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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 24, 2021 2:00am-2:31am BST

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hello — you're watching bbc news — very good to have you with us. i'm rich preston, our top stories. the us special envoy to haiti resigns in protest at his government's deportation policy for haitians, calling it inhumane and counter—productive. the german election campaign enters its final days — as the frontrunners to succeed angela merkel hold their last televised debate. a divided society — we look at the plight of migrant workers in singapore, who've largely been banned from mixing with the general public since the start of the pandemic. we deserve something better as a human being, so we want that and we want our privileges back. the dangers and difficulties of life at 50 degrees celsius —
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a temperature already reached this year, in parts of australia. and — how america's reckoning over race is playing out in the world of art — 16 months after the killing of geroge floyd. hello and welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe, wherever in the world you'rejoining us from. the white house says us border agents in parts of texas will no longer ride horses, after videos of officers coralling haitian migrants towards a river were widely criticised. the us special envoy for haiti, daniel foote, has resigned in protest at the deportation of haitians, describing the biden administration's policy as inhumane. our correspondent will grant
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has this report from the us mexico border. in the dead of night, immigration agents in northern mexico drag haitian families from their hotels as they sleep. just miles from their destination, they can go no particulars further, no matter how desperate they are. even if they made it, they would have been greeted by scenes like this. as migrants attempted to cross from mexico to a makeshift camp in texas this week, they were pushed back by mounted border patrol officers using whips. the biden administration has already deported thousands back to haiti, prompting the us special envoy to resign in protest. deportation is these people's worst nightmare. having travelled from south america to the border town of mexicali, they gather in a haitian restaurant for the only meal a day they can afford. this man has lost more than most. his mother died and his father was left badly injured as the family home collapsed in the recent earthquake. having traversed 11 countries and the dense jungle
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of the darien gap to get here, he says he can't be sent back now. translation: there is nothing for me in haiti, nothing. - if they're going to send me back, they may as welljust kill me, just end it all. the late summer temperatures in mexicali are brutal. beyond this border wall lie many miles of inhospitable desert. yet the haitians who have arrived here in recent days say they will endure almost anything to avoid the same fate as many of their countrymen — deported from texas back to a country on its knees. meanwhile, there is no sign of an end to this crisis. tens of thousands of haitians are scattered in scores of mexican cities, and many thousands more are trapped en route in colombia. in truth, very few will be let into the us. migrant rights groups say the biden administration's policy towards haitians is exclusionary and racist. the united states has
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functioned for hundreds of years as a country that has not welcomed, provided opportunity, or provided justice to black people. and i think anyone who does this type of work at this point could not look themselves in the mirror and not say that there's an effort by the united states government to keep black people from entering. the biden administration is facing its biggest border crisis yet, but so far, its answers are the same as the trump administration's. across mexico, police continue to intercept buses and raid hotel rooms. close bilateral cooperation, or doing the americans' dirty work. for the haitians travelling north, it amounts to the same thing. will grant, bbc news, mexicali. martha pskowski is a journalist for the el paso times. shejoins me now from el paso. for the el paso times.
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thank you very much for making the time for us. you've been to a couple of these hotspots where there has been clashes between border patrol agents and some of these migrants. what is the situation on the ground at the moment? i was reporting _ ground at the moment? i was reporting earlier— ground at the moment? i was reporting earlier this - ground at the moment? i was reporting earlier this week - ground at the moment? i was| reporting earlier this week and mexican immigration agents have closed in the park and the mexican side where people had been congregating so the pressure has really increased. when i got there last weekend people were openly walking on the street. that is not the case any more and there's a lot of fear on the mexican side as well and people do not want to cross over to the us because they have heard that deportation is going forward. it is either stay in mexico, an attempt to cross to the us for
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you will potentially be sent back to a country that you may be left months ago.— be left months ago. yes, they are really _ be left months ago. yes, they are really left _ be left months ago. yes, they are really left without - are really left without options. everyone has been asking me what to do now and everyone i've spoken with, the people i interviewed there. they really don't know what to do. they spent all their money. they have spent months travelling. this was really their last charlotte and they are holding out hope that they may be able to enter the us but thatis may be able to enter the us but that is looking less and less likely. that is looking less and less likel . �* likely. the biden administration . likely. the biden i administration says likely. the biden - administration says it has likely. the biden _ administration says it has seen administration says it has seen a huge surge in migrants trying to cross the border. hundred thousand people detained in july and the first time this number has been hit in 20 years. has this been badly managed byjoe biden and his team? in managed by joe biden and his team? u, , managed by joe biden and his team? . . , ., managed by joe biden and his team? ., ., ., , team? in the case of haitians there's been _ team? in the case of haitians there's been a _ team? in the case of haitians there's been a lot _ team? in the case of haitians there's been a lot of - team? in the case of haitians| there's been a lot of confusion and the policies are really
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unclear so one factor contributing to this is that haitians were granted temporary status at the end ofjuly but that only applied to haitians who are already in the us. and at the same time title 42 has made it so that us authorities can expel anyone arriving on the border who in previous times would have been able to open an asylum claim. so the haitians in mexico now, many of them came from south america and the numbers havejust them came from south america and the numbers have just been building and there's been no other option for them to try and access the us.- other option for them to try and access the us. there has been an announcement - and access the us. there has been an announcement that l been an announcement that border agents will no longer ride on horseback. what you make of that? i ride on horseback. what you make of that?— make of that? i think it is an encouraging _ make of that? i think it is an encouraging step. _ make of that? i think it is an encouraging step. i - make of that? i think it is an encouraging step. i was - make of that? i think it is an l encouraging step. i was there on sunday as a border patrol intimidated families that were crossing the river, charging at them, using their brains like whips. i think the situation was already dire and those
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images really brought a lot more attention to it so that is one step but the bigger question of how the us will handle the haitians who have very real claims for humanitarian protection, that question remains.— question remains. thank you very much — question remains. thank you very much for— question remains. thank you very much forjoining - question remains. thank you very much forjoining us. - question remains. thank you i very much forjoining us. good to get your insights.— to get your insights. thank ou. thank you. seven of the main candidates in germany's general election have held a final televised debate ahead of polling day on sunday. they included the three frontrunners to succeed angela merkel, who's standing down after i6—years as chancellor. 0ur correspondent in berlin, damien mcguinness, watched the debate. with just three days to go before the election, this debate was a final chance for party leaders to win over voters.
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topics ranged from affordable housing and the national debt to climate change and how to deal with china. the current leader in the polls is 0laf scholz, the centreleft social democrat to replace angela merkel. when asked about the new aukus security pact between the uk, australia and the us, mr scholz said germany should work together with france to create a stronger europe. "i can understand the irritation that france felt about how the defence pact was worked out," he said. his conservative rival, armin laschet, who is lagging behind slightly in the polls, said that europe needed to act independently and cited the american withdrawal from afghanistan. "we need common european defence projects for when the us pulls back," he said. this election campaign has been unusual in many ways.
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the polls have been erratic, there are more swing voters than ever before and unprecedented numbers are undecided. in one poll, 40% of people say they still haven't made their minds up. whoever they do choose, though, it's likely that after the elections, coalition talks will be long and complicated. all of this means that this is one of the most unpredictable elections modern germany has ever known. damien mcguinness, bbc news, berlin. let s get some of the day's other news. the catalan leader, carles puigdemont, who tried to declare independence from spain, has been arrested in italy on a spanish arrest warrant — after four years as a fugitive. spain wants to extradite the former president of catalonia, to face charges of rebellion. he's been living in exile in belgium. authorities in peru will cremate the body
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of abimael guzman, the former leader of the shining path rebel group that was responsible for the deaths of thousands in the nineteen—eighties and 90s. his ashes will be scattered in an undisclosed location. the government have refused to bury guzman, fearing his grave could become a shrine. a us centers for disease control advisory panel has recommended a booster shot of the pfizer/biontech vaccine for americans aged 65 and over, and some adults with underlying medical conditions that put them at risk of severe disease. but the panel declined to recommend boosters for adults ages 18 to 64 who live or work in institutions with high risk of contracting covid. south korea's daily coronavirus cases reached a new high of 2,434 cases on thursday. the korea disease control and prevention agency says it's the worst wave of infections since earlyjuly. in singapore, ever since a series of covid—i9 outbreaks in dormitories last year, migrant labourers have been banned from mixing with the general public.
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for the past 18 months, the majority have only been allowed out of their facilities to go to work. but, with one of the highest vaccination rates in the world, singapore and its government are facing increasing pressure to let them out. nick marsh has been speaking to some of the men wanting to leave. it's been one of the world's longest lockdowns. behind this barbed wire, there's talk of a growing mental health crisis — thousands of men confined in dormitories, leaving only to work. for sharif, things are starting to get too much. i want to send a message to singapore government. we long time in dormitory, so many people are mentally anguished. so, we need to release... we need to allow to go out. please.
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and with 80% of the public and 90% of workers now vaccinated, experts say that the confinement policy isn't protecting anyone. after 18 months, it's very clear that the mental health challenges, the social isolation are all really bubbling up. speaking as a public health professional, i would say that the covid—19 concerns are massively overblown. we can strike a better balance. recently, a handful were allowed out. they were given four hours near a hindu temple as part of a pilot scheme. feel free to share your i thoughts on this location. the government invited us to meet one of them. the authorities call the outing a milestone. the conditions are different. most of the workers live in common conditions, and that's why the measures put in place have to take into cognizance of that.
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but the workers who spoke to the bbc said they felt they were being punished for their substandard living conditions rather than protected from the virus. tasrif shares a room with 18 others. we deserve something better as a human being, so we want that and we want our privileges back. the government told us they look to ensure workers have access to mental health support, but they remain separated from the general public, known officially in singapore as the community. it's been a year and a half now, and for the men who live here, nothing has changed.
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they're still waiting for the day they can finally leave. but in all this time, the message that they have received has been loud and clear — there are those in singapore who are part of the community, and then there are those who are not. nick marsh, bbc news, singapore. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: the team of therapy dogs working to relieve stress at a chilean hospital, overwhelmed by cases of coronavirus. benjohnson, the fastest man on earth, is flying home to canada in disgrace. all athletes should be clean going into the games. i'm just happy that justice is served. it is a simple fact that this morning, these people were in their homes. tonight, those homes have been burnt down by serbian soldiers and police. all the taliban positions alongj here have been strengthened,
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presumably in case i the americans invade. it's no use having a secret service which cannot preserve its own secrets against the world, and so the british government has no option but to continue this action, even after any adverse judgment in australia. concorde had crossed the atlantic faster than any plane ever before, breaking the record by six minutes. this is bbc news, the latest headlines. the us special envoy to haiti resigns in protest at his government's deportation policy for haitians, calling it inhumane and counter—productive. the us secretary of state, antony blinken, has acknowledged that it will take time and hard work to heal washington's relationship with france. it comes after friction between the two countries following a multi—lateral submarine deal between the us, britain and australia — which led to the abandonment of a multibillion dollar french deal with canberra.
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mr blinken spoke at a news conference after a meeting with his french counterpart — have a listen. 0ur meeting today followed yesterday's conversation between president biden and president macha but they agreed that there announcement would have benefited from open consultations among allies and they decided on a process of in—depth consultations going forward. we recognise this will take time and hard work and we will be demonstrating it not only with words but in deeds and i'm committed to working closely with the minister on this crucial effort. in the latest edition of our global warming series on what life is like at 50 degrees celsius, we focus on australia. climate change has had a devastating impact on the country, with soaring temperatures and unusually intense bush fires. hanan razek reports.
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it's been called the black summer. between 2019—2020, a prolonged heat wave caused huge itjust was extremely hot, and everyone was starting to get worried day by day until it happened. india and her family were among those hit by the fires in a rural area of southern australia. coming this way! oh, my! no, no, no! i thought we were going to lose the house, but ijust calmed down for a second and the fire kept going up the mountain. herfamily managed to save their home, but at least 3000 other houses were lost in the fires. i'm worried for my future, i'm worried that this
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house won't be here in another five years. scientists say the risk of weather conditions fuelling fires is 30% higher than it was 100 years ago because of climate change. there's very strong evidence — irrefutable evidence, in fact — that the climate of australia has changed, especially over the last 50—70 years. we're still in the middle - of this heat wave as we head into the christmas period. i have a two—year—old and a four—year—old daughter. it really bothers me that the world that they're experiencing now is a lot different to my childhood.
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sarah and herfamily were living in sydney in 2020 when the suburb of penrith was the hottest place on earth, officially reaching a high of 48.9 degrees celsius. the heatwave had a deadly impact on some indigenous species. i've just come down to these trees to give these bats some water. i don't know what to do, honestly. this one died. we've had many that have died. australia has the highest carbon emissions per capita of the world's richest nations. it's also rated the worst for climate policy in the 2020 international climate change performance index. the country's prime minister rejected the findings that seven out of ten australians say they want their government to take more action in combating climate change. what plants do you think would be planted in our backyard? strawberries. you want strawberries? people like sarah are already making changes. she has decided to relocate her family to a cooler city than sydney. sarah is building an eco—friendly home on this plot. as a scientist, i know how bad the future looks. but as a mum, as a person, i guess as a human being, i really struggle withjust how bad those impacts will be. hanan razek, bbc news.
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america's reckoning over race has illuminated all aspects of us life — including the art world. top museums and galleries are now soul searching over who holds the top jobs, and which artists get their work shown. the bbc�*s laura trevelyan has been finding out how calls for racial justice are affecting america's art scene. a neighbourhood of washington steeped in history with a gallery showcasing black artist. since the protests he has seen a new enthusiasm for the working showing.— the working showing. there's definitely been _ the working showing. there's definitely been a _ the working showing. there's definitely been a spotlight. the working showing. there'sl definitely been a spotlight and an uptick interest in creatives of colour and time will tell. his great. you'll need to collaborate but i also feel like it is important to have independent black calories to create a self—sustaining
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ecosystem. create a self-sustaining ecosystem.— create a self-sustaining ecos stem. , , ., ., ecosystem. this is a featured artist whose _ ecosystem. this is a featured artist whose work _ ecosystem. this is a featured artist whose work explores i ecosystem. this is a featured l artist whose work explores the experience of black women. she said the people 2020 has opened the eyes of the world is something she's long been depicting. something she's long been depicting-— depicting. and philly woke everyone _ depicting. and philly woke everyone no _ depicting. and philly woke everyone up and _ depicting. and philly woke everyone up and it - depicting. and philly woke everyone up and it made l depicting. and philly woke - everyone up and it made people realise — everyone up and it made people realise just how realistic racial— realise just how realistic racial injustice is and what that— racial injustice is and what that actually looks like. for black— that actually looks like. for black people. that actually looks like. for black people-— that actually looks like. for black people. that actually looks like. for black --eole. , ., black people. the beckoning of a race in america _ black people. the beckoning of a race in america has - black people. the beckoning of a race in america has posed . a race in america has posed tough questions for the elite world of art in museums which is a big draw for the crowds here in washington. more than one year after the death of george floyd and the protests which swept dc. are these powerful institutions doing a betterjob of their reflecting the diversity of america. the curator can see a shift happening. i curator can see a shift happening-— curator can see a shift happening. curator can see a shift ha eninu. . ., ., happening. i received an e-mail that they were _ happening. i received an e-mail that they were exhibit _ happening. i received an e-mail that they were exhibit an -
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that they were exhibit an artist _ that they were exhibit an artist who— that they were exhibit an artist who is _ that they were exhibit an artist who is a _ that they were exhibit an artist who is a nigerian l artist who is a nigerian figurative _ artist who is a nigerian figurative artist- artist who is a nigerian figurative artist and - artist who is a nigerianl figurative artist and she artist who is a nigerian i figurative artist and she is going _ figurative artist and she is going to _ figurative artist and she is going to have _ figurative artist and she is going to have an - figurative artist and she isl going to have an exhibition figurative artist and she is - going to have an exhibition on a november— going to have an exhibition on a novemberand _ going to have an exhibition on a novemberand i— going to have an exhibition on a november and i was - going to have an exhibition on . a november and i was incredibly excited — a november and i was incredibly excited to— a november and i was incredibly excited to see _ a november and i was incredibly excited to see that. _ a november and i was incredibly excited to see that. so - a november and i was incredibly excited to see that. so i - a november and i was incredibly excited to see that. so i do - excited to see that. so i do see — excited to see that. so i do see a — excited to see that. so i do see a lrit— excited to see that. so i do see a bit of— excited to see that. so i do see a bit of change, - excited to see that. so i do l see a bit of change, actually. at this — see a bit of change, actually. at this collection _ see a bit of change, actually. at this collection america's l at this collection america's first modern art museum when it opened 100 years ago the ceo says they too are responding to the national debate of a race. we have quite vigorous internal discussions and it was not a moment where i think one could be responsively neutered. flit be responsively neutered. 0f artisan expression of how the artist sees the world so too is the selection by galleries and museums of the work they show the public. in the wake of the racial reckoning there is an effort to see the bigger picture.
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effort to see the bigger picture. coronavirus has meant it's a dog's life for many this past year, but a team of therapy dogs have been working to relieve stress with at a hospital in chile which, for months, was overwhelmed by cases of coronavirus and other emergency surgeries. hospital staff say the presence of four legged friends has made a paw situation better, as mark lobel reports. meet pepe. giving a look of love to this children's hospital in chile. lifting the spirits of staff and patients. translation: when one enters this hospital with dogs everyone greets you and their expressions change. therapy sessions here resemble a mixture of the dog show crafts and yoga with an abridged version of downward dog. what looks like a dogs dinner is anything but. therapy takes many forms.
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translation: the therapy is perfect for the children. the children that are very sick this helps them escape the stress of the hospital, of what they are living. walkies with these caring canines warms the heart as coronavirus cases sword, they had a ringside seat. translation: dog therapy now units has been a tremendous contribution for patients, parents and workers. does reduce anxiety and stress, patients are more willing to receive treatment and attend checkups. proving best friends to all ages, these therapy dogs are available for different strokes for different folks. let's bring you some live pictures now from la palma — where a volcano which started erupting on the weekend shows no signs of stopping. about 6,000 of la palma's population of 80,000 have been evacuated since sunday . over 200 homes have been destroyed. experts had originally predicted the lava would hit the atlantic ocean potentially causing explosions and sending
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out clouds of toxic gases. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @richpreston it has been an unusually warm september so far. we keep unusually high temperatures as we move into the weekend. thursday was a warm day for many but not for all. 23 degrees with the top temperature in the midlands, compare that with just ten in shetland. this lozenge of cold air worked in from the north but that cold air already clearing away. you can see the orange colours flooding across the map as we head for the next few days. that means warm and at times quite humid weather. that air is holding a lot of moisture and that means a lot of cloud. no pressure to the north of us, high pressure to the south, driving a westerly wind, quite a strong wind across the northern half of the uk and one that will deliver a lot of cloud across western
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scotland, northern ireland, parts of northern england and wales. thick to give spots of rain, mist untilfog here and there. but with some shelter from the westerly when the cloud should break across eastern scotland to give some sunshine at times and warmth as well. 20 or 21. across parts of wales and england some real warmth especially in sunnier places. 23 or maybe 2a degrees. thru friday night we will keep that pretty warm and humid air in place and we will see a lot of cloud, some spots of rain and drizzle, mist untilfog of cloud, some spots of rain and drizzle, mist until fog and more persistent rain into the far north of scotland and a very very mild started saturday for most of us. as we head through saturday we can expect a lot of cloud in the forecast. a lot of dry weather too. high—pressure not too far away. the highs building to the east of us. as you can see, on saturday, a lot of dry weather around but extensive cloud cover. some sunny spells and more across northern scotland.
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also is the chance of seeing one of two showers. the breeze will be strengthening across western areas but it is a southerly breeze by this stage are still feeling quite warm. high teens or low 20s celsius. that southerly breeze will strengthen as we move through saturday night and particularly into sunday as this frontal system squashes in from the west. that southerly wind really picking up. that wind, though, will start to break cloud up a bit more so we will see more sunshine on sunday and one or two showers but as this front slides and northern ireland, ireland, some heavy rain late in the day, 17—22. it does turn cooler during next week.
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this is bbc news.
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the headlines: the white house says us border agents in part of texas will no longer ride horses, after videos of officers coralling haitian migrants towards a river were widely criticised. the us special envoy for haiti, daniel foote, has resigned in protest at the deportation of haitians. the main candidates to be german chancellor have clashed over the future direction of the eu during the final debate, ahead of sunday's election. the social democrats, said germany and france should work closely together to help create a stronger europe. curent chancellor angela merkel steps down after 16 years. the us secretary of state has acknowledged that it will take time and hard work to heal washington's relationship with france. it comes after friction between the two countries following a multi—lateral submarine deal between the us, britain and australia that didn't include france. now on bbc news, wejoin afghanistan's 9/11 generation as they say farewell to their afghanistan.

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