was an agent and now he is a retired agent. i cannot wait to see how they put a ball on this. if you're special, exciting and, rightly, it makes me feel proud that there is a british excitement at seeing this kind of things and it is close to ten years ago that he jumped out of a
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helicopter at the london olympic opening ceremony and it feels like yesterday. we opening ceremony and it feels like esterda . ~ ,, .,~ ., ., yesterday. we were speaking to are corresponding _ yesterday. we were speaking to are corresponding in _ yesterday. we were speaking to are corresponding in berlin _ yesterday. we were speaking to are corresponding in berlin a _ yesterday. we were speaking to are corresponding in berlin a moment. yesterday. we were speaking to are i corresponding in berlin a moment ago ahead of the elections and she said that germany cannot imagine angela merkel not being chancellor, perhaps our equivalent is not being able to imagine daniel craig not being born. who is your choice to replace him? i have been seeing henry cavill who seems like a clear choice. he has played superman, a big title franchise role, maybe he doesn't want to do that. he also in the witcher, but would he be a perfect fit after mission impossible and the man from uncle. quite a good—looking quy man from uncle. quite a good—looking guy as well full no. man from uncle. quite a good-looking guy as well ful— guy as well full no, i do not buy it. guy as well full no, i do not buy it- everyone _ guy as well full no, i do not buy it. everyone has— guy as well full no, i do not buy it. everyone has an _ guy as well full no, i do not buy it. everyone has an opinion - guy as well full no, i do not buy it. everyone has an opinion on i guy as well full no, i do not buy - it. everyone has an opinion on james it. everyone has an opinion onjames bond. i think he is too perfect looking. i thinkjames bond needs to be slightly craggy and slightly mean look about him as well traditionally and i do not think henry cavill has that. ~ . �* and i do not think henry cavill has that. ~ ., �*
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and i do not think henry cavill has that. ., , ., that. what you're saying is that it cannot be me- — that. what you're saying is that it cannot be me. that's _ that. what you're saying is that it cannot be me. that's fine! - cannot be me. that's fine! laughter that speculation continues as well, doesn't it? also, i suppose, we have had phoebe waller bridge writing and being involved in the writing as well, so bond has often been accused of being misogynistic and the imbalance of women cosmic rolls which is obviously changing in this bond as well, because we have a female agent, a female 00, but there is humour in it as well, which lobbies the is part of bond. i feel like this could _ lobbies the is part of bond. i feel like this could be _ lobbies the is part of bond. i feel like this could be an _ lobbies the is part of bond. i f,,i like this could be an opportunity to see more of that dry wit from daniel craig. he shied away from it in the past. we sought a literal in specter, but i think with phoebe waller bridge of fleabag fame, this is our chance for more one—liners, generally bond needs to reflect the times he is from four if you look at the 605 and 705, these are different
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eras, different ways of thinking for i'm excited to see how the producers will reinvent this character. i5 will reinvent this character. is this enough, all this hype to get us back into the cinemas in big numbers? i back into the cinemas in big numbers?— back into the cinemas in big numbers? ., ., numbers? i would say so. i am readin: numbers? i would say so. i am reading reports _ numbers? i would say so. i am reading reports that _ numbers? i would say so. i ami reading reports that apparently numbers? i would say so. i am - reading reports that apparently they are having to hire new staff temporarily or perhaps permanently because there is such an interest in seeing no time to die. we are seeing pre—pandemic levels of booking taking place. it is a humongous deal for cinemas and should remind a lot of people of the joy of seeing a motion picture on the big screen with a perfect sound, the popcorn, the whole ceremony of it. it is a tradition for we have the music, the villain, the gadgets, the girls, there is this element of tradition, like i say, and i think cinemas will hopefully do very, very well out of it. ., ~ , ., , . hopefully do very, very well out of it. thank you very much. the way you checked your—
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it. thank you very much. the way you checked your cops _ it. thank you very much. the way you checked your cops there, _ it. thank you very much. the way you checked your cops there, i _ it. thank you very much. the way you checked your cops there, i think - it. thank you very much. the way you checked your cops there, i think you i checked your cops there, i think you are in with a shout for the job. no time to die is in cinemas from thursday, when we'll be speaking to ali again and hearing more from his interview with daniel craig. that's all from breakfast for today. we'll be back tomorrow from six. have a great day, bye—bye.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. queues at petrol stations as the government prepares to announce a temporary visa scheme to make it easierforforeign lorry drivers to work in the uk. we have got labour shortages, not just in hgv drivers, but across the economy. we have got supply chain problems, we have got energy problems, we have got energy problems, and i think we need government to grip these things with us in business and get ahead of these things rather than behind them. two canadians are heading home after spending over 1,000 days in detention in china over spying charges. prince andrew's us lawyers accept he has been served with legal papers alleging that he sexually assaulted virginia giuffre. he denies all allegations. it's the final day of campaigning in germany, where voters will elect
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a new chancellor tomorrow.

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