Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 24, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
this is bbc news, i'm ben mundy. the headlines at 2:00pm: the government urges motorists not to panic buy fuel as long queues form at some service stations amid fears of shortages due to a lack of delivery drivers. if you don't need to fill up don't fill up. there is no shortage. if you are unlucky enough when you do need fuel that it's out, that the chances are the next one would be. police release cctv footage of a man wanted about the killing of sabina nessa in south east london, as they continue to question another man on suspicion of her murder. tonight, a vigil will be held a week after the 28—year—old was attacked as she walked to meet a friend at a pub. a report warns it could take a decade to clear the backlog of cancer treatment in england. anyone for doubles? the duchess of cambridge
2:01 pm
congratulates emma raducanu on winning the us open, as she looks ahead to the future. i still think i have a lot of room for development in terms of my tennis_ for development in terms of my tennis career and when it can go so i'm excited — tennis career and when it can go so i'm excited to start working on it. hello, good afternoon. senior government ministers are meeting later to discuss the closure of some petrol stations because of a shortage of delivery drivers. queues are forming at several forecourts, despite government pleas for people not to panic buy fuel. both bp and esso have closed some petrol stations because of supply problems. and ministers are not ruling out the idea of changing visa rules to bring in foreign lorry drivers or using soldiers to drive fuel tankers.
2:02 pm
our business correspondent, theo leggett, reports. queues outside petrol stations. they had been appearing up and down the country as motorists worry they may not be able to fill up. the fuel giant bp has admitted that some of its outlets have been running dry and a small number have had to close. other retailers have also been affected. but operators say panic buying will only make matters worse. if you don't need to fill up, don't fill up. there is no shortage. if you are unlucky enough when you do need fuel that a site is out, the chances are the next nearest one won't be. there are plenty of petrol stations for the majority of the population. it's not as if you have to drive half an hour to find one, there are plenty about. so don't panic buy, itjust causes more of a problem. there isn't a shortage of fuel. the uk's refineries have plenty. the problem is getting it to petrol stations. the issues that bp has been having in getting supplies to garages
2:03 pm
like this one are serious in themselves, and it is because the company can't get it hold of enough tanker drivers. but that is merely a symptom of a much wider problem, a national shortage of heavy goods vehicle drivers that is affecting the entire economy. at the moment, experts say the country needs an extra 90,000 to 100,000 drivers, but recruiting and training them takes time. it isn't as simple as yes, you have passed your test, brilliant, we are going to send you to scotland or, more tomorrow, because there are lots of other safety related things that have to be done, making sure they know how to secure loads and things like that. it's notjust a case of being a steering wheel attendant any more, there was a lot of pressure on the driver to make sure all the boxes are ticked. this instructor says there is plenty of demand from would—be drivers. the only problem we have at the moment is test dates and getting enough tests for the candidates. we have got such a backlog, and i am sure we are not the only company in that position. people within the industry say more immediate measures are needed while new drivers are trained up.
2:04 pm
they want foreign hauliers to be given short—term visas to help the gap. the government has been reluctant to do this, but today the transport secretary said all options were open. i would do whatever is required if that would help. what i don't want to do, and i have been hinting at this, is undercut, as has happened before, with cheaper european drivers and then find that our drivers drop out because they are being undercut. that doesn't solve the problem, itjust creates a new problem. the shortage of lorry drivers is so serious that it's unlikely any single step will solve it in the short term. but ministers are acutely aware that further disruptions to the supply chain could mean even more empty shelves in the run—up to christmas. theo leggett, bbc news. let's get more from our deputy political editor, vicki young, in westminster. the government saying it will do
2:05 pm
whatever required to sort this so whatever required to sort this so what are they going to do? the? whatever required to sort this so what are they going to do? they are not rulin: what are they going to do? they are not ruling anything _ what are they going to do? they are not ruling anything out _ what are they going to do? they are not ruling anything out but - what are they going to do? they are not ruling anything out but what - what are they going to do? they are not ruling anything out but what we | not ruling anything out but what we need to know is what are they going to rule in. they will be this meeting at a 3pm, senior ministers will be present, where they will be looking at what their alternative options are. in the short—term, you could think that maybe the army could think that maybe the army could be used to help with deliveries. remember the situation here is that there is not a shortage of petrol, it's about the distribution, it's about getting it to the right place. and of course the main message from the government is not to panic because as we have seen with previous fuel crises, that is the problem. if everyone rushes to the pumps and tries to fill up, it becomes self—fulfilling. the other option of course is the possibility of somehow getting more hgv drivers. that means more training and increasing the capacity for testing. that is something the government has said it is putting
2:06 pm
place but it's not going to have an immediate effect. what about foreign hgv drivers? and this idea of temporary visas? up until now, it's been thought the home office are very much against that. i am told they are not dead set against it, that they are willing to try something if they think it will work and you had from grant shapps they they are not convinced it will be enough, but i think we are getting to the point now where it could well be that after this meeting the decide that is the only thing they can now do is to have temporary visas and then i guess just hope there are lots of hgv drivers sitting in other countries across the channel who want to come here. i suppose that is the unknown at this point. a vigil will be held tonight in south east london to remember sabina nessa, the primary school teacher murdered last weekend. detectives are still questioning a man on suspicion of killing her and they've also issued cctv footage
2:07 pm
of another man they want to talk to. sabina, who was 28, is thought to have been attacked as she walked to a pub near her home in kidbrooke last friday. june kelly reports. last friday, sabina nessa was finishing her working week as a primary school teacher and looking forward to the weekend. seven days on, she's in the thoughts of so many who never knew her, but are horrified and angry at the way her young life was taken. sabina, who was 28, was on her way to a pub in kidbrooke village in south—east london to meet a friend. she never arrived. a 38—year—old man is now in custody on suspicion of murder. detectives are also looking for this man, and have issued these images. he was caught on cctv walking in pegler square, which was where sabina was heading. police are appealing for anyone who recognises this man to contact them immediately. he is believed to have
2:08 pm
access to this silver car. at the school where sabina taught, parents and their children are mourning a much loved teacher. very sad news. very, very sad. we didn't expect it. so... yeah, she was a kind person, and a lovely person and, you know, we are missing her. she's very helpful and she helps us do our spellings. did you know her? yes. what do you remember of her? she helped me when i was lost. and when i was with my teacher, she helped me get back to my mum. sabina nessa's killing has once again brought into sharp focus the issues of violence against women, their safety on the streets and male attitudes. in this community now, the council is issuing hundreds of personal alarms to females. this evening in kidbrooke, local people will hold a vigil in memory of sabina.
2:09 pm
it's a chance for the community to come together, collective grief, you know, a show of solidarity. and also, you know, a chance to sort of demand justice for sabina. it's going to be just a time for some gentle reflection and there will be a few people speaking, and we will have candles there. and they're asking people who can't be there to also light a candle for sabina. june kelly, bbc news. 0ur correspondent megan paterson is in south east london. what is the latest with the police investigation? this what is the latest with the police investigation?— investigation? this afternoon, olice investigation? this afternoon, police have — investigation? this afternoon, police have released - investigation? this afternoon, police have released moving l investigation? this afternoon, - police have released moving cctv footage of that they are trying to get in contact with. they have told us they have gone through an extensive trawl of cctv in the area they believe that sabina nessa spent her last moments. they found these pictures of a man and they want
2:10 pm
members of the public to try and trace him. he was seen near the area where she was expected to go and meet a friend on friday night. we now know that five minute journey from her home to the pub where her friend was didn't happen. her body was found the following day by a member of the public. throughout the afternoon here we have seen a number of flowers left here grow and grow and a number of the people here only getting to know sabina nessa after her death but feeling important enough to come down to share the grief and the shock and to share some sort of comfort with her family who are obviously devastated at this time. the police are continuing to appealfor time. the police are continuing to appeal for witnesses and they do have a man under arrest, a 38—year—old man, who has been arrested on suspicion of murder. he is still in police custody. the police are appealing for people to come forward and the police will be at the vigil tonight which is
2:11 pm
happening at around 70 m. members of the local community and women's safety campaigners will be here and we expect some speeches and a minutes silence for sabina nessa and a moment of reflection for people to come together to remember her and her life and to celebrate her life. she was a cherished daughter, sister and a dedicated teacher. that vigil tonight is a moment of reflection and the police investigation continues. that cctv being particularly crucial and detectives are asking people if they recognised that man of the vehicle they believe he is connected to to get in touch. presumably the police vigil tonight will reassuring the community and we can see behind you that park is a busy park surrounded by busy roads. there are people walking past. how have the community being reacting? understandably, there is a level of concern as well as the shock about
2:12 pm
her murder. there is concern about how safe this area is. last friday it would have been relatively busy, people are jogging or walking and out enjoying their weekend as she was. so there is a level of concern about how safe it is. the police are keen to reassure people that this is a safe area, that they have more controls and they are listening to concerns and they are trying to work out how better to change what seems to be a culture of violence towards women. they are reiterating this area is safe and they will be at the vigil tonight offering reassurance to people but it is obviously a concern here for people, not only in this community, but across the country as we have seen this happen elsewhere previously. a report suggests it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog in cancer treatment in england. the study, by the institute for public policy research, says almost 20,000 people have not been diagnosed because of missed referrals during the pandemic. and it says even with a 5% increase in treatments,
2:13 pm
hospitals may not clear cancer waiting lists until 2033. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. the pandemic has affected all parts of the nhs, with cancer services no exception. 0ne worry is the number of people who fail to get a diagnosis of cancer because they have not yet been referred for specialist tests. now a report from the ippr suggests that that could mean a huge backlog of cases we don't yet know about. there is a major backlog in cancer referrals and then in treatment, and the problem is, we haven't really got the capacity or workforce to be able to catch up with this. and as this study shows, from a very reputable group, that if we don't do something about it, we will have this problem for a decade. so we need to do something about it, and it's not ok. the report estimates around 19,500 people have not yet been diagnosed with cancer because of missed referrals. diagnostics is a big issue, with the pandemic leading to a 37%
2:14 pm
drop in endoscopies, 25% drop in mri scans and 10% fewer ct scans than expected. nhs england says cancer services have now returned to pre—pandemic levels, but the report says if the health service was able to improve that performance by 5%, the backlog would still not be cleared until 2033. and the authors warn that without a big investment in equipment and staff, thousands of people will be left waiting for a diagnosis and treatment. dominic hughes, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: the government urges motorists not to panic buy fuel, as queues form at some service stations amid fears of shortages due to a lack of delivery drivers police release cctv footage of a man wanted over the killing
2:15 pm
of sabina nessa in south east london as they continue to question another man on suspicion of her murder it could take a decade to clear the backlog of cancer treatment in england, according to a new report protesters are gathering around the world to demand action on climate change, ahead of november's crucial international summit on climate action known as cop26. hundreds of rallies are expected — including in germany which holds a general election on sunday. the united nations security council has warned millions of people around the world are being displaced by climate change. here's a look at some of the protests that are taking place at the moment. the largest gatherings happening right now are in germany. crowds have gathered in cities including berlin —— among them is greta thunberg, one of the world's best known climate activists. she's been holding what she calls �*fridays for future' strikes.
2:16 pm
according to a new report by the un the global— according to a new report by the un the global emissions are expected to rise by— the global emissions are expected to rise by16%_ the global emissions are expected to rise by 16% by 2030 compared to 2010 levels _ rise by 16% by 2030 compared to 2010 levels yes. _ rise by 16% by 2030 compared to 2010 levels. yes, you heard that right. time _ levels. yes, you heard that right. time and — levels. yes, you heard that right. time and time again the people in power— time and time again the people in power show their true interest and priorities — power show their true interest and priorities it— power show their true interest and priorities. it is not an overstatement to say that this that they simply don't give a damn about us. they simply don't give a damn about us we _ they simply don't give a damn about us we can — they simply don't give a damn about us. we can no longer leave this to the people — us. we can no longer leave this to the people in power to take care of. specialist teams from kent police are involved in a careful and painstaking process to remove two climate activists who've glued their hands to the top of a tanker, blocking access to the port of dover. earlier, 17 members of the insulate britain protest group were arrested after they caused gridlock in the town and surrounding roads. 0ur correspondent, charlie rose, is on the scene. what is the latest? presumably this
2:17 pm
is causing a lot of disruption. this has caused _ is causing a lot of disruption. this has caused a _ is causing a lot of disruption. this has caused a huge _ is causing a lot of disruption. ti 3 has caused a huge amount of chaos here in dover and the surrounding areas. all of the routes into the town have been completely gridlocked because they support or access to this port, the key route for trade and passengers and people and holiday—makers into the uk and in and out of this country was completely blocked. police made 17 arrests but two of these activists remained because they were stuck on top of a tankerjust outside their sport. their hands were glued to the roof. it took police a very long time, it was a long and careful and painstaking process to remove them from the roof of this tanker. 0nce from the roof of this tanker. once they were down, i approached one of them as he was taken into a police van. i asked them as he was taken into a police van. iasked him them as he was taken into a police
2:18 pm
van. i asked him why he was doing this and he said local people were completely upset by the disruption he has caused and he told me he was very sorry about the disruption that he and his other activists have caused. he says that the only way he can get its message across. i asked him if he was prepared to go to prison and he said yes. there has been disruption here in doverfour hours today throughout the morning and local residents were really upset by what's going on including the kent police and crime commissioner, matthew scott. he has been vocal about all of this and he wants penalties for this sort of thing increased to deter climate activists from taking this sort of action. 0verthe activists from taking this sort of action. over the past week or so we have seen lots of protests, days of action on the m25, causing misery for motorists on the london orbital
2:19 pm
by the insulate britain protest group, the same activists that have been taking action here today. they want to see more homes in britain insulated as a way of combating climate change. but they have been banned from taking action on the m25 now so i dare say we have not seen the last of the insulate britain protest group. a former paralympian who superglued himself to a plane during an extinction rebellion protest has been jailed for a year. james brown staged the demo at city airport nearly two years ago. the double gold medallist was found guilty of causing a public nuisance. british airways claims his actions caused disruption to more than 300 passengers and cost it £a0,000. huge queues are forming at airports around the uk after a nationwide systems
2:20 pm
failure affected e—gates. heathrow, gatwick, stansted, edinburgh and manchester airports heathrow airport tweeted �*the issue is impacting a number of ports of entry....our teams are working with border force to find a solution as quickly as possible" just over 800,000 people, or one in 80, are estimated to have had covid in the uk last week. that's slightly down on the previous week according to figures released today by the office for national statistics. infection rates are falling in england for the first time in several weeks, but the 0ns say rates remain high across the uk. they report there are encouraging signs that infection rates have continued to decrease among young adults, possibly reflecting the impact of the vaccination programme. a 31—year—old man accused
2:21 pm
of murdering three children and a woman in derbyshire last weekend has appeared before derby crown court. damien bendall spoke only to confirm his name via a video link from custody. the bodies of 35—year—old terri harris, her 13—year—old son john, 11—year—old daughter lacey, and lacey's friend, 11—year—old connie gent were all found last sunday morning at a house in killamarsh. damien bendall was remanded in custody. the bbc has obtained first—hand accounts from migrants who claim they've been illegally deported from the european union by polish border troops. five migrants attempting to cross into poland have died from suspected hypothermia and exhaustion in the past week. this morning the european commission has called the situation "concerning" and has urged the polish authorities to give "care and assistance" to those on the border. 0ur europe correspondent, nick beake, has sent this report. they thought they were going to die
2:22 pm
— stranded in the freezing forest, farfrom home. we found kelly and owen, brothers from nigeria. they claim they've been pushed back and forth by both belarusian and polish border guards for the past three weeks. they were playing us like football — the belarusians would beat us, push us to poland. in poland, they beat us, push us back to belarus. the men had flown to belarus from various countries, all with the promise that they'd be able to travel on to a neighbouring country in the eu. but 21—year—old magellan from cameroon explained what belarusian troops actually did. they monitor the polish police across the border, they tell us this way there is no polish police, so they will tell us, we must cross those wires. so we crawl under... we can see a lot of people here are not in a good state.
2:23 pm
apparently, a doctor's on the way, but also the border force are on their way, so it is not clear what's going to happen to these men. belarus is often called europe's last dictatorship. but poland, an eu country, has declared that migrants can be pushed back over its border, a policy that's illegal under international law. have your border force been pushing migrants back into belarus? "talk to our press office", he tells us. human rights activists have been trying to find those stranded on the border. we don't know how many other deaths there are in the forest. this lawyer has been working here for a month. politicians are talking about politics, but what we can see isjust people, it's not politics at all. it's just people that need assistance, people that need medical assistance, people that need international protection to not be returned to the country where they face danger. so here on the ground, it's absolutely not politics,
2:24 pm
it's just a humanitarian crisis that we are dealing with right now. the fear among charities, human rights groups, is that we're going to be seeing more of this because more people are coming to belarus, more people are trying to get across the border into poland, into the european union. translation: there is an organised assault on the polish border, and we will certainly not budge. we cannot be subject to blackmail. it's also wet? back in the forest, another young man emerges from the woodland. jafar is a 20—year—old from iraq. he's got hypothermia. he and two others are taken to hospital, the rest driven to a quarantine centre. but all fear they will soon be sent back to the freezing forest once again. nick beake, bbc news, on the poland—belarus border.
2:25 pm
restaurant, cafe and pub bosses in the uk will soon be banned from keeping customer tips left for staff and service charges added to bills. it's currently up to business owners to decide whether the money is divided equally or put back into the company. the government legislation is expected to come into force within the next year. a man who spent years collecting old postcards has been tracking down the people they were orginally sent to, ortheirfamilies, to reunite them with a piece of their past. stu prince began the project when he was forced to shield during lockdown last year. amanda kirton has been to meet him. oh, yeah, these are the orphanage ones. well, i've always been interested in postcards and such. but i got leukaemia and that meant heavy, heavy chemo. i was in a state of shock, really. i was wondering whether i'd be here or not. it was a pretty scary time.
2:26 pm
well, covid was that next year, 2020. and i knew i was going to be locked down for quite a while. and i thought about my postcards, and i said, "i used to enjoy them". needing a distraction, stu began purchasing postcards in online auctions. and i thought, well, i could open a little facebook group, reach people with the intention of reuniting with families. and i started putting them on, six at a time, and people started to get interested, and i matched a couple. exhausted from his treatment, stu had limitations. people started to pool together to help him to research. i was poorly, and the only way i could, you know, cope was with my researchers. they're fantastic. i'm looking all the time for evidence that will tie the name to the address and the date. some of the postcards might
2:27 pm
have a happy birthday, so i will send them a personal message. and how does it feel when she finds them? yes! quite early on, stu purchased a postcard that was sent in 1946 to a baby. such a cute card to a one—year—old, i thought that was absolutely lovely. i put the card on my page. one of my researchers, she contacted me saying, "i've found the baby". then a lady contacted me, "that card is me! that baby is me!" i was chuffed to death. i got a facebook message from stu, talking about this postcard that he'd found. the postcard was sent by her late grandparents. i was amazed. it was for my first birthday, 74 years ago. out of adversity came something really nice. something usefulfor a big reach of people, and ifelt really good about it. i felt good about myself for
2:28 pm
the first time for quite a while. part of my recovery, reakktm to feel useful. and i think that's, for any person recovering from leukaemia or cancer, to feel useful is big, it's massive. stu prince ending that report from amanda kirton. specialist teams from kent police have been trying to remove two activists who have glued their hands to a top of the tank and we now know that 39 people have been arrested today. the insulate britain protest group have been causing gridlock in the town and surrounding roads over the town and surrounding roads over the past few hours. we will have more on that story through the afternoon. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes.
2:29 pm
it looks pretty cloudy through the rest of the afternoon across western areas of the uk. the cloud thick enough to bring patches of drizzle for north west england and across wales. that will tend to ease. brighter spells later on. southern and eastern england along with north—eastern scotland having the best of the sunshine. temperatures 31 for the time of year. overnight tonight, turning murky with fog patches developing around the coasts of western england, wales and southern counties of england. some more drizzle and rain to come across the highlands of scotland. through saturday, staying quite damp for much of the day but otherwise a lot of cloud across western areas in the best of the breaks in the cloud in eastern wales, the midlands, eastern england, eastern and north—eastern areas of scotland and in that sunshine temperatures again well above average.
2:30 pm
hello this is bbc news. the headlines... the government urges motorists not to panic buy fuel as long queues form at some service stations amid fears of shortages due to a lack of delivery drivers if you don't need to fill, don't fill up. there is no shortage. if you are on what off when you do need to fuel that a site is out, chances are the next one will not be. police release cctv footage of a man wanted over the killing
2:31 pm
of sabina nessa in south east london — as they continue to question another man on suspicion of her murder. tonight a vigil will be held a week after the 28—year—old was attacked as she walked to meet a friend at a pub. a report warns it could take a decade to clear the backlog of cancer treatment in england. anyone for doubles? the duchess of cambridge congratulates emma raducanu on winning the us open, as she looks ahead to the future... i still think i have a lot of room for development in terms of my tennis career and when and oak so i'm excited to start working on it. —— where it can go. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. after all the waiting and all the hype, the 43rd
2:32 pm
edition of the ryder cup is underway in wisconsin. europe looking to defend their title that they won in paris three years ago. the foresomes are well underway — world number onejon rahm and the experienced sergio garcia teed off first for europe against american pair justin thomas and jordan spieth. its currently all square in that match. all the other pairings are out on the course. red bull's max verstappen will start sunday's russian grand prix from the back of the grid as a result of a penalty for using too many engines this season.
2:33 pm
in second practice today it was a mercedez one two with valtteri bottas finishing quickest, just ahead of his teammate lewis hamilton. verstappen�*s grid penalty gives hamilton and mercedes a golden opportunity to gain ground in the championship — the dutchman is five points ahead of hamilton heading into this weekend. england have won the netball series against new zealand, after an astonishing come back to beat the world champions. the roses were ten goals down at one point, but rallied in the fourth quarter to level the score. england then nudged themselves in front and held on for a close win. they lost the series 3—0 last time they visited new zealand in 2020.. but now have a confidence boosting win going into the commonwealth games. anthonyjoshua, has opened up, about how he deals with the stress,
2:34 pm
and mental challenge, of competing, at an elite level. the wba, wbo and ibf world heavyweight champion, defends his titles tomorrow, against the former undisputed cruiserweight champion, olek—sandr usyk in london, and says, it's the little things in life that matter. it's a lonely sport, yeah. so we're talking now, we're chill, but there will be a time when i'm on my own and thinking about it. when you wake up sometimes, i don't have the best sleep. if you wake up with, thank god i'm awake, thank god for this water i'm about to drink, and i'm happy, it changes the perspective of your day. that's how i've been dealing with all this pressure is, i'm happy to be here, no pressure, no stress. and finally, emma raducanu has been part of a homecoming event at the lawn tennis association national centre today, to mark her title win at this month's us open. raducanu became the first british woman to win a grand slam for 44 years and the first qualifier
2:35 pm
to win a major too. and she was playing with royalty at the event — the duchess of cambridge made a guest appearance. afterwards, raducanu reflected on her history making time in new york. i'v e i've had many cool opportunities but denies this is that mccann best moment i've enjoyed is the moment after the final in the end everyone else in your team just had a really nice meal together and we spoke until early hours of the morning just reflecting on the fortnight, the three weeks we had. white might not like meeting famous people and getting given incredible things, getting given incredible things, getting all the fancy balls? just the moment value and your team go, look at what we just did? you might guess, the opportunities i've had have been incredible and they've enjoyed all of them but the special moment have been incredible and they've enjoyed all of them but the special moment is have been incredible and they've enjoyed all of them but the special moment is with have been incredible and they've enjoyed all of them but the special moment is with the have been incredible and they've enjoyed all of them but the special moment is with the team, have been incredible and they've enjoyed all of them but the special moment is with the team, the have been incredible and they've enjoyed all of them but the special moment is with the team, the one that really sticks in my head and i will probably keep that forever. that's all the sport for now.
2:36 pm
you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. i'll have more of a later this afternoon but for now, back to you. a report suggests it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog in cancer treatment in england. the study — by the institute for public policy research — says almost 20,000 people have not been diagnosed because of missed referrals during the pandemic. and it says even with a 5% increase in treatments, hospitals may not clear cancer waiting lists until 2033. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. kruti shrotri is head of policy development at cancer research uk. thank you forjoining us. lots of numbers they are, maybe you can give our viewers a sense of what that means for an individual.- our viewers a sense of what that means for an individual. thank you, es. means for an individual. thank you, yes- there — means for an individual. thank you, yes- there are _ means for an individual. thank you, yes. there are lots _ means for an individual. thank you, yes. there are lots of _ means for an individual. thank you, yes. there are lots of numbers - means for an individual. thank you, yes. there are lots of numbers they are and ultimately what they show is the devastating impact that the
2:37 pm
pandemic has had on cancer services. for an individual, what this means is they may have cancer. they may be living in the community without knowing it, having to wait longer for tests and treatment, and we know an early diagnosis that cancer gives you the best chance of survival so this is really concerning for patients and is a more anxious time if you already have cancer. we know nhs staff working _ if you already have cancer. we know nhs staff working currently - if you already have cancer. we know nhs staff working currently hard - if you already have cancer. we knowj nhs staff working currently hard but this report is highlighting quite clearly that there was not enough of them to cope with this. that clearly that there was not enough of them to cope with this.— them to cope with this. that is exactly spot — them to cope with this. that is exactly spot on. _ them to cope with this. that is exactly spot on. this _ them to cope with this. that is exactly spot on. this is - them to cope with this. that is - exactly spot on. this is something that was a problem even before the pandemic, we are struggling pre—pandemic, not enough staff or kit, and we saw that reflected in the fact that cancer waiting times were consistently being missed, the impact has only made it worse. if
2:38 pm
the government want to improve that and get services to where they should be, better than where they were before, it absolutely has to put the money in at the conference of spending review nick tober to make sure the nhs can grow in numbers of staff and equipment as well. ., ., , numbers of staff and equipment as well. . . , , ., well. can anything be done in the short term _ well. can anything be done in the short term to _ well. can anything be done in the short term to turn _ well. can anything be done in the short term to turn round - well. can anything be done in the short term to turn round these i short term to turn round these numbers or is it a long—term project? numbers or is it a long-term ro'ect? , ., ., project? there is not a quick fix. the more _ project? there is not a quick fix. the more we — project? there is not a quick fix. the more we do, _ project? there is not a quick fix. the more we do, the _ project? there is not a quick fix. the more we do, the sooner- project? there is not a quick fix. the more we do, the sooner thej the more we do, the sooner the better so the government having an opportunity in a few weeks' time to make a difference and the sooner that happens, the sooner there is a commitment to train on more staff and get more kit, the sooner these issues can be addressed and turned around, so it really is crucial that action is taken soon.
2:39 pm
you advice to anyone watching who thinks they may have something that needs checking?— needs checking? there are many --eole needs checking? there are many people who _ needs checking? there are many people who did _ needs checking? there are many people who did not _ needs checking? there are many people who did not come - needs checking? there are many| people who did not come forward needs checking? there are many i people who did not come forward to their gp because they felt services have been overburdened or they were not safe, and the messages if you think you have a sign or symptom that might be cancer or something that might be cancer or something that does not feel right with your body, it's really important that you go to your gp to get it checked out, it's probably not cancer but if it is, it could be the thing that saves your life. is, it could be the thing that saves our life. ., ~ is, it could be the thing that saves our life. ., ,, i. ., ., , an update on that news we brought you earlier — the nationwide systems failure that affected e—passport gates at heathrow, gatwick, stansted, edinburgh and manchester airports has now been resolved, according to the home office. huge queues had built up — it's not clear how long
2:40 pm
they will take to clear. the influential sister of north korea's leader, kimjong un, has said pyongyang is willing to resume talks with south korea if it doesn't provoke the north with hostile policies. kim yo—jong s statement was in response to renewed calls from seoul to officially declare an end to the korean war as a way to bring back peace to the peninsula. our seoul correspondent laura bicker gave us this analysis. well, this is a rather surprising statement. kim jong—un�*s sister, kim yo—jong, is used to kind of putting out statements that are rather forceful in nature, usually critical of seoul in nature. and here, right at the top of the statement, she says she is willing to discuss what she called "an admirable idea" to end the korean war with this declaration, this declaration that president moon here in seoul has been advocating for quite some time. in the last week, at the united nations general assembly,
2:41 pm
he once again renewed that call for an end of war declaration. just to remind your viewers, the korean war ended in 1953 with an armistice, not a peace treaty. so the peninsula has been in an official state of war ever since. there have been many discussions about ending the war and declaring it to come to an official end, and there are many arguments for and against. but when it comes to pyongyang, certainly here in seoul, they have both agreed at different stages that this is something that should be done. but there are no discussions going on between north and south, and that's where the statement is very interesting. for the first time in a long time, it's almost like a little sliver of hope, almost like the door to talks is opening just slightly. but then you go into the statement and there are a lot of ifs and a lot of buts. she wants south korea to end its hostile policy, and by that she usually means when it comes to having troops, us troops, based on the peninsula, and the policy of sanctions, which are international sanctions backed by the united nations. so there are various ifs and buts attached to this, but it's the first time i think i've seen such a sliver of hope from kim yo—jong.
2:42 pm
the main candidates to be german chancellor have clashed over the future direction of the eu and how to deal with china. in a final debate, ahead of sunday's election, they discussed climate change, affordable housing and how to defend the country from outside interference. the election marks the end of angela merkel�*s long reign as chancellor. our correspondent in berlin damien mcguinness watched the final debate. this debate was a final chance for party leaders to win over voters. topics ranged from affordable housing and the national debt to climate change and how to deal with china. the current leader in the polls is olaf scholz, the centreleft
2:43 pm
social democrat to replace angela merkel. when asked about the new aukus security pact between the uk, australia and the us, mr scholz said germany should work together with france to create a stronger europe. "i can understand the irritation that france felt about how the defence pact was worked out," he said. his conservative rival, armin laschet, who is lagging behind slightly in the polls, said that europe needed to act independently and cited the american withdrawal from afghanistan. "we need common european defence projects for when the us pulls back," he said. this election campaign has been unusual in many ways. the polls have been erratic, there are more swing voters than ever before and unprecedented numbers are undecided. in one poll, 40% of people say they still haven't made their minds up. whoever they do choose, though, it's likely that after the elections, coalition talks will be long and complicated. all of this means that this is one
2:44 pm
of the most unpredictable elections modern germany has ever known. damien mcguinness, bbc news, berlin. islamist militants from al shabab, have brought terror to mozambique for more than four years. the group which has links to the islamic state group, operates in the north of the country. violence there has left more than 2,500 people dead and 700 thousand people displaced. rwanda has sent troops to help and our deputy africa editor anne soy has travelled with them. making the best of what's available, but what should be a normal activity has to happen
2:45 pm
under watchful eyes here in northern mozambique. for months, residents have been terrorised by militants affiliated to the islamic state. translation: every time we ran, they pursued us, | and then they beat us, they beat us so badly. they slaughtered people, so we kept running. our mosques have been destroyed, the churches have also been destroyed, we still don't understand what they want. they have only recently resettled here after the area was made safe by rwandan soldiers. this has been the scene of attacks from militants since 2017, which intensified last year, displacing tens of thousands of people. and the rwandan forces say they have now liberated 90% of the province, which is what they have come to show us. the motivation is actually driven by our history. we have experienced this before. and we feel that we should protect in any activity or any initiative that would lead to the security
2:46 pm
of people wherever we are called upon. they launched their offensive here injuly after being invited by the mozambique government. it followed global outrage after an attack at this hotel in palma. it was popular with expats. hundreds were hiding here when the militants struck. translation: on the tenth day, we came here and found bodies, | but they were decomposing. even my grandson, i only identified him by his shirt. we couldn't tell who had died. we just buried all the bodies we found. many are still displaced. this woman tells me she would like to return home, but there is nothing to go back to. she comes from the port city
2:47 pm
of mocimboa da praia — it was under militant control for more than a year. almost every building we saw had been destroyed by previous fighting. it is here that the forces finally declared victory. this was the stronghold of the militants, the nerve centre of the operation. the militants could be on the back foot, thought to be hiding in a forest further south, but the threat they pose is still real. anne soy, bbc news, cabo delgado. ever since a series of covid—19 outbreaks in dormitories last year, migrant labourers in singapore have been banned from mixing with the general public. for the past 18 months, the majority have only been allowed out of their facilities to go to work. but, with one of the highest vaccination rates in the world,
2:48 pm
singapore and its government are facing increasing pressure to let them out. nick marsh has been speaking to some of the men wanting to leave. it's been one of the world's longest lock is, behind this barbed wire, there is talk of a growing mental health crisis. thousands of men confined in dormitories, leaving only to work. confined in dormitories, leaving only to work-— confined in dormitories, leaving onl to work. , only to work. this is a painful time for me. only to work. this is a painful time for me- for— only to work. this is a painful time for me. for sharif, _ only to work. this is a painful time for me. for sharif, this _ only to work. this is a painful time for me. for sharif, this is - only to work. this is a painful time for me. for sharif, this is starting | for me. for sharif, this is starting to net for me. for sharif, this is starting to get too — for me. for sharif, this is starting to get too much. _ for me. for sharif, this is starting to get too much. i _ for me. for sharif, this is starting to get too much. i want _ for me. for sharif, this is starting to get too much. i want to - for me. for sharif, this is starting to get too much. i want to send i for me. for sharif, this is starting to get too much. i want to send a| to get too much. i want to send a messaue to get too much. i want to send a message to _ to get too much. i want to send a message to the _ to get too much. i want to send a message to the singapore - to get too much. i want to send a - message to the singapore government. we are a long time in dormitories so many people are mentally anguished, so we need released. we need to be allowed to go out. please. it’s so we need released. we need to be allowed to go out. please.— allowed to go out. please. it's not 'ust that allowed to go out. please. it's not just that migrant _ allowed to go out. please. it's not just that migrant workers... - allowed to go out. please. it's not just that migrant workers... with l just that migrant workers... with 80% of the public are 90% of workers now vaccinated, experts say that the
2:49 pm
confinement policy is not protecting anyone. after 18 months, it's very clear that a mental health challenge, the social isolation is all really bubbling up. the concern are massively overblown, we can strike a better balance. recently a handful were allowed out. as part of a pilot scheme. the government invited us to meet one of them. the authorities called the outing a milestone. authorities called the outing a milestone-— authorities called the outing a milestone. _, ., , , milestone. the conditions they live in is different. _ milestone. the conditions they live in is different. most _ milestone. the conditions they live in is different. most of— milestone. the conditions they live in is different. most of them - milestone. the conditions they live in is different. most of them live i in is different. most of them live in is different. most of them live in communal conditions and that is why message break measures put in place...
2:50 pm
why message break measures put in lace... , , place... they felt they were protected — place... they felt they were protected from _ place... they felt they were protected from the - place... they felt they were protected from the virus. i place... they felt they were l protected from the virus. we place... they felt they were - protected from the virus. we want that and we _ protected from the virus. we want that and we want _ protected from the virus. we want that and we want our... _ protected from the virus. we want that and we want our... to - protected from the virus. we want that and we want our... to bring l that and we want our... to bring back. they remain separated from the public. known officially as the community. it's been a year and a half now and for the men who live here, nothing is changed. they are still waiting for the day they can finally leave but in all this time, the message that they have received has been loud and clear. it's nearly time to grab the sequins and put on the dancing shoes — with just 2a hours to go
2:51 pm
until strictly come dancing waltzes its way back onto oui’ screens. 15 new celebrities will take to the ballroom tomorrow night, to begin their bid for the glitterball trophy. and of course, our very own dan walker will be among them. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been chatting to them ahead of the big night. how much of a learning experience has the whole thing been so far? it's been unbelievable. from finding out what my chest size was to my collarbone to my bellybutton, to putting on sheer, like, snakeskin tops, to learning how to dance. but everything has just been amazing. i thought you were going to give us a flash there! so did i! what's going on? i learnt a lot in rugby which is so unhelpful for dancing. you need stiff ankles in rugby and you need flexible ankles in dancing.
2:52 pm
you need to be able to lift your arm. yeah, straight, that's something, straight hands above his head. look how much pain he's in! but we'll sort that out. i'm not sure the judges need to see that face when i do that. which bit of your body has had the biggest surprise so far? i like these questions! these are the best questions ever. i would say my entire body. there are things that, when we were in the studio the first day, he was pushing my shoulders back, what's the other one, my hips had to face this way. my legs were doing something very odd. a lot of twisting action she needs to work on at the moment. we need more twisting in your spine. yes, i don't have enough twist in my spine. there is actually quite a serious reason why you wanted to do the show. there is a very serious reason. my beautiful sister, who died five years ago to the day
2:53 pm
that we started rehearsals, left the world in a glitterball coffin. she was a bit of a disco diva. for real? for real. she had a glitterball coffin? i got her a glitterball coffin. so i'm doing it for her, because she would be thrilled. and she'd be watching slightly like that, probably. i am so sore, i've honestly never been this sore in my life but it's been amazing, i'm having so much fun. out of my comfort zone but i think i'm working hard? yes. yeah. you did say it's harder than the olympics and i for some reason celebrated! he's definitely giving it absolutely everything with a smile on his face, he loves it. we'll see how far we get but i don't think there's ever been any olympic champion swimmers who go into world championship dancing. hey! i haven't even done my first dance yet, what am i even thinking about?
2:54 pm
bbc breakfast is representing, this time, dan walker, what have you made of him so far? he has this grace about him byjust standing there. so i can't wait to see him in a tail suit, in a ballroom number. because i think it's going to suit him to a tee. i can't wait to see him on the floor. plus nadia is an incredible teacher, and i think he's in incredible, capable hands. i love dan. i love dan, but not as much as my mum. my mum is like, is it all right if we vote dan as well, pet? i was like, mother, come on! howay! because of the way daniel works... she doesn't call me dan, she calls me daniel. i love daniel. that's what you like, you said i can call you, i'm allowed. i said you can call me whatever you like and you've gone for daniel. do many people call you daniel? my mum and nadia. aljaz said you have poise. poise?
2:55 pm
he said that? he said you look like a dancer. i've already got a new walk, actually, do you want to see it? i won't walk for you, but this is, this is pre—nadia. this is post nadia, what do you think? whoa. yeah, big change. # talk the talk, just walk the walk tonight # cos we don't need permission to dance. cheering i can't wait for that! we'll check the weather in a moment — and then have more on our main news this afternoon. the government's warning motorists not to panic buy fuel. but i just want to quickly show you these pictures into us — from various fuel stations. some forecourts are out of petrol because of a shortage of delivery drivers. very much down to that — and not a lack of fuel. the government is meeting this afternoon — in fact in a few minutes — to look options open to them. and we'll have more on that with our
2:56 pm
political correspondent shortly. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. a lot of cloud across western areas of the uk over the next few days but evenif of the uk over the next few days but even if it stays cloudy where you are, eitherway, it is even if it stays cloudy where you are, either way, it is going to be very, very mild with the wind is coming from your own way south—west, dragging in some tropical air. —— subtropical air. tim rogers this weekend pushing widely into the 20s where we do see some sunshine, glossy mouth —— lossiemouth in north scotland is above the seasonal average. mind you, today, pretty mild. bit of rain in west scotland, some patches of drizzle for north west england and across wales but who the rest of the sunshine today,
2:57 pm
southern and eastern england, northern and eastern areas of scotland and raleigh sunshine comes out again, temperatures pushing real1 into the 20s. overnight tonight, rather murky condition to come across western england, wales and southern england, too, with practice developing around the coast and hills, some rain pushing into western scotland, probably a light and patchy, northern ireland stays cloudy but mild wherever you are. into the forecast, some damp weather, quite persistent for much of the day but a lot of dry weather, just some showers popping up across western areas and the rest of the sunshine for north—east wales across the midlands, eastern england and into eastern and north—eastern areas of scotland. again, temperatures well above average for the time of year, well into the 20s. looking at the chart, to sunday, this cold front approaches from the west otherwise it is a largely dry picture on sunday with spells of sunshine developing and probably a little bit more anyway of sunshine given that the wins will be blowing a little bit more strongly but there could be a few isolated showers
2:58 pm
across western areas but otherwise fine. best of the sunshine again, northern and north—eastern only took scotland into parts of eastern england through the midlands and probably eastern wales as well but for northern ireland, a change with a seeing rain moving on sunday afternoon with the rain being accompanied by some squally winds and a band of rain is a cold front putting eastwards. into the first part of monday in what follows is much cooler and fresher north—westerly winds so bridges will be dropping back down to average, maybe even a touch below and it looks like quite an unsubtle spell of weather with a mixture of sunshine and fairly blustery showers for many. that's your weather.
2:59 pm
3:00 pm
this is bbc news, i'm ben mundy. the headlines at 3:00pm: the government urges motorists not to panic buy fuel as long queues form at some service stations amid fears of shortages due to a lack of delivery drivers. if you don't need to fill up, don't fill up. there is no shortage. if you are unlucky enough when you do need fuel that a site is out, the chances are the next nearest one won't be. police release cctv footage of a man wanted over the killing of sabina nessa in south east london as they continue to question another man on suspicion of her murder. tonight, a vigil will be held a week after the 28—year—old was attacked as she walked to meet a friend at a pub. a report warns it could take a decade to clear the backlog of cancer treatment in england. anyone for doubles?
3:01 pm
the duchess of cambridge congratulates emma raducanu on winning the us open, as she looks ahead to the future. i still think i have a lot of room for development _ in terms of my tennis career and where it can go, - so i'm excited to start working on it. - hello, good afternoon. senior government ministers are meeting later to discuss the closure of some petrol stations, because of a shortage of delivery drivers. queues are forming at several forecourts, despite government pleas for people not to panic buy fuel. both bp and esso have closed some petrol stations because of supply problems. and, ministers are not ruling out the idea of changing visa rules to bring in foreign lorry drivers
3:02 pm
or using soldiers to drive fuel tankers. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. queues outside petrol stations. they had been appearing up and down the country as motorists worry they may not be able to fill up. the fuel giant bp has admitted that some of its outlets have been running dry and a small number have had to close. other retailers have also been affected. but operators say panic buying will only make matters worse. if you don't need to fill up, don't fill up. there is no shortage. if you are unlucky enough when you do need fuel that a site is out, the chances are the next nearest one won't be. there are plenty of petrol stations for the majority of the population. it's not as if you have to drive half an hour to find one, there are plenty about. so don't panic buy, itjust causes more of a problem. there isn't a shortage of fuel. the uk's refineries have plenty. the problem is getting it to petrol stations. the issues that bp has been having in getting supplies to garages like this one are serious in themselves, and it is
3:03 pm
because the company can't get it hold of enough tanker drivers. but that is merely a symptom of a much wider problem, a national shortage of heavy goods vehicle drivers that is affecting the entire economy. at the moment, experts say the country needs an extra 90,000 to 100,000 drivers, but recruiting and training them takes time. it isn't as simple as yes, you have passed your test, brilliant, we are going to send you to scotland or, more tomorrow, because there are lots of other safety related things that have to be done, making sure they know how to secure loads and things like that. it's notjust a case of being a steering wheel attendant any more, there was a lot of pressure on the driver to make sure all the boxes are ticked. this instructor says there is plenty of demand from would—be drivers. the only problem we have at the moment is test dates and getting enough tests for the candidates. we have got such a backlog, and i am sure we are not the only company in that position. people within the industry say more immediate measures are needed
3:04 pm
while new drivers are trained up. they want foreign hauliers to be given short—term visas to help the gap. the government has been reluctant to do this, but today the transport secretary said all options were open. i would do whatever is required if that would help. what i don't want to do, and i have been hinting at this, is undercut, as has happened before, with cheaper european drivers and then find that our drivers drop out because they are being undercut. that doesn't solve the problem, itjust creates a new problem. the shortage of lorry drivers is so serious that it's unlikely any single step will solve it in the short term. but ministers are acutely aware that further disruptions to the supply chain could mean even more empty shelves in the run—up to christmas. theo leggett, bbc news. let's get more from our deputy political editor vicki young in westminster.
3:05 pm
the government says it will do whatever is required, they are meeting this afternoon, what are you hearing? fist meeting this afternoon, what are you hearin: ? �* ., ., , ., hearing? at the moment what they are sa in: is hearing? at the moment what they are saying is that — hearing? at the moment what they are saying is that they _ hearing? at the moment what they are saying is that they are _ hearing? at the moment what they are saying is that they are not _ hearing? at the moment what they are saying is that they are not ruling - saying is that they are not ruling everything out. what we want to know is what they are going to roll in and how they're going to with this. this is notjust about petrol, it's about food distribution. there is clearly an ongoing problem here. the government is saying don't panic when it comes to petrol and there is plenty to go around. theyjust have to get it to the right place. but human behaviour comes into this and we can see already what's been happening. looking back over the last 20 or so years, you can see how quickly something like this when it comes to people filling up their cars and the lorries, how it can quickly become very difficult political situation. so there is no doubt that downing street want to get this sorted. what are the
3:06 pm
options? in the short term in terms of distribution is there a chance they could bring in the army to do some of the driving. there has been no formal request for that but of course that could change. then there is this other ideas about short term visas for hgv drivers. only last night the home office was saying they had no plans to do this. what grant shapps was saying was they want to encourage industries to use people who are already living in the uk, to train them and give them decent wages and encourage them to take up thesejobs. decent wages and encourage them to take up these jobs. but it does seem as if the message is different now and i am detecting a slight shift saying that priti patel is not dead set against this idea of short—term visas to help if it works. what they don't want to do is to change their mind on this, bring in these short—term visas and discover the are lots of hgv drivers who are willing to come over to the uk in the short—term and work. we may or
3:07 pm
may not find out more after this meeting this afternoon. a vigil will be held tonight in south east london to remember sabina nessa, the primary school teacher murdered last weekend. detectives are still questioning a man on suspicion of killing her, and they've also issued cctv footage of another man they want to talk to. sabina, who was 28, is thought to have been attacked as she walked to a pub near her home in kidbrooke last friday. june kelly reports. last friday, sabina nessa was finishing her working week as a primary school teacher and looking forward to the weekend. seven days on, she's in the thoughts of so many who never knew her, but are horrified and angry at the way her young life was taken. sabina, who was 28, was on her way to a pub in kidbrooke village in south—east london to meet a friend. she never arrived. a 38—year—old man is now in custody on suspicion of murder. detectives are also looking for this
3:08 pm
man, and have issued these images. he was caught on cctv walking in pegler square, which was where sabina was heading. police are appealing for anyone who recognises this man to contact them immediately. he is believed to have access to this silver car. at the school where sabina taught, parents and their children are mourning a much loved teacher. very sad news. very, very sad. we didn't expect it. so... yeah, she was a kind person, and a lovely person and, you know, we are missing her. she's very helpful and she helps us do our spellings. did you know her? yes. what do you remember of her? she helped me when i was lost. and when i was with my teacher, she helped me get back to my mum. sabina nessa's killing has once again brought into sharp focus the issues of violence
3:09 pm
against women, their safety on the streets and male attitudes. in this community now, the council is issuing hundreds of personal alarms to females. this evening in kidbrooke, local people will hold a vigil in memory of sabina. it's a chance for the community to come together, collective grief, you know, a show of solidarity. and also, you know, a chance to sort of demand justice for sabina. it's going to be just a time for some gentle reflection and there will be a few people speaking, and we will have candles there. and they're asking people who can't be there to also light a candle for sabina. june kelly, bbc news. the metropolitan commissioner assistant commissioner louisa rolfe gave an update on the investigation. this is a shocking and tragic
3:10 pm
incident _ this is a shocking and tragic incident that has affected offices across _ incident that has affected offices across the net and of course the communities of london. we are working — communities of london. we are working incredibly hard to secure justice _ working incredibly hard to secure justice for— working incredibly hard to secure justice for his family who had at the forefront of our minds at this time _ the forefront of our minds at this time we — the forefront of our minds at this time. we have not only our dedicated homicide _ time. we have not only our dedicated homicide teams but significant number— homicide teams but significant number of resources from across the net supporting what is a significant investigation. i would say we have -ot investigation. i would say we have got a _ investigation. i would say we have got a dedicated homicide team which will he _ got a dedicated homicide team which will be many dozens of officers along — will be many dozens of officers along with officers involved in searches, _ along with officers involved in searches, cctv trawls, house—to—house enquiries, so a significant — house—to—house enquiries, so a significant number of people. assistant commissioner rolfe went on to address claims of an epidemic of violence against women. the report last week to decide violence — the report last week to decide violence against women is an epidemic _ violence against women is an epidemic. it is a societal problem that we _ epidemic. it is a societal problem that we can't solve alone. we are determined to work with partners and with communities to ensure that people _ with communities to ensure that people don't tolerate violence against — people don't tolerate violence against women. i certainly think it
3:11 pm
has all— against women. i certainly think it has all the — against women. i certainly think it has all the hallmarks of an epidemic. it is something that is tolerated — epidemic. it is something that is tolerated far too much in society. we are _ tolerated far too much in society. we are determined to bring offenders tojustice _ we are determined to bring offenders tojustice and to we are determined to bring offenders to justice and to prevent these offences— to justice and to prevent these offences where we can. our correspondent megan paterson is in south east london. we have heard about the investigation. tonight there is a vigil to remember sabina nessa. that vigilto remember sabina nessa. that vision is vigil to remember sabina nessa. trisgt vision is expected to take place at around 7pm, a week on from sabina nessa's murder. we expect that vigil will last around an hour. faith leaders, members of the community will make speeches. they will be a minutes silence. people are being asked to come down to remember sabina nessa and her life and to celebrate a life and her life and to celebrate a life and to take a moment to reflect on what has happened to her. the met
3:12 pm
police say they will also be at the vigil and they are a way that people in the community are extremely shocked and concerned about what has happened and they will be listening to those concerns and hoping to reassure people. throughout today we have seen people come to leave flowers and many of the people have never met sabina nessa before but they feel compelled to come down here to share in the grief and the sorrow and to show their condolences for her family. the headlines on bbc news: the government urges motorists not to panic buy fuel, as queues form at some service stations amid fears of shortages due to a lack of delivery drivers. police release cctv footage of a man wanted over the killing of sabina nessa in south east london as they continue to question another man on suspicion of her murder. it could take a decade to clear the backlog of cancer treatment in england, according to a new report.
3:13 pm
specialist teams from kent police have been involved in a painstaking process to remove two climate activists who've glued their hands to the top of a tanker, blocking access to the port of dover. earlier 39 members of the insulate britain protest group were arrested after they caused gridlock in the town and surrounding roads. our correspondent charlie rose has spent the day at the scene. this has caused a huge amount of chaos here in dover and the surrounding areas. all the arterial routes into the town have been complete —— in complete gridlock because access to this port, a key route for trade in passengers and people and holiday—makers into the uk and in none out of this country was completely blocked. two of these climate activists remained because they were stuck on top of a tanker
3:14 pm
just outside the sport. their hands were glued to the roof and it took police a very long time, it was a long, careful, painstaking process to remove them from the roof of the tanker. once they were down i approached one of them as he was taken into a police van and i asked him why he was doing this. he said local people were completely upset by the disruption he has caused. he told me he was very sorry about the disruption that he and his other climate activists in his group have caused. he said if the only way he can get his message across. i asked him if he was prepared to go to prison and he said yes. there has been disruption here in doverfour hours today and throughout the morning lots of local residents and motorists really upset by what's going on, including the kent police
3:15 pm
and crime commissioner, matthew scott. he has been quite vocal about all of this and he wants penalties for this sort of thing increased to deter climate activists from taking this sort of action. protesters are gathering around the world to demand action on climate change, ahead of november's crucial international summit on climate action known as cop26. hundreds of rallies are expected, including in germany which holds a general election on sunday. the united nations security council has warned that millions of people around the world are being displaced by climate change. here's a look at some of the protests that are taking place at the moment. the largest gatherings happening right now are in germany. crowds have gathered in cities including berlin and among them is greta thunberg, one of the world's best known climate activists. she's been holding what she calls �*fridays for future' strikes. earlier, she addressed the crowd. according to a new report by the un, global emissions are expected
3:16 pm
time and time again, the people in power show their true interest and priorities. it is not an overstatement to say that they simply don't give a damn about us. we can no longer leave this to the people in power to take care of. just over 800,000 people, or one in 80, are estimated to have had covid in the uk last week. that's slightly down on the previous week according to figures released today by the office for national statistics. infection rates are falling in england, for the first time in several weeks, but the ons say rates remain high across the uk. they report there are encouraging signs that infection rates have continued to decrease among young adults, possibly reflecting the impact of the vaccination programme. a report suggests it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog
3:17 pm
in cancer treatment in england. the study, by the institute for public policy research, says almost 20,000 people have not been diagnosed because of missed referrals during the pandemic. and it says even with a 5% increase in treatments, hospitals may not clear cancer waiting lists until 2033. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. the pandemic has affected all parts of the nhs, with cancer services no exception. one worry is the number of people who fail to get a diagnosis of cancer because they have not yet been referred for specialist tests. now a report from the ippr suggests that that could mean a huge backlog of cases we don't yet know about. there is a major backlog in cancer referrals and then in treatment, and the problem is, we haven't really got the capacity or workforce to be able to catch up with this. and as this study shows, from a very reputable group, that if we don't do something about it, we will have this problem for a decade.
3:18 pm
so we need to do something about it, and it's not ok. the report estimates around 19,500 people have not yet been diagnosed with cancer because of missed referrals. diagnostics is a big issue, with the pandemic leading to a 37% drop in endoscopies, 25% drop in mri scans and 10% fewer ct scans than expected. nhs england says cancer services have now returned to pre—pandemic levels, but the report says if the health service was able to improve that performance by 5%, the backlog would still not be cleared until 2033. and the authors warn that without a big investment in equipment and staff, thousands of people will be left waiting for a diagnosis and treatment. dominic hughes, bbc news. earlier we heard from kruti shrowtree, head of policy development at cancer research uk. there are lots of numbers they and uttimatety — there are lots of numbers they and ultimately what _
3:19 pm
there are lots of numbers they and ultimately what they _ there are lots of numbers they and ultimately what they show - there are lots of numbers they and ultimately what they show is - there are lots of numbers they and ultimately what they show is the i ultimately what they show is the devastating _ ultimately what they show is the devastating impact— ultimately what they show is the devastating impact of— ultimately what they show is the devastating impact of the - ultimately what they show is the i devastating impact of the pandemic has had _ devastating impact of the pandemic has had on — devastating impact of the pandemic has had on cancer— devastating impact of the pandemic has had on cancer services. - devastating impact of the pandemic has had on cancer services. for- has had on cancer services. for individuals— has had on cancer services. for individuals it _ has had on cancer services. for individuals it means— has had on cancer services. for individuals it means they - has had on cancer services. for individuals it means they may. has had on cancer services. for- individuals it means they may have cancer _ individuals it means they may have cancer and — individuals it means they may have cancerand be _ individuals it means they may have cancer and be living _ individuals it means they may have cancerand be living in— individuals it means they may have cancer and be living in the - cancer and be living in the community— cancer and be living in the community without - cancer and be living in the l community without knowing cancer and be living in the i community without knowing it. cancer and be living in the - community without knowing it. they might— community without knowing it. they might have — community without knowing it. they might have to— community without knowing it. they might have to wait _ community without knowing it. they might have to wait longer— community without knowing it. they might have to wait longer for- community without knowing it. they might have to wait longer for tests i might have to wait longer for tests and treatment _ might have to wait longer for tests and treatment. we _ might have to wait longer for tests and treatment. we know— might have to wait longer for tests and treatment. we know that i might have to wait longer for tests and treatment. we know that an i might have to wait longer for tests i and treatment. we know that an early diagnosis _ and treatment. we know that an early diagnosis of _ and treatment. we know that an early diagnosis of cancer— and treatment. we know that an early diagnosis of cancer gives _ and treatment. we know that an early diagnosis of cancer gives you - and treatment. we know that an early diagnosis of cancer gives you the i diagnosis of cancer gives you the best chances _ diagnosis of cancer gives you the best chances of— diagnosis of cancer gives you the best chances of survival. - diagnosis of cancer gives you the best chances of survival. so i diagnosis of cancer gives you the best chances of survival. so thisl diagnosis of cancer gives you the i best chances of survival. so this is reatty _ best chances of survival. so this is really concerning _ best chances of survival. so this is really concerning news _ best chances of survival. so this is really concerning news and - best chances of survival. so this is really concerning news and makes| really concerning news and makes four patients _ really concerning news and makes four patients are _ really concerning news and makes four patients are more _ really concerning news and makes four patients are more anxious i really concerning news and makes i four patients are more anxious time on what _ four patients are more anxious time on what already _ four patients are more anxious time on what already is _ four patients are more anxious time on what already is an _ four patients are more anxious time on what already is an actions - four patients are more anxious time on what already is an actions time i on what already is an actions time if you _ on what already is an actions time if you have — on what already is an actions time if you have cancer. _ on what already is an actions time if you have cancer. we _ on what already is an actions time if you have cancer.— if you have cancer. we know nhs staff work — if you have cancer. we know nhs staff work hard _ if you have cancer. we know nhs staff work hard with _ if you have cancer. we know nhs staff work hard with this - if you have cancer. we know nhs staff work hard with this report i if you have cancer. we know nhs staff work hard with this report is highlighting there is not enough of them to cope with this. that highlighting there is not enough of them to cope with this.— them to cope with this. that is exactly spot — them to cope with this. that is exactly spot on. _ them to cope with this. that is exactly spot on. this _ them to cope with this. that is exactly spot on. this is - them to cope with this. that is i exactly spot on. this is something that was— exactly spot on. this is something that was a — exactly spot on. this is something that was a problem _ exactly spot on. this is something that was a problem even - exactly spot on. this is something that was a problem even before i exactly spot on. this is something i that was a problem even before the pandemic — that was a problem even before the pandemic. cancer— that was a problem even before the pandemic. cancer services - that was a problem even before the pandemic. cancer services were i pandemic. cancer services were struggling — pandemic. cancer services were struggling pre—pandemic. - pandemic. cancer services were struggling pre—pandemic. theyl struggling pre—pandemic. they wereh't— struggling pre—pandemic. they weren't enough— struggling pre—pandemic. they weren't enough staff _ struggling pre—pandemic. they weren't enough staff and - struggling pre—pandemic. they weren't enough staff and of i struggling pre—pandemic. they weren't enough staff and of kit| struggling pre—pandemic. they- weren't enough staff and of kit and weren't enough staff and of kit and we saw _ weren't enough staff and of kit and we saw that — weren't enough staff and of kit and we saw that reflected _ weren't enough staff and of kit and we saw that reflected in _ weren't enough staff and of kit and we saw that reflected in the - weren't enough staff and of kit and we saw that reflected in the fact i we saw that reflected in the fact that cancer— we saw that reflected in the fact that cancer waiting _ we saw that reflected in the fact that cancer waiting times - we saw that reflected in the fact that cancer waiting times were i that cancer waiting times were consistently _ that cancer waiting times were consistently being _ that cancer waiting times were consistently being messed i that cancer waiting times were consistently being messed or. that cancer waiting times were - consistently being messed or targets were being _ consistently being messed or targets were being missed. _ consistently being messed or targets were being missed. the _ consistently being messed or targets were being missed. the impact- consistently being messed or targets were being missed. the impact of. consistently being messed or targetsi were being missed. the impact of the pandemic— were being missed. the impact of the
3:20 pm
pandemic has — were being missed. the impact of the pandemic has made _ were being missed. the impact of the pandemic has made the _ were being missed. the impact of the pandemic has made the situation- pandemic has made the situation worse _ pandemic has made the situation worse if— pandemic has made the situation worse if the _ pandemic has made the situation worse. if the government - pandemic has made the situation worse. if the government want i pandemic has made the situation| worse. if the government want to improve _ worse. if the government want to improve waiting _ worse. if the government want to improve waiting times _ worse. if the government want to improve waiting times and - worse. if the government want to improve waiting times and tackle | worse. if the government want to i improve waiting times and tackle the backlog _ improve waiting times and tackle the backlog and — improve waiting times and tackle the backlog and get _ improve waiting times and tackle the backlog and get cancer— improve waiting times and tackle the backlog and get cancer services i improve waiting times and tackle the backlog and get cancer services to i backlog and get cancer services to where _ backlog and get cancer services to where they— backlog and get cancer services to where they should _ backlog and get cancer services to where they should be _ backlog and get cancer services to where they should be then - backlog and get cancer services to where they should be then it i backlog and get cancer services to where they should be then it has i backlog and get cancer services toi where they should be then it has to put the _ where they should be then it has to put the money— where they should be then it has to put the money in _ where they should be then it has to put the money in at _ where they should be then it has to put the money in at the _ put the money in at the comprehensive - put the money in at the i comprehensive spending put the money in at the - comprehensive spending review put the money in at the _ comprehensive spending review in october— comprehensive spending review in october to— comprehensive spending review in october to make _ comprehensive spending review in october to make sure _ comprehensive spending review in october to make sure the - comprehensive spending review in october to make sure the nhs- comprehensive spending review in| october to make sure the nhs can .row october to make sure the nhs can grow numbers _ october to make sure the nhs can grow numbers of— october to make sure the nhs can grow numbers of staff— october to make sure the nhs can grow numbers of staff and - october to make sure the nhs can i grow numbers of staff and equipment. can anything _ grow numbers of staff and equipment. can anything be — grow numbers of staff and equipment. can anything be done _ grow numbers of staff and equipment. can anything be done in— grow numbers of staff and equipment. can anything be done in the _ can anything be done in the short—term to turn around these numbers or is this a long—term project? numbers or is this a long-term ro'ect? , �* ., project? there isn't a quick fix. the more _ project? there isn't a quick fix. the more that _ project? there isn't a quick fix. the more that we _ project? there isn't a quick fix. the more that we do _ project? there isn't a quick fix. the more that we do sooner i project? there isn't a quick fix. | the more that we do sooner the better~ — the more that we do sooner the better~ the _ the more that we do sooner the better. the government- the more that we do sooner the better. the government have i the more that we do sooner the j better. the government have an opportunity— better. the government have an opportunity in _ better. the government have an opportunity in a _ better. the government have an opportunity in a few— better. the government have an opportunity in a few weeks' i better. the government have an| opportunity in a few weeks' time better. the government have an. opportunity in a few weeks' time to make _ opportunity in a few weeks' time to make a _ opportunity in a few weeks' time to make a difference _ opportunity in a few weeks' time to make a difference and _ opportunity in a few weeks' time to make a difference and the - opportunity in a few weeks' time to make a difference and the sooner. make a difference and the sooner that happens— make a difference and the sooner that happens the _ make a difference and the sooner that happens the sooner- make a difference and the sooner that happens the sooner there i make a difference and the sooner that happens the sooner there isi make a difference and the sooneri that happens the sooner there is a commitment — that happens the sooner there is a commitment and _ that happens the sooner there is a commitment and there _ that happens the sooner there is a commitment and there is - that happens the sooner there is a commitment and there is money. that happens the sooner there is al commitment and there is money to train more — commitment and there is money to train more staff— commitment and there is money to train more staff and _ commitment and there is money to train more staff and get— commitment and there is money to train more staff and get more - commitment and there is money to train more staff and get more kit, i train more staff and get more kit, then— train more staff and get more kit, then the _ train more staff and get more kit, then the sooner— train more staff and get more kit, then the sooner these _ train more staff and get more kit, then the sooner these issues i train more staff and get more kit, then the sooner these issues canl train more staff and get more kit, i then the sooner these issues can be addressed _ then the sooner these issues can be addressed and — then the sooner these issues can be addressed and turned _ then the sooner these issues can be addressed and turned around. - then the sooner these issues can be addressed and turned around. it i addressed and turned around. it reatiy— addressed and turned around. it reatty is — addressed and turned around. it really is crucial— addressed and turned around. it really is crucial that _ addressed and turned around. it really is crucial that action - addressed and turned around. it really is crucial that action is i really is crucial that action is taken — really is crucial that action is taken soon _ really is crucial that action is taken soon.— really is crucial that action is taken soon. ., " ijijij , taken soon. more than 19,000 people should have been _ taken soon. more than 19,000 people should have been diagnosed _ taken soon. more than 19,000 people should have been diagnosed haven't i should have been diagnosed haven't been because of missed referrals.
3:21 pm
what is your advice to anyone watching who thinks they may have something that needs checking? it’s something that needs checking? it's a really important point. there are many— a really important point. there are many people — a really important point. there are many people who _ a really important point. there are many people who didn't _ a really important point. there are many people who didn't come i a really important point. there are i many people who didn't come forward to their— many people who didn't come forward to their gp_ many people who didn't come forward to their gp because _ many people who didn't come forward to their gp because they— many people who didn't come forward to their gp because they felt - many people who didn't come forward to their gp because they felt the i to their gp because they felt the services — to their gp because they felt the services have _ to their gp because they felt the services have been— to their gp because they felt thei services have been overburdened to their gp because they felt the - services have been overburdened with covid or— services have been overburdened with covid or they— services have been overburdened with covid or they weren't _ services have been overburdened with covid or they weren't safe. _ services have been overburdened with covid or they weren't safe. the - covid or they weren't safe. the message — covid or they weren't safe. the message is— covid or they weren't safe. the message is if— covid or they weren't safe. the message is if you _ covid or they weren't safe. the message is if you think- covid or they weren't safe. the message is if you think you i covid or they weren't safe. the. message is if you think you have covid or they weren't safe. the i message is if you think you have a si-n message is if you think you have a sign or— message is if you think you have a sign or symptom _ message is if you think you have a sign or symptom that _ message is if you think you have a sign or symptom that might- message is if you think you have a sign or symptom that might be i message is if you think you have a i sign or symptom that might be cancer or something — sign or symptom that might be cancer or something that— sign or symptom that might be cancer or something that doesn't _ sign or symptom that might be cancer or something that doesn't feel - sign or symptom that might be cancer or something that doesn't feel right i or something that doesn't feel right with your— or something that doesn't feel right with your body, _ or something that doesn't feel right with your body, it's _ or something that doesn't feel right with your body, it's really— with your body, it's really important _ with your body, it's really important you _ with your body, it's really important you go - with your body, it's really important you go to i with your body, it's really important you go to yourl with your body, it's really. important you go to your gp with your body, it's really- important you go to your gp to get it checked _ important you go to your gp to get it checked out. — important you go to your gp to get it checked out. it's _ important you go to your gp to get it checked out. it's probably- important you go to your gp to get it checked out. it's probably not. it checked out. it's probably not cancer — it checked out. it's probably not cancer but — it checked out. it's probably not cancer but if _ it checked out. it's probably not cancer but if it _ it checked out. it's probably not cancer but if it is— it checked out. it's probably not cancer but if it is it _ it checked out. it's probably not cancer but if it is it could - it checked out. it's probably not cancer but if it is it could be i it checked out. it's probably not cancer but if it is it could be thej cancer but if it is it could be the thing _ cancer but if it is it could be the thing that— cancer but if it is it could be the thing that saves _ cancer but if it is it could be the thing that saves your _ cancer but if it is it could be the thing that saves your life. - restaurant, cafe and pub bosses in the uk, will soon be banned from keeping customer tips left for staff and service charges added to bills. it's currently up to business owners to decide whether the money is divided equally or put back into the company. the government legislation is expected to come into force within the next year. a man who spent years collecting old postcards has been tracking down the people they were orginally sent
3:22 pm
to, ortheirfamilies, to reunite them with a piece of their past. stu prince began the project when he was forced to shield during lockdown last year. amanda kirton has been to meet him. oh, yeah, these are the orphanage ones. well, i've always been interested in postcards and such. but i got leukaemia and that meant heavy, heavy chemo. i was in a state of shock, really. i was wondering whether i'd be here or not. it was a pretty scary time. well, covid was that next year, 2020. and i knew i was going to be locked down for quite a while. and i thought about my postcards, and i said, "i used to enjoy them". needing a distraction, stu began purchasing postcards in online auctions. and i thought, well, i could open a little facebook group, reach people with the intention of reuniting with families. and i started putting them on, six at a time, and people
3:23 pm
started to get interested, and i matched a couple. exhausted from his treatment, stu had limitations. people started to pool together to help him to research. i was poorly, and the only way i could, you know, cope was with my researchers. they're fantastic. i'm looking all the time for evidence that will tie the name to the address and the date. some of the postcards might have a happy birthday, so i will send them a personal message. and how does it feel when she finds them? yes! quite early on, stu purchased a postcard that was sent in 1946 to a baby. such a cute card to a one—year—old, i thought that was absolutely lovely. i put the card on my page. one of my researchers, she contacted me saying, "i've found the baby". then a lady contacted me, "that card is me! that baby is me!"
3:24 pm
i was chuffed to death. i got a facebook message from stu, talking about this postcard that he'd found. the postcard was sent by her late grandparents. i was amazed. it was for my first birthday, 74 years ago. out of adversity came something really nice. something usefulfor a big reach of people, and ifelt really good about it. i felt good about myself for the first time for quite a while. part of my recovery, reakktm to feel useful. and i think that's, for any person recovering from leukaemia or cancer, to feel useful is big, it's massive. stu prince ending that report from amanda kirton. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes.
3:25 pm
hello again. it looks pretty cloudy through the rest of the afternoon across western areas of the uk. the cloud thick enough to bring some rain to western scotland and some patches of drizzle for north west england and across wales. although, that will tend to ease. a few brighter spells pushing into the northwest later on. southern and eastern england along with north—eastern scotland having the best of the sunshine. temperatures very warm for the time of year. reaching a high well into the low 20s. overnight tonight, turning murky with fog patches developing around the coasts and hills of western england, wales and the southern counties of england. some more drizzle and rain to come across the highlands of scotland. through saturday, staying quite damp for much of the day but otherwise a lot of cloud across western areas. the best of the breaks in the cloud in eastern wales, the midlands, eastern england, eastern and north—eastern areas of scotland. and in that sunshine, temperatures again well above average.
3:26 pm
3:27 pm
3:28 pm
3:29 pm
hello this is bbc news. the headlines... the government urges motorists not to panic buy fuel as long queues form at some service stations amid fears of shortages due to a lack of delivery drivers if you're unlucky enough that they cite is out when you need to refuel, they will not. police release footage of a man wanted over the killing of sabina nessa in south east london — as they continue
3:30 pm
to question another man on suspicion of her murder tonight a vigil will be held a week after the 28—year—old was attacked as she walked to meet a friend at a pub. elsewhere: a report warns it could take a decade to clear the backlog of cancer treatment in england. anyone for doubles? the duchess of cambridge congratulates emma raducanu on winning the us open, as she looks ahead to the future. i think ithinki i think i have a lot of room for development in terms of my tennis career and i think it is something i need to keep working on. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. after all the waiting and all the hype, the 43rd edition of the ryder cup is underway in wisconsin. europe looking to defend their title that they won in paris three years ago. europe have won 9 of the past 12, including the ryder cup at paris in 2018. but worth remembering 6 of the past 7 have been
3:31 pm
won by the home side. the foursomes are all now well under way. sergio garcia and the world number one and us open championjohn rahm are taking onjustin thomas and jordan spieth who won three of their matches together in 2018. england's paul casey is alongside norwegian victor hovland, at 2a the youngest player in the european side. they're taking on the world number two dustinjohnson and this year's open champion colin morikawa. and the english pair lee westwood and matt fitzpatrick are taking on the four time major champion brooks koepka and daniel berger. another huge sporting event taking place this weekend is the world heavyweight championship fight between anthony joshua and oleksandr usyk. the pair have weighed in this afternoon ahead of the bout tomorrow night
3:32 pm
at the tottenham hotspur stadium. usyk was at his heaviest ever weight for the fight wherejoshua puts his ibf, wba and wbo belts on the line. speaking to the bbc, joshua has opened up, about how he deals with the stress, and mental challenge, of competing, at an elite level. it's a lonely sport, yeah. so we're talking now, we're chill, but there will be a time when i'm on my own and thinking about it. when you wake up sometimes, i don't have the best sleep. if you wake up with, thank god i'm awake, thank god for this water i'm about to drink, and i'm happy, it changes the perspective of your day. that's how i've been dealing with all this pressure is, i'm happy to be here, no pressure, no stress. red bull's max verstappen will start sunday's russian grand prix from the back of the grid as a result of a penalty for using too many engines this season. in second practice today it was a mercedez one two with valtteri bottas finishing quickest, just ahead of his teammate lewis hamilton. verstappen's grid penalty gives hamilton and mercedes a golden opportunity to gain ground in the championship — the dutchman is five points ahead of hamilton heading into this weekend. england have won the netball series against new zealand,
3:33 pm
after an astonishing come back to beat the world champions. the roses were ten goals down at one point, but rallied in the fourth quarter to level the score. england then nudged themselves in front and held on for a close win. they lost the series 3—0 last time they visited new zealand in 2020.. but now have a confidence boosting win going into the commonwealth games. —— red bull's max verstappen will start sunday's russian grand prix from the back of the grid as a result of a penalty for using too many engines this season. in second practice today it was a mercedez one two with valtteri bottas finishing quickest, just ahead of his teammate lewis hamilton. verstappen's grid penalty gives hamilton and mercedes a golden opportunity to gain ground in the championship — the dutchman is five points ahead of hamilton heading into this weekend. and finally, emma raducanu has been part of a homecoming event at the lawn tennis association national centre today, to mark her title win at this month's us open. raducanu became the first british woman to win a grand slam for 44 years and the first qualifier to win a major too. and she was playing with royalty at the event — the duchess of cambridge made a guest appearance. afterwards, raducanu
3:34 pm
reflected on her history making time in new york. i'v e i've had many cool opportunities but i've had many cool opportunities but i would say the nicest and best moment i've enjoyed was the moment after the final when me and everyone in the team just had a really nice meal together and we spoke until the early hours of the morning just reflecting on the fortnight, three weeks that we had. hat reflecting on the fortnight, three weeks that we had.— weeks that we had. not meeting famous people _ weeks that we had. not meeting famous people and _ weeks that we had. not meeting famous people and getting i weeks that we had. not meetingj famous people and getting given incredible things? going to all the fancy balls? it is the moment with your team going just what we did, look at what we did. the your team going just what we did, look at what we did. the moments we have had have — look at what we did. the moments we have had have been _ look at what we did. the moments we have had have been incredible - look at what we did. the moments we have had have been incredible and i have had have been incredible and i've enjoyed all of them but that is the special moment with team is the one that really sticks in my head and i will probably keep that for ever. that's all the sport for now. emma raducanu — the homecoming party is now on the bbc iplayer if you want to watch more. over the bbc sport website there's the latest from the ryder cup and full coverage of the final day of crickets county championship season. warwickshire needing to beat somerset to pip leaders lancashire to title. more on the gas crisis we've been reporting on over the past week. nearly one—and—a—half million customers have been hit in two weeks by the collapse of energy firms in the uk. it's down to a rise in the price of wholesale gas. market regulator ofgem has described the increase as �*unprecedented' and says more firms could go bust. it also means there are fewer deals available to customers on price comparison sites and uswitch says
3:35 pm
there's currently �*no point�* in customers shopping around. i'm nowjoined by dermot nolan who is the former ceo of ofgem, the uk energy regualator. the may what are the main issues? you might be price of gas nationally, and over the world. it's gone up by a huge amount. we use gas for all our heating the, and gas is also the main way we generate electricity. when we see the huge spike throughout the entire world. the higher price for electricity as well. that is basically what has
3:36 pm
happened. if your firm goes if yourfirm goes bust, don't worry. you will be moved to another supplier at hopefully the same rate. in that sense, don't worry. it's never great to see a firm go bust but some firms that are not done as well as they should be arguing boss so don't panic, you will be switched to someone else and have continuity of supply which is really important to emphasise. there is no evidence that any of the big firms are going bust but there is a regime set in law and this will sound a bit of a mouthful but a
3:37 pm
special administration regime. one of the big firms if they went bust and i don't see any evidence of that, it will be taken over. that has not happened before. as i hasten to add, but there is a very carefully planned regime so if one of the big firms that go bust, there is someone to deal with that. let's hope that doesn't happen but if it does, i think it will be dealt with. there will be concern from a lot of people watching this about how this develops. as someone who knows this industry, what can you say to those watching that can put your mind at ease? , ., ease? listen, i will not hide the truth which _ ease? listen, i will not hide the truth which is _ ease? listen, i will not hide the truth which is that _ ease? listen, i will not hide the truth which is that energy i ease? listen, i will not hide the} truth which is that energy prices with gas and electricity are likely to to stay at a high level for the next 6—12 months, there will be an increase... and i'm afraid there is
3:38 pm
nothing really we can do about that. there may be measures that the government can take but prices are going to be higher than they were. against that, i would say the lights will stay on, no system is ever perfect but the lights will stay on, your heat will still flow so you will be fine in that department, don't worry about that. if you feel you really cannot afford these kinds of prices and i know that will be difficult, there are two possibilities, one, the government may opt to do something in the forthcoming budget. i don't know if they will, that is a matter for government but they will be focusing towards the fuel poor. if you're struggling to pay your bills, and it is easy for me to say but i do mean it, you should contact your supplier at an early stage was that if you have trouble paying your bills, your supplier is about that obliged to do something about it, to work with you, offer you some kind of payment and, make sure you are given some
3:39 pm
measure, some leniency over the payment. if you really feel your bill is going up £300 — 400 and unfortunately that is possible, even likely. if that is happening and you're worried, contact your supplier earlier. they have an obligation to deal with you and treat you fairly. that is something i would say to consumers and there are some positive aspects on these things. are some positive aspects on these thins. ., , ., are some positive aspects on these thins. ., ,, ., things. the timeframe you mentioned on the likelihood _ things. the timeframe you mentioned on the likelihood of— things. the timeframe you mentioned on the likelihood of seeing _ things. the timeframe you mentioned on the likelihood of seeing these - on the likelihood of seeing these prices for customers, that sounds ambitious to some extent given the fact is that of driving up the wholesale gas prices. i don't think it's ambitious in the sense that what was driving up wholesale gas prices is partly a cold winter last year and russia was holding some supply and actually the far east, particularly china and japan, high demand for gas as their economies recover but it was also the fact that frankly we have a lot of electricity through gas and a lot of
3:40 pm
wind which did not grow up. and there are a set of factors that i think will last but if you look at what the markets are saying and markets often get things wrong but their best guess is that the wholesale price of gas will start to fall around march or april of next year so although it will be expected, i expect to do is not you, the market believes the prices will change come the spring next year and will start to fall so that is my best guess and i may be wrong. my best guess and i may be wrong. my best guess and i may be wrong. my best guess as ordinary consumers are going to start to pay higher energy prices for the next 9—10 months and thatis prices for the next 9—10 months and that is very regrettable but i hope they would fall after that. thank you forjoining us. some breaking news to bring you now, two 14—year—old boys have been
3:41 pm
sentenced at reading crown court to 13 years and 12 years respectively in a young offenders institution for the murder of autistic 13—year—old 0lly stephens in emmer green, reading, onjanuary 3 this year. helena wilkinson has been following the case. 0lly was, as parents say, generous, caring and over standing up for the defenceless. erie is captured on a neighbour was a door bell camera leaving home on a sunday afternoon in january. leaving home on a sunday afternoon injanuary. he had just told his mum that he loved her. i in january. he had 'ust told his mum that he loved her.— that he loved her. i went to the door and it _ that he loved her. i went to the door and it was _ that he loved her. i went to the door and it was a _ that he loved her. i went to the door and it was a boy _ that he loved her. i went to the door and it was a boy i - that he loved her. i went to the door and it was a boy i knew. . that he loved her. i went to the i door and it was a boy i knew. olly would have _ door and it was a boy i knew. 0lly would have nothing to do with normally _ would have nothing to do with normally. he would have nothing to do with normall . , ., , would have nothing to do with normall . , . , , normally. he said olly has been stabbed and _ normally. he said olly has been stabbed and i _ normally. he said olly has been stabbed and i went _ normally. he said olly has been stabbed and i went back- normally. he said olly has been stabbed and i went back to - normally. he said olly has been stabbed and i went back to the l stabbed and i went back to the stairs because stewart was upstairs and shouted he has been stabbed and that you came screaming down the stairs, his sisters, and you ran out without your shoes on over to the field. fish without your shoes on over to the field. ~ ., ' y without your shoes on over to the field. ~ ., , , , without your shoes on over to the field. ~ .,' , , ., ~ field. an off duty nurse walking her do found field. an off duty nurse walking her dog found olly _ field. an off duty nurse walking her dog found olly and _ field. an off duty nurse walking her dog found olly and try _ field. an off duty nurse walking her dog found olly and try to _ dog found 0lly and try to resuscitate him but he died at the scene. ., , ., i.
3:42 pm
resuscitate him but he died at the scene. ., , ., ,, ~ , scene. you 'ust fill to your knees and are scene. you just fill to your knees and are screaming, _ scene. you just fill to your knees and are screaming, my _ scene. you just fill to your knees and are screaming, my boy, - scene. you just fill to your knees and are screaming, my boy, no. | scene. you just fill to your knees i and are screaming, my boy, no. he screamed that and i looked over and 0lly was just completely lifeless. there was somebody trying to do cpr butjust there was somebody trying to do cpr but just the colouring there was somebody trying to do cpr butjust the colouring of his skin, you knew immediately he had gone. 0lly was lured to the park by a girl as part of a set up with the two boys already there waiting to attack. 0lly at the two boys knew each other but had fallen out. the boys believed 0lly grasp on them to the brother of a boy they had mocked in a social media group chat. during the trial, the jury was shown videos and photos found on the mobiles belonging to the two boys. this is the younger boy showing off his knives in his bedroom. he was 13 when he stabbed 0lly with a vegetable knife. the older boy was 14 and had posed with a knife from i4 and had posed with a knife from photos himself. yell at the age of
3:43 pm
the children involved has made the investigation shocking and i think the overwhelming emotion that i feel and i think the investigation team feel as well as one of sadness. the death of any 13—year—old boy in the circumstances as tragic but it's even more so when you take into account the ages of those responsible. it's eight months since 0lly died on a tree has grown he was found, a place for his family to visit. when 0lly left home in the day he was killed, his parents said he had a spring in his step and laughter in his heart. this is how they say they will remember him. to recap, 214—year—old boys have been sentenced to 13 and i2 recap, 214—year—old boys have been sentenced to 13 and 12 years respectively at a young offenders institute for the death of 0lly
3:44 pm
stephens. we now know the girl who lured him to the park has been sentenced to three years and two months and we will get more on that from our correspondent at reading crown court later. —— two 14—year—old boys. the main candidates to be german chancellor have clashed over the future direction of the eu and how to deal with china. in a final debate, ahead of sunday's election, they discussed climate change, affordable housing and how to defend the country from outside interference. the election marks the end of angela merkel�*s long reign as chancellor. 0ur correspondent in berlin damien mcguinness watched the final debate. this debate was a final chance for party leaders to win over voters. topics ranged from affordable housing and the national debt to climate change and how to deal with china. the current leader in the polls is 0laf scholz, the centreleft social democrat to replace angela merkel. when asked about the new aukus security pact between the uk, australia and the us, mr scholz said germany should work
3:45 pm
together with france to create a stronger europe. "i can understand the irritation that france felt about how the defence pact was worked out," he said. his conservative rival, armin laschet, who is lagging behind slightly in the polls, said that europe needed to act independently and cited the american withdrawal from afghanistan. "we need common european defence projects for when the us pulls back," he said. this election campaign has been unusual in many ways. the polls have been erratic, there are more swing voters than ever before and unprecedented numbers are undecided. in one poll, 40% of people say they still haven't made their minds up. whoever they do choose, though, it's likely that after the elections, coalition talks will be long and complicated. all of this means that this is one of the most unpredictable elections modern germany has ever known.
3:46 pm
damien mcguinness, bbc news, berlin. residents in south—western spain have a mammoth —— ever since a series of covid—i9 outbreaks in dormitories last year, migrant labourers in singapore have been banned from mixing with the general public. for the past 18 months, the majority have only been allowed out of their facilities to go to work. but, with one of the highest vaccination rates in the world, singapore and its government are facing increasing pressure to let them out. nick marsh has been speaking to some of the men wanting to leave.
3:47 pm
it's been one of the world's longest lock is, behind this barbed wire, there is talk of a growing mental health crisis. thousands of men confined in dormitories, leaving only to work. this is a painful time for me. for sharif, this is starting to get too much. i want to send a message to the singapore government. we are a long time in dormitories so many people are mentally anguished, so we need released. we need to be allowed to go out. please. with 80% of the public are 90% of workers now vaccinated, experts say that the confinement policy is not protecting anyone. after 18 months, it's very clear that a mental health challenge, the social isolation is all really bubbling up. the concern are massively overblown, we can strike a better balance. recently a handful were allowed out. as part of a pilot scheme. the government invited us to meet one of them.
3:48 pm
the authorities called the outing a milestone. the conditions they live in is different. most of them live in communal conditions and that is why message break measures put in place... they felt they were protected from the virus. we want that and we want our... to bring back. they remain separated from the public. known officially as the community. it's been a year and a half now and for the men who live here, nothing is changed. they are still waiting for the day they can finally leave but in all this time, the message that they have received has been loud and clear.
3:49 pm
we want our dignity back. the government _ we want our dignity back. the government said _ we want our dignity back. tue government said they we want our dignity back. tte government said they want to... and they are separated from the general public known in singapore as the community. it's been a year and i have now and for the men who live here, nothing has changed, they are still waiting for the day they can finally leave but the message that he has received has been loud and clear but there are those in singapore who are part of the community and then there are those who are not. residents in south—western spain have a mammoth clean—up operation ahead — after towns were inundated with floodwater following torrential rain. it comes as world leaders focus on the climate crisis during talks at the un general assembly. tanya dendrinos reports.
3:50 pm
a torrent of fast flowing water, streets submerged after heavy rain caused flash flooding in parts of south—western spain. translation: breathtaking, - the water that fell was not normal. cars piled up as they were carried away on a road resembling more of a river, while fences simply gave way. according to spain's meteorological agency, huelva province received more than 100 millimetres of rain in a matter of hours on thursday. as the water receded, muddy streets were filled with people and possessions. locals clearing their homes of everything unsalvageable, some are struggling to comprehend the devastating reality at beginning of a lengthy recovery efforts. translation: i'm left with nothing, nothing, and i am just _ an 82—year—old pensioner. i'm 82 years old and i have nothing left. it's just another extreme weather event, and this in the week world leaders are gathered for the un general assembly, with calls for action on climate change taking centre stage. tanya dendrinos, bbc news.
3:51 pm
let's return to that breaking news from reading crown court. three schoolchildren have been sentenced to a total of 28 years for killing 0lly stephens injanuary this year. their attack on the 13 was planned, gold came to a beauty spot where he was ambushed by two boys and stabbed twice. 0ur correspondent is outside reading crown court. yes, thejudges continuing yes, the judges continuing with yes, thejudges continuing with her remarks. she told the three teenagers, all 14 years old, that what the sentences were going to be and then she is now telling them how she reached those sentences. two of them are in the dock, the girl and one of the boys, and one of the
3:52 pm
other boys, the other boy is watching proceedings by a video link. she also noted that the family... she spoke to the family in court and thejudge family... she spoke to the family in court and the judge said to them that they had been quiet, patient and dignified every day during this five week trial and she said it had been humbling for us all to watch. as you say, the sentence, a total of 28 years for those three i4—year—olds, a goal and two boys, and they cannot be named because of his age. the girl loomed 0lly stephens into —— the girl lured 0lly stephens into —— the girl lured 0lly stephens into —— the girl lured 0lly stephens into a park where the boys attacked him. the parent said about 15 months after the sun left their family home, they got a knock on the doorfrom a boy family home, they got a knock on the door from a boy standing they are telling them they are son had been stabbed. they were then told of how —— they told of how they ran down to
3:53 pm
the field and it was where they are that they watched on as they watched paramedics try to save their 13—year—old son and 0lly stephens... and incredibly moving victim impact statement was read out to the people in court who were in tears, the judge herself was visibly upset, 0lly stephens' father said he could not sense danger, was unable to back down, was kind, caring, giving and loving while being unable to ask for help when he needed it most. he went on to say sadly he put his faith, loyalty and trust in the wrong people, bad people and then he turned to the door where two of the teenagers were and he said, all because of the three of you, our son is dead. we hold you equally responsible. there will be no forgiveness from us ever. thejudge,
3:54 pm
continuing with her sentencing remark, the teenagers sentenced for a total of 28 years for killing oliver stephens, i4 a total of 28 years for killing oliver stephens, 14 years old, who was lowered to that park. and we expect that rack of a lured. we expect that rack of a lured. we expect to hear from expect that rack of a lured. we expect to hearfrom his parents outside of the court. we will try to bring you the news. many thanks. coming up to four o'clock. one more before the weather. coronavirus has meant a difficult time for many this past year — but a team of therapy dogs has been working to relieve stress at a hospital in chile which, for months, was overwhelmed by cases of coronavirus. hospital staff say the presence of four legged friends has made a big difference to morale,
3:55 pm
as mark lobel reports. meet pepe, oh, and keemu, giving a lick of love to this children's hospital in chile, lifting the spirits of staff and patients. translation: when one enters this hospital with dogs, everyone greets| you and their expressions change. therapy sessions here resembling a mixture of the dog show crufts and yoga, with an abridged version of downward dog. what looks like a dog's dinner is anything but. a comer. eso! therapy takes many forms. translation: therapy i is perfect for the children. with children that are very sick, this helps them escape the stress of the hospital, but they are living. walkies for these caring canines warms hearts. as coronavirus cases soared, they had a ringside seat. translation: dog therapy - in our units has been a tremendous contribution for patients, parents and workers. it has reduced anxiety and stress, patients are more willing to receive treatment and attend medical checkups.
3:56 pm
proving best friends to all ages, these therapy dogs available for different strokes, for different folks. mark lobel, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello again. i think there's going to be a lot of cloud across western areas of the uk over the next few days but even if it stays cloudy where you are, either way, it is going to be very, very mild with the wind is coming from your own way south—west, dragging in subtropical air. temperatures this weekend pushing widely into the 20s where we do see some sunshine, lossiemouth in north scotland is above the seasonal average. mind you, today, pretty mild.
3:57 pm
extensive cloud across western areas. bit of rain in west scotland, some patches of drizzle for north west england and across wales but who the rest of the sunshine today, southern and eastern england, northern and eastern areas of scotland and where the sunshine comes out again, temperatures pushing well on into the 20s. overnight tonight, rather murky condition to come across western england, wales and southern england, too, with practice developing around the coast and hills, some rain pushing into western scotland, probably a light and patchy, northern ireland stays cloudy but mild wherever you are. into the forecast, some damp weather, quite persistent for much of the day but a lot of dry weather, just some showers popping up across western areas and the rest of the sunshine for north—east wales across the midlands, eastern england and into eastern and north—eastern areas of scotland. again, temperatures well above average for the time of year, well into the 20s. looking at the chart, to sunday, this cold front approaches from the west otherwise it is a largely dry picture on sunday
3:58 pm
with spells of sunshine developing and probably a little bit more anyway of sunshine given that the wins will be blowing a little bit more strongly but there could be a few isolated showers across western areas but otherwise fine. best of the sunshine again, northern and north—eastern only took scotland into parts of eastern england through the midlands and probably eastern wales as well but for northern ireland, a change with a seeing rain moving on sunday afternoon with the rain being accompanied by some squally winds and a band of rain is a cold front putting eastwards. into the first part of monday in what follows is much cooler and fresher north—westerly winds so bridges will be dropping back down to average, maybe even a touch below and it looks like quite an unsubtle spell of weather with a mixture of sunshine and fairly blustery showers for many. that's your weather.
3:59 pm
4:00 pm
this is bbc news, i'm ben mundy. the headlines at 4:00pm: three school children have been sentenced to a total of 28 years for killing reading teenager olly stephens in a berkshire beauty spot in january. the government urges motorists not to panic buy fuel as long queues form at some service stations amid fears of shortages due to a lack of delivery drivers. if you don't need to fill up, don't fill up. there is no shortage. if you are unlucky enough when you do need fuel that a site is out, the chances are the next nearest one won't be. police release footage of a man wanted over the killing of sabina nessa in south east london as they continue to question another man on suspicion of her murder. tonight, a vigil will be held a week after the 28—year—old was attacked as she walked to meet a friend at a pub. elsewhere, a report warns it could take a decade to clear
4:01 pm
the backlog of cancer treatment in england. and anyone for doubles? the duchess of cambridge congratulates emma raducanu on winning the us open, as she looks ahead to the future. i still think i have a lot of room for development _ in terms of my tennis career and where it can go, - so i'm excited to start working on it. - three teenagers have been sentenced at reading crown court for their part in the murder of 13—year—old olly stephens. two 14 year old boys were given to 13 years and 12 years respectively in a young offenders institution. a 14 year old girl who lured olly to the park where the attack took
4:02 pm
place was sentenced to three years and two months. helena wilkinson reports. thejudge is continuing the judge is continuing with thejudge is continuing with her sentencing remarks. she has already handed down those sentences to the 3i4—year—olds, two boys and a girl. two of them within the dock, one of them was watching proceedings via video link. in terms of the breakdown of the sentences, the girl who set ollie up, she was the one who set ollie up, she was the one who lowered ollie to the park in january on a sunday afternoon. the judge sentenced her to three years and two months. one of the boys, the one who threw the first punch, received 12 years. and the boy who stabbed ollie received 13 years. the judge before she began her sentencing remarks that she spoke to the family in court and said that
4:03 pm
she remarked on how patient and dignified they had been everyday in this courtroom. she said it was humbling for all of us to watch the pain and the grief and the anger and the statements of the family had provided today the judge said reflected was almost unbearable to hear. we did heara reflected was almost unbearable to hear. we did hear a statement from ollie's father who read an incredibly powerful victim impact statement to the court and they were tears in the courtroom. thejudge itself looked visibly upset as he said to the court that the murder of their son was called, senseless, it was a murder that ripped the heart out of their family. he went on to say that no child deserves to meet such a callous end and he said that his son was just trying to protect someone else's little brother. the judge also spoke directly to the
4:04 pm
3i4—year—olds today in court. she said to them, whatever party should have you played, what you did that day, all of you it was utterly cruel. she said they had taken one life, they had damaged their own futures and they had caused so much pain to so many people. so 3i4—year—olds, a girl and two boys, have been sentenced to a total of 28 years and we are expecting to hear from oliver stevens's family who will come out of the court at some point in the next hour we think and also from the investigating officer to hear from also from the investigating officer to hearfrom him. but the family has said the death of their son has had a devastating impact on them. olly was, his parents say, generous, caring and always would stand up for the defenceless.
4:05 pm
here he is captured on a neighbours' door bell camera leaving home on a sunday afternoon injanuary. he had just told his mum that he loved her. i went to the door and it was a boy that i knew. olly wouldn't have anything to do with him normally. and he said olly has been stabbed. and ijust remember running back towards the stairs because stewart was upstairs and shouting "ollie has been stabbed!" his sister was upstairs as well. they both came screaming down the stairs and you ran out without your shoes over to the field. an off—duty nurse walking her dog found olly and tried to resuscitate him, but he died at the scene. stuart just fell to his knees and he was just screaming, "my boy, my boy. n°_r. he screamed that and i looked over and olly was just com pletely lifeless. there was somebody trying to do cpr but the colouring of his skin and the fact that he just wasn't moving at all. yes, you knew immediately. he had gone. olly was lured to the park
4:06 pm
by the girl as part of the setup. the two boys were already there, waiting to attack. olly and the two boys knew each other but had fallen out. the boys believed olly grassed on them to the brother of a boy they had knocked in a social media group chat. during the trial, the jury was shown videos and photos found on the mobiles belonging to the two boys. this is the youngest showing off his knives in his bedroom. he was 13 when he stabbed olly with a vegetable knife. the older boy was 14 and had posed with a knife for photos himself. the age of the children involved has made the investigation shocking - and i think the overwhelming emotion that i feel and the investigation - team feels is one of sadness. the death of any 13—year—old boy | in these circumstances is tragic. | but it's even more so when you take into account the ages _ of those responsible. it's eight months since olly died.
4:07 pm
a tree is growing where he was found. a place for his family to visit. when olly left home on the day he was killed, his parents said he had a spring in his step and laughter in his heart. this is how they see they will remember him. when his father was reading that statement, an incredibly moving statement, an incredibly moving statement earlier today, he looked at the 3i4—year—olds and he said to them, all because the three of you ourson them, all because the three of you our son is dead. we hold weekly responsible. they will be no forgiveness from this error. —— ever. senior government ministers are meeting to discuss the closure of some petrol stations,
4:08 pm
because of a shortage of delivery drivers. queues are forming at several forecourts, despite government pleas for people not to panic buy fuel. both bp and esso have closed some petrol stations because of supply problems. and, ministers are not ruling out the idea of changing visa rules to bring in foreign lorry drivers — or using soldiers to drive fuel tankers. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. queues outside petrol stations — they've been appearing up and down the country as motorists worry they might not be able to fill up. the fuel giant bp has admitted that some of its outlets have been running dry and a small number have had to close. other retailers have also been affected. but operators say panic—buying will only make matters worse. if you don't need to fill up, don't fill up. there's no shortage. if you're unlucky enough when you do need fuel that a site is out, the chances are the next nearest one won't be. and let's be honest, there are plenty of petrol stations for a vast majority of the population. it's not as if you have to drive half an hour to find one — there's plenty about. so don't panic—buy — itjust causes more of a problem.
4:09 pm
there isn't actually a shortage of fuel — the uk's refineries have plenty. the problem is getting it to petrol stations. the issues that bp has been having in getting supplies to garages like this one are serious in themselves, and it's because the company can't get it hold of enough tanker drivers. but that's merely a symptom of a much wider problem — a national shortage of heavy goods vehicle drivers that is affecting the entire economy. at the moment, experts say the country needs an extra 90,000 to 100,000 drivers, but recruiting and training them takes time. it isn'tjust as simple as "yes, you have passed your test today — brilliant. we're going to send you to scotland or cornwall tomorrow," because there are lots of other things and safety—related things that have to be done — making sure they know how to secure loads and things like that, the drivers' hours, making sure they know what... so it's notjust a case of a steering wheel attendant any more. there's a lot of pressure behind a driver to make sure that all the boxes are ticked. this instructor says there's plenty of demand from would—be drivers. the only problem we have
4:10 pm
at the moment is test dates, getting enough tests for the candidates, because we have such a backlog, and i'm sure we're not the only company in that position. people within the industry say more immediate measures are needed while new drivers are trained up. they want foreign hauliers to be given short—term visas to help fill the gap. the government has been reluctant to do this, but today the transport secretary said all options were open. i would do whatever is required, if that would help. what i don't want to do, and i have been hinting at this, is undercut, as has happened before, with cheaper european drivers and then find that our drivers drop out because they're being undercut. that doesn't solve the problem — itjust creates a new problem. the shortage of lorry drivers is so serious that it's unlikely any single step will solve it in the short term. but ministers are acutely aware that further disruptions to the supply chain could mean even more empty shelves in the run—up to christmas.
4:11 pm
theo leggett, bbc news. let's get more from our political correspondent, peter saull. the government is meeting this afternoon and says it will do whatever is required. what are the next steps?— next steps? that meeting is still onaroin. next steps? that meeting is still ongoing- grant _ next steps? that meeting is still ongoing. grant shapps _ next steps? that meeting is still ongoing. grant shapps said - next steps? that meeting is still ongoing. grant shapps said they| next steps? that meeting is still - ongoing. grant shapps said they are ruling nothing out. i suppose one of the more extreme options would be bringing in the army to get the feel to the petrol stations. the ministers are continuing to stress its not a problem of a lack of fuel, it's that distribution issue. not enough lorry drivers to get to local forecourts. we are now told they are considering the idea of a temporary visa for his tv drivers from abroad to come to the uk and perhaps plug some of the gaps in that labour market. last night we were told by a home office source that was something they were not looking at.
4:12 pm
now it appears the home secretary has softened his stance on that one. we are not expecting any kind of imminent announcement on this. it would be something of a climb—down for the government to do that. some political opponents already starting to pile in, the scottish first minister nicola sturgeon singh the prime minister should have listened to voices during the eu referendum who are telling him that ending free movement and cutting in immigration would lead to a critic —— critical labour shortages. and the cbi has said in the past hour that it wants a much more urgent and active approach to be taken by the government. ml approach to be taken by the government.— approach to be taken by the rovernment. �* , government. all the while, these talks are ongoing _ government. all the while, these talks are ongoing and _ government. all the while, these talks are ongoing and the - government. all the while, these i talks are ongoing and the timescale is key because the longer it goes on without a resolution those cues will keep on forming. without a resolution those cues will keep on forming-— keep on forming. that's right. the foreian keep on forming. that's right. the foreign office _ keep on forming. that's right. the foreign office minister— keep on forming. that's right. the foreign office minister tweeted i keep on forming. that's right. the foreign office minister tweeted a | foreign office minister tweeted a few moments ago, there is no fuel shortage. they are keen to tell
4:13 pm
people. eventually the petrol will get to those forecourts so don't panic buy. but if you are trying to get to work tomorrow or if you have important things to get to where you are running a business, you feel you have to get to the petrol station. it's a difficult one the government and an issue that has caused problems for governments in the past. the problem with petrol. the government wants to try to deal with it but even if it were to relax the immigration rules there is no guarantee we would get a flood of drivers coming from abroad to plug that labour market. there are no easy fixes here but certainly the hope is that eventually that feel will get to those stations that have had to close. we will get to those stations that have had to close-— had to close. we have 'ust heard that the scottish _ had to close. we have just heard that the scottish government - had to close. we have just heard | that the scottish government has said there is no shortage of fuel in scotland and supplies are operating as normal. however, ministers have
4:14 pm
had urgent discussions within the sector and say they will support consumers however they can. those comments come after long queues have been seen outside some scottish petrol stations. the headlines on bbc news: three school children have been sentenced to a total of 28 years for killing reading teenager olly stephens in a berkshire beauty spot injanuary. the government urges motorists not to panic buy fuel, as queues form at some service stations amid fears of shortages due to a lack of delivery drivers. police release cctv footage of a man wanted over the killing of sabina nessa in south east london as they continue to question another man on suspicion of her murder. a vigil will be held tonight in south east london to remember sabina nessa, the primary school teacher murdered last weekend. detectives are still questioning
4:15 pm
a man on suspicion of killing her and they've also issued cctv footage of another man they want to talk to. sabina, who was 28, is thought to have been attacked as she walked to a pub near her home in kidbrooke last friday. june kelly reports. last friday, sabina nessa was finishing her working week as a primary school teacher and looking forward to the weekend. seven days on, she's in the thoughts of so many who never knew her, but are horrified and angry at the way her young life was taken. sabina, who was 28, was on her way to a pub in kidbrooke village in south—east london to meet a friend. she never arrived. a 38—year—old man is now in custody on suspicion of murder. detectives are also looking for this man, and have issued these images. he was caught on cctv walking in pegler square, which was where sabina was heading. police are appealing for anyone who recognises this man to contact them immediately.
4:16 pm
he is believed to have access to this silver car. at the school where sabina taught, parents and their children are mourning a much loved teacher. very sad news. very, very sad. we didn't expect it. so... yeah, she was a kind person, and a lovely person and, you know, we are missing her. she's very helpful and she helps us do our spellings. did you know her? yes. what do you remember of her? she helped me when i was lost. and when i was with my teacher, she helped me get back to my mum. sabina nessa's killing has once again brought into sharp focus the issues of violence against women, their safety on the streets and male attitudes. in this community now, the council is issuing hundreds of personal alarms to females.
4:17 pm
this evening in kidbrooke, local people will hold a vigil in memory of sabina. it's a chance for the community to come together, collective grief, you know, a show of solidarity. and also, you know, a chance to sort of demand justice for sabina. it's going to be just a time for some gentle reflection and there will be a few people speaking, and we will have candles there. and they're asking people who can't be there to also light a candle for sabina. june kelly, bbc news. our correspondent, megan paterson, is in south east london. what is the latest with that police investigation? the what is the latest with that police investigation?— what is the latest with that police investigation? the police have told us they have _ investigation? the police have told us they have trawled _ investigation? the police have told us they have trawled through - investigation? the police have told us they have trawled through cctv| us they have trawled through cctv footage extensively since the murder. they are very interested in identifying the man we saw in that cctv footage. he was seen near the
4:18 pm
place where she was supposed to be meeting a friend last friday night. she was supposed to be going to a pub to meet a friend and we know she didn't make thatjourney. her body was discovered the following day by a person walking their dog. they want members of the public to help try to identify that man and the police want them to get in touch if they have an inkling of how we might be. they also want people to get in touch if they recognise that vehicle be so because they believe he had access to it. we are focusing on that cctv footage and they have released that and are asking people to look at it. obviously we know there is a 38—year—old man was arrested on suspicion of murder and he remains in custody. the police asking people to think if they were in the area and if they spotted something to come forward. later tonight they will be a visual held here and local community members and women safety groups will come down here and there will be a moments silence and faith leaders will give
4:19 pm
readings. it's an opportunity for people to come down and reflect on her life and to stand up against that violence against women. the police will be at the vigil and they will be talking to people, trying to reassure people. they have said this afternoon that women should not have to change their behaviours, they shouldn't have to always walk along brightly lit streets. they should be safe to walk around the streetjust like everyone expects to be. so they will be answering questions and trying to allay fears that the priority at the moment is trying to identify that man in the cctv footage that has been issued by the police. with me now are amie dibba and sian healy who have helped to organise the vigil in kidbrooke this
4:20 pm
evening. we are here to show honour and respect to her life. we want to expend —— extend our deepest condolences to family and no one should lose a loved one or anyone in this way. should lose a loved one or anyone in this wa . ~ . . should lose a loved one or anyone in this wa . ~ ., ., should lose a loved one or anyone in thiswa .~ ., ., , should lose a loved one or anyone in thiswa . ~ ., ., , ., this way. what have you been hearing from the community _ this way. what have you been hearing from the community both _ this way. what have you been hearing from the community both they - this way. what have you been hearing from the community both they and i from the community both they and within social media? this from the community both they and within social media?— within social media? this is a very close-knit — within social media? this is a very close-knit community. _ within social media? this is a very close-knit community. we - within social media? this is a very close-knit community. we are - within social media? this is a very close-knit community. we are all| close—knit community. we are all very shocked and saddened by what has happened and today when we think about the _ has happened and today when we think about the vigil the feeling in the community is this is a chance to reflect_ community is this is a chance to reflect and _ community is this is a chance to reflect and gather together and to show _ reflect and gather together and to show that we are a strong community and the _ show that we are a strong community and the most important thing for us is to focus— and the most important thing for us is to focus on thinking about her and sending our condolences to the famitx _ and sending our condolences to the famitx the — and sending our condolences to the family. the mood in the community is very sad _ family. the mood in the community is very sad at— family. the mood in the community is very sad at the moment and hopefully this evening gives people a chance to reflect — this evening gives people a chance to reflect and take a minute to think—
4:21 pm
to reflect and take a minute to think about her and her family. to reflect and take a minute to think about herand herfamily.| think about herand herfamily. i understand that the focus think about herand herfamily. t understand that the focus tonight will be on her and herfamily but the police will be there as well and those conversations between the community and the police will be key as well. , , . , ., as well. definitely. we understand that and that _ as well. definitely. we understand that and that is _ as well. definitely. we understand that and that is why _ as well. definitely. we understand that and that is why they - as well. definitely. we understand that and that is why they will - as well. definitely. we understand that and that is why they will be i that and that is why they will be present. however, the message that we are going to continue putting out is that our main focus tonight is for her. the reason being is that we cannot ask people to say something if they are not aware of what has happened. we leave space for those types of conversations but the focus tonight is to make sure there is a platform and space to speak about what has happened to this young woman. ~ ., ., ,, what has happened to this young woman. ~ ., ., i. .,, woman. what do you hope the vigil tonirht will woman. what do you hope the vigil tonight will achieve? _ woman. what do you hope the vigil tonight will achieve? i _ woman. what do you hope the vigil tonight will achieve? i hope - woman. what do you hope the vigil tonight will achieve? i hope this . tonight will achieve? i hope this evenin: is tonight will achieve? i hope this evening is a _ tonight will achieve? i hope this evening is a peaceful, _ tonight will achieve? i hope this evening is a peaceful, calm - tonight will achieve? i hope this - evening is a peaceful, calm moment
4:22 pm
of reflection. it will give the community a chance to mourn for her and hopefully it will help, if peopte _ and hopefully it will help, if people have things they can share with the _ people have things they can share with the police to find justice for her, _ with the police to find justice for her. they— with the police to find justice for her, they might have the opportunity to do that _ her, they might have the opportunity to do that. but i hope this evening is a moment of calm and also to remind — is a moment of calm and also to remind people who live here that we do have _ remind people who live here that we do have a _ remind people who live here that we do have a strong community and that together— do have a strong community and that together we will support each other. many thanks forjoining us. specialist teams from kent police have been involved in a painstaking process to remove two climate activists who've glued their hands to the top of a tanker, blocking access to the port of dover. earlier 39 members of the insulate britain protest group were arrested after they caused gridlock in the town and surrounding roads. our correspondent, charlie rose, has spent the day at the scene. this has caused a huge amount of chaos here in dover and the surrounding areas.
4:23 pm
all the arterial routes into the town have been in complete gridlock because access to this port, a key route for trade and passengers and people and holiday—makers into the uk and in and out of this country was completely blocked. two of these climate activists remained because they were stuck on top of a tankerjust outside the port. their hands were glued to the roof and it took police a very long time, it was a long, careful, painstaking process to remove them from the roof of the tanker. once they were down, i approached one of them as he was taken into a police van and i asked him why he was doing this. i said local people were completely upset by the disruption he has caused. he told me he was very sorry about the disruption that he and his other climate activists in his group have caused.
4:24 pm
he said it's the only way he can get his message across. i asked him if he was prepared to go to prison and he said yes. there has been disruption here in dover for hours today and throughout the morning lots of local residents and motorists were really upset by what was going on, including the kent police and crime commissioner, matthew scott. he has been quite vocal about all of this and he wants penalties for this sort of thing increased to deter climate activists from taking this sort of action. just over 800,000 people, ori in 80, are estimated to have had covid in the uk last week. that's slightly down on the previous week according to figures released today by the office for national statistics. (00v) infection rates are falling in england, statistics. infection rates are falling in england, for the first time in several weeks, but the ons say rates
4:25 pm
remain high across the uk. they report there are encouraging signs that infection rates have continued to decrease among young adults, possibly reflecting the impact of the vaccination programme. a report suggests it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog in cancer treatment in england. the study — by the institute for public policy research — says almost 20,000 people have not been diagnosed because of missed referrals during the pandemic. and it says even with a 5% increase in treatments, hospitals may not clear cancer waiting lists until 2033. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. the pandemic has affected all parts of the nhs, with cancer services no exception. one worry is the number of people who fail to get a diagnosis of cancer because they have not yet been referred for specialist tests. now a report from the ippr suggests
4:26 pm
that that could mean a huge backlog of cases we don't yet know about. there is a major backlog in cancer referrals and then in treatment, and the problem is, we haven't really got the capacity or workforce to be able to catch up with this. and as this study shows, from a very reputable group, that if we don't do something about it, we will have this problem for a decade. so we need to do something about it, and it's not ok. the report estimates around 19,500 people have not yet been diagnosed with cancer because of missed referrals. diagnostics is a big issue, with the pandemic leading to a 37% drop in endoscopies, 25% drop in mri scans and 10% fewer ct scans than expected. nhs england says cancer services have now returned to pre—pandemic levels, but the report says if the health service was able to improve that performance by 5%, the backlog would still not be cleared until 2033. and the authors warn that without a big investment in equipment and staff,
4:27 pm
thousands of people will be left waiting for a diagnosis and treatment. dominic hughes, bbc news. that warm weather will continue into the weekend. overnight we have extensive cloud which will redevelop and some mist and fog patches forming. quite murky around coasts and hills. the cloud tending to fill in. into the forecast for the weekend and they could be bits and pieces of drizzle
4:28 pm
for western scotland. the fog slow to lift off the hills in the south and west but eventually we should see some breaks in the cloud. the best of them across central england. that's where we will see temperatures running into the low 20s. even when it stays cloudy it will still be pretty mild.
4:29 pm
hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... three school children have been sentenced to a total of 28 years for killing reading teenager olly stephens in a berkshire
4:30 pm
beauty spot in january. the government urges motorists not to panic buy fuel as long queues form at some service stations amid fears of shortages due to a lack of delivery drivers if you don't need to fill, don't fill up. there is no shortage. if you are on what off when you do need to fuel that a site is out, chances are the next one will not be. police are urgently seeking a man captured on cctv close to where sabina nessa was killed in south east london , they continue to question another man on suspicion of her murder tonight a vigil will be held a week after the 28—year—old was attacked as she walked to meet a friend at a pub elsewhere: a new report warns it could take a decade to clear the backlog of cancer treatment in england. and anyone for doubles? the duchess of cambridge congratulates emma raducanu
4:31 pm
on winning the us open, as she looks ahead to the future. sport now... and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's chettan. good afternoon. first to the ryder cup, postponed last year because of the pandemic, now underway at whistlings straits in wisconsin. the usa have made a better start. europe have won 9 of the past 12, including the ryder cup at paris in 2018. but worth remembering 6 of the past 7 have been won by the home side. jordan spieth and justin thomas were out first. sergio garcia and the world number one and us open championjohn rahm are taking onjustin thomas and jordan spieth who won three of their matches together in 2018. you can see the other three matches apart from that are going the way of the americans right now. and the english pair lee westwood and matt fitzpatrick are taking on the four time major champion brooks koepka and daniel berger.
4:32 pm
and there are the debuts as well, three against rory michael rory and poulter. —— against mcilroy. another huge sporting event taking place this weekend is the world heavyweight championship fight between anthony joshua and oleksandr usykthe pair have weighed in this afternoon ahead of the bout tomorrow night at the tottenham hotspur stadium. usyk was at his heaviest ever weight for the fight, withjoshua still 19 pounds heavier. speaking to the bbc, joshua has opened up, about how he deals with the stress, and mental challenge, of competing at an elite level: it's a lonely sport, yeah. so we're talking now, we're chill, but there will be a time when i'm on my own and thinking about it. when you wake up sometimes, i don't have the best sleep. if you wake up with, thank god i'm awake, thank god for this water i'm
4:33 pm
about to drink, and i'm happy, it changes the perspective of your day. that's how i've been dealing with all this pressure is, i'm happy to be here, no pressure, no stress. red bull's max verstappen will start sunday's russian grand prix from the back of the grid as a result of a penalty for using too many engines this season.|n second practice today it was a mercedez one two with valtteri bottas finishing quickest, just ahead of his teammate lewis hamilton. verstappen's grid penalty gives hamilton and mercedes a golden opportunity to gain ground in the championship — the dutchman is five points ahead of hamilton heading into this weekend. the liverpool manager jurgen klopp says now is a "good moment" to consider bringing in safe standing at stadiums. premier league and championship clubs can now apply to pilot safe standing areas from january next year, and klopp says he would welcome it. the stadiums are completely different to a time when really sad things happened. the construction is different, all these kind of thing so i think i like it. i like the idea but especially i'm really excited about how much better could the atmosphere be at anfield if we
4:34 pm
had safe standing. british number one emma raducanu has split with her coach who helped guide her to a first major title at the us open earlier this month. andrew richardson was hired for the summer tournaments in the united states, which ended with that extraordinary win in new york where the 18 year old became the first british woman to win a grand slam for 44 years and the first qualifier to win a major too. today she was playing with royalty — the duchess of cambridge making a guest appearance at an lta event to mark her achievement. i definitely want to keep just improving and being the best version of myself on the court and off the court, and maximising my potential and i think i have a lot of room for development in terms of my tennis career, where it can go so i'm excited to start working on it. emma raducanu — the homecoming party is now on the bbc iplayer if you want to watch more. over the bbc sport website there's the latest from the ryder cup and full coverage of the final day of crickets county championship season. warwickshire needing to beat
4:35 pm
somerset to pip leaders lancashire to title. we are expecting to your from the parents and the police regarding the mother of oliver stephens. three children have _ mother of oliver stephens. three children have been _ mother of oliver stephens. three children have been sentenced - mother of oliver stephens. three children have been sentenced to l mother of oliver stephens. three | children have been sentenced to a total of 28 years for killing the reading teenager back injanuary this year and we will bring you those statements from the police and the family when that happens. first though... the government is reportedly backing plans for another large—scale nuclear power plant in the uk to help the country achieve its net zero targets. it is in discussions with american nuclear reactor manufacturer westinghouse amongst other groups, to develop the new plant in anglesey. we can now speak to the chief executive of the nuclear industry association. to see you. many thanks
4:36 pm
for joining association. to see you. many thanks forjoining us. firstly. let does know what nia does. you might be represent the company is working in the supply chain, supplying low—carbon out to city as we have for 15 years. what part could this play in the energy future of the uk? particularly jobs particularlyjobs in wales? tt particularly jobs in wales? if you particularly 'obs in wales? if you build a particularly jobs in wales? if you build a nuclear— particularly jobs in wales? if you build a nuclear power— particularly jobs in wales? if you build a nuclear power station, i particularly jobs in wales? if you | build a nuclear power station, you have a big construction project like hinckley at the moment as one of the biggest projects in europe at the moment which brings a lot of skilled jobs, apprenticeships, graduate opportunities, opportunities for people to move from different sectors from oil and gas and other things and you bring jobs during the operation because once they are built, you have more years of producing electricity 20 47 and the electricity they produce is what we need for a net zero which is what
4:37 pm
we've been hearing about today. what we've been hearing about today. what would ou we've been hearing about today. what would you say — we've been hearing about today. what would you say to _ we've been hearing about today. what would you say to people who have safety concerns? element nuclear power has been around for many decades and has been externally safe, it has produced electricity without carbon emissions and the biggest safety of people, air quality and people on the planet is what we are seeing in the air to produce electricity and what we've got to stop and what nuclear alongside wind and solar can do is produce electricity without carbon emissions and you can do it without worrying about the weather conditions which is one of the things that has impacted currently in the gas price issues that are causing problems in the electricity market. you reference it there but the other issue critics may have is going to be the value for money, does it deliver on that? can it deliver on that?—
4:38 pm
does it deliver on that? can it deliver on that? and the running costs mean _ deliver on that? and the running costs mean you _ deliver on that? and the running costs mean you don't _ deliver on that? and the running costs mean you don't have - deliver on that? and the running costs mean you don't have the i costs mean you don't have the fluctuation we've had and the wind and solar. you need all of the low—carbon ways of producing electricity is getting a zero which means no more nuclear, more wind and more storage technology. it is not a choice between those, so you get the best mix of all of those, to get in at zero and the same time reduce our reliance on burning fossil fuels and what causes the volatility we've seenin what causes the volatility we've seen in the market. we have morning and more renewables, already in place, we wouldn't be so reliant on gas and the impact on people's bills that you will see over the next few months would not be significant.
4:39 pm
with that context, what role could nuclear powerplay in the short term? in the short—term, we've got a fleet now which is ageing and they will close for instance, reaching the end of our generation live, being around for a long time so what we need in the short term as decisions to be able to get in trade, building a new power station for the future otherwise we will have our emissions are increasing and energy security as we've seen probably being even more compromised before it gets better so some of these decisions should be taken a while ago. we've been talking about this for a really long time. been talking about this for a really lona time. , ., ., , .,, long time. sorry, we have to stop ou long time. sorry, we have to stop you there. _ long time. sorry, we have to stop you there. many _ long time. sorry, we have to stop you there, many thanks _ long time. sorry, we have to stop you there, many thanks for- long time. sorry, we have to stop| you there, many thanks forjoining us. that go to reading crown court now and hear more on the case regarding olly stephens. the circumstances that led to the tragic killing of olly stephens in january this year. no parent should
4:40 pm
have to endure the horror of their child dying this way and the shocking revelation of a determined plan of those involved to ambush olly and attack him. the courage and dignity they have displayed has been remarkable. i want to thank the jury you had to watch and listen to evidence over the trial that would undoubtedly have been shocking and distressing to them. i'm pleased that the full facts of olly's death have been established and those responsible have been held to account. olly's family have told me on many occasions how he's a young man who stood up for the underdog in what was fair. i hope you would feel that, in that sense, just as has been achieved. but this is not a case where any of us today should be celebrating these verdict for the sentences. a 13—year—old boy with a bright future ahead of him has died in and distressing circumstances and his family and friends have been devastated by his loss. three other young people and their families have had their lives changed forever. the
4:41 pm
implications have been devastating. many young people have been severely affected by his death. the circumstances of his death are truly shocking but it is vital that his death is not in vain. i know his family are determined that his death is the foundation of something far more positive, in particular education and intervention for young people to try and prevent others from finding themselves in this type of sit duration —— this type of destructive situation. people should be shocked by this and we as a community and society need to look at this murder and violent deaths of other young people which are occurring all too frequently. all of us as an adult community have a response ability for children, a duty to set the right standards and values for our younger generation to educate them around the risk of carrying knives, to intervene and provide them with suitable deterrence to provide constructive ways to fulfil their time and to support them in developing
4:42 pm
friendships and relationships that are not solely based on virtual contact. most importantly, we have to teach them and make them realise that life is precious. thejury in the trial have heard of numerous images, videos and munication is about knives, stabbings and threats of serious violence being shared among younger people. sadly this case is not the exception, social media is featuring far too frequently and incidence of murder and serious violence in this country. we are quite rightly seeing huge efforts being made to tackle behaviours and attitudes towards online abuse and hate crimes and across social platforms. the sharing of violent and weapon —related content particularly by children also need to be a priority for these companies to put processes and safeguards in place that either remove the ability to share this material or enable automatic reporting and removal of such content. olly's death is a tragedy that should not have happened and we all have a duty to educate and protect the children of our communities to ensure other families do not suffer the same devastation. thank you. i will hand over to
4:43 pm
olly's father.— thank you. i will hand over to olly's father. good afternoon. sor , olly's father. good afternoon. sorry. let _ olly's father. good afternoon. sorry. let me _ olly's father. good afternoon. sorry, let me start _ olly's father. good afternoon. sorry, let me start again. - olly's father. good afternoon. i sorry, let me start again. oliver was our sunshine and ourjoy. we brought love and laughter to us and so many others without himself even being aware of the impact he has had on our live. olly's autism made him so special and we embrace that, worked with it and, because of it, olly brought us so many priceless moments. it was an honour and a privilege to call him our son, to be his parents and to have raised someone so loving, caring and protective, to have shared a short amount of time we had with him was a gift in itself. relax for a few moments preoccupied with getting on with life, two car eyes off forjust a moment and it cost us him dearly. —— we took our eyes off him. he left from the moment he was born and can renew to love him forever forevermore. we stand here not celebrating but deeply saddened by the events that played out and led
4:44 pm
to the demise of our son. we started with olly doing as he always did, standing up and protecting others, and ended with a knife being thrust into our son's body not once but twice with fatal, devastating consequences. there is a cancer in children's lives, starts with the use of a mobile phone. with apps that are provided to entertain, yet are misused to spread slander, hatred, misinformation and bile, and ends in the cold, cruel murder. olly is not the only victim. there have been many already. our laws need to change to protect our children, to empower the investigation of the police and to help parents navigate the dangers of online victimisation. if it was up to me, no child under 16 would have a mobile phone. our children deserve a carefree and happy childhood, not to spend it cowering in their bedrooms,
4:45 pm
terrified and contemplating suicide because they are made to feel worthless by some random, spineless individual hiding behind a screen. online ideas imperative. if this horrific situation is to change, as is the licensing of the purchase of knives. in an immature child's hands, a knife is as lethal as a firearm. andy howard and his team of many have been incredibly professional throughout this whole terrible situation. sadly, we have... they have to deal with the crimes in the fall out on a regular basis. this needs to change. we as a family cannot thank hames valley police force an offer for the help, support and kindness shown to us in extremely difficult circumstances. —— thames valley police. over the last nine months. they shown incredible compassion towards olly and spent many hours processing olly's case. we would like to thank the crown, the jury and witnesses were carrying out their duty with
4:46 pm
due diligence and respect. this case was horrific and it can't have been easy on any of you. thank you to our legal counsel who have guided us through the trial, unwavering, ever supporting. our deepest gratitude to the emergency services and all of those who fought to save olly's life. we know you did everything you could to save him and we will be forever grateful. lastly, to our families, friends and friends of all the poor�*s who have helped us of the past few months and supported us in our darkest hours. we love and thank you all. ourjourney, our life sentence has just begun, you all. ourjourney, our life sentence hasjust begun, life without our youthful boy. —— without our beautiful boy. that without our youthful boy. -- without our beautiful boy.— our beautiful boy. that was stuart ste - hens, our beautiful boy. that was stuart stephens, father _ our beautiful boy. that was stuart stephens, father of _ our beautiful boy. that was stuart stephens, father of olly -
4:47 pm
our beautiful boy. that was stuart stephens, father of olly stephens who was killed injanuary this year. 3i4—year—olds have been sentenced for killing the reading teenager. we heard from andy howard who led the investigation and police calling the murder truly shocking and referencing the social media element to this case. this started with a row on social media and then olly's dad describing his son as a loving and caring. it'sjust gone dad describing his son as a loving and caring. it's just gone for 40 5pm. —— it's just gone for 4:45pm. the main candidates to be german chancellor have clashed over the future direction of the eu and how to deal with china. in a final debate, ahead of sunday's election, they discussed climate change, affordable housing and how to defend the country from outside interference. the election marks the end of angela merkel�*s long reign as chancellor. our correspondent in berlin damien mcguinness watched the final debate.
4:48 pm
this debate was a final chance for party leaders to win over voters. topics ranged from affordable housing and the national debt to climate change and how to deal with china. the current leader in the polls is olaf scholz, the centreleft social democrat to replace angela merkel. when asked about the new aukus security pact between the uk, australia and the us, mr scholz said germany should work together with france to create a stronger europe. "i can understand the irritation that france felt about how the defence pact was worked out," he said. his conservative rival, armin laschet, who is lagging behind slightly in the polls, said that europe needed to act independently and cited the american withdrawal from afghanistan. "we need common european defence projects for when the us pulls back," he said. this election campaign has been unusual in many ways. the polls have been erratic, there are more swing voters
4:49 pm
than ever before and unprecedented numbers are undecided. in one poll, 40% of people say they still haven't made their minds up. whoever they do choose, though, it's likely that after the elections, coalition talks will be long and complicated. all of this means that this is one of the most unpredictable elections modern germany has ever known. damien mcguinness, bbc news, berlin. a man who spent years collecting old postcards has been tracking down the people they were orginally sent to, or theirfamilies, to reunite them with a piece of their past. stu prince began the project
4:50 pm
when he was forced to shield during lockdown last year. amanda kirton has been to meet him. oh, yeah, these are the orphanage ones. well, i've always been interested in postcards and such. but i got leukaemia and that meant heavy, heavy chemo. i was in a state of shock, really. i was wondering whether i'd be here or not. it was a pretty scary time. well, covid was that next year, 2020. and i knew i was going to be locked down for quite a while. and i thought about my postcards, and i said, "i used to enjoy them". needing a distraction, stu began purchasing postcards in online auctions. and i thought, well, i could open a little facebook group, reach people with the intention of reuniting with families. and i started putting them on, six at a time, and people started to get interested, and i matched a couple. exhausted from his treatment, stu had limitations. people started to pool together to help him to research. i was poorly, and the only way i could, you know, cope was with my researchers. they're fantastic.
4:51 pm
i'm looking all the time for evidence that will tie the name to the address and the date. some of the postcards might have a happy birthday, so i will send them a personal message. and how does it feel when she finds them? yes! quite early on, stu purchased a postcard that was sent in 1946 to a baby. such a cute card to a one—year—old, i thought that was absolutely lovely. i put the card on my page. one of my researchers, she contacted me saying, "i've found the baby". then a lady contacted me, "that card is me! that baby is me!" i was chuffed to death. i got a facebook message from stu, talking about this postcard that he'd found. the postcard was sent by her late grandparents.
4:52 pm
i was amazed. it was for my first birthday, 74 years ago. out of adversity came something really nice. something usefulfor a big reach of people, and ifelt really good about it. i felt good about myself for the first time for quite a while. part of my recovery, really, to feel useful. and i think that's, for any person recovering from leukaemia or cancer, to feel useful is big, it's massive. stu prince ending that report from amanda kirton. it's nearly time to grab the sequins and put on the dancing shoes — with just 24 hours to go until strictly come dancing waltzes its way back onto oui’ screens. 15 new celebrities will take to the ballroom tomorrow night, to begin their bid for the glitterball trophy. and of course, our very own dan walker will be among them. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been chatting to them ahead of the big night.
4:53 pm
how much of a learning experience has the whole thing been so far? it's been unbelievable. from finding out what my chest size was to my collarbone to my bellybutton, to putting on sheer, like, snakeskin tops, to learning how to dance. but everything has just been amazing. i thought you were going to give us a flash there! so did i! what's going on? i learnt a lot in rugby which is so unhelpful for dancing. you need stiff ankles in rugby and you need flexible ankles in dancing. you need to be able to lift your arm. yeah, straight, that's something, straight hands above his head. look how much pain he's in! but we'll sort that out. i'm not sure the judges need to see that face when i do that.
4:54 pm
which bit of your body has had the biggest surprise so far? i like these questions! these are the best questions ever. i would say my entire body. there are things that, when we were in the studio the first day, he was pushing my shoulders back, what's the other one, my hips had to face this way. my legs were doing something very odd. a lot of twisting action she needs to work on at the moment. we need more twisting in your spine. yes, i don't have enough twist in my spine. there is actually quite a serious reason why you wanted to do the show. there is a very serious reason. my beautiful sister, who died five years ago to the day that we started rehearsals, left the world in a glitterball coffin. she was a bit of a disco diva. for real? for real. she had a glitterball coffin? i got her a glitterball coffin. so i'm doing it for her, because she would be thrilled. and she'd be watching slightly like that, probably. i am so sore, i've honestly never been this sore in my life but it's been amazing,
4:55 pm
i'm having so much fun. out of my comfort zone but i think i'm working hard? yes. yeah. you did say it's harder than the olympics and i for some reason celebrated! he's definitely giving it absolutely everything with a smile on his face, he loves it. we'll see how far we get but i don't think there's ever been any olympic champion swimmers who go into world championship dancing. hey! i haven't even done my first dance yet, what am i even thinking about? bbc breakfast is representing, this time, dan walker, what have you made of him so far? he has this grace about him byjust standing there. so i can't wait to see him in a tail suit, in a ballroom number. because i think it's going to suit him to a tee. i can't wait to see him on the floor. plus nadia is an incredible teacher, and i think he's in incredible, capable hands. i love dan. i love dan, but not as much as my mum.
4:56 pm
my mum is like, is it all right if we vote dan as well, pet? i was like, mother, come on! howay! because of the way daniel works... she doesn't call me dan, she calls me daniel. i love daniel. that's what you like, you said i can call you, i'm allowed. i said you can call me whatever you like and you've gone for daniel. do many people call you daniel? my mum and nadiya. aljaz said you have poise. poise? he said that? he said you look like a dancer. i've already got a new walk, actually, do you want to see it? i won't walk for you, but this is, this is pre—nadia. this is post nadiya, what do you think? whoa. yeah, big change. # talk the talk, just walk the walk tonight # cos we don't need
4:57 pm
permission to dance. cheering now it's time for a look at the weather. today we found more of that very warm sunshine and as far as the temperatures have gone, is afternoon, the warmest spot i've seen is in oxfordshire, 25 celsius. that's about seven celsius warmer thanit that's about seven celsius warmer than it should be at this late date of september. and to the east of this, henley on times, in oxfordshire, had some of that warm sunshine as well. —— henley on thames. quite murky across western areas and some drizzle falling from just about anywhere. mist and fog patches developing round hills and coast in the south and west as well with poor visibility, temperatures at 13-15 c with poor visibility, temperatures at 13—15 c for the vast majority of us quite a cloudy starting weekend. this weekend, our air is coming from a long way south—west, dragging this
4:58 pm
hot air from the subtropics, really, which is why we got temperatures way above normal for the time of year which continue into the weekend, lossiemouth in northern scotland, temperatures here six celsius above average, newcastle, five celsius warmer than it should be at this late stage in september and mind you have to be patient as it will be a cloudy starting today with the mist and fog slow to clear and drizzle probably lasting into the afternoon across scotland but nothing too heavy year. eventually we will see the counting and breaking with the rest of the sunshine likely across central and eastern england, eastern and north—eastern areas of scotland and north—eastern areas of scotland and those areas climb well into the 20 again but even while they stay cloudy, still above average for the time, 19-20 c cloudy, still above average for the time, 19—20 c the high. a sunday, we do have this cold front approaching northern ireland. i have that, they winds will strengthen in any case and the stronger south—westerly winds will have a better chance of knocking a few holes into the cloud so better chance of seeing some more anyway sunshine for scotland, england and wales with some ice
4:59 pm
leather chair was dotted around but it's in northern ireland three afternoon that we see the weather really go downhill with heavy rain on the way here and some squally gusts of wind. on sunday night, the cold front, error of rain with the squally winds put it across the country and as that clears through, what happens at the winscombe round for more of a north— north—westerly direction with this feeling like orton really has arrived and kicked an early next week with the temperatures dropping down to average, perhaps a bit below and turning more unsettled with rain and showers around for much of next week with strong winds, particularly on tuesday with is looking at... around. more change on the way, feeling more like autumn next week. that's the latest.
5:00 pm
today at 5pm: ministers meet to discuss supply problems at petrol stations across the country — the government says people should carry on buying petrol as normal. if you don't need to fill up, don't fill up. there is no shortage. if you are unlucky enough when you do need fuel that a site is out, the chances are the next nearest one won't be. borisjohnson is understood to be considering relaxing visa rules to allow more foreign truck drivers into britain, to ease fuel shortages. we'll have the latest from westminster in the next couple of minutes. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm: three schoolchildren have been sentenced to a total of 28 years for killing reading teenager olly stephens in a berkshire beauty spot in january. his family call for reforms to social media.

44 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on