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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 24, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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hello, this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world: the uk government says it will do whatever it takes as a shortage of lorry drivers causes some petrol stations to close. i'm not saying there aren't pressures — there are. it's just that we are making many, many changes and moving heaven and earth, if you like, to get people into driving hgvs. has your local petrol station been affected by this? how concerned are you about fuel shortages, or shortages more generally? get in touch — on twitter, i'm on @annita—mcveigh or you can use the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher sabina nessa in south—east london. the metropolitan police has also
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released an image of another man they are searching for — seen walking through nearby pegler square. the finalfew hours of campaigning get under way ahead of sunday's german election, as angela merkel prepares to stand down after 16 years as chancellor. the committee investigating the capitol riot issues its first subpoenas of president trump's allies — including his former chief strategist steve bannon. it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog of patients waiting for cancer treatment in england. that's the warning in a report by a think tank. restaurant, cafe and pub bosses in the uk will soon be banned from keeping customer tips left for staff, under new rules.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the uk's transport secretary has said the government will "do whatever is required" to tackle fuel supply problems. grant shapps said he wouldn't rule out changing visa rules to allow more foreign drivers to work in the uk — or even asking the army to help, although he said using the military "probably" wasn't the solution. the road haulage association says there's an urgent need to grant temporary visas to attract more hgv drivers from abroad. it is estimated that the uk is short of about 100,000 hgv drivers — with gaps made worse by both the pandemic and brexit. ministers are stressing there is no need for motorists, or shoppers, to start panic—buying. theo leggett reports petrol stations with no petrol, or diesel. yet another consequence of the national shortage of lorry drivers. the fuel giant bp supply is about 1,200 outlets across the country.
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some have had to close temporarily, while others have run out of one or more types of fuel. rival supplier esso says it's also experienced problems at a small number of sites it operates in partnership with tesco. the problem isn't a lack of fuel. there is plenty available at the country's refineries. but there simply aren't enough tanker drivers to take it petrol stations. well, it's happened because of a multitude of factors. brexit — we've lost about 20,000 european drivers. we lost about 40,000 trucker training tests during the pandemic because of social distancing rules — those were tests cancelled. and we've had a historic shortage in this country of tens
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of thousands of lorry drivers. and that means we've got a shortage now of 100,000. that has already led to bare shelves in supermarkets and other stores, which people within the sector have warned are likely to get worse in the run—up to christmas. the haulage industry body logistics uk says the shortage is a very serious issue, but it has warned consumers against panic—buying fuel. that is a call echoed by the government, which says people should refuel as normal. it points out it has already taken steps to make training new hgv drivers quicker and easier. the fuel is there and it can continue to flow. i'm not saying there aren't pressures — there are. it's just we are making many, many changes and moving heaven and earth, if you like, to get people into driving hgvs. not all petrol retailers are affected by the current problems. morrisons, co—op and sainsbury�*s say their petrol stations are operating as normal. but the fact shortages are occurring at all has highlighted once again how supply chains in the uk are coming under intense strain. theo leggett, bbc news.
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our business correspondent ben thompson is at a petrol station in stockport this morning to see how busy things are. really brisk trade at this bp petrol station in stockport, despite those calls not to panic—buy, and of course we saw this at the start of the pandemic. as soon as people start changing their shopping habits, even buying just a little bit more than they would normally, it causes problems for supplies. i have been speaking to the guy who owns this petrol station and they normally get a delivery every five days which normally lasts them for five days but he says looking at the current rate of demand it will probably last him about three days, and the problem is theyjust don't know when they will get another delivery. bp said it will prioritise motorways and interior roots but this is not
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one of them so they don't know when they will get a fresh delivery. normally if they need to they can call up and a truck will arrive within 2a hours. some suggestion that, as far as bp are concerned, that could take up to ten days to get here. so it is a problem if people start buying more, and the boss was telling me a little earlier theyjust don't know when the next supply will come. the planning is all very difficult at the moment anyway for the company for the companies deliverin- the fuel, so if you put that out of sync it becomes even more difficult and problematic for them. talking logistics, i know you get a couple of deliveries every ten days. how long, that would last you five days? what are they tell you about getting deliveries? they are saying, "we hope you get it but we can't guarantee it," so we're just not sure until we get into about two days' time if we will get another — we just don't know at the moment. so problematic as far as planning is concerned. what is the solution? we just wejust don't we just don't know right now.
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you heard from the transport secretary grant shapps this morning saying they will consider whatever they need to make sure supplies get through. that could involve getting the army to drive some of those trucks if it comes to that. but also for the first time talking about potentially relaxing the rules on visas for foreign drivers, because we know this problem has been caused by a perfect storm of issues. it is an ageing workforce of hgv drivers leaving the industry, there are changes to the tax rules that make it less attractive to work in, fewer recruits into the industry and a backlog of licenses — there are tests to get licenses for new drivers. on top of that, demand picking up after the pandemic meaning many
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businesses are now operating shipping things around the country and, crucially, brexit has changed the these are rules forforeign drivers working in the uk. taken together, it means a shortage of about 100,000 hgv drivers and today seeing the impact on the fuel industry after we have already seen the impact on restaurants and supermarket shelves, and to it is the turn of the fuel industry, and the problem is we just don't know how much worse this will get before it gets better. that was ben thomson. well, a few people filling up with fuel at that petrol station this morning stopped to tell us how they're feeling... if everyone does that there will be none _ if everyone does that there will be none for— if everyone does that there will be none for anyone, if everyone does that there will be none foranyone, so if everyone does that there will be none for anyone, sol if everyone does that there will be none for anyone, so i put on a bit. i get _ none for anyone, so i put on a bit. i get angry, — none for anyone, so i put on a bit. i get angry, but i would panic. obviously— i get angry, but i would panic. obviously i need to get the children to school, _ obviously i need to get the children to school, college, _ obviously i need to get the children to school, college, and _ obviously i need to get the children to school, college, and go- obviously i need to get the children to school, college, and go about. to school, college, and go about my daily business. _ to school, college, and go about my daily business, so, _ to school, college, and go about my daily business, so, yeah, _ to school, college, and go about my daily business, so, yeah, are- to school, college, and go about my daily business, so, yeah, are more. daily business, so, yeah, are more likely— daily business, so, yeah, are more likely to _ daily business, so, yeah, are more likely to come _ daily business, so, yeah, are more likely to come and _ daily business, so, yeah, are more likely to come and fill _ daily business, so, yeah, are more likely to come and fill up. - daily business, so, yeah, are more likely to come and fill up. [it’s - likely to come and fill up. it's likely to come and fill up. it's like everything _ likely to come and fill up. like everything else. people likely to come and fill up- like everything else. people say there is a shortage and everyone panics but if everyone is sensible i don't see a problem. they will get the fuel. it will be a priority for the fuel. it will be a priority for the government so they will make sure it happens. joining me now is jan godsell, professor of operations and supply chain strategy at the university of warwick and dean of loughborough's school of business and economics. thank you very much for your time today. we are reiterating this message. there is fuel, but it is
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about the supply chain, isn't it, that shortage of drivers? and compounded by brexit and the pandemic. could this situation have been foreseen? could moore have been done to avoid the supply chain issues we are seeing? —— could moore have been done. i issues we are seeing? -- could moore have been done-— have been done. i think, first and foremost. — have been done. i think, first and foremost. we _ have been done. i think, first and foremost, we need _ have been done. i think, first and foremost, we need to _ have been done. i think, first and foremost, we need to echo - have been done. i think, first and foremost, we need to echo the i have been done. i think, first and - foremost, we need to echo the advice of your— foremost, we need to echo the advice of your last _ foremost, we need to echo the advice of your last interviewee, who said that actually what we need to do is 'ust that actually what we need to do is just do— that actually what we need to do is just do not— that actually what we need to do is just do not panic and to continue buying _ just do not panic and to continue buying fuel and other things at the rate that _ buying fuel and other things at the rate that we use them. it is all about— rate that we use them. it is all about supply chain planning. and actually— about supply chain planning. and actually what we saw during covid—19 is that— actually what we saw during covid—19 is that essentially we stopped buying — is that essentially we stopped buying fuel, and actually from a survey— buying fuel, and actually from a survey we — buying fuel, and actually from a survey we did early on within the covid _ survey we did early on within the covid pandemic, actually the issues around _ covid pandemic, actually the issues around delivery to customers was actually _ around delivery to customers was actually a — around delivery to customers was actually a fairly minimal issue only affecting _ actually a fairly minimal issue only affecting about 12% of firms, but at the time _ affecting about 12% of firms, but at the time about 51% of firms were seeing _ the time about 51% of firms were seeing an— the time about 51% of firms were
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seeing an issue within their warehouses. what we are also seeing as it is _ warehouses. what we are also seeing as it is not _ warehouses. what we are also seeing as it is not affecting all fuel retailers _ as it is not affecting all fuel retailers and that is because they perhaps— retailers and that is because they perhaps have planned their supply chain— perhaps have planned their supply chain for— perhaps have planned their supply chain for fuel in different ways, and i— chain for fuel in different ways, and i suspect those retailers are not seeing — and i suspect those retailers are not seeing issues at the moment, they had — not seeing issues at the moment, they had a — not seeing issues at the moment, they had a buffer or contingency within— they had a buffer or contingency within their supply chain, not just for fuel— within their supply chain, not just for fuel itself, but also of the hgv drivers— for fuel itself, but also of the hgv drivers needed to move the fuel around — drivers needed to move the fuel around the country. how drivers needed to move the fuel around the country. how important is that message — around the country. how important is that message to _ around the country. how important is that message to people _ around the country. how important is that message to people not - around the country. how important is that message to people not to - around the country. how important is that message to people not to panic, j that message to people not to panic, not to panic by, because if they do that does that create a problem that wasn't there in the first place? does it turn a relatively small issue into something much larger in the supply chain? are issue into something much larger in the sopply chain?— the supply chain? are absolutely, and we need _ the supply chain? are absolutely, and we need to _ the supply chain? are absolutely, and we need to think _ the supply chain? are absolutely, and we need to think back- the supply chain? are absolutely, and we need to think back to - and we need to think back to those graphic— and we need to think back to those graphic images of people filling their trolleys full of toilet roll in the — their trolleys full of toilet roll in the early stages of covid—19. the reality— in the early stages of covid—19. the reality is— in the early stages of covid—19. the reality is that as consumers we tend to buy— reality is that as consumers we tend to buy things at a very predictable and constant rate, and actually
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advanced planning systems can therefore make sure that those products — therefore make sure that those products can be fulfilled at that very constant rate. we have sort of been _ very constant rate. we have sort of been caught out a little bit here because — been caught out a little bit here because perhaps we focused on the planning _ because perhaps we focused on the planning around the products themselves, the fuel or the toilet rolls and — themselves, the fuel or the toilet rolls and forgotten about those logistics — rolls and forgotten about those logistics movements required to move them around for some however, supply chains _ them around for some however, supply chains are _ them around for some however, supply chains are adaptable and once we identify— chains are adaptable and once we identify those issues then both industry— identify those issues then both industry and the government can work together— industry and the government can work together to _ industry and the government can work together to put them right, so the most _ together to put them right, so the most important thing that everyone in our— most important thing that everyone in our country can do at the moment isjust_ in our country can do at the moment isjust to _ in our country can do at the moment isjust to continue in our country can do at the moment is just to continue to buy things at the rate _ is just to continue to buy things at the rate they use them. isjust to continue to buy things at the rate they use them.— the rate they use them. logistics uk, the road _ the rate they use them. logistics uk, the road haulage _ the rate they use them. logistics l uk, the road haulage association, they are saying while they may be plans in place to deal with the immediate term —— the medium term, and talking about the number of hgv drivers on our roads, that in the short term they need the occupation to be put on the shortage list to a row to allow drivers from the eu or elsewhere to come into the uk. would you be in agreement with them? —— to
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allow drivers. would there be an argument to opening that up again to allow drivers from elsewhere than the uk? ., . ., , . , allow drivers from elsewhere than the uk? ., _, , . , ., the uk? one of the consequences of covid-19 was — the uk? one of the consequences of covid-19 was we _ the uk? one of the consequences of covid-19 was we actually _ the uk? one of the consequences of covid-19 was we actually stopped i covid—19 was we actually stopped training _ covid—19 was we actually stopped training lorry drivers, that was an inevitable — training lorry drivers, that was an inevitable consequence of lockdown. at the _ inevitable consequence of lockdown. at the same time, actually to our advantage — at the same time, actually to our advantage at the time, when we weren't— advantage at the time, when we weren't moving things around as much, _ weren't moving things around as much, we — weren't moving things around as much, we allowed or supported drivers— much, we allowed or supported drivers to — much, we allowed or supported drivers to go back to their home countries — drivers to go back to their home countries. but what we now need is some _ countries. but what we now need is some spare — countries. but what we now need is some spare capacity in that system to be _ some spare capacity in that system to be able — some spare capacity in that system to be able to respond to the surges we see _ to be able to respond to the surges we see as _ to be able to respond to the surges we see as the economy opens back up. i'd we see as the economy opens back up. i'd rely— we see as the economy opens back up. i'd rely on _ we see as the economy opens back up. i'd rely on the — we see as the economy opens back up. i'd rely on the experts here, and if they believe the best way to date -et they believe the best way to date get that — they believe the best way to date get that buffer to help us through this period is to relax the visa regulations to get those drivers moving — regulations to get those drivers moving again, then that would be something that would seem sensible. professor— something that would seem sensible. professorjan godsell professorjan godsell from loughborough university, thank you very much, professor of operations
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and supply chain strategy at the university. i have been asking you to send in thoughts on twitter about all of this story, driver shortages, fuel shortages. 0ne about all of this story, driver shortages, fuel shortages. one from twitter. "we live in an interdependent world. put up barriers, you invite scarcity. " they also say they are concerned about creating an environment for more road axtens if any of the measures around training and allowing hgv drivers to qualify our relaxed —— more road accidents. and this one as well, "tanker drivers with potentially hazardous loads also have to pass far more stringent tests in addition to hgv it is the perfect storm. this is going to get worse. " another one on twitter. " you know if you panics and about the shortage then tell them not to panic—buy they leave thinking the first thing you told them, not the second. " that was something i was talking to the get about there. keep
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your comments coming in full stop your comments coming in full stop you can get in touch with me on twitter, @annita—mcveigh, and use the hashtag, bbc your questions, and we will try to read out more of those comments. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of the murder of london primary school teacher sabina nessa. her body was found in a park last weekend. officers have also released images of another person they'd like to speak to in connection with the investigation, as sean dilley reports. do you recognise this man? if you do, police would like to hear from you, as your information could help officers investigating sabina nessa's death. police believe the 28—year—old primary school teacher was attacked as she walked through cator park in south—east london on her way to meet a friend. we believe as she walked through the park she was approached by an individual and fatally attacked. sabina's body was sadly found by a member of the public, and we are appealing for anyone who was here on friday evening, and who thinks they saw anything unusual, to come forward.
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he last night's arrest was the second in a case that has hit local people hard. the many poignant tributes reflect a community's loss, as people young and old try to understand. the other arrested man, who is in his 40s, was released under investigation earlier this week. detectives believe sabina nessa was attacked at about 8.30 on friday night, shortly after leaving her nearby home on astell road. she had been on her way to meet a friend at the depot bar. her body was found near the one space community centre on saturday afternoon. sabina's sister has been sharing police updates on twitter, and paid her own tribute to her "beautiful, talented and caring sister". she said her family never thought this could happen to them. police are appealing to anyone who may have any information about sabina's death to come forward. people in the kidbrooke and wider lewisham and greenwich areas are asked to pay special attention to these cctv images. any information could hold the key to what led to the teacher's death.
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sean dilley, bbc news. 0ur correspondent megan paterson is in south—east london. megan, give us a sense of the outpouring of feeling that has been expressed in the messages left on those floral tributes behind you. yes, well, here, as you can see, flowers left behind me not far from the spot where sabina nessa plus my body was found on saturday afternoon by that member of the public. people coming down to leave flowers —— sabina nessa's body full stop some of these people knew her as a friend, teacher, and some didn't, but all of them expressing that level of grief, shock and upset for the loss of her life. a 28—year—old teacher who held their dash not heard there in sean's report described by her family is a beautiful and kind soul, by her teaching colleagues is dedicated to
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her pupils, so people coming out to lay flowers and have a moment of reflection here in the park this morning. the police again reiterating that message of people with information and might have seen something, to come forward, releasing more cctv information of a car they believe was connected to the investigation, and also of a man in a nearby square. 38—year—old man remains in police custody arrested on suspicion of murder, the police outlining sabina nessa's last moves yesterday. they say it should have been a five minute journey she took from her house on one side of the park to a pub on the other to meet a friend. we know now of course that she never completed thatjourney. she never completed that journey. the she never completed thatjourney. the police will be here this evening at a vigil which is going to be held near the site where body was found. it has been organised by local members of the community and by winning's safety campaign groups. they want people to come down here to take a moment of reflection to think about sabina nessa, to think about her life, what she achieved and herfamily, and they
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about her life, what she achieved and her family, and they also want them to come down here to unite against violence against women. there is a sense here of great sadness but also great fear and great worry about how safe these streets are and the met police are here to reiterate to people they have increased patrols, they are listening to people's concerns and they say the streets are safe. that will be the focus tonight of that vigil as well of course i thinking about sabina nessa, thinking about herfamily and about about sabina nessa, thinking about her family and about the loss caused by her murder here.— by her murder here. thank you very much. megan _ by her murder here. thank you very much, megan paterson _ by her murder here. thank you very i much, megan paterson in south-east much, megan paterson in south—east london. iamjoined by i am joined by archdeacon alastair cutting of lewisham and greenwich. how important do you think is that you will be for people to express their grief and indeed their outrage for what has happened to sabina? these events are really important. three _ these events are really important. three my— these events are really important. three my -- — these events are really important. three my —— through my ministry over
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the years— three my —— through my ministry over the years i— three my —— through my ministry over the years i have been involved in a number— the years i have been involved in a number of— the years i have been involved in a number of sudden and tragic deaths and i number of sudden and tragic deaths and i was _ number of sudden and tragic deaths and i was particularly moved by this one, and i was particularly moved by this one. and _ and i was particularly moved by this one. and to — and i was particularly moved by this one, and to echo with my colleague, archdeacon, — one, and to echo with my colleague, archdeacon, who is to my daughters were murdered in london last year, and there _ were murdered in london last year, and there are some echoes about a young _ and there are some echoes about a young woman being found in a park that are _ young woman being found in a park that are very, very vibrant for me in this— that are very, very vibrant for me in this particular context. the local— in this particular context. the local community... there are a couple — local community... there are a couple of— local community... there are a couple of vigils going on tonight. one is— couple of vigils going on tonight. one is starting at 6.15 at st james church, _ one is starting at 6.15 at st james church, the — one is starting at 6.15 at st james church, the local parish church for this particular community in kidbrooke, and there is a chance to li-ht kidbrooke, and there is a chance to light candles and say some prayers within— light candles and say some prayers within the — light candles and say some prayers within the safe space of the church context _ within the safe space of the church context there. then in the community in kidbrooke — context there. then in the community in kidbrooke itself at pegler square there will— in kidbrooke itself at pegler square there will be the wider community vigil~ _ there will be the wider community vigil~ at _ there will be the wider community vigil. at 7pm. this one is very much a community— vigil. at 7pm. this one is very much a community vigil, coordinated by local— a community vigil, coordinated by local people like annie and andy who have but— local people like annie and andy who have but it _ local people like annie and andy who have put it together. it has been picked _ have put it together. it has been picked up — have put it together. it has been picked up in a more wider context by reclaim _ picked up in a more wider context by
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reclaim the — picked up in a more wider context by reclaim the streets and whatnot were wanting _ reclaim the streets and whatnot were wanting to _ reclaim the streets and whatnot were wanting to support this as well but there _ wanting to support this as well but there is— wanting to support this as well but there is a — wanting to support this as well but there is a really strong feeling locally of wanting to make people feel that — locally of wanting to make people feel that they can be safe within our communities. you mentioned the sisters, our communities. you mentioned the sisters. and — our communities. you mentioned the sisters. and they _ our communities. you mentioned the sisters, and they were _ our communities. you mentioned the sisters, and they were together - our communities. you mentioned the j sisters, and they were together when they were killed. sabina was on her own. the sisters we are told, trying to move around in company, but as a man of god how do you try to make sense of this, how do you try to help people to make sense of this? how do you send out a message to women when women are not the problem here? this is violence perpetrated by men. here? this is violence perpetrated b men. , , ., here? this is violence perpetrated b men. , ., . ., by men. this is a real concern for us, and by men. this is a real concern for us. and you _ by men. this is a real concern for us, and you mentioned _ by men. this is a real concern for us, and you mentioned in - by men. this is a real concern for us, and you mentioned in the - by men. this is a real concern for us, and you mentioned in the bit| us, and you mentioned in the bit that megan was saying a moment ago about one _ that megan was saying a moment ago about one space, charity, community centre. _ about one space, charity, community centre. run— about one space, charity, community centre, run mainly by local christians from the local churches who are _ christians from the local churches who are involved in running this command — who are involved in running this
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command part of its work is to work with the _ command part of its work is to work with the youth, the young women and the young _ with the youth, the young women and the young men of the community. we are often— the young men of the community. we are often saying we need to tackle these _ are often saying we need to tackle these things with the youngsters. well, _ these things with the youngsters. well, here's a community centre doing _ well, here's a community centre doing just — well, here's a community centre doing just that, and ironically it is one — doing just that, and ironically it is one that _ doing just that, and ironically it is one that is likely to lose its place — is one that is likely to lose its place as the wider development around — place as the wider development around kidbrooke village continues, and i around kidbrooke village continues, and i think— around kidbrooke village continues, and i think community ventures like this one _ and i think community ventures like this one space are really vital for helping _ this one space are really vital for helping us — this one space are really vital for helping us try to engage with young people _ helping us try to engage with young people. there are lots of sports activities — people. there are lots of sports activities that go on at one space at the _ activities that go on at one space at the moment and the christian ethos _ at the moment and the christian ethos of that little community centre — ethos of that little community centre is — ethos of that little community centre is what tries to help people engage _ centre is what tries to help people engage. the christian faith is partly— engage. the christian faith is partly based on a god whose son jesus _ partly based on a god whose son jesus came to earth and died, a father— jesus came to earth and died, a father losing a son at the heart of what _ father losing a son at the heart of what the christian faith is all about, — what the christian faith is all about, so— what the christian faith is all about, so i think there is something where _ about, so i think there is something where faith— about, so i think there is something where faith can sometimes help touch for people _ where faith can sometimes help touch for people who are struggling in these _ for people who are struggling in these sorts of circumstances. what is the role for _ these sorts of circumstances. what is the role for men _ these sorts of circumstances. what is the role for men here? _ these sorts of circumstances. what is the role for men here? as - these sorts of circumstances. “wrist is the role for men here? as we look at the murder of sabina, as we look
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at the murder of sabina, as we look at the murder of sabina, as we look at the other murders of women that have happened that might have happened. what is the role for men, what do they need to do to step up to play their part in making life safer for everyone? to play their part in making life saferfor everyone? i to play their part in making life safer for everyone?— to play their part in making life safer for everyone? i think that's really important _ safer for everyone? i think that's really important question. - safer for everyone? i think that's really important question. in - safer for everyone? i think that'sj really important question. in this case: _ really important question. in this case, we — really important question. in this case, we don't know yet. we don't know the _ case, we don't know yet. we don't know the murderer was, at this stage. — know the murderer was, at this stage. but— know the murderer was, at this stage, but we know from so many other— stage, but we know from so many other murders that actually it is men _ other murders that actually it is men who— other murders that actually it is men who have done that. i was in a zoom _ men who have done that. i was in a zoom call— men who have done that. i was in a zoom call last night with a local mp and he _ zoom call last night with a local mp and he pulled together a number of community activists, and one of the specific— community activists, and one of the specific things that was mentioned there _ specific things that was mentioned there by— specific things that was mentioned there by another community activist was, how— there by another community activist was, how can we help members of our community, _ was, how can we help members of our community, the men and women, to actually— community, the men and women, to actually speak out when they see things— actually speak out when they see things that are not right? and some links to _ things that are not right? and some links to some training that can be donem _ links to some training that can be donem and — links to some training that can be done... and the whole business of trying _ done... and the whole business of trying to— done... and the whole business of trying to make sure we look out for one another, to bear one another's burdens. _ one another, to bear one another's burdens. is — one another, to bear one another's burdens. isa— one another, to bear one another's burdens, is a very difficult thing, so you're — burdens, is a very difficult thing, so you're absolutely right about this, _ so you're absolutely right about this, and — so you're absolutely right about this, and we continue about it in education. — this, and we continue about it in education, in there are some great
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local— education, in there are some great local schools and great work the police _ local schools and great work the police are — local schools and great work the police are doing with schools, community liaison officers attached to each _ community liaison officers attached to each individual school to school to each individual school to school to try _ to each individual school to school to try to _ to each individual school to school to try to engage with these particular issues at a practical level — particular issues at a practical level. ., ~' , ., , particular issues at a practical level. ., ~ , ., , . particular issues at a practical level. . ,, , . ., level. thank you very much for your time today. — level. thank you very much for your time today. the _ level. thank you very much for your time today, the venerable - level. thank you very much for your time today, the venerable alastair. time today, the venerable alastair cutting, archdeacon of lewisham and greenwich, thank you very much. climate protesters have blocked the entrance to the port of dover in kent. insulate britain said more than a0 of its supporters in two groups have blocked the a20 toward the docks. the group caused chaos on the m25 five times in the past fortnight, but they have been threatened with imprisonment if they return to the motorway. the main candidates to be german chancellor have clashed over the future direction of the eu and how to deal with china. in a final debate, ahead of sunday's election, they discussed climate change, affordable housing and how to defend the country from outside interference. the election marks the end of angela merkel“s long reign as chancellor. 0ur correspondent in berlin damien mcguinness watched the final debate.
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with just three days to go before the election, this debate was a final chance for party leaders to win over voters. topics ranged from affordable housing and the national debt to climate change and how to deal with china. the current leader in the polls is olaf scholz, the centreleft social democrat to replace angela merkel. when asked about the new aukus security pact between the uk, australia and the us, mr scholz said germany should work together with france to create a stronger europe. “'i can understand the irritation that france felt about how the defence pact was worked out," he said. his conservative rival, armin laschet, who is lagging behind slightly in the polls, said that europe needed to act independently and cited the american withdrawal from afghanistan. "we need common european defence projects for when the us pulls back," he said.
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this election campaign has been unusual in many ways. the polls have been erratic, there are more swing voters than ever before and unprecedented numbers are undecided. in one poll, 40% of people say they still haven't made their minds up. whoever they do choose, though, it's likely that after the elections, coalition talks will be long and complicated. all of this means that this is one of the most unpredictable elections modern germany has ever known. damien mcguinness, bbc news, berlin. a congressional committee investigating the riot at the us capitol building earlier this year has issued its first round of subpoenas. among those summoned to appear are former president trump“s chief of staff, mark meadows, and the political strategist, steve bannon. the house of representatives select committee is investigating efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential
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election result, and the storming of the capitol by supporters of mr trump. here's our north america correspondent, david willis. well, many in congress remained horrified by the events of january the 6th, the day which saw some of the worst political violence of this kind in this country in more than 200 years, and which led to a delay of several hours in the certification ofjoe biden“s election victory. they want to get to the bottom of what happened in order to make sure that it never happens again, and to that end subpoenas have now been issued to four former close advisers to donald trump. they include his former chief of staff, mark meadows, his former close adviser steve bannon, former deputy in the communications department dan scavino, and an official at the us pentagon, a former official, cash patel.
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now, they have all been given two weeks in order to come up with documents regarding their communications from each other and with members of the white house in the days running up to the 6th ofjanuary and on the day of the ride itself. and a week after that deadline, each of the foreman will then be required to give sworn testimony to congress. should they refuse to do so, and former president trump has himself said that he might cite executive privilege in an attempt to avoid giving evidence to the select committee, then it is possible they could be subject to criminal contempt charges. this committee wants to know what president trump knew in the run—up to the events onjanuary the 6th, what he was doing, whom he spoke to and so on, and also wants to know what he and those around him did in order to try to overturn the results of last year's presidential election.
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david willis. to north korea now, where the influential sister of the country's leader, kimjong—un, has said pyongyang is willing to resume talks with south korea if it doesn't provoke the north with hostile policies. kim yo—jong“s statement was in response to renewed calls from seoul to officially declare an end to the korean war as a way to bring back peace to the peninsula. 0ur seoul correspondent laura bicker gave us this analysis. well, this is a rather surprising statement. kim jong—un“s sister, kim yo—jong, is used to kind of putting out statements that are rather forceful in nature, usually critical of seoul in nature. and here, right at the top of the statement, she says she is willing to discuss what she called "an admirable idea" to end the korean war with this declaration, this declaration that president moon here in seoul has been advocating for quite some time. in the last week, at the united nations general assembly, he once again renewed that call
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for an end of war declaration. just to remind your viewers, the korean war ended in 1953 with an armistice, not a peace treaty. so the peninsula has been in an official state of war ever since. there have been many discussions about ending the war and declaring it to come to an official end, and there are many arguments for and against. but when it comes to pyongyang, certainly here in seoul, they have both agreed at different stages that this is something that should be done. but there are no discussions going on between north and south, and that's where the statement is very interesting. for the first time in a long time, it's almost like a little sliver of hope, almost like the door to talks is opening just slightly. but then you go into the statement and there are a lot of ifs and a lot of buts. she wants south korea to end its hostile policy, and by that she usually means when it comes to having troops, us troops, based on the peninsula, and the policy of sanctions, which are international sanctions
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backed by the united nations. so there are various ifs and buts attached to this, but it's the first time i think i've seen such a sliver of hope from kim yo—jong. ii ijust want i just want to i just want to bring i just want to bring you ijust want to bring you some ijust want to bring you some more ijust want to bring you some more tweets you have been sending me and this is about the shortage of lorry drivers, it has been causing supply chain issues in the uk. the latest is some petrol stations, only a few, but some have had to close their forecourt at the moment because of a lack or slowdown in fuel deliveries. this is from graham davies, making an interesting point, passing hgv testis an interesting point, passing hgv test is one thing, but companies want experience and often only take on drivers with two years driving experience, would you trust another strider with £100,000 truck and trailer and a £250,000 load on overcrowded motorways? want
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experience. that is an interesting point when they want to get people more on—board. another says, i think government needs to allow drivers from other parts of the uk to fill the void, covid and brexit have contributed to the shortage. john says, why can the dvla remove hgv classification licence from our license at 70 years old? i could still be driving at 73 now, and says he still drives and hopes to do so for many years. this from anthony francis, wondering about the situation in norwich, he says there is a shortage of bus drivers, leading to cuts in services and he is wondering whether this is a knock—on effect of higher wages being offered to hgv drivers, leading to people switching jobs. thank you for all of those comments. you can contact me on twitter and use the hashtag. time now for a look at headlines.
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the uk government says it will do whatever it takes, as a shortage of lorry drivers causes some petrol stations to close. i'm not saying there aren't pressures — there are. it's just that we are making many, many changes and moving heaven and earth, if you like, to get people into driving hgvs. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher sabina nessa in south—east london. the metropolitan police has also released an image of another man they are searching for — seen walking through nearby pegler square. the finalfew hours of campaigning gets under way ahead of sunday's german election, as angela merkel prepares to stand down after 16 years as chancellor. the committee investigating the capitol riot issues its first subpoenas of president trump“s allies — including his former chief strategist steve bannon. it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog of patients waiting for cancer treatment in england. that's the warning in a report by a think—tank. restaurant, cafe and pub bosses
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in the uk will soon be banned from keeping customer tips left for staff, under new rules. nearly 1.5 million customers have been hit in two weeks by the collapse of energy firms in the uk. it“s down to a rise in the price of wholesale gas. market regulator 0fgem has described the increase as “unprecedented“ and says more firms could go bust. it also means there are fewer deals available to customers on price comparison sites and uswitch says there's currently “no point“ in customers shopping around. earlier i spoke with justina miltienyte, who is an energy policy expert at uswitch. i asked her if consumers should wait and allow the process of their energy company to potentially collapse or if they should instead shop around and look for the best deal. so absolutely they should let that process happen. the main reason for that is
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if they have built up any credit with their previous supplier, that will be automatically transferred to the new supplier and the best way to make sure that that happens in the most efficient way possible is to sit through the process, make sure it is completed and then have a look around to see anything is available. 0k, yes, because the ground is still shifting, isn't it? we heard 0fgem saying that more energy companies may go bust. how tricky does it make it for comparison websites like yourselves, let alone us as general consumers, to gauge what the best deal is? we are constantly assessing the situation, it changes hourly and we are just making sure that we are doing what is right by the customers and at the moment, the best advice is to sit tight and if you are on a fixed tariff, your prices will not rise until your tariff runs out. if you are on a variable tariff, it is protected by the price cap, so it is likely to be the best deal for you for now. 0k, clearly some people are looking around and we have had messages
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from viewers wondering whether they should go for a cheaper variable deal at this point or a fixed deal, which is more expensive, sure, but they're wondering whether that is the right way to go given the volatility at the moment. so, it depends on everyone“s individual circumstances. if you are worried about how to go through winter, it is likely that the variable deal is going to be the best price for now, the caveat here is to make sure that you are vigilant, maybe sign up to a newsletter or news alert when the better deal is becoming available. if you are worried long term what prices might do, a fixed might be the right thing to do, but i caution that you should make sure you can afford it, because a fixed is for 12 or 2a months, so you will be set on this price for that time. is it possible to say at this stage how much typically prices might go up by? it is difficult to say
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in the long—term, but at the moment, prices are going to stay where they are on the default price cap, so the variable tariff will stay where it is as of the 1st of october so there is admittedly a rise happening next week, but from there onwards until the 1st of april, the price will stay the same. and various people we have been talking to about this story have been repeating the same sort of piece of advice, and i think it is worth repeating with you, i'm sure you would agree, that if you have a company that has gone bust or you are worried about your energy supplier, you should try to take a photograph or in some way download the information that you have on bills, your credit history etc, so you actually have proof of that. absolutely, that would simply make the process a lot easier because, as you can imagine, when the supplier goes bust and the new supplier takes over, there is lots and lots of admin that
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goes into it, so anything to help that process is helpful to have evidence of your account. the bbc has obtained first—hand accounts from migrants who claim they've been illegally deported from the european union by polish border troops. eu members poland, latvia and lithuania have each declared a state of emergency, amid a surge of thousands of people trying to cross from belarus. the eu has accused the belarusian president alexander lukashenko of using migrants as weapons — by luring them in and then sending them towards eu countries. poland has banned human rights activists and journalists from its border zone — but our europe correspondent nick beake and video journalist bruno boelpaep travelled to the area and have just sent this special report. they thought they were going to die — stranded in the freezing forest, farfrom home. we found kelly and owen, brothers from nigeria, they claimed they had been pushed back and forth by both belarusian and polish border guards for the past three weeks.
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they were playing us like football — the belarusians would beat us, push us to poland, in poland, they catch us, beat us, push us back to belarus. the men had flown to belarus from various countries, all with the promise they would be able to travel on to a neighbouring country in the eu. but this 21—year—old from cameroon explained what belarussian troops actually did. they monitor the polish police across the border, they tell us, "this way there is no polish police," so they will tell us, we must cross those wires. so we creep and crawl under... we can see a lot of people here are not in a good state. apparently a doctor is on the way, but also the border force are on their way, so it is not clear what is going to happen to these men. belarus is often called europe“s last dictatorship, but poland, an eu country, has declared that migrants can be pushed back over its border,
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a policy that is illegal under international law. have your border force been pushing migrants back into belarus? "talk to our press office", he tells us. human rights activists have been trying to find those stranded on the border. we don't know how many other deaths there are in the forest. this lawyer has been working here for a month. politicians are talking about politics, but what we can see is just people, it is not politics at all. it is just people that need assistance, people that need medical assistance, people that need international protection to not be returned to the country where they face danger. so here on the ground it is absolutely not politics, it is just a humanitarian crisis that we are dealing with right now. the fear among charities, human rights groups is that we're going to be seeing more of this because more people are coming to belarus, more people are trying to get across the border
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into poland, into the european union. back in the forest, another young man emerges from the woodland. jafar is a 20—year—old from iraq, he has got hypothermia. he and two others are taken to hospital, the rest driven to a quarantine centre. but all fear they will soon be sent back to the freezing forest once again. nick beake, bbc news, on the poland—belarus border. ever since a series of covid—19 outbreaks in dormitories last year, migrant labourers in singapore have been banned from mixing with the general public. for the past 18 months, the majority have only been allowed out of their facilities to go to work. but, with one of the highest vaccination rates in the world,
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singapore and its government are facing increasing pressure to let them out. nick marsh has been speaking to some of the men wanting to leave. it's been one of the world's longest lockdowns. behind this barbed wire, there“s talk of a growing mental health crisis — thousands of men confined in dormitories, leaving only to work. for sharif, things are starting to get too much. i want to send a message to singapore government. we long time in dormitory, so many people are mentally anguished. so, we need to release... we need to allow to go out. please. and with 80% of the public and 90% of workers now vaccinated,
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experts say that the confinement policy isn“t protecting anyone. after 18 months, it's very clear that the mental health challenges, the social isolation are all really bubbling up. speaking as a public health professional, i would say that the covid—19 concerns are massively overblown. we can strike a better balance. recently, a handful were allowed out. they were given four hours near a hindu temple as part of a pilot scheme. feel free to share your i thoughts on this location. the government invited us to meet one of them. the authorities call the outing a milestone. the conditions are different. most of the workers live in common conditions, and that's why the measures put in place have to take into cognizance of that. but the workers who spoke to the bbc
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said they felt they were being punished for their substandard living conditions rather than protected from the virus. tasrif shares a room with 18 others. we deserve something better as a human being, so we want that and we want our privileges back. the government told us they look to ensure workers have access to mental health support, but they remain separated from the general public, known officially in singapore as the community. it's been a year and a half now, and for the men who live here, nothing has changed. they're still waiting for the day they can finally leave. but in all this time, the message that they have received has been loud and clear — there are those in singapore who are part of the community, and then there are those who are not. nick marsh, bbc news, singapore. in mozambique, islamist militants have brought terror to the north of the country for more
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than four years. the group, al shabab, has links to the islamic state group. gfx it operates in the cabo delgado province, which was home to africa's largest natural gas project, run by french company total. it's close to the town of palma, where in april, dozens of people were left dead after an attack by the insurgents, leading to total withdrawing their workers. the violence has left more than 2,500 people dead and 700 thousand people displaced. rwanda has sent in its forces to help and our deputy africa editor anne soy has been travelling in mozambique with their troops. (tx making the best of what is
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available, but what should be a normal activity has to happen under watchful eyes here in northern mozambique. for months, residents have been terrorised by militants affiliated to the islamic state. translation: every time we ran, they pursued us, | and then they beat us, they beat us so badly. they slaughtered people, so we kept running. 0ur mosques have been destroyed, the churches have also been destroyed, we still don't understand what they want. they have only recently resettled here after the area was made safe by rwandan soldiers. this has been the scene of attacks from militants since 2017, which intensified last year, displacing tens of thousands of people. and the rwandan forces say they have now liberated 90% of the province, which is what they have come to show us. the motivation is actually driven by our history. we have experienced this before. and we feel that we should protect in any activity or any initiative
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that would lead to the security of people wherever we are called upon. they launched their offensive here injuly after being invited by the mozambique government. it followed global outrage after an attack at this hotel in palma. it was popular with expats. hundreds were hiding here when the militants struck. translation: on the tenth day, we came here and found bodies, | but they were decomposing. even my grandson, i only identified him by his shirt. we couldn't tell who had died. we just buried all the bodies we found. many are still displaced. this woman tells me she would like to return home, but there is nothing to go back to. she comes from the port city of mocimboa da praia — it was under militant control
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for more than a year. almost every building we saw had been destroyed from previous fighting. it is here in mocimboa da praia that the forces finally declared victory. this was the stronghold of the militants, the nerve centre of the operation. the militants could be on the back foot, thought to be hiding in a forest further south, but the threat they pose still real. anne soy, bbc news, cabo delgado. the headlines on bbc news... the uk government says it will do whatever it takes, as a shortage of lorry drivers causes some petrol stations to close. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher sabina nessa in south—east london. the finalfew hours of campaigning gets under way ahead of sunday's german election, as angela merkel prepares to stand down after 16 years as chancellor.
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an australian doctor says he has developed a new first—aid method which could help save shark attack victims from fatal blood loss from the legs. the technique requires a by—stander to use their fist and apply pressure between the hip bone and groin area. well, that doctor is nicholas taylor, who explains how the technique works. we developed this technique because bleeding from shark bites is really catastrophic and the injuries that sharks cause is, you know, lots and lots of damage to the muscles, sometimes the bones and blood vessels in the leg. we knew that trying to put pressure on the bleeding point where people would normally try and fix bleeding would not be successful. we also knew that bystanders try and use a surfboard leg rope to improvise a tourniquet, and we didn't know whether that would be successful or not,
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so we designed a study to work out whether pushing on the groin over the femoral artery, as you describe, or using the leg rope would be the best, and we found that pushing the groin was by far the best way of stopping the blood flow. so it is really quite easy. you just lay the person down who is bleeding and you find their midline where their generals are and you find the outside of the hip bone, and the groin crease is where the leg joins onto the body, so all you need to do is, in the middle of that spot, push down as hard as you can and you will compress the femoral artery and stop the blood flowing to the leg. residents in south—western spain have a mammoth clean—up operation ahead, after towns were inundated with floodwater following torrential rain. it comes as world leaders focus on the climate crisis during talks at the un general assembly. tanya dendrinos reports. a torrent of fast flowing water, streets submerged after heavy rain caused flash flooding in parts of south—western spain. translation: breathtaking, - the water that fell was not normal. cars piled up as they were carried
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away on a road resembling more of a river, while fences simply gave way. according to spain's meteorological agency, huelva province received more than 100 millimetres of rain in a matter of hours on thursday. as the water receded, muddy streets were filled with people and possessions. locals clearing their homes of everything unsalvageable, some struggling to comprehend the devastating reality at the beginning of a lengthy recovery effort. translation: i'm left with nothing, nothing, and i am just _ an 82—year—old pensioner. i'm 82 years old and i have nothing left. it's just another extreme weather event, and this in the week world leaders are gathered for the un general assembly, with calls for action on climate change taking centre stage. tanya dendrinos, bbc news.
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restaurant, cafe and pub bosses in the uk, will soon be banned from keeping customer tips left for staff. it's currently up to business owners to decide whether the money is divided equally or put back into the company. the government legislation is expected to come into force within the next year. when postcard collector stu prince began shielding at the start of the pandemic, he decided to turn his hobby into a genealogy mission as a distraction. after spending years collecting postcards — some of them centuries old — stu began tracking down the original recipients or their families, to reunite them with a piece of their past. amanda kirton has been to meet him. there“s thousands and thousands looking for their descendants. oh, yeah, these are the orphanage ones. well, i've always been interested in postcards and such. but i got leukaemia and that
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meant heavy, heavy chemo. i was in a state of shock, really. i was wondering whether i'd be here or not. it was a pretty scary time. well, covid was that next year, 2020. and i knew i was going to be locked down for quite a while. and i thought about my postcards, and i said, used to enjoy them. needing a distraction, stu began purchasing postcards in online auctions. and i thought, well, i could open a little facebook group, reach people with the intention of reuniting them with families. and i started putting them on, six at the time, and people started to get interested, and i matched a couple. where do you find the descendants? their descendants, ijust put it on my page. exhausted from his treatment, stu had limitations. people started to pull together
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to help him to research. i was poorly, and the only way i could, you know, cope was with my researchers. they“re fantastic. i'm looking all the time for evidence that will tie the name to the address and the date. some of the postcards might have a happy birthday, so i will send them a personal message. and how does it feel when she finds them? yes, gotcha! quite early on, stu purchased a postcode that was sent in 1946 to a baby. such a cute card, to a one—year—old, i thought that was absolutely lovely. i put the card on my page. one of my researchers, she contacted me saying, "i've found the baby". then a lady contacted me, "that card is me! that baby is me!" i was chuffed to death.
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i got a facebook message from stu, talking about this postcard that he'd found. the postcard was sent by her late grandparents. i was amazed. it was for my first birthday, 74 years ago. when i reunite people like that, i just feel good. i feel like i've given something. i would absolutely love something from my ancestors. i suppose it brought back the memories of them. they're all very long gone. if anything, find out who they are, who they were, where they really came from. when they're still around to answer your silly questions. that's it, i'm going to cry, sorry! ijust wanted to do something and peoplejoined in. out of adversity came
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something really nice. something usefulfor a big reach of people and i felt really good about it. i felt good about myself. for the first time for quite awhile. part of my recovery, to feel useful. and i think that's, for any person recovering from leukaemia or cancer, to feel useful is big, it“s massive. i can't describe how massive that is, yeah. amanda kirton, bbc news. what a lovely story. officials in the us have formally handed over one of the world's oldest literary works to iraqi authorities. the gilgamesh dream tablet, which was made 3500 years ago, tells the story of a hero—king in ancient
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mesopotamia. the hugely valuable artefact was looted from iraq in the early 1990s but was recently tracked down in the us. you“re watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. where the sun is shining this afternoon, once again, it will be an unusually warm september's day. temperatures yesterday got into the low 20s, that warm air coming in on and increasingly westerly breeze. notice how the amber colours stay in place into the weekend, southerly breeze adds a bit more in the way of humidity, but there is signs of change into the west as we finish the weekend and go into next week. more on that in a moment. let“s deal with the here and now, though. as i said, westerly wind, high pressure to the south, low pressure to the north. these weather fronts are basically only areas of cloud pushing their way eastwards for the most part. it will feed in quite a lot of low cloud, though,
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across western coasts and hills, patchy rain or drizzle there, there will be the odd glimmer of brightness for some. best chance of sunshine central and eastern areas but even here probably more cloud than yesterday. as i said, it is a westerly breeze, strongest in the north. but we get a bit of a foehn effect across the east of scotland where temperatures are much higher than they should be, 20, 21 degrees aberdeenshire and angus, could get up to 23, 2a across parts of east anglia. we should be around 1a to 17, 18 degrees across the uk this time of year. we will have temperatures not far off that, in fact, tonight by the end of the night. plenty of cloud in place, some patchy rain or drizzle, heavy bursts of rain towards the far north and north—west of scotland and the coolest of the air far north—east and in towards orkney and shetland. but look at that, most places mid—teens as we start saturday morning. so, this is how saturday starts, outbreaks of rain wishing ——pushing across the north, some continuing through the day across the highlands but light and patchy. elsewhere, one or two spots of light rain or drizzle, most will be dry, a fair bit of cloud to begin with but we will still see some sunny breaks, especially in central and eastern areas. temperatures still well above where they should be
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for the time of year, even if they are down just a notch on what we will see through today. saturday night and into sunday, an area of low pressure, winds circulating around that in an anticlockwise fashion, so more of a southerly breeze, these weather fronts approaching from the west, something in the south as well but mainly in the form ofjust some showers pushing north, so a greater chance of some rain here on sunday but fairly short lived, i think. a lot more sunshine through the rest of england and wales compared with saturday, temperatures there into their 20s widely once again but wet and windy weather there into ireland late in the day, spreading eastwards across the country through sunday night into monday and it is that which brings the change for next week. just take a look at some of the capital city forecasts. it is going to be a very mixed week. there is going to be some sunshine, plenty of showers, some of those heavy and thundery, and it will feel cooler.
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this is bbc news. i“m martine croxall. the headlines at 11. the government says it will do whatever it takes, as a shortage of lorry drivers causes some petrol stations to close. i am not saying there aren't pressures, there are. it's just that we are making many, many changes and moving heaven and earth to get people into driving hgvs. queues have started to form outside some filling stations in the uk. photos from places including chester, newbury and leeds show cars trying to reach the pumps. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, sabina nessa, in south—east london. the metropolitan police has also released an image of another man they are searching for, seen walking through nearby pegler square. it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog
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of patients waiting for cancer treatment in england. that's the warning in a report by a think—tank. restaurant, cafe and pub bosses in the uk will soon be banned from keeping customer tips left for staff, under new rules. and coming up, it's nearly time to grab the sequins and put on the dancing shoes, with just 2a hours to go until strictly come dancing waltzes its way back onto oui’ screens. this good morning and welcome to bbc news. this good morning and welcome to bbc news. the transport secretary has said the government will "do whatever is required" to tackle fuel supply problems in the uk. grant shapps said he wouldn't rule out changing visa rules to allow more foreign drivers to work in the uk, or even asking the army this to help, although he said
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using the military "probably" wasn't the solution. the road haulage association says there's an urgent need to grant is temporary visas to attract more hgv drivers from abroad. it is estimated that the uk is short of about 100,000 hgv drivers — with gaps made worse by both the pandemic and brexit. ministers are stressing there is no need for motorists, or shoppers, to start panic buying. theo leggett reports. petrol stations with no petrol, or diesel. yet another consequence of the national shortage of lorry drivers. the fuel giant bp supplies about 1,200 outlets across the country. some have had to close temporarily, while others have run out of one or more types of fuel. rival supplier esso says it's also experienced problems at a small number of sites it operates in partnership with tesco. the problem isn't a lack of fuel. there is plenty available at the country's refineries. but there simply aren't enough tanker drivers to take it petrol stations. it's part of a much wider
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problem — a national shortage of lorry drivers. well, it's happened because of a multitude of factors. brexit — we've lost about 20,000 european drivers. we lost about 40,000 trucker training tests during the pandemic because of social distancing rules — those tests cancelled. and we've had a historic shortage in this country of tens of thousands of lorry drivers. and that means we've got a shortage now of 100,000. that has already led to bare shelves in supermarkets and other stores, which people within the sector have warned are likely to get worse in the run—up to christmas. the haulage industry body logistics uk said the shortage is a very serious issue, but has warned consumers against panic—buying fuel. that is a call echoed by the government, which says people should refuel as normal. it points out it has already taken steps to make training new hgv drivers quicker and easier.
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the fuel is there and it can continue to flow. i'm not saying there aren't pressures — there are. it's just we are making many, many changes and moving heaven and earth, if you like, to get people into driving hgvs. not all petrol retailers are affected by the current problems. morrisons, co—op and sainsbury“s say their petrol stations are operating as normal. but the fact shortages are occurring at all has highlighted once again how supply chains in the uk are coming under intense strain. theo leggett, bbc news. despite the government trying to reassure that you don't need to panic buy petrol, he are starting to form outside petrol stations. we have just had these pictures in front newbury in berkshire where you can see at this particular filling station they are queueing up to make sure that they don't run out. there are petrol stations which have some
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pumps that are closed, but the government has said the refineries have plenty of petrol. the issue is just trying to get the tankers full to deliver. that isn't newbury in berkshire, a few people deciding they will fill up while they can. our business correspondent, ben thompson is at a petrol station in stockport this morning to see how busy things are. really brisk trade at this bp petrol station in stockport, despite those calls not to panic—buy, and of course we saw this at the start of the pandemic. as soon as people start changing their shopping habits, even buying just a little bit more than they would normally, it causes problems for supplies. i have been speaking to the guy who owns this petrol station and they normally get a delivery every five days which normally lasts them for five days but he says looking at the current rate of demand it will probably last him about three days, and the problem is theyjust don't know when they will get another delivery.
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bp said it will prioritise motorways and interior roots but this is not one of them so they don't know when they will get a fresh delivery. normally if they need to they can call up and a truck will arrive within 24 hours. some suggestion that, as far as bp are concerned, that could take up to ten days to get here. so it is a problem if people start buying more, and the boss was telling me a little earlier theyjust don't know when the next supply will come. the planning is all very difficult at the moment anyway for the companies delivering the fuel, so if you put that out of sync it becomes even more difficult and problematic for them. talking logistics, i know you get a couple of deliveries every ten days. how long, that would last you five days? what are they telling you about getting deliveries? they are saying, "we hope you get it but we can't guarantee it," so we're just not sure until we get in about two days' time if we will get another —
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we just don't know at the moment. so problematic as far as planning is concerned. what is the solution? we just don't know right now. you heard from the transport secretary grant shapps this morning saying they will consider whatever they need to make sure supplies get through. that could involve getting the army to drive some of those trucks if it comes to that. but also for the first time talking about potentially relaxing the rules on visas for foreign drivers, because we know this problem has been caused by a perfect storm of issues. it is an ageing workforce of hgv drivers leaving the industry, there are changes to the tax rules that make it less attractive to work in, fewer recruits into the industry and a backlog of licenses — there are tests to get licenses for new drivers. on top of that, demand picking up after the pandemic, meaning many businesses are now operating shipping things around
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the country and, crucially, brexit has changed the visa rules for foreign drivers working in the uk. taken together, it means a shortage of about 100,000 hgv drivers and today seeing the impact on the fuel industry after we have already seen the impact on restaurants and supermarket shelves, today is the turn of the fuel industry, and the problem is we just don't know how much worse this will get before it gets better. well, a few people filling up with fuel at that petrol station this morning stopped to tell us how they're feeling. if everyone goes out rushing, then they'll be none for no—one, so i'll put a bit in but i'm not rushing about. i don't panic, mate, there's no point. it's not going to get us anywhere, is it? i'd get angry, though, but i won't panic. obviously i need to get the children to school, to college, _ and go about my daily business, so, yeah, i'm more likely— to come and fill up. it's like everything else. people say there is a shortage and everyone panics but if everyone is just sensible about it, i can't see there being a problem. they will get the fuel in. it is going to be a priority for the government so they will make sure it happens.
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joining me now is helena wright, who“s transport manager for w“s transport in norfolk, a part—time hgv driver and sits on a regional council of the road haulage association. this rather busy woman at the moment. what are the issues facing your firm? moment. what are the issues facing our firm? 1, .., , moment. what are the issues facing ourfirm? , your firm? basically, in the last two months _ your firm? basically, in the last two months of _ your firm? basically, in the last two months of our _ your firm? basically, in the last two months of our firm - your firm? basically, in the last two months of our firm we - your firm? basically, in the lastj two months of our firm we have your firm? basically, in the last - two months of our firm we have told 22 trucks off the road because we had an advert for hgv drivers and didn't have one applicant. hagar didn't have one applicant. how unusualthis? _ didn't have one applicant. how unusual this? in _ didn't have one applicant. how unusualthis? in normal- didn't have one applicant. how unusualthis? in normaltimes, what unusual this? in normal times, what would the response normally be? normally we would have people on record to call who had left their details. this is the first time for our business that has happened. but it has been a problem that has been a long time coming, unfortunately. tell us how you could see this coming down the track? quite
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riuhtl , coming down the track? quite rightly. in _ coming down the track? quite rightly. in the _ coming down the track? quite rightly, in the previous - coming down the track? quite rightly, in the previous clip . coming down the track? (si ike: rightly, in the previous clip there is an age relation to drivers coming out of the industry. a lot of drivers are over the age of 55 that are looking to retire and we are not attracting as an industry for the younger generation.— attracting as an industry for the younger generation. what would make it more attractive? _ younger generation. what would make it more attractive? facilities _ younger generation. what would make it more attractive? facilities are - younger generation. what would make it more attractive? facilities are a - it more attractive? facilities are a bi ke it more attractive? facilities are a big key part _ it more attractive? facilities are a big key part in _ it more attractive? facilities are a big key part in this. _ it more attractive? facilities are a big key part in this. i _ it more attractive? facilities are a big key part in this. i was - it more attractive? facilities are a big key part in this. i was talking. big key part in this. i was talking earlier, for the last three or four weeks, facilities are awful, it is not good for a driver who is out on the road and away for five nights a week. and also how you are treated as a driver to delivery and collection places is very bad. you talk about _ collection places is very bad. you talk about the _ collection places is very bad. you talk about the facilities where you need a shower, something decent to eat. you are not well provided for? it is notjust that eat. you are not well provided for? it is not just that facilities for overnight. that is not great but some companies will expect drivers
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to pay that out of their own pocket, so you have that cost which is absolutely horrendous in this country. along with the fact you don't get a nice meal, you have to eat out of a cardboard box. it is also the facilities you get as a driver when you get to collection and delivery places. drivers are sitting 26 hours waiting to be unloaded with no facilities provided. unloaded with no facilities provided-— unloaded with no facilities rovided. . , ., ~ , provided. that is inhumane. and yet ou are a provided. that is inhumane. and yet you are a part _ provided. that is inhumane. and yet you are a part hgv _ provided. that is inhumane. and yet you are a part hgv driver. _ provided. that is inhumane. and yet you are a part hgv driver. keep - provided. that is inhumane. and yet you are a part hgv driver. keep you | you are a part hgv driver. keep you doin: it? you are a part hgv driver. keep you doing it? i — you are a part hgv driver. keep you doing it? i have _ you are a part hgv driver. keep you doing it? i have done _ you are a part hgv driver. keep you doing it? i have done it _ you are a part hgv driver. keep you doing it? i have done it all - doing it? i have done it all my life. it is part of the family, passed down from my grandfathers and great grandfathers and basically you are born into it and you know no different. at the end of the day, if i don't do it and i don't teach my future children to do it, who is going to do it? because it is causing a problem.-
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going to do it? because it is causing a problem. very little end u . causing a problem. very little end u- in the causing a problem. very little end up in the shop _ causing a problem. very little end up in the shop without _ causing a problem. very little end up in the shop without having - causing a problem. very little end | up in the shop without having been brought by a truck. how much of the driver shortage for yourfirm in your part of the country is down to brexit, the fact that people went home after we left the eu? i don't think it is down _ home after we left the eu? i don't think it is down to _ home after we left the eu? i don't think it is down to brexit. - home after we left the eu? i don't think it is down to brexit. i - home after we left the eu? i don't think it is down to brexit. i have . think it is down to brexit. i have been sitting on the fence for the last few weeks trying to figure out a rule and what is causing it, but i can say it is not brexit that is causing it. a lot of people are not wanting to join the industry. there is not a massive queue of people waiting to take a test. i know the government have opened up and said no problem, we have test provided, but there is a cost element, people haven't got the money and people just don't want to do it. covid—19 has played a huge part in this. it does make people realise that, do they want to be away from their families five nights a week?
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unfortunately, you can order something today and have it delivered on your doorstep tomorrow. there are so many things i want to ask! does it mean we need to change our expectations of how quickly we get things? i our expectations of how quickly we aet thin . s? ~ our expectations of how quickly we aet thins? ., ., our expectations of how quickly we aet thins? ~' ., , ., get things? i think we do, yeah. the last 15 months. _ get things? i think we do, yeah. the last 15 months, all— get things? i think we do, yeah. the last 15 months, all of— get things? i think we do, yeah. the last 15 months, all of us _ get things? i think we do, yeah. the last 15 months, all of us have - get things? i think we do, yeah. the last 15 months, all of us have gone l last 15 months, all of us have gone through dramatic changes with covid—19 and we did see a little bit of a slow in the trade and things were more manageable and all of a sudden you have the people vacationing in this country, which is great, but there has to be a demand to keep it all going. i think if we look at other european countries, they do hgv bands over certain times in period to take trucks off the road. they are spending time with their family. evenif spending time with their family. even if you attract new people to the industry, they have tests to take and it is even more specialised
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if you are carrying flammable fuels. you can't shock at this, can you? you can't shock at this, can you? you can't shock at this, can you? you can't conjure plenty of new drivers out of thin air. ida. you can't conjure plenty of new drivers out of thin air.— drivers out of thin air. no, of course you — drivers out of thin air. no, of course you count _ drivers out of thin air. no, of course you count and - drivers out of thin air. no, of course you count and the - drivers out of thin air. no, of l course you count and the other drivers out of thin air. no, of - course you count and the other thing is these bits of kit they are driving, they are £250,000 plus and this isn't me knocking anyone who is 18 years old wanting to come into this industry, because i welcome them with open arms, but unfortunately because we have so much pressure behind us you need to make sure that these people are safe on the roads. it is one of the largest vehicles on the road. it isn't largest vehicles on the road. it isn“tjust largest vehicles on the road. it isn't just a largest vehicles on the road. it isn“tjust a simple as you have passed your test and we will send you to scotland or cornwall tomorrow, because there are a lot of other things and safety related things that have to be done, how to secure it loads and things like that. making sure they know. so it is notjust that. making sure they know. so it is not just a that. making sure they know. so it is notjust a case of that. there is
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more pressure on the driver to make sure all the boxes are ticked because otherwise they get fined and us as a company could find. abs, because otherwise they get fined and us as a company could find.— us as a company could find. a very comlex us as a company could find. a very complex situation _ us as a company could find. a very complex situation and _ us as a company could find. a very complex situation and we - us as a company could find. a very complex situation and we are - complex situation and we are grateful to you for talking us through it. grateful to you for talking us through it— grateful to you for talking us through it. grateful to you for talking us throu~h it. ., ~' ., ,, climate protesters have blocked the entrance to the port of dover in kent. insulate britain said more than 40 of its supporters in two groups have blocked the a20 toward the docks. the group caused chaos on the m25 five times in the past fortnight, but they have been threatened with imprisonment if they return to the motorway. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of the murder of london primary school teacher, sabina nessa. her body was found in a park last weekend. officers have also released images of another person they“d like to speak to in connection with the investigation, as sean dilley reports. do you recognise this man?
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if you do, police would like to hearfrom you, as your information could help officers investigating sabina nessa“s death. police believe the 28—year—old primary school teacher was attacked as she walked through cator park in south—east london on her way to meet a friend. we believe as she walked through the park she was approached by an individual and fatally attacked. sabina“s body was sadly found by a member of the public, and we are appealing for anyone who was here on friday evening, and who thinks they saw anything unusual, to come forward. last night's arrest was the second in a case that has hit local people hard. the many poignant tributes reflect a community's loss, as people young and old try to understand. the other arrested man, who is in his 40s, was released under investigation earlier this week. detectives believe sabina nessa was attacked at about half past eight on friday night, shortly after leaving her nearby home on astell road.
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she had been on her way to meet a friend at the depot bar. her body was found near the one space community centre on saturday afternoon. sabina“s sister has been sharing police updates on twitter, and paid her own tribute to her "beautiful, talented and caring sister". she said herfamily never thought this could happen to them. police are appealing to anyone who may have any information about sabina“s death to come forward. people in the kidbrooke and wider lewisham and greenwich areas are asked to pay special attention to these cctv images. any information could hold the key to what led to the teacher's death. sean dilley, bbc news. 0ur correspondent megan paterson is in south east london. we can see there by the sheer number of floral tributes that have been brought that this has really affected the community. absolutely,
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this morning — affected the community. absolutely, this morning already _ affected the community. absolutely, this morning already we _ affected the community. absolutely, this morning already we have - affected the community. absolutely, this morning already we have seen i affected the community. absolutely, this morning already we have seen a | this morning already we have seen a steady stream of people coming to leave flowers here. many people knew sabina nessa, and many didn“t leave flowers here. many people knew sabina nessa, and many didn't but felt moved to come here to share their grief and shock and their emotion at her murder. many of the cards here express concern and condolence and make reference to the fact that she was taking a five minute journey from one side of the pack to a home to meet a friend. a number of card say all of us should be able to do that safely and make the journey to meet a friend and to do it in a safe way. later on today, at seven o'clock, a vigil will be held. it has been organised by the local community here supported by campaigners for women's safety. they are encouraging people to share their memories, remember her and take a moment to reflect on life, the people that he loved, people's
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life she contributed to as a teacher. we heard from her colleagues that she was dedicated to her pupils and we had from people she was very much loved as a teacher, someone who spent time and had patients. the police will be at that vigil this evening was not the metropolitan police hope that people will be reassured by their presence but they will also talk to the police hunt share concerns and hopefully they can be made to feel more safe on the street, because there is anxiety amongst people living in the community about how safe it is to be out and about. the police say it is said to be on the streets but they will be here to offer reassurance. that 38—year—old man is in police custody under suspicion of murder. the investigation is continuing. the police are asking for the public to help. police are asking for the public to hel. ., ~' ,, police are asking for the public to hel. ., ~' , police are asking for the public to hel. ., ~ , . police are asking for the public to hel. ., , . ~ ., the headlines on bbc news...
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the government says it will do whatever it takes, as a shortage of lorry drivers causes some petrol stations to close. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, sabina nessa, in south—east london. it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog of patients waiting for cancer treatment in england. thats the warning in a report by a think—tank. nearly 1.5 million customers have been hit in two weeks by the collapse of energy firms in the uk. it“s down to a rise in the price of wholesale gas. market regulator 0fgem has described the increase as “unprecedented“ and says more firms could go bust. it also means there are fewer deals available to customers on price comparison sites and uswitch says there's currently “no point“ in customers shopping around. alex, thank you forjoining us. how
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many people are contacting your organisation with specific concerns about this? we organisation with specific concerns about this? ~ ., organisation with specific concerns about this? ~ . , ., , about this? we are seeing a big increase in _ about this? we are seeing a big increase in contacts _ about this? we are seeing a big increase in contacts to - about this? we are seeing a big increase in contacts to our - about this? we are seeing a big l increase in contacts to our service and the website that deals with this issue has seen a 9000% increase in visits to that page and a 50% increase in call centres. what are people i worried what it means for them and i think the message we are trying to get across is that if your energy supply fails, you don't need to worry, your energy will continue as normal and the regulator will find you a new energy supplier who will take you on as a customer and protect your balances.— protect your balances. what about eo - le protect your balances. what about people who _ protect your balances. what about people who are — protect your balances. what about people who are behind _ protect your balances. what about people who are behind with - protect your balances. what about people who are behind with their. people who are behind with their payments might be some kind of debt repayment plan? what provision is made for them to continue to pay in that way? made for them to continue to pay in that wa ? ., , ., made for them to continue to pay in that wa ? . , ., ., that way? that is a good point and somethin: that way? that is a good point and
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something we _ that way? that is a good point and something we are _ that way? that is a good point and something we are concerned - that way? that is a good point and l something we are concerned about. when an energy company does go bust, any debt owed by customers passes to the administrators so the company that winds down the old firm. so any agreement can be torn up and the administrator can ask for that debt in a we are concerned that will to people over the edge this winter if they get those large one—off bills. we are urging the government to put in place new protections to guarantee people can continue with their new repayment plans. what their new repayment plans. what about people _ their new repayment plans. what about people who _ their new repayment plans. what about people who at _ their new repayment plans. what about people who at the - their new repayment plans. what about people who at the moment and if it from the warm home discount? how concerned are you that they might lose that if they are forced to transfer to another supplier? this is another concern we have. some energy suppliers, the larger ones offer that to low income
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households. pensioners and low—income disabled families. if your company fails, the new supplier doesn“t your company fails, the new supplier doesn't have to give that to you and in the past it is an voluntary basis and it is important that the government steps in and guarantees a payment. we know that a company that went bust, 15,000 of its customers weren“t pay that discount so it is really urgent we can guarantee those 15,000 people will get it again this winter. ii 15,000 people will get it again this winter. , ., , 15,000 people will get it again this winter. i. , , , , .,, winter. if your energy supplier has one winter. if your energy supplier has gone bust. — winter. if your energy supplier has gone bust, looks _ winter. if your energy supplier has gone bust, looks like _ winter. if your energy supplier has gone bust, looks like it— winter. if your energy supplier has gone bust, looks like it could - winter. if your energy supplier has gone bust, looks like it could go i gone bust, looks like it could go post are you a just concern, what should people be doing in preparation and not doing? i should people be doing in preparation and not doing? i thinkl think we would _ preparation and not doing? i thinkl think we would recommend - preparation and not doing? i thinkl think we would recommend that. preparation and not doing? i thinkl think we would recommend that if. think we would recommend that if your company goes bust, take a metre reading so you know where you were in your usage at the point that the old company failed and then if you have your bills, keep them in case you need to refer to them later.
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just sit tight and wait until you hearfrom the just sit tight and wait until you hear from the new company that will take you on as a customer and they will let you know what you need to do next. the only other thing i would mention is the thing that will change with a new supplier is the price and in the current climate it will be likely to go up. that is going to be challenging for people. we know people on low incomes are already facing a cut to universal credit in the next couple of weeks, £200 a week, so facing higher heating bills on top of that will be a challenge and we are keen that the government will reverse that could to universal credit.— government will reverse that could to universal credit. some people say that increase — to universal credit. some people say that increase was _ to universal credit. some people say that increase was the _ to universal credit. some people say that increase was the very _ to universal credit. some people say that increase was the very thing - that increase was the very thing that increase was the very thing that paid their bills throughout the pandemic. we are coming onto winter, of course, so it is likely to be even more of a cost for people. that £20 a week — even more of a cost for people. that £20 a week has _ even more of a cost for people. trust £20 a week has been a lifeline and
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one that people can't do without. it was hard enough already and now these price rises on top will make things even harder for people and if we get to winter and colder weather, that will push build even higher. something really simple and easy the government can do is to carry on paying that £20 a week. we appreciate _ paying that £20 a week. we appreciate you talking to us. thank you very much for talking to us. it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog of patients this waiting for cancer treatment in england, according to a report. the research estimates that 19—and—a—half—thousand people the research estimates that 19,500 people who should have been diagnosed with cancer had not been, because of missed referrals. 0ur health correspondent, dominic hughes has more. the pandemic has affected all parts of the nhs, with cancer services no exception. 0ne worry is the number of people who have failed to get a diagnosis of cancer because they have not yet been referred for specialist tests.
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now a report from the ippr suggests that could mean a huge backlog of cases we don't yet know about. the report estimates around 19,500 people have not yet been diagnosed with cancer because of missed referrals. diagnostics is a big issue, with the pandemic leading to a 37% drop in endoscopies, a 25% drop in mri scans and 10% fewer ct scans than expected. nhs england says cancer services have now returned to pre—pandemic levels. but the report says if the health service was able to improve that performance by 5%, the backlog would still not be cleared until 2033. and the authors warn that without a big investment in equipment and staff, thousands of people will be left waiting for diagnosis and treatment. dominic hughes, bbc news. britain's us open champion emma raducanu is back on court in london, attending a celebration event at the national tennis centre in roehampton. our sports correspondent
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jo currie is there. she is hoping she has a good view. can we speak to you? tell us what you can see. no, apparently not. i can see there was some tennis being played but not sufficient to commentate on it! anyway, sorry, we will go back later and hear about emma ruddock in a bit. inafinal in a final debate ahead of sunday plasma collection, affordable housing, climate change and how to defend the country from outside interference. the election marks the end of angela merkel long reign as chancellor. withjust end of angela merkel long reign as chancellor. with just three days to go before the election, this debate with a final chance for party leaders to win over voters.
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when asked about the new security pact between the uk, australia and the us, he said that germany should work together with france to create a stronger europe. i can understand the irritation that france felt about how the defence pact is worked out, he said. his conservative rival, who is lagging behind in the polls, said that europe needed to act independently and cited the american withdrawal from afghanistan. we need common european defence projects for when the us pulls back, he said. this election campaign has
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been unusual in many ways. the polls have been erratic, there are more swing voters than ever before and unprecedented numbers are undecided. in one poll, 40% of people say they still haven't made their minds up. whoever they do choose it is likely after the elections coalition talks will be long and complicated. all of this means that this is one of the most unpredictable elections modern germany has ever known. 31—year—old man is to stand trial charged with murder after a mother and three children were found dead in a house in derbyshire. danny savage is outside the court in derby. it has been going on? the man in ruestion derby. it has been going on? the man in question is — derby. it has been going on? the man in question is 31— derby. it has been going on? the man in question is 31 years _ derby. it has been going on? the man in question is 31 years old. _ derby. it has been going on? the man in question is 31 years old. he - in question is 31 years old. he appeared before magistrates in derby earlier this week. today he appeared
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in crown court in derby and he appeared via a video link from custody. the court heard he was charged with four counts of murder. he spoke only to confirm his name and listen to proceedings and they were to talk about how the case progresses and the date. the next hearing is marked down for the 19th of november in nottingham and the trial will potentially take place in derby between march and the end of may next year. so a trial date was set today for this case. he is charged with killing terry harris, 35 years old, and her children who were 11 and 13 and also an 11—year—old. their bodies were found on sunday morning. he was arrested afterwards. he“s on sunday morning. he was arrested afterwards. he's been held in custody since and he will remain in custody since and he will remain in custody as this process continues. thank you very much.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. much more typical autumn weather is on the way for next week. 0ut there over the next few days, it stays warm where you get the sunshine, the best of which this afternoon to the south and the east. still plenty of cloud, though, across some central and western areas and it is around coasts and hills in particular where you might see some light rain or drizzle at times, but even with that, temperatures still up in the teens. in the east, 20, 21 degrees in aberdeenshire and angus, 24 possible across parts of east anglia. a good 4 to 6 degrees above where we should be at this stage in the year. through this evening and overnight, it is going to stay on the warm side, plenty of cloud, some light rain or drizzle. heavier bursts of rain towards the highlands and islands, coolest across the far north—east of mainland scotland towards orkney and shetland where there will be a bit more cloud tomorrow. early rain in orkney and shetland, still some sunny spells in eastern scotland. elsewhere on saturday, a fairly cloudy start, some brighter breaks, the odd isolated shower but temperatures still on the high side. that continues, then, into sunday, but changes later on sunday, heavy rain in the west sweeps its way eastwards and, as you can see from a selection of city forecasts, cooler and showery next week.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines... the government says it will do whatever it takes, as a shortage of lorry drivers causes some petrol stations to close. i am not saying there aren't pressures, there are. it's just that we are making many, many changes and moving heaven and earth to get people into driving hgvs. queues have started to form outside some petrol stations in the uk — despite calls not to panic buy. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, sabina nessa, in south—east london. the metropolitan police has also released an image of another man they are searching for — seen walking through nearby pegler square.
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it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog of patients waiting for cancer treatment in england. that's the warning in a report by a think—tank. restaurant, cafe and pub bosses in the uk will soon be banned from keeping customer tips left for staff, under new rules. and coming up... it“s nearly time to grab the sequins and put on the dancing shoes — with just 24 hours to go until strictly come dancing waltzes its way back onto oui’ screens. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here“s chetan pathak. thank you. it's less than 90 minutes until one of sports greatest rivalries, being renewed for the first time in three years. team europe may hold the ryder cup, but they face a hostile partisan 40,000 strong crowd now in wisconsin, with team usa favourties on paper to win back the famous trophy. the americans, though, do have questions over their team spirit.
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andy swiss is there for us. cheering so can they do it again? europe“s team were cheered to the stage as the ryder cup was officially opened in front of thousands of fans. but they know they face some challenge. on paper, america's team is one of the strongest ever with eight of the world's top ten players. but after a year's delay because of covid, there was relief on both sides that one of golf“s most famous events is finally back. there is no question, the ryder cup is a special occasion, but all things considered, has there ever been the prospect of a ryder cup quite as special as this one? after all the world has been through these past two years, it is such a joy and relief to be standing here in front of you today, and in front of so many of you. well, in just a few hours“ time, this long—awaited ryder cup will finally be under way and the stands here will be filled with cheering supporters. but one thing is for certain, not many of them will be cheering for europe.
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# god bless america! # america's home advantage has never been greater. because of travel restrictions to the us, there are just a sprinkling of european fans here. but padraig harrington's team have been busy winning friends. during final practice, they threw gifts into the crowd and received an enthusiastic welcome. but they will know their opponents are ready for the challenge. they're playing great and they're excited to get going. i mean, i can't tell you how excited they are to get going and get that first tee ball in the air. but europe, remember, have won four of the last five ryder cups, including the most recent one in paris in 2018. they might be the underdogs but they'll be hoping once again for a bit of that ryder cup magic. andy swiss, bbc news, whistling straits. there is more build—up to that over on the bbc sport website at the moment. next a netball.
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england have won the netball series against new zealand, after an astonishing come back, to beat the world champions. the roses were ten goals down at one point, but rallied in the fourth quarter to level the score. england then nudged themselves in front and held on for a close win. they lost the series 3—0 last time they visited new zealand in 2020, but now have a confidence boosting win going into the commonwealth games. the body that represents europe“s top football clubs, has raised, what it's called, "grave concern and alarm", over fifa“s plans for a world cup every two years. the european club“s association, the eca, says the proposals by fifa. would lead to a "direct and destructive impact," on club football, and players“ health and wellbeing would be put at risk. former arsenal manager arsene wenger is leading the calls, for fewer international breaks, to stage more world cups. and in an interview with bbc podcast "the sports desk", he says he is ready "to gamble to make football better."
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i would say the world cup in such a huge event but i don't think it will diminish the prestige. you want to be the best in the world and you want to be the best in the world every year, so i don't think having a world cup every two years would diminish the prestige. anthonyjoshua has opened up about how he deals with the stress, and mental challenge, of competing at an elite level. the wba, wbo and ibf world heavyweight champion, defends his titles tomorrow, against the former undisputed cruiserweight champion, 0leksandr usyk in london, and says, it's the little things in life that matter. it's a lonely sport, yeah. so we're talking now, we're chill, but there will be a time when i'm on my own and thinking about it. when you wake up sometimes, i haven't had the best sleep. if you wake up with, thank god i'm awake,
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thank god for this water i'm about to drink, and i'm happy, it changes the perspective of your day. that's how i've been dealing with all this pressure is, i'm happy to be here, no pressure, no stress. and valterri bottas led lewis hamilton in a mercedes one—two in first practice at the russian grand prix. you can find more on that and all those stories on the bbc sport website. i'll be back with you later in the afternoon. for now, back to you. thank you very much. to north korea now where the influential sister of the country's leader, kimjong—un, has said pyongyang is willing to resume talks with south korea if it doesn't provoke the north with hostile policies. kim yo—jong“s statement was in response to renewed calls from seoul to officially declare an end to the korean war as a way to bring back peace to the peninsula. 0ur seoul correspondent laura bicker gave us this analysis. well, this is a rather surprising statement. kim jong—un“s sister, kim yo—jong, is used to kind of putting out statements that are rather forceful in nature, usually critical of seoul in nature. here, right at the top
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of the statement, she says she is willing to discuss what she called "an admirable idea" to end the korean war with this declaration, this declaration that president moon here in seoul has been advocating for quite some time. in the last week, at the united nations general assembly, he once again renewed that call for an end of war declaration. just to remind your viewers, the korean war ended in 1953 with an armistice, not a peace treaty. so the peninsula has been in an official state of war ever since. there have been many discussions about ending the war and declaring it to come to an official end, and there are many arguments for and against. but when it comes to pyongyang, certainly here in seoul, they have both agreed at different stages this is something that should be done. but there are no discussions going on between north and south, and that's where the statement is very interesting. for the first time in a long time,
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it's almost like a little sliver of hope, almost like the door to talks is opening just slightly. but then you go into the statement and there are a lot of ifs and a lot of buts. she wants south korea to end its hostile policy, and by that she usually means when it comes to having troops, us troops, based on the peninsula, and the policy of sanctions, which are international sanctions backed by the united nations. so there are various ifs and buts attached to this, but it's the first time i think i've seen such a sliver of hope from kim yo—jong. a congressional committee, investigating the riot at the us capitol building earlier this year, has issued its first round of subpoenas. among those summoned to appear are former president trump“s chief of staff, mark meadows, and the political strategist, steve bannon. the house of representatives select committee is investigating efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election result — and the storming of the capitol
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by supporters of mr trump. here's our north america correspondent david willis. well, many in congress remained horrified by the events of january the 6th, the day which saw some of the worst political violence of this kind in this country in more than 200 years, and which led to a delay of several hours in the certification ofjoe biden“s election victory. they want to get to the bottom of what happened in order to make sure that it never happens again, and to that end subpoenas have now been issued to four former close advisers to donald trump. they include his former chief of staff, mark meadows, his former close adviser steve bannon, former deputy in the communications department, dan scavino, and an official at the us pentagon, a former official, cash patel. now, they have all been given two weeks in order to come up with documents regarding their communications
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with each other and with members of the white house in the days running up to the 6th ofjanuary and on the day of the riot itself. and a week after that deadline, each of the four man will then be required to give sworn testimony to congress. should they refuse to do so, and former president trump has himself said that he might cite executive privilege in an attempt to avoid giving evidence to the select committee, then it is possible they could be subject to criminal contempt charges. this committee wants to know what president trump knew in the run—up to the events onjanuary the 6th, what he was doing, whom he spoke to and so on, and it also wants to know what he and those around him did in order to try to overturn the results of last year's presidential election. david willis reporting. residents in south—western spain have a mammoth clean—up operation ahead after towns were inundated with floodwater
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following torrential rain. it comes as world leaders focus on the climate crisis during talks at the un general assembly. tanya dendrinos reports. a torrent of fast flowing water, streets submerged after heavy rain caused flash flooding in parts of south—western spain. translation: breathtaking, - the water that fell was not normal. cars piled up as they were carried away on a road resembling more of a river, while fences simply gave way. according to spain's meteorological agency, huelva province received more than 100 millimetres of rain in a matter of hours on thursday. as the water receded, muddy streets were filled with people and possessions. locals clearing their homes of everything unsalvageable, some struggling to comprehend the devastating reality at the beginning of a lengthy recovery effort.
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translation: i'm left with nothing, nothing, and i am just _ an 82—year—old pensioner. i'm 82 years old and i have nothing left. it's just another extreme weather event, and this in the week world leaders are gathered for the un general assembly, with calls for action on climate change taking centre stage. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. you are watching bbc news. a reminder of our headlines. queues have started to form outside petrol stations in the uk, despite calls not to panic buy as shortage of lorry drivers because of some stations to close. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, sabina nessa, in south—east london. it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog of patients waiting for cancer treatment in england. that's the warning in a report by a think—tank. restaurant, cafe and pub bosses in the uk, will soon be banned
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from keeping customer tips left for staff. it's currently up to business owners to decide whether the money is divided equally or put back into the company. the government legislation is expected to come into force within the next year. earlier, my colleague annita mcveigh asked chef simon wood if he agreed with the new rules. yes, absolutely, that is how we have always done it, pre—pandemic, post—pandemic, i think it is a positive step for everyone that works in hospitality. whether a service charges should be something that is current and enforced rather than higher prices is another debate, but i do believe that the guys here that work for me at the woodkraft restaurants in cheltenham and here in manchester, we provide the service, they should keep the entire share of the pot and it is split evenly amongst everybody who works in the business, aside from the directors themselves. the kitchen porters, chefs, barstaff, hosts, everyone gets an equal share of the entire pot. but you must know other restaurants
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where they operate differently and whatjustification do they make for not giving the tips directly to the staff, not sharing them out equally? i would have to say the restaurants that do that, they can't really justify that. from a personal perspective, i'm a restaurateur, i think anyone who is doing that is lining their own pockets, if i'm honest. the staff and chefs provide the service, they should be the ones that directly benefit from it. what difference do you think it makes in motivating staff and retaining staff if they get to keep those tips? it is a massive motivation. i have changed my prices here at the restaurant after the second lockdown to increase people's salaries, we do pay above the basic here and get good people for good money, you get what you pay for, you can enhance that by a service charge and it does take a difference. people bank on it. we saw it in the furlough scheme, tips were not included. i have to say, it is a good and welcome decision
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by the government but it would have been more welcome if it was included in the furlough for the teams throughout the country that were working in hospitality. well, it is taking legislation, as we mentioned, in the introduction to make it law that staff are allowed to keep the tips that are given to them by customers but do you worry that that might be taken away from staff in other ways, in their wages, for example? i'd like to think not. there may be some operators out there but this country in general needs to start to see hospitality as a viable career path, because it really is. you can meet some great people, earn good money and work for the right operator. that is my advice to anyone coming into hospitality, be picky who you choose and work for someone that is there and will look after you. yes, and, you know, the pandemic has taight us many things and one of those, i am sure you would agree, simon, is not to take things like hospitality for granted. 100%. we were all desperate to get back to it. yeah, myself included, very much so.
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we are loving being back and long may it continue. so, happy staff means happy bosses and generally a better working environment, so are you hopeful that everyone will get on—board with this, even if they are slightly reluctant to? yeah, there will be some reluctant people out there but it is what it is. for me, it is very welcome, it is what is fair and, you know, we all like going out and being served and looked after by people that are happy in what they are doing is far more preferable than being served by someone that is really not enjoying what they are doing, and that is down to the operator. we all have a responsibility throughout the entire industry to look after our teams, our customers and our businesses. chef simon wood speaking to anita. it“s nearly time to grab the sequins and put on the dancing shoes — with just 24 hours to go until strictly come dancing waltzes its way back onto our screens. 15 new celebrities will take to the ballroom tomorrow night, to begin their bid
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for the glitterball trophy. and of course, our very own dan walker will be among them. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been chatting to them ahead of the big night. cheering how much of a learning experience has the whole thing being so far? it has the whole thing being so far? it has been unbelievable. to finding out what my chest size was, to the measurement from my collarbone to my bellybutton, departing on sheer shakes been —— snakeskin clothes, to learning to dance, it“s shakes been —— snakeskin clothes, to learning to dance, it's been amazing. i learning to dance, it's been amazing-— learning to dance, it's been amazinu. ., i. �* ., ., amazing. i thought you're going to flush us there! _ amazing. i thought you're going to flush us there! rugby _ amazing. i thought you're going to flush us there! rugby is _ amazing. i thought you're going to flush us there! rugby is unhelpful| flush us there! rugby is unhelpful for dancing- _ flush us there! rugby is unhelpful for dancing. you _ flush us there! rugby is unhelpful for dancing. you need _ flush us there! rugby is unhelpful for dancing. you need stiff - flush us there! rugby is unhelpful for dancing. you need stiff ankles| for dancing. you need stiff ankles for dancing. you need stiff ankles for rugby, flexible for dancing. you need to be at the lift your arms. look how much pain he is in lifting his arm _ look how much pain he is in lifting his arm up~ — look how much pain he is in lifting his arm up. we will sort that out.
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i'm his arm up. we will sort that out. i'm not— his arm up. we will sort that out. i'm not sure _ his arm up. we will sort that out. i'm not sure the judges need to see that face when i do that.— that face when i do that. which bit of our that face when i do that. which bit of your body _ that face when i do that. which bit of your body has — that face when i do that. which bit of your body has had _ that face when i do that. which bit of your body has had the - that face when i do that. which bit of your body has had the biggest l of your body has had the biggest surprise so far? i of your body has had the biggest surprise so far?— surprise so far? i like these questions- _ surprise so far? i like these questions. these _ surprise so far? i like these questions. these are - surprise so far? i like these questions. these are the i surprise so far? i like these i questions. these are the best questions _ questions. these are the best questions ever. _ questions. these are the best questions ever. i _ questions. these are the best questions ever. i would - questions. these are the best questions ever. i would say i questions. these are the bestl questions ever. i would say my entire — questions ever. i would say my entire body! there are things... we were _ entire body! there are things... we were in— entire body! there are things... we were in the — entire body! there are things... we were in the studio on the first day pushing _ were in the studio on the first day pushing my shoulders back and my hips had _ pushing my shoulders back and my hips had to— pushing my shoulders back and my hips had to face this way. my legs were _ hips had to face this way. my legs were doing something very odd. she needs were doing something very odd. sips. needs to were doing something very odd. she needs to work on twisting motion at the moment, — needs to work on twisting motion at the moment, twisting _ needs to work on twisting motion at the moment, twisting in— needs to work on twisting motion at the moment, twisting in your- needs to work on twisting motion atj the moment, twisting in your spine. yes, _ the moment, twisting in your spine. yes. i— the moment, twisting in your spine. yes. idon't — the moment, twisting in your spine. yes. idon't have _ the moment, twisting in your spine. yes, i don't have enough— the moment, twisting in your spine. yes, i don't have enough twist - the moment, twisting in your spine. yes, i don't have enough twist in . yes, i don't have enough twist in my spine _ yes, i don't have enough twist in my sine. , ., yes, i don't have enough twist in my sine. _, , ., , yes, i don't have enough twist in my sine. _,, ., , , spine. there is a serious reason why ou spine. there is a serious reason why you wanted — spine. there is a serious reason why you wanted to _ spine. there is a serious reason why you wanted to do _ spine. there is a serious reason why you wanted to do the _ spine. there is a serious reason why you wanted to do the show. - spine. there is a serious reason why you wanted to do the show. there i spine. there is a serious reason why you wanted to do the show. there is a very serious _ you wanted to do the show. there is a very serious reason. _ you wanted to do the show. there is a very serious reason. my _ you wanted to do the show. there is a very serious reason. my beautifull a very serious reason. my beautiful sister who died five years ago to the day that we started rehearsals left the world in a glitterball coffin. she was a bit of a disco diva. ., . ,,
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coffin. she was a bit of a disco diva. ., ., ,, ., ., diva. for real? she had a glitterball _ diva. for real? she had a glitterball coffin? - diva. for real? she had a glitterball coffin? for - diva. for real? she had a i glitterball coffin? for real, i diva. for real? she had a - glitterball coffin? for real, i got her a glitterball _ glitterball coffin? for real, i got her a glitterball coffin. - glitterball coffin? for real, i got her a glitterball coffin. i'm - glitterball coffin? for real, i got| her a glitterball coffin. i'm doing it for her, she will be thrilled. she will be watching slightly like that, probably. i she will be watching slightly like that, probably-— that, probably. i am so so. i've honestly _ that, probably. i am so so. i've honestly never _ that, probably. i am so so. i've honestly never been _ that, probably. i am so so. i've honestly never been this - that, probably. i am so so. i've honestly never been this so - that, probably. i am so so. i've honestly never been this so in l that, probably. i am so so. i've i honestly never been this so in my life but— honestly never been this so in my life but it — honestly never been this so in my life but it has been amazing. i've had so _ life but it has been amazing. i've had so much fun come out of my comfort— had so much fun come out of my comfort zone.— had so much fun come out of my comfort zone. ., _ ., , ., comfort zone. you did say was harder than olympics — comfort zone. you did say was harder than olympics and — comfort zone. you did say was harder than olympics and i _ comfort zone. you did say was harder than olympics and i for— comfort zone. you did say was harder than olympics and i for some - comfort zone. you did say was harder than olympics and i for some reason | than olympics and i for some reason celebrated! — than olympics and i for some reason celebrated! he— than olympics and i for some reason celebrated! ., , , celebrated! he has definitely given it everything _ celebrated! he has definitely given it everything with _ celebrated! he has definitely given it everything with a _ celebrated! he has definitely given it everything with a smile - celebrated! he has definitely given it everything with a smile on - celebrated! he has definitely given it everything with a smile on his i it everything with a smile on his face. ~ , ., ., face. we will see how far we get better ending — face. we will see how far we get better ending there _ face. we will see how far we get better ending there has - face. we will see how far we get better ending there has been i face. we will see how far we get better ending there has been an| face. we will see how far we get i better ending there has been an an olympic— better ending there has been an an olympic swimming champion that goes into dancing. i haven't even do my first dance — into dancing. i haven't even do my first dance yet! what are i thinking about? _ first dance yet! what are i thinking about? �* �* first dance yet! what are i thinking about? “ �* .~ , first dance yet! what are i thinking about? “ �* , , , about? bbc breakfast is represented, dan walker, what _ about? bbc breakfast is represented, dan walker, what have _ about? bbc breakfast is represented, dan walker, what have you _ about? bbc breakfast is represented, dan walker, what have you made - about? bbc breakfast is represented, dan walker, what have you made of l dan walker, what have you made of him so far? he dan walker, what have you made of him so far?— him so far? he has this grace about him. i him so far? he has this grace about him- i can't — him so far? he has this grace about him. i can't wait _ him so far? he has this grace about him. i can't wait to _ him so far? he has this grace about him. i can't wait to see _ him so far? he has this grace about him. i can't wait to see him - him so far? he has this grace about him. i can't wait to see him in - him so far? he has this grace about him. i can't wait to see him in a - him. i can't wait to see him in a tail him. ican't wait to see him in a tail suit— him. ican't wait to see him in a tail suit in— him. ican't wait to see him in a tail suit ina—
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him. i can't wait to see him in a tail suit in a ballroom number because — tail suit in a ballroom number because i— tail suit in a ballroom number because i think it will suit him to a tee _ because i think it will suit him to a tee plus, _ because i think it will suit him to a tee. plus, nadia is an incredible teacher— a tee. plus, nadia is an incredible teacher i— a tee. plus, nadia is an incredible teacher i think is an incredible hands — teacher i think is an incredible hands l— teacher i think is an incredible hands. ., �* ., . hands. i love dan. but not as much as my mum- _ hands. i love dan. but not as much as my mum- my — hands. i love dan. but not as much as my mum. my mum _ hands. i love dan. but not as much as my mum. my mum is— hands. i love dan. but not as much as my mum. my mum is like - hands. i love dan. but not as much as my mum. my mum is like is- hands. i love dan. but not as much as my mum. my mum is like is it i hands. i love dan. but not as much l as my mum. my mum is like is it ok ifi as my mum. my mum is like is it ok if i vote— as my mum. my mum is like is it ok if i vote for— as my mum. my mum is like is it ok if i vote for dan— as my mum. my mum is like is it ok if i vote for dan as _ as my mum. my mum is like is it ok if i vote for dan as well, _ as my mum. my mum is like is it ok if i vote for dan as well, pet? - as my mum. my mum is like is it ok if i vote for dan as well, pet? i - if i vote for dan as well, pet? i was _ if i vote for dan as well, pet? i was like. — if i vote for dan as well, pet? i was like, mum, _ if i vote for dan as well, pet? i was like, mum, come - if i vote for dan as well, pet? i was like, mum, come on! - because the way daniel works... because the way daniel works. .. she calls me daniel. _ because the way daniel works. .. she calls me daniel. i— because the way daniel works. .. she calls me daniel. i love _ because the way daniel works. .. she calls me daniel. i love daniel. - because the way daniel works. .. she calls me daniel. i love daniel. you i calls me daniel. i love daniel. you said i calls me daniel. i love daniel. you said i was— calls me daniel. i love daniel. you said i was allowed. _ calls me daniel. i love daniel. you said i was allowed. i _ calls me daniel. i love daniel. you said i was allowed. i said - calls me daniel. i love daniel. you said i was allowed. i said you - said i was allowed. i said you could call me whatever _ said i was allowed. i said you could call me whatever you _ said i was allowed. i said you could call me whatever you like - said i was allowed. i said you could call me whatever you like and - said i was allowed. i said you could call me whatever you like and you | call me whatever you like and you went for daniel. goes back to many people call you daniel? my mum and nadia. �* ., people call you daniel? my mum and nadia. . . i. people call you daniel? my mum and nadia. �* . y., . people call you daniel? my mum and nadia. . . ., , nadia. al'az said you have poise. bo s? nadia. aljaz said you have poise. bo s? he nadia. aljaz said you have poise. itoys? he said — nadia. aljaz said you have poise. boys? he said you _ nadia. aljaz said you have poise. boys? he said you look- nadia. aljaz said you have poise. boys? he said you look like - nadia. aljaz said you have poise. boys? he said you look like a - boys? he said you look like a dancer. boys? he said you look like a dancer- l _ boys? he said you look like a dancer. i already _ boys? he said you look like a dancer. i already have - boys? he said you look like a dancer. i already have a - boys? he said you look like a dancer. i already have a new| boys? he said you look like a - dancer. i already have a new walk,
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actuall . dancer. i already have a new walk, actually- -- _ dancer. i already have a new walk, actually. -- ntamack. _ dancer. i already have a new walk, actually. -- ntamack. this - dancer. i already have a new walk, actually. -- ntamack. this is - actually. —— ntamack. this is pre—nadia, this is post. big change. cheering and applause so envious of dan walker! a team of therapy dogs has been working to relieve stress at a hospital in chile which, for months, was overwhelmed by cases of coronavirus. hospital staff say the presence of four legged friends has made a big difference to morale, as mark lobel reports. meet pepe, oh, and keemu, giving a lick of love to this children's hospital in chile, lifting the spirits of staff and patients. translation: when one enters this hospital with dogs, everyone greets| you and their expressions change. therapy sessions here resembling a mixture of the dog show crufts and yoga, with
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an abridged version of downward dog. what looks like a dog's dinner is anything but. a comer. eso! therapy takes many forms. translation: therapy i is perfect for the children. with children that are very sick, this helps them escape the stress of the hospital, of what they are living. walkies for these caring canines warms hearts. as coronavirus cases soared, they had a ringside seat. translation: dog therapy - in our units has been a tremendous contribution for patients, parents and workers. it has reduced anxiety and stress, patients are more willing to receive treatment and attend medical checkups. proving best friends to all ages, these therapy dogs available for different strokes, for different folks. mark lobel, bbc news.
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it makes me feel betterjust looking at them. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. hello. where the sun is shining this afternoon, once again, it will be an unusually warm september's day. temperatures yesterday got into the low 20s, that warm air coming in on and increasingly westerly breeze. notice how the amber colours stay in place into the weekend, southerly breeze adds a bit more in the way of humidity, but there is signs of change into the west as we finish the weekend and go into next week. more on that in a moment. let“s deal with the here and now, though. as i said, westerly wind, high pressure to the south, low pressure to the north. these weather fronts are basically only areas of cloud pushing their way eastwards for the most part. it will feed in quite a lot of low cloud, though, across western coasts and hills, patchy rain or drizzle there, there will be the odd glimmer of brightness for some. best chance of sunshine central and eastern areas but even here probably more cloud than yesterday. as i said, it is a westerly breeze, strongest in the north. but we get a bit of a foehn effect across the east of scotland where temperatures are much higher than they should be, 20, 21 degrees aberdeenshire and angus,
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could get up to 23, 24 across parts of east anglia. we should be around 14 to 17, 18 degrees across the uk this time of year. we will have temperatures not far off that, in fact, tonight by the end of the night. plenty of cloud in place, some patchy rain or drizzle, heavy bursts of rain towards the far north and north—west of scotland and the coolest of the air far north—east and in towards orkney and shetland. but look at that, most places mid—teens as we start saturday morning. so, this is how saturday starts, outbreaks of rain pushing across the north, some continuing through the day across the highlands but light and patchy. elsewhere, one or two spots of light rain or drizzle, most will be dry, a fair bit of cloud to begin with but we will still see some sunny breaks, especially in central and eastern areas. temperatures still well above where they should be for the time of year, even if they are down just a notch on what we will see through today. saturday night and into sunday, an area of low pressure, winds circulating around that in an anticlockwise fashion, so more of a southerly breeze, these weather fronts approaching from the west, something in the south as well but mainly in the form ofjust some showers pushing north, so a greater chance of some rain here on sunday but fairly short lived, i think.
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a lot more sunshine through the rest of england and wales compared with saturday, temperatures there into their 20s widely once again but wet and windy weather there into ireland late in the day, spreading eastwards across the country through sunday night into monday and it is that which brings the change for next week. just take a look at some of the capital city forecasts. it is going to be a very mixed week. there is going to be some sunshine, plenty of showers, some of those heavy and thundery, and it will feel cooler. goodbye. and it will feel cooler.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at midday. the government says it will do whatever it takes, as a shortage of lorry drivers causes some petrol stations to close. i am not saying there aren't pressures, there are. it's just that we are making many, many changes and moving heaven and earth to get people into driving hgvs. queues have started to form outside some petrol stations in the uk, despite calls not to panic buy. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, sabina nessa, in south—east london. the metropolitan police has also released an image of another man they are searching for — seen walking through nearby pegler square. it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog of patients waiting for cancer treatment in england. that's the warning in
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a report by a think—tank. restaurant, cafe and pub bosses in the uk, will soon be banned from keeping customer tips left for staff, under new rules. game, set and match — a homecoming e she has been meeting the duchess of cambridge. and coming up, it's nearly time to grab the sequins and put on the dancing shoes — with just 24 hours to go until strictly come dancing waltzes its way back onto our screens. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the transport secretary has said the government will "do whatever is required" to tackle fuel supply problems in the uk. grant shapps said he wouldn't rule out changing visa rules to allow more foreign drivers to work
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in the uk — or even asking the army to help, although he said using the military "probably" wasn't the solution. there are around 8,000 petrol stations in the uk and while there is no shortage of petrol and diesel at uk refineries, it's getting it to forecourts that's been an issue. the road haulage association says there's an urgent need to grant temporary visas to attract more hgv drivers from abroad. it is estimated that the uk is short of about 100,000 hgv drivers — with gaps made worse by both the pandemic and brexit. ministers are stressing there is no need for motorists, or shoppers, to start panic buying. but these were the scenes in newbury earlier, with people stopping to fill up. and at a sainsbury“s store in chester there were more people waiting to get fuel. further queues here in gamston in nottinghamshire, and also more drivers arriving at this tesco filling station in cardiff.
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people have been queueing up in cardiff in tesco. people have been queueing up in cardiff in tesco. theo leggett reports. petrol stations with no petrol, or diesel. yet another consequence of the national shortage of lorry drivers. the fuel giant bp supplies about 1,200 outlets across the country. this some have had to close temporarily, while others have run out of one or more types of fuel. rival supplier esso says it's also experienced problems at a small number of sites it operates in partnership with tesco. the problem isn't a lack of fuel. there is plenty available at the country's refineries. but there simply aren't enough tanker drivers to take it petrol stations. it's part of a much wider problem — a national shortage of lorry drivers. well, it's happened because of a multitude of factors. brexit — we've lost about 20,000 european drivers. we lost about 40,000 trucker training tests during the pandemic
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because of social distancing rules — those tests cancelled. and we've had a historic shortage in this country of tens of thousands of lorry drivers. and that means we've got a shortage now of 100,000. that has already led to bare shelves in supermarkets and other stores, which people within the sector have warned are likely to get worse in the run—up to christmas. the haulage industry body logistics uk said the shortage is a very serious issue, but has warned consumers against panic—buying fuel. that is a call echoed by the government, which says people should refuel as normal. it points out it has already taken steps to make training new hgv drivers quicker and easier. the fuel is there and it can continue to flow. i'm not saying there aren't pressures — there are. it's just we are making many, many changes and moving heaven and earth, if you like, to get people into driving hgvs. not all petrol retailers are affected by the current problems.
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morrisons, co—op and sainsbury“s say their petrol stations are operating as normal. but the fact shortages are occurring at all has highlighted once again how supply chains in the uk are coming under intense strain. theo leggett, bbc news. our business correspondent, ben thompson has been at a petrol station in stockport to see how busy things are. really brisk trade at this bp petrol station in stockport, despite those calls not to panic—buy, and of course we saw this at the start of the pandemic. as soon as people start changing their shopping habits, even buying just a little bit more than they would normally, it causes problems for supplies. i have been speaking to the guy who owns this petrol station and they normally get a delivery every five days which normally lasts them for five days but he says looking at the current rate of demand it will probably last him about three days, and the problem is theyjust don't know when they will get another delivery.
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bp said it will prioritise motorways and arterial routes but this is not one of them so they don't know when they will get a fresh delivery. normally if they need to they can call up and a truck will arrive within 24 hours. some suggestion that, as far as bp are concerned, that could take up to ten days to get here. so it is a problem if people start buying more, and the boss was telling me a little earlier theyjust don't know when the next supply will come. the planning is all very difficult at the moment anyway for the companies delivering the fuel, so if you put that out of sync it becomes even more difficult and problematic for them. talking logistics, i know you get a couple of deliveries every ten days. how long, would that last you, five days? what are they telling you about getting deliveries? they are saying, "we hope you get it but we can't guarantee it," so we're just not sure until we get in about two days' time if we will get another —
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we just don't know at the moment. so, problematic as far as planning is concerned. what is the solution? we just don't know right now. you heard from the transport secretary grant shapps this morning saying they will consider whatever they need to make sure supplies get through. that could involve getting the army to drive some of those trucks if it comes to that. but also for the first time talking about potentially relaxing the rules on visas for foreign drivers, because we know this problem has been caused by a perfect storm of issues. it is an ageing workforce of hgv drivers leaving the industry, there are changes to the tax rules that make it less attractive to work in, fewer recruits into the industry and a backlog of licenses — there are tests to get licenses for new drivers. on top of that, demand picking up after the pandemic, meaning many businesses are now operating shipping things around the country and, crucially, brexit has changed the visa rules for foreign drivers
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working in the uk. taken together, it means a shortage of about 100,000 hgv drivers and today seeing the impact on the fuel industry after we have already seen the impact on restaurants and supermarket shelves, today is the turn of the fuel industry, and the problem is we just don't know how much worse this will get before it gets better. well, a few people filling up with fuel at that petrol station this morning stopped to tell us how they're feeling. if everyone goes out rushing, then they'll be none for no—one, so i'll put a bit in but i'm not rushing about. i don't panic, mate, there's no point. it's not going to get us anywhere, is it? i'll get angry, though, but i won't panic. obviously i need to get the children to school, to college, _ and go about my daily business, so, yeah, i'm more likely- to come and fill up. it's like everything else. people say there is a shortage and everyone panics but if everyone is just sensible about it, i can't see there being a problem. they will get the fuel in. it is going to be a priority for the government so they will
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make sure it happens. joining me now is adrianjones, national officer for road transport and logistics at unite, the union. was thank you forjoining us. in your view, where does the shortage of driver stem from? it is historical. _ of driver stem from? it is historical. you _ of driver stem from? it is historical. you captured l of driver stem from? it is | historical. you captured it of driver stem from? it is i historical. you captured it in of driver stem from? it 3 historical. you captured it in the introduction. it has been coming for a long time. the employers and the government across the country and across the world have known it is an ageing workforce, not enough people are coming into the industry, so this is not new. the impact has been hastened by everything you have said, brexit, covid—19. but this is not new and employers and the uk government had done very, very little to address it up until this point. i have to smile when grant shapps says they are moving heaven and earth. they are not, they are tinkering things on the outside.
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like relaxing drivers hours, a safety issue, that is not helping, it will make it worse. grant shapps needs to stop flailing around and get stuck into the issues to address the cause of the shortage rather than the symptoms. run the cause of the shortage rather than the symptoms. run through what those issues — than the symptoms. run through what those issues are. _ than the symptoms. run through what those issues are. you _ than the symptoms. run through what those issues are. you start _ than the symptoms. run through what those issues are. you start off - than the symptoms. run through what those issues are. you start off with - those issues are. you start off with a lack of respect — those issues are. you start off with a lack of respect and _ those issues are. you start off with a lack of respect and i _ those issues are. you start off with a lack of respect and i think- those issues are. you start off with a lack of respect and i think we - those issues are. you start off with a lack of respect and i think we can all do something by saying thank you to all of the drivers that deliver everything that we use in our homes, our work. just that little bit of saying thank you, showing respect from us goes a long way. of course, pay is a really important element of this. for many years, and when a tory minister acknowledges that drivers have been underpaid, we know it is something serious, and unite carried out a survey this week that identifies a majority of the public agreed with us that drivers need a pay increase. so we need employers not to be offering signing on
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bonuses, retention bonuses, we need proper rates of pay and we need changes in the industry to give drivers better work life balance, better facilities to take rest and using basic facilities like toilets. there are a whole raft of issues of the government can get stuck into but they are just tinkering around the edges. but they are 'ust tinkering around the edaes. ., .,, ., the edges. some of those out long-term — the edges. some of those out long-term structural - the edges. some of those out long-term structural things i the edges. some of those out i long-term structural things that long—term structural things that won't be fixed quickly. you could look at pay. all unions argue that their members are worth more money. but how many people who say that lorry drivers should earn more would be prepared to pay more for the goods they then go on to buy? ultimately, for years part of the problem with transport and the supply chain is that it has been devalued, retailers, manufacturers have wanted to pay as little as possible for transport. and when
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something is cheap, it is not valued, and that is where we have lost the respect. this is not about charging customers more. when we look at the massive profits made by some of the uk“s largest retailers, it is about making sure that those profits are used to pay proper wages throughout the supply chain. this is not about putting the cost onto customers, but ultimately our members, our drivers are the customers as well. so it is a fully supported circle that we need to raise wages. it is as simple as that. if raise wages. it is as simple as that. ., , ., raise wages. it is as simple as that. . , ., ., ., that. if it wages were rage to an attractive level, _ that. if it wages were rage to an attractive level, how _ that. if it wages were rage to an attractive level, how many - that. if it wages were rage to an i attractive level, how many people who were trained hgv drivers might be tempted back? that who were trained hgv drivers might be tempted back?— be tempted back? that is a key auestion be tempted back? that is a key question and — be tempted back? that is a key question and that _ be tempted back? that is a key question and that is _ be tempted back? that is a key question and that is something| be tempted back? that is a key i question and that is something we have been pressing the government to do that research, to contact those licence holders who aren't currently driving. whilst pay is important, many drivers are leaving the
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industry because of the conditions they worked in. extremely long hours, starting early, not knowing if you are getting home, not knowing how long the dahlias, not knowing which days of the work you will work from one week to the next. —— day is. all of these things have to be addressed because if we do is put frantic light around the entrance of the industry and once you have entered, it is still the same state it is in now, then we will not retain drivers and unite have been calling on the industry and the government to establish a national council where we can look at wages and good practice and terms and conditions. if grant shapps wants to move heaven and earth, that is what we say he should be doing. thank you very much- — 17 people have been arrested as climate activists blocked the port of dover, causing queues of vehicles attempting to cross the channel. insulate britain said more
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than 40 of its supporters gathered at the port. the protest began just before 8.30 this morning and was cleared by police two hours later. the group caused chaos on the m25 five times in the past fortnight, you“re watching bbc news. some breaking news now and in the past few minutes figures released by the 0ns estimates that one in 90 people had coronavirus in the uk latest week. that“s down from the previous week which was one in 80. the bbc“s head of statistics, robert cuffe, is with me. it is going down but what is a trend over the last few weeks showing us? we are seeing different trends in different parts of the uk. that one in 90 figure is for england and that seems to be moving down driven by falls in london, southeast and yorkshire. in the rest of england it has been more wobbly and in scotland we think level is a good deal
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higher, probably in the region of one in 45, and the good news is the highjumps we have one in 45, and the good news is the high jumps we have seen at the start of september have levelled off. there is no evidence they are starting to come down yet. we are hoping... scotland has seen the highest rates. in northern ireland and wales it is kind of in the middle, in between, and it is not clear if they are going up or down from these data.— clear if they are going up or down from these data. what impact can be discerned from _ from these data. what impact can be discerned from the _ from these data. what impact can be discerned from the schools _ from these data. what impact can be discerned from the schools going - discerned from the schools going back for the autumn term? the ons data is really — back for the autumn term? the ons data is really clear. _ back for the autumn term? the ons data is really clear. kids _ back for the autumn term? the ons data is really clear. kids are - back for the autumn term? the ons data is really clear. kids are on - data is really clear. kids are on the way up and everyone else on the way down. children, the rates are higher than... way down. children, the rates are higherthan... 0nce way down. children, the rates are higher than... once you have young
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adult, the rates are falling and down below 1.5%. it is pretty clear that, whether it is the opening of schools or the fact younger children haven't been vaccinated or mixed as much in the past, we are certainly seeing a different picture for younger people than we are for older people. younger people than we are for older --eole. ., ~ younger people than we are for older --eole. a, ~' ,, younger people than we are for older --eole. a, ~' , younger people than we are for older --eole. ., ~ , . queues have started to form outside some petrol stations in the uk — despite calls not to panic buy, as a shortage of lorry drivers causes some stations to close. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, sabina nessa, in south—east london. it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog of patients waiting for cancer treatment in england. that's the warning in a report by a think—tank.
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sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here“s chetan pathak. good afternoon. three years after europe“s famous win in paris, the 43rd edition of the ryder cup begins today in front of a partisan home crowd at whistling straits. the opening ceremony took place last night, with europe in their dark grey suits getting a warm welcome to the stage, at least, but the crowd will be against them when the action gets under way at just after one o'clock this afternoon, with spaniards, jon rahm and sergio garcia, playing the opening foursomes. so hitting alternate shots. experience is on europe“s side. garcia alone, has amassed 25 and a half points in his career; the same as the entire, us team combined, and the most in ryder cup history. paul casey is playing alongside europe“s youngest player, 24—year—old viktor hov—land. everybody on the team get along. i don't feel like we're hiding anybody. there have been ryder cups through the years, i don't think we were hiding anybody in paris, but
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you maybe play guys because, as a up to the challenge? everybody on this team is up to the challenge. it“s... team is up to the challenge. it's... the things you don't see. hopefully, we can produce the golf and show you what i think and believe on the golf course but in that team room and locker room it is unlike anything i've experienced. england have won the netball series against new zealand, after an astonishing come back to beat the world champions. the roses were ten goals down at one point, but rallied in the fourth quarter to level the score. england then nudged themselves in front and held on for a close win. they lost the series 3—0 last time they visited new zealand in 2020, but now have a confidence boosting win going into the commonwealth games. valtteri bottas led lewis hamilton in a mercedes one—two in first practice at the russian grand prix. bottas, who won the race last year, finished just over two tenths of a second ahead of hamilton. championship leader max verstappen
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was third for red bull. the dutchman is facing a three—place grid penalty on sunday after being found predominantly to blame for the crash with lewis hamilton last time out in italy which ended both their races. the body that represents europe“s top football clubs, has raised, what it's called "grave concern and alarm" over fifa“s plans for a world cup every two years. the european club“s association, the eca, says the proposals by fifa would lead to a direct and destructive impact on club football, and players“ health and wellbeing would be put at risk. former arsenal manager arsene wenger is leading the calls, calls for fewer international breaks, to stage more world cups. a more in—depth analysis is on the bbc sport website. a more in—depth analysis is on the bbc sport website. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of the murder of london primary school teacher,
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sabina nessa. her body was found in a park last weekend. officers have also released images of another person they“d this like to speak to in connection with the investigation, as sean dilley reports. do you recognise this man? if you do, police would like to hear from you, as your information could help officers investigating sabina nessa“s death. police believe the 28—year—old primary school teacher was attacked as she walked through cator park in south—east london on her way to meet a friend. we believe as she walked through the park she was approached by an individual and fatally attacked. sabina“s body was sadly found by a member of the public, and we are appealing for anyone who was here on friday evening, and who thinks they saw anything unusual, to come forward. last night's arrest was the second in a case that has hit local people hard. the many poignant tributes reflect a community's loss, as people young and old try to understand. the other arrested man, who is in his 40s, was released under investigation
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earlier this week. detectives believe sabina nessa was attacked at about 8.30 on friday night, shortly after leaving her nearby home on astell road. she had been on her way to meet a friend at the depot bar. her body was found near the one space community centre on saturday afternoon. sabina“s sister has been sharing police updates on twitter, and paid her own tribute to her "beautiful, talented and caring sister". she said her family never thought this could happen to them. police are appealing to anyone who may have any information about sabina“s death to come forward. people in the kidbrooke and wider lewisham and greenwich areas are asked to pay special attention to these cctv images. any information could hold the key to what led to the teacher's death. sean dilley, bbc news. 0ur correspondent megan patterson sent this update in the last hour. this morning already we have seen a steady stream of people coming to leave flowers here.
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many people knew sabina nessa, many didn“t, many lived alongside her in this community and just feel moved to come down here to share their grief, their shock and their emotion at her murder. many of the cards here just expressing concern, condolence and making reference to the fact that sabina nessa was taking what should have been a five—minute journey from one side of the park, from her home, to meet a friend in a pub in another. a number of them are saying that all of us should be able to do that safely, that she should have been able to make thatjourney to meet a friend and been able to do it in a safe way. later on today at seven o'clock, near the site where sabina nessa“s body was found, a vigil will be held. it has been organised by the local community, supported by campaigners for women's safety. they are encouraging people to come down, share their memories of sabina nessa, to remember her, to take a moment to reflect on her life, the people that she loved, the people's lives
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that she contributed to as a teacher. we have heard from our colleagues that she was very dedicated to her pupils and we have heard from her pupils that she was very much loved as a teacher, someone who spent time and took patience with her pupils. the police will be at that vigil this evening. the metropolitan police are hoping that people will be reassured by their presence but also that they will talk to the police, share their concerns and hopefully they can be made to feel more safe on these streets, because there is a degree of anxiety, as you would imagine, here amongst people living in the community about how safe it is to be out and about. the police think that it is safe to be on the street, but they will be here to offer reassurance. we know that 38—year—old man remains in police custody under suspicion of murder. the investigation continuing. the police still asking for the public to help too. a 31—year—old man has appeared in court charged with four counts of murder. damien bendall was remanded in custody at derby crown court for trial next year. he“s accused of killing
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a 35—year—old woman, terri harris, and three children, aged 11 and 13, who were found dead in a house in killamarsh near sheffield on sunday. it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog of patients waiting for cancer treatment in england, according to a report. the research estimates that 19,500 people who should have been diagnosed with cancer had not been, because of missed referrals. 0ur health correspondent, dominic hughes has more. one worry is a number of people who fail to get a diagnosis of cancer because they have not been referred for specialist test. a report from the ippr suggests that could mean a huge backlog that we don't know about. the report estimates around 19,500 people have not yet been diagnosed with cancer because of missed referrals. diagnostics is a
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big issue, with the pandemic leading to... nhs england says counter services have now returned to pre—pandemic levels but the report says the health service was able to improve by 5%, the backlog which shall not be cleared until 2023 and the author warn that without big investment in equipment and staff, thousands will be left waiting for diagnosis and treatment. britain's us open champions are attending a homecoming event at the national tennis centre in roehampton. emma raducanu will be joined byjoe salisbury, alfie hewitt and gordon reid. our sports correspondent jo currie is there. plenty of talent on show today? absolutely, welcome to the lawn tennis association in roehampton where we have had all sorts of royalty here today. the court may be
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empty now but a few moments ago the duchess of cambridge was he a meeting tennis royalty. she was meeting tennis royalty. she was meeting emma raducanu, along with three other british us open champions. it was a case of how much tennis talent can you get on one course. afterwards, emma raducanu spoke to the bbc and she was asked to give an evaluation of the duchess“s tennis skills and she says she was very impressed. she says duchess was at home on court and a hitting ability was good. for the lta this is the emma raducanu homecoming. a couple of weeks after she claimed the us open championship. it is a wonderful achievement for her the lta are hoping that she can spark a new wave of players coming into the spot. 0ver of players coming into the spot. over the years, the number of players, particularly youngsters, is dwindling and now they have an 18—year—old that hopefully can attract more players and more
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diverse players. 150 children from local schools have been meeting emma raducanu and showing off what they can do. , ., raducanu and showing off what they can do. , . , , ., can do. they have inspired a few --eole! can do. they have inspired a few people! emma — can do. they have inspired a few people! emma raducanu - can do. they have inspired a few people! emma raducanu is - can do. they have inspired a few| people! emma raducanu is going can do. they have inspired a few i people! emma raducanu is going to can do. they have inspired a few - people! emma raducanu is going to be doing a question and answer on iplayer soon? rats doing a question and answer on iplayer soon?— doing a question and answer on iplayer soon? doing a question and answer on ipla er soon? . , , ., iplayer soon? as i understand it. it is a wonderful— iplayer soon? as i understand it. it is a wonderful opportunity - iplayer soon? as i understand it. it is a wonderful opportunity for- iplayer soon? as i understand it. it | is a wonderful opportunity for young players who are keen to get into tennis or already play it is like for an 18—year—old to go all the way to a majorfinal. let“s for an 18—year—old to go all the way to a majorfinal. let's not forget she didn't drop a set on the way to the final. what it is like to go on to win a cabbage. the lta hope young players will say, if emma raducanu can do it, i can do it as well. thank you very much. breaking news. another energy company has gone bust. this time pfp energy, and
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their website is telling us what we need to know. they“d regret that... of need to know. they“d regret that... 0fjim have appointed british gas to take on customers. the advice is not to take on a new supplier yet. if you are a domestic customer with credit on your account with pfp, that money is protected. you will not lose it. it is money that is held safely for you and will be owed to you. a list of questions fair that we have been asking people, people like the citizens of advice bureau. they have also said they don't have the confidence in... we all need energy to power our homes and having a market with a range of
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competitors is allowed everyone to have fedor prices. it is too late for us, but here is a petition to sign to raise those issues. information about what is happening but also a political perspective from pfp energy, who havejust gone bust. more typical autumn weather is on the way for next week. it is staying warm. best of the south and east. plenty of cloud and around coasts and hills we might see light rain and drizzle. in the east, 20, 201 degrees. aberdeenshire. this evening, on the one side. plenty of cloud, rain and drizzle. heavy rain in the highlands. there may be more
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cloud tomorrow. early rain in shetland, sunny spells in eastern scotland and elsewhere a fairly cloudy start. some brighter breaks, the odd isolated showers and temperatures still on the high side. that continues into sunday with changes on sunday. heavy rain goes eastwards and as you can see, cooler and showery next week.
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hello, this is bbc news with martine croxall. the headlines... the government says it will do whatever it takes, as a shortage of lorry drivers causes some petrol stations to close. i am not saying there aren't pressures, there are. it's just that we are making many, many changes and moving heaven and earth to get people into driving hgvs. queues have started to form outside some petrol stations in the uk, despite calls not to panic buy. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, sabina nessa, in south—east london. the metropolitan police has also released an image of another man they are searching for — seen walking through nearby pegler square. it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog of patients waiting for cancer treatment in england. that's the warning in a report by a think—tank.
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restaurant, cafe and pub bosses in the uk, will soon be banned from keeping customer tips left for staff, under new rules. and coming up... it“s nearly time to grab the sequins and put on the dancing shoes — with just 24 hours to go until strictly come dancing waltzes its way back onto our screens. the main candidates to be german chancellor have clashed over the future direction of the eu and how to deal with china. in a final debate, ahead of sunday's election, they discussed climate change, affordable housing and how to defend the country from outside interference. the election marks the end of angela merkel“s long reign as chancellor. 0ur correspondent in berlin damien mcguinness watched the final debate. with just three days to go before the election, this debate was a final chance for party leaders to win over voters.
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topics ranged from affordable housing and the national debt to climate change and how to deal with china. the current leader in the polls is this man, the centreleft social democrat to replace angela merkel. when asked about the new aukuk security packs between the uk, australia and the us, he said germany should work together with france to create a stronger europe. translation: | can understand i the irritation france felt about how the defence worked out. his conservative rival, who is lagging behind slightly, said that europe needed to act independently and cited the american withdrawal from afghanistan. translation: we need pro'ects from in the us pulls back. h translation: we need pro'ects for when the us pulls back. h this election campaign has been unusual in many ways.
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the polls have been erratic, there are more swing voters than ever before and unprecedented numbers are undecided. in one poll, 40% of people say they still haven't made their minds up. whoever they do choose, it's likely that after the elections, coalition talks will be long and complicated. all of this means that this is one of the most unpredictable elections modern germany has ever known. damien mcguinness, bbc news, berlin. residents in south—western spain have a mammoth clean—up operation ahead after towns were inundated with floodwater following torrential rain. it comes as world leaders focus on the climate crisis during talks at the un general assembly. tanya dendrinos reports. a torrent of fast flowing water, streets submerged after heavy rain caused flash flooding in parts of south—western spain. translation: breathtaking, - the water that fell was not normal.
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cars piled up as they were carried away on a road resembling more of a river, while fences simply gave way. according to spain's meteorological agency, huelva province received more than 100 millimetres of rain in a matter of hours on thursday. as the water receded, muddy streets were filled with people and possessions. locals clearing their homes of everything unsalvageable, some struggling to comprehend the devastating reality at the beginning of a lengthy recovery effort. translation: i'm left with nothing, nothing, and i am just _ an 82—year—old pensioner. i'm 82 years old and i have nothing left. it's just another extreme weather event, and this in the week world leaders are gathered for the un general assembly, with calls for action on climate change taking centre stage. tanya dendrinos, bbc news.
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the influential sister of north korea's leader, kimjong—un, has said pyongyang is willing to resume talks with south korea if it doesn't provoke the north with hostile policies. kim yo—jong“s statement was in response to renewed calls from seoul to officially declare an end to the korean war as a way to bring back peace to the peninsula. 0ur seoul correspondent laura bicker gave us this analysis. well, this is a rather surprising statement. kim jong—un“s sister, kim yo—jong, is used to kind of putting out statements that are rather forceful in nature, usually critical of seoul in nature. here, right at the top of the statement, she says she is willing to discuss what she called "an admirable idea" to end the korean war with this declaration, this declaration that president moon here in seoul has been advocating for quite some time. in the last week, at the united nations general assembly, he once again renewed that call for an end of war declaration.
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just to remind your viewers, the korean war ended in 1953 with an armistice, not a peace treaty. so the peninsula has been in an official state of war ever since. there have been many discussions about ending the war and declaring it to come to an official end, and there are many arguments for and against. but when it comes to pyongyang, certainly here in seoul, they have both agreed at different stages this is something that should be done. but there are no discussions going on between north and south, and that's where the statement is very interesting. for the first time in a long time, it's almost like a little sliver of hope, almost like the door to talks is opening just slightly. but then you go into the statement and there are a lot of ifs and a lot of buts. she wants south korea to end its hostile policy, and by that she usually means when it comes to having troops, us troops, based on the peninsula,
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and the policy of sanctions, which are international sanctions backed by the united nations. so there are various ifs and buts attached to this, but it's the first time i think i've seen such a sliver of hope from kim yo—jong. a congressional committee, investigating the riot at the us capitol building earlier this year, has issued its first round of subpoenas. among those summoned to appear are former president trump“s chief of staff, mark meadows, and the political strategist, steve bannon. the house of representatives select committee is investigating efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election result and the storming of the capitol by supporters of mr trump. here's our north america correspondent david willis. well, many in congress remained horrified by the events of january the 6th, the day which saw some of the worst political violence of this kind in this country in more than 200 years, and which led to a delay of several
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hours in the certification ofjoe biden“s election victory. they want to get to the bottom of what happened in order to make sure that it never happens again, and to that end subpoenas have now been issued to four former close advisers to donald trump. they include his former chief of staff, mark meadows, his former close adviser steve bannon, former deputy in the communications department, dan scavino, and an official at the us pentagon, a former official, cash patel. now, they have all been given two weeks in order to come up with documents regarding their communications with each other and with members of the white house in the days running up to the 6th ofjanuary and on the day of the riot itself. and a week after that deadline, each of the four man will then be required to give sworn testimony to congress. should they refuse to do so, and former president trump has himself said that he might cite executive privilege in an attempt to avoid giving evidence to the select committee,
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then it is possible they could be subject to criminal contempt charges. this committee wants to know what president trump knew in the run—up to the events onjanuary the 6th, what he was doing, whom he spoke to and so on, and it also wants to know what he and those around him did in order to try to overturn the results of last year's presidential election. let“s return to our main story. despite the government warning people not to panic buy petrol, queues are starting to form outside petrol stations across the country. these were the scenes in newbury earlier today, with people stopping to fill up. at a sainsbury“s store in chester, there were more people waiting to get fuel.
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the suspense is killing you, i can tell! further queues here in gamston in nottinghamshire. and also more drivers arriving at this tesco filling station in cardiff. i think that is what lord frost used to call lord privy seal news. look it up, it is funny. well, one of the problems is said to be a temporary shortage of drivers for fuel tankers. helena wright is transport manager for w“s transport in norfolk, and sits on a regional council of the road haulage association. she says they're struggling to find people who want to become lorry drivers. a lot of people are not wanting to join the industry, there is not a massive, massive queue of people waiting to take the test. i know the government have opened up and said, yeah, no problem, we've got all these tests provided, but there is a cost element to that that people haven't got the money and, like i say, there are people thatjust don't want to do it. covid, ithink, has played a huge part in this. it has made people realise —
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do they want to be away from their families four, five nights a week? unfortunately, with the supply chain as it is, you can order something today and have it delivered on your doorstep tomorrow. restaurant, cafe and pub bosses in the uk, will soon be banned from keeping customer tips left for staff. it's currently up to business owners to decide whether the money is divided equally or put back into the company. the government legislation is expected to come into force within the next year. earlier my colleague annita mcveigh asked chef simon wood if he agreed with the new rules. yes, absolutely, that is how we have always done it, pre—pandemic, post—pandemic, i think it is a positive step for everyone that works in hospitality. whether a service charges should be something that is current and enforced rather than higher prices is another debate, but i do believe that the guys here that work for me at the woodkraft restaurants in cheltenham and here in manchester, we provide the service, they should keep the entire share of the pot and it is split
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evenly amongst everybody who works in the business, aside from the directors themselves. the kitchen porters, chefs, barstaff, hosts, everyone gets an equal share of the entire pot. but you must know other restaurants where they operate differently and whatjustification do they make for not giving the tips directly to the staff, not sharing them out equally? i would have to say the restaurants that do that, they can't really justify that. from a personal perspective, i'm a restaurateur, i think anyone who is doing that is lining their own pockets, if i'm honest. the staff and chefs provide the service, they should be the ones that directly benefit from it. what difference do you think it makes in motivating staff and retaining staff if they get to keep those tips? it is a massive motivation. i have changed my prices here at the restaurant after the second lockdown to increase people's salaries, we do pay above the basic here and get good people for good
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money, you get what you pay for, you can enhance that by a service charge and it does take a difference. people bank on it. we saw it in the furlough scheme, tips were not included. i have to say, it is a good and welcome decision by the government but it would have been more welcome if it was included in the furlough for the teams throughout the country that were working in hospitality. well, it is taking legislation, as we mentioned, in the introduction to make it law that staff are allowed to keep the tips that are given to them by customers but do you worry that that might be taken away from staff in other ways, in their wages, for example? i'd like to think not. there may be some operators out there but this country in general needs to start to see hospitality as a viable career path, because it really is. you can meet some great people, earn good money and work for the right operator. that is my advice to anyone coming into hospitality, be picky who you choose and work for someone that is there
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and will look after you. yes, and, you know, the pandemic has taight us many things and one of those, i am sure you would agree, simon, is not to take things like hospitality for granted. 100%. we were all desperate to get back to it. yeah, myself included, very much so. we are loving being back and long may it continue. so, happy staff means happy bosses and generally a better working environment, so are you hopeful that everyone will get on—board with this, even if they are slightly reluctant to? yeah, there will be some reluctant people out there but it is what it is. for me, it is very welcome, it is what is fair and, you know, we all like going out and being served and looked after by people that are happy in what they are doing is far more preferable than being served by someone that is really not enjoying what they are doing, and that is down to the operator. we all have a responsibility throughout the entire industry to look after our teams, our customers and our businesses.
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chef simon wood speaking to anita. the headlines on bbc news... queues have started to form outside some petrol stations in the uk — despite calls not to panic buy, as a shortage of lorry drivers causes some stations to close. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering the primary school teacher, sabina nessa, in south—east london. it could take more than a decade to clear the backlog of patients waiting for cancer treatment in england. that's the warning in a report by a think—tank. it“s nearly time... oh, i'm over here, sorry. we got carried away with the sequence. it's just 24 hours to go until strictly come dancing waltzes its way back onto our screens. 15 new celebrities will take
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to the ballroom tomorrow night, to begin their bid for the glitterball trophy. and of course, our very own dan walker will be among them. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been chatting to them ahead of the big night. cheering how much of a learning experience has the whole thing been so far? it's been unbelievable. from finding out what my chest size was to my collarbone to my bellybutton, to putting on sheer, like, snakeskin tops, to learning how to dance. but everything has just been amazing. i thought you were going to give us a flash there! so did i! what's going on? i learnt a lot in rugby which is so unhelpful for dancing. you need stiff ankles in rugby and you need flexible ankles in dancing. you need to be able to lift your arm. yeah, straight, that's something, straight hands above his head. look how much pain he's in! but we'll sort that out. i'm not sure the judges need to see that face when i do that.
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which bit of your body has had the biggest surprise so far? i like these questions! these are the best questions ever. i would say my entire body. there are things that, when we were in the studio the first day, he was pushing my shoulders back, what's the other one, my hips had to face this way. my legs were doing something very odd. a lot of twisting action she needs to work on at the moment. we need more twisting in your spine. yes, i don't have enough twist in my spine. there is actually quite a serious reason why you wanted to do the show. there is a very serious reason. my beautiful sister, who died five years ago to the day that we started rehearsals, left the world in a glitterball coffin. she was a bit of a disco diva. for real? for real. she had a glitterball coffin? i got her a glitterball coffin. so i'm doing it for her, because she would be thrilled.
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and she'd be watching slightly like that, probably. i am so sore, i've honestly never been this sore in my life but it's been amazing, i'm having so much fun. out of my comfort zone but i think i'm working hard? yes. yeah. you did say it's harder than the olympics and i for some reason celebrated! he“s definitely giving it absolutely everything with a smile on his face, he loves it. we'll see how far we get but i don't think there's ever been any olympic champion swimmers who go into world championship dancing. hey! i haven't even done my first dance yet, what am i even thinking about? bbc breakfast is representing, this time, dan walker, what have you made of him so far? he has this grace about him byjust standing there. so i can't wait to see him in a tail suit, in a ballroom number. because i think it's going to suit him to a tee. i can't wait to see him on the floor. plus nadia is an incredible
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teacher, and i think he's in incredible, capable hands. i love dan. i love dan, but not as much as my mum. my mum is like, is it all right if we vote dan as well, pet? i was like, mother, come on! howay! because of the way daniel works... she doesn't call me dan, she calls me daniel. i love daniel. that's what you like, you said i can call you, i'm allowed. i said you can call me whatever you like and you've gone for daniel. do many people call you daniel? my mum and nadia. aljaz said you have poise. poise? he said that? he said you look like a dancer. i've already got a new walk, actually, do you want to see it? i won't walk for you, but this is, this is pre—nadia. this is post nadia, what do you think? whoa. yeah, big change.
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# talk the talk, just walk the walk tonight # cos we don't need permission to dance. # cheering tomorrow. not long to wait. when postcard collector stu prince began shielding at the start of the pandemic, he decided to turn his hobby into a genealogy mission, as a distraction. after spending years collecting postcards — some of them centuries old, stu began tracking down the original recipients or their families, to reunite them with a piece of their past. amanda kirton has been to meet him. there“s thousands and thousands looking for their descendants. oh, yeah, these are the orphanage ones. well, i've always been interested in postcards and such. but i got leukaemia and that meant heavy, heavy chemo. i was in a state of shock, really.
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i was wondering whether i'd be here or not. it was a pretty scary time. well, covid was that next year, 2020. and i knew i was going to be locked down for quite a while. and i thought about my postcards, and i said, used to enjoy them. needing a distraction, stu began purchasing postcards in online auctions. and i thought, well, i could open a little facebook group, reach people with the intention of reuniting them with families. and i started putting them on, six at the time, and people started to get interested, and i matched a couple. where do you find the descendants? their descendants, ijust put it on my page. exhausted from his treatment, stu had limitations. people started to pull together to help him to research. i was poorly, and the only way i could, you know,
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cope was with my researchers. they“re fantastic. i'm looking all the time for evidence that will tie the name to the address and the date. some of the postcards might have a happy birthday, so i will send them a personal message. and how does it feel when she finds them? yes, gotcha! quite early on, stu purchased a postcode that was sent in 1946 to a baby. such a cute card, to a one—year—old, i thought that was absolutely lovely. i put the card on my page. one of my researchers, she contacted me saying, "i've found the baby". then a lady contacted me, "that card is me! that baby is me!" i was chuffed to death. i got a facebook message
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from stu, talking about this postcard that he'd found. the postcard was sent by her late grandparents. i was amazed. it was for my first birthday, 74 years ago. when i reunite people like that, i just feel good. i feel like i've given something. i would absolutely love something from my ancestors. i suppose it brought back the memories of them. they're all very long gone. if anything, find out who they are, who they were, where they really came from. when they're still around to answer your silly questions. that's it, i'm going to cry, sorry! ijust wanted to do something and peoplejoined in. out of adversity came something really nice. something usefulfor a big reach of people and i felt
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really good about it. i felt good about myself. for the first time for quite awhile. part of my recovery, to feel useful. and i think that's, for any person recovering from leukaemia or cancer, to feel useful is big, it“s massive. i can't describe how massive that is, yeah. amanda kirton, bbc news. what a lovely thing to do. ben brown is coming up with the bbc news at one. now it's time for a look at the weather. i think there's going to be a lot of cloud across western areas over the next few days but even if it is cloudy where you are, either way it is going to be mild with winds
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coming a long way south—west dragging in subtropical air. when the sunshine comes out, it will feel warm for late september. temperatures this weekend pushing into the 20s where we see sunshine. northern scotland, temperatures will be around six celsius above the seasonal average. be around six celsius above the seasonalaverage. it be around six celsius above the seasonal average. it is pretty mild today as well, and extensive cloud across western areas, rain for west scotland. patches of drizzle for north west england and across wales. the best of the centring today in southern eastern and north—eastern areas of scotland. whether centring comes out, temperatures pushing well on into the 20s. —— where the sun comes out, temperatures pushing into the 20s. fog patches developing around the coast and hills on saturday morning, rain pushing into western scotland, northern ireland stays cloudy. mild wherever you are. into the weekend, persistent like rain, a lot of dry weather, the best
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of the sunshine for north—east wales, across the midlands, eastern england and into eastern and north—eastern areas of scotland. temperatures well up above average for the time of year, well into the 20s. looking at the chance into sunday, we have this cold front approaching from the west, otherwise approaching from the west, otherwise a largely dry picture on sunday with spells of sunshine developing and probably more in the way of sunshine, giving the winds will be blowing more strongly. but there could be isolated showers across western areas, otherwise fine. best of the sunshine northern and north—eastern scotland, eastern england, through the midlands and probably eastern wales as well. for northern ireland a change, rain moving and in a sunday afternoon, that will be accompanied by squally winds. this under rain is a cold front pushing it was on sunday night and into the first part of monday. what follows is cooler and fresher north—westerly winds. temperatures
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will be dropping back down to average, may be a touch below, and it looks like it will be unsettled with a mixture of sunshine and blustery showers. that is your weather.
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1:00 pm
the government urges people not to panic—buy fuel, after some petrol stations had to close because there aren't enough tanker delivery drivers. but this afternoon, there are long queues of motorists in some parts of the country trying to fill up: petrol station owners insists there's no need to panic... if you don't need to fill up, don't fill up. there's no shortage. if you're unlucky enough when you do need fuel that a site is out, the chances are that the next nearest one won't be. ministers say they're moving heaven and earth to resolve the shortage of delivery drivers — we“ll examine the options. also this lunchtime... a vigil tonight for london schoolteacher sabina nessa, as police continue to question a man suspected of her murder. it could take a decade to clear the backlog in cancer treatment in england, according to a new report.

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