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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 23, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — with me, christian fraser. joe biden�*s envoy to haiti quits — telling the president his treatment of haitian migrants at the border is inhumane. stung by the criticism, the administration says it will no longer be using horses to round up migrants. the white house says they have repatriated m00 migrants — some 5000 are still trying to cross. the sharp rise in gas prices has turned up the heat on the energy providers — there are now 1.5 million uk customers in need of a new energy contract after their supplier went bust. more are expected to follow. 0n capitol hil, a now—annual showdown over whether to raise or suspend the debt ceiling — if the two sides can't agree soon, the us could end up defaulting on its considerable debt.
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and, the chinese property that was facing demolition, whose owner figured out how to stave off the city's bulldozers — posters of xijinping pasted on every surface. joe biden is not having a good week — the row with the french, the row over spending within his own democratic party, and now a row over the treatment of haitian migrants massed on the southern border. today, as if it wasn't bad enough, the special envoy for haiti quit, citing in his letter of resignation the "inhumane" policies of the biden administrration which he said were "counterproductive". on tuesday, these pictures emerged of border guards on horse back, with lassoos, forcing migrants back towards the rio grande river to the mexican side.
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over 1000 of the migrants who had crossed have since been flown back to haiti. in his letter, the envoy, daniel foote, said haiti was a collapsed state which could not cope with the return of thousands of people who lacked food and shelter. here who lacked food and shelter. is the bbc�*s will gran�* in the dead of night, immigration agents in northern mexico drag haitian families from their hotels as they sleep. just miles from their destination, they can go no further, no matter how desperate they are. even if they made it, they would have been greeted by scenes like this. as migrants attempted to cross from mexico to a makeshift camp in texas this week, they were pushed back by mounted border patrol officers using whips. the biden administration has already deported thousands back to haiti, prompting the us special envoy to resign in protest. deportation is these people's worst nightmare.
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having travelled from south america to the border town of mexicali, they gather in a haitian restaurant for the only meal a day they can afford. this man has lost more than most. his mother died and his father was left badly injured as the family home collapsed in the recent earthquake. having traversed 11 countries and the dense jungle of the darien gap to get here, he says he can't be sent back now. translation: there is nothing for me in haiti, nothing. - if they're going to send me back, they may as welljust kill me, just end it all. the late summer temperatures in mexicali are brutal. beyond this border wall lie many miles of inhospitable desert. yet the haitians who have arrived here in recent days say they will endure almost anything to avoid the same fate as many of their countrymen — deported from texas back to a country on its knees. meanwhile, there is no sign of an end to this crisis. tens of thousands of haitians are scattered in scores
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of mexican cities, and many thousands more are trapped en route in colombia. in truth, very few will be let into the us. migrant rights groups say the biden administration's policy towards haitians is exclusionary and racist. the united states has functioned for hundreds of years as a country that has not welcomed, provided opportunity, or provided justice to black people. and i think anyone who does this type of work at this point could not look themselves in the mirror and not say that there is an effort by the united states government to keep black people from entering. the biden administration is facing its biggest border crisis yet, but so far it's answers are the same as the trump administration's. across mexico, police continue to intercept buses and raid hotel rooms. close bilateral cooperation,
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or doing the americans�* dirty work. for the haitians travelling north, it amounts to the same thing. will grant, bbc news, mexicali. i'm joined now by patrice lawrence, co—director of the undocu black network, working with haitian migrants on the issue in dc, and former deputy chief of mission to haiti, ambassador vicki huddleston. we have just seen there in that package, streams of people coming across the river flowing into texas. politically, this is very difficult forjoe biden because he can't be seen to be a soft touch on immigration. what should he do with all these people coming in? first immigration. what should he do with all these people coming in?- all these people coming in? first of all, we all these people coming in? first of all. we should _ all these people coming in? first of all, we should make _ all these people coming in? first of all, we should make sure _ all these people coming in? first of all, we should make sure we - all these people coming in? first of all, we should make sure we are i all, we should make sure we are careful of language. language, such as streaming of who is coming into the country, seeking asylum, seeking
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refuge, so that dehumanises individuals who are making this very dangerous, treacherous and courageous journey. joe biden should lean into what he promised when he ran for election, which was that he is going to be a president who is equitable to all people, especially black people. joe biden should remember when he went on vended knee in little haiti in my army and are said to the haitian people that he would deliver them a brighter day. a brighter day is providing asylum and providing humanitarian aid for people. providing humanitarian aid for --eole. ., ., , ., ., people. four months ago, the secretary _ people. four months ago, the secretary for _ people. four months ago, the secretary for homeland - people. four months ago, the l secretary for homeland security people. four months ago, the - secretary for homeland security said in the wake of the latest f creek they would be temporary protected status for haitians who were in the country for 18 months. was that the green light for people who are in many other countries, such as chile,
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to try and get to america as quickly as they could? i to try and get to america as quickly as they could?— as they could? i think it is difficult to _ as they could? i think it is difficult to assess - as they could? i think it is difficult to assess that - as they could? i think it is l difficult to assess that when as they could? i think it is - difficult to assess that when there are also serious pushback for individuals who have been in places like chile, who are now experiencing a boiling point of racism, and so have been forced out, their work permits have not been renewed, they had not been allowed to stay, and things have gotten worse. since gps was granted, we know there was of the assassination of the president, as well as a brand—new earthquake. things got more dire for individuals, and they did what anyone is seeking to take care of themselves and their family would do. they went to a place where they thought they could be say. ambassador, let me turn to you. the white house said in the last few hours they have repatriated 11100 people, many of them don't want to go off course. would there have been due process? would each and every
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one of them have been vetted before they were put on that plane? generally, they are, and i hope indeed — generally, they are, and i hope indeed this was the case. it was very— indeed this was the case. it was very fast— indeed this was the case. it was very fast so— indeed this was the case. it was very fast so it is hard to know. generally. _ very fast so it is hard to know. generally, immigration and naturalisation and interviews at the migrant, _ naturalisation and interviews at the migrant, asks them if of their background, if they are fleeing because — background, if they are fleeing because of fear of their wives or danger — because of fear of their wives or danger. the problem here, and ijust want to— danger. the problem here, and ijust want to say— danger. the problem here, and ijust want to say i— danger. the problem here, and ijust want to say i feel so badly for the haitian— want to say i feel so badly for the haitian people, the situation in haiti _ haitian people, the situation in haiti is — haitian people, the situation in haiti is tragic. no government to speak— haiti is tragic. no government to speak of. — haiti is tragic. no government to speak of, assassinated president, a whole _ speak of, assassinated president, a whole line _ speak of, assassinated president, a whole line of corrupt presidents. the united — whole line of corrupt presidents. the united states always seems to -et the united states always seems to get it— the united states always seems to get it wrong, and haiti always seems to get— get it wrong, and haiti always seems to get it _ get it wrong, and haiti always seems to get it wrong. there never seems to get it wrong. there never seems to he a _ to get it wrong. there never seems to be a correct solution on haiti,
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but i _ to be a correct solution on haiti, but i think— to be a correct solution on haiti, but i think in this case, given the situation — but i think in this case, given the situation in — but i think in this case, given the situation in haiti, that the united states— situation in haiti, that the united states needs to provide protection for these — states needs to provide protection for these haitians and not send them back _ for these haitians and not send them back. ~ . , ., , for these haitians and not send them back. ~ . , «r, ., back. which is likely what the s - ecial back. which is likely what the special envoy. _ back. which is likely what the special envoy, daniel - back. which is likely what the special envoy, daniel foote, | back. which is likely what the | special envoy, daniel foote, is saying. you are deputy chief in mission in 94—95. around that time, a young senator, joe biden, said this about haiti. if haiti just quietly sunk into the caribbean or rose up 300 feet, it wouldn't matter a whole lot. i wondered if that statement is coming back to haunt him. right now, haiti is a problem for americana. the special envoy who resigned today said the approach is deeply flawed and this is the result, we are seeing it on our border. i think that president _ seeing it on our border. i think that president biden, - seeing it on our border. i think that president biden, then - seeing it on our border. i think- that president biden, then senator biden, _ that president biden, then senator biden, was speaking of haiti in terms —
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biden, was speaking of haiti in terms of its importance to the united — terms of its importance to the united states. he is the thing, the carihhean— united states. he is the thing, the caribbean is important to the united states, and haiti is very much a part— states, and haiti is very much a part of— states, and haiti is very much a part of it. — states, and haiti is very much a part of it. as— states, and haiti is very much a part of it, as is cuba and the dominican _ part of it, as is cuba and the dominican republic. this is our back and we _ dominican republic. this is our back and we need — dominican republic. this is our back and we need a marshall plan, or some kind of— and we need a marshall plan, or some kind of very— and we need a marshall plan, or some kind of very high level presidential interest that will help these countries have better government. this is— countries have better government. this is first — countries have better government. this is first and foremost. stop the corruption — this is first and foremost. stop the corruption and have investment so that people have lives and jobs and won't _ that people have lives and jobs and won't come to the united states. because — won't come to the united states. because this could happen from cuba as well _ because this could happen from cuba as well we _ because this could happen from cuba as well. we need to take a serious look at _ as well. we need to take a serious look at where we are going in at the caribbean — look at where we are going in at the caribbean. and i don't blame this administration. it's been going on for a _ administration. it's been going on for a very— administration. it's been going on for a very long time. when i was in fora very long time. when i was in cuha— for a very long time. when i was in cuba with— for a very long time. when i was in
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cuba with the clinton administration, we brought back... ten years— administration, we brought back... ten years later, we helped him leave — ten years later, we helped him leave. . , ., ., , ., leave. the administration says that the are leave. the administration says that they are not _ leave. the administration says that they are not to _ leave. the administration says that they are not to use _ leave. the administration says that they are not to use horses - leave. the administration says that they are not to use horses on - leave. the administration says that they are not to use horses on the l they are not to use horses on the board out again, but let me show our years of this picture. this is what looks like today— a line of 4x4 vehicles alongside the river, which effectively looks like a wall. those coming across the river now there is no way through. this coming across the river now there is no way through-— no way through. this administration under joe no way through. this administration underjoe biden. — no way through. this administration underjoe biden, and _ no way through. this administration underjoe biden, and painfully- no way through. this administration | underjoe biden, and painfully under underjoe biden, and painfully under a fellow contra women, kamala harris, has chosen to be at war with immigrants. these images are showing me that has been at their choice, that they are at war with immigrants, at one with black people, and they have made the choice and said to do that over
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compassion and care. i do not trust anyone at that border, at that moment, in those cars, or on horses, to provide care and compassion, which would be at the humane and just thing to do. america often prides itself as being the moral compass of the world, but they are showing that they have failed, that they have failed human beings, that they have failed human beings, that they are failing hey she, and they are failing their own principles. joe biden is no better than trump. in fact, he is perhaps worse, because he promised a better day. at least trump told those he was going to be evil. . ., least trump told those he was going to be evil. ., ,, y., late summer in europe is usually the time when the natural gas inventories are replenished for the winter. but this year, natural gas within european storage sites is at the lowest level it has been at, in a decade. there's a global shortage, which has led to soaring prices. and it is european
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consumers feeling the pain. the rising price of wholesale gas has hit the uk particularly hard. 1.5 million gas customers have lost their supplier in recent weeks as several energy companies collapsed. the uk's regulator 0fgem has said it will appoint new suppliers for those customers, but they may face higher prices. across europe prices are soaring — to their highest level in years. theres a complex number of factors behind the price hike. an unusually cold spring, the pandemic of course, making it harder for companies to predict energy consumption and plan for storage — and on top of all that russia has slowed down its delivery of gas to the european continent. here's a map that shows average day—ahead energy prices across europe for the most recent day available — last sunday. you can see the uk leads the pack, with italy shortly behind. so, who better to talk to than ialian marco alvera, the ceo of europe's largest gas infrastructure company, snam. it operates 40,000km of gas pipelines across europe. and they have a subsidiary that operates here in the uk.
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can you tell us why there is a problem with gas storage here in the uk? ., ., , problem with gas storage here in the uk? ., .,, , ., ., uk? the uk had gas storage, the uk is less of the — uk? the uk had gas storage, the uk is less of the geological— uk? the uk had gas storage, the uk is less of the geological luck - uk? the uk had gas storage, the uk is less of the geological luck of - is less of the geological luck of having several reservoirs in the north sea that can be turned into gas storage is, but the uk took a decision not to subsidise storage and let the markets function. the uk is piggybacking on european storage. we have a pipeline to internet the uk to the belgium and the and the netherlands. the uk consumes about six times more energy in the winter than summer. when the uk is importing from the netherlands and belgium, it is actually importing from the storages based there. the uk physically harder storage, but let it shut down. —— physically had storage. pl. let it shut down. -- physically had storaue. �* ., .,
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let it shut down. -- physically had storaue. ., ., , ., storage. a lot of people on social media are _ storage. a lot of people on social media are saying _ storage. a lot of people on social media are saying that _ storage. a lot of people on social media are saying that it - storage. a lot of people on social. media are saying that it would have made a difference if we are in the internal energy market. they were looking at that map and say italy is not as high as the uk. would it have made a difference if we are still in the european union? i made a difference if we are still in the european union?— made a difference if we are still in the european union? i don't think it would have — the european union? i don't think it would have made _ the european union? i don't think it would have made a _ the european union? i don't think it would have made a difference, - the european union? i don't think it would have made a difference, but| the european union? i don't think itj would have made a difference, but i do think they winter ahead is to be a tricky one. if it is warm, everything will be fine and crisis will come down to stop if it is very cold and called in at the wrong times, then this could be an issue. i truly hope brexit does not apply to energy. the bigger we are, the stronger we are, the more resilient we are. no change due to brexit yet,. but when that is a gash gas shortage, then situations can get tricky quite quickly.— tricky quite quickly. when you're talkin: tricky quite quickly. when you're talking about — tricky quite quickly. when you're
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talking about future _ tricky quite quickly. when you're talking about future proofing - tricky quite quickly. when you're - talking about future proofing energy into the future, does brexit help? i think in the medium to long term, it could help, because the uk has huge hygiene potential, it can produce green hydrogen from offshore wind, it can produce blue hydrogen from natural gas. it can become truly a exporter of that mother go to europe. people do not realise today we can make green hygiene at similar prices to the current ones of gas. in five years time, we will be making green hydrogen cheaper than oil. the uk has an opportunity because of its vast wind resources because of its vast wind resources because it has the industrial capabilities in scotland, the oil offshore industry can be repurposed for offshore wind. not being within europe gives it a degree of visibility and speed of execution. so i am not at all is said about the uk medium and long—term opportunity. but the next winter and probably
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coming wonders, due to the voice of the rise of demand in asia, but the main reason that china has added essentially in the us for years something of the size of the uk's market, switching from coal to gas in the house is. we will have a few winters which will be tricky and i really encourage people to think about how to fill up more storages in europe. if housing uk, i would maybe think about building some storage sites. you can score four stored gas for decades, just park it there and keep it for a cold winter. let's hope it's a balmy winter, that would really help. stay with us on bbc news — still to come: monday is shaping up to be a showdown in washington as congress will have to decide once again whether or not to raise the debt ceiling. campaigners have lost a high court
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challenge against the government, over legislation which allows the abortion of foetuses with the condition up until birth. they argued that allowing terminations in certain cases after 2a weeks is unlawfully discriminatory, butjudges today dismissed the case. the verdict was met with disappointment by those pushing for a change in the law. iama i am a mother of two fantastic little boys, tom and aidan, and i love and i evaluate my two children equally. the law, as it stands, and thisjudgment has equally. the law, as it stands, and this judgment has effectively ruled today that my children aren't equal, and that is so wrong. there is no reason that eden shouldn't be afforded the same rights and protection as any other child. —— aidan. the law powerfully communicates that his wife is of lesser value, and i believe that perpetuates negative stereotypes about disability. we came to really try and change it today, and unfortunately it didn't go our way.
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so, let's focus onjoe biden's other problem — his spending plans. it is not overstating the issue, to say the votes coming up these next few weeks could be the most consequential of his presidency. there are two spending bills pending that need to go through the house. the first is a bipartisan infrastructure bill, which comes before them on monday for a trillion dollars. which a few months ago looked like a win, but now the progressive wing of his democratic party have told the president they will not support it unless there is a guarantee that the senate will pass the second and much bigger budget bill for 3.5 trillion dollars. and in the senate, two democratic moderatesjoe manchin and kirstin sinema who he needs — say there's no way they can support such an enormous social safety net. separate to that, the issue of the debt ceiling. next month — as they do every year — congress will vote on whether or not to raise the legal limit on how much
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money the us federal government can borrow. that legal limit has been in place since 1917 and has been raised over 100 times normally on a bipartisan vote. the debt ceiling is not raised to cover new spending — it is raised to cover debts that have already been run up. and so they are voting in a sense to honour the cheques that donald trump had written. it is money already spent. and yet the republicans say they won't vote for it. so there is a risk that america could default on its debts. i'm joined now by ron christie, in washington, and amanda renteria in california. in washington, and amanda is in washington, and amanda it hyperbole to say thi the is it hyperbole to say this could be the biggest week of his presidency coming up? this the biggest week of his presidency cominu u - ? , , the biggest week of his presidency cominu u? , ,., , the biggest week of his presidency cominu u-? , ,., , , the biggest week of his presidency comina-u? , , , ., coming up? this is a very big week. if ou coming up? this is a very big week. if you cannot _ coming up? this is a very big week. if you cannot get — coming up? this is a very big week. if you cannot get a _ coming up? this is a very big week. if you cannot get a debt _ coming up? this is a very big week. if you cannot get a debt ceiling, - if you cannot get a debt ceiling, that would lead to a shutdown, that does have huge implications for our economy, especially while we are in recovery. it is also a statement about where we are in a country and what kinds of things we can tackle. this is supposed to be a bipartisan effort, the outs are usually
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supposed to come together in a bipartisan way because it is right for the country and you don't want to default and create a real storm within our economy. we have been there before, when the markets crashed and this happened. right now, that critical time would be absolutely devastating to the american people. the progressive sa , ass american people. the progressive say. pass it _ american people. the progressive say. pass it all — american people. the progressive say, pass it all or— american people. the progressive say, pass it all or get _ american people. the progressive say, pass it all or get nothing. - american people. the progressive say, pass it all or get nothing. is i say, pass it all or get nothing. is that realistic? how real is that threat? are they that hard line that they would make the perfect the enemy of the good? i they would make the perfect the enemy of the good?— they would make the perfect the enemy of the good? i think people are very passionate _ enemy of the good? i think people are very passionate about - enemy of the good? i think people are very passionate about what - enemy of the good? i think people are very passionate about what is l are very passionate about what is happening out there. in at this big package you mentioned, it is disaster relief for a lot of the disasters people have faced on the ground, as well as how we tackle with what's happening with afghan refugees coming back into the country. there is a lot that happens you're usually at the end of the year, you put all together. there's a lot on the table. progressives feel very passionate about it, i have not seen a big move of negotiation with republicans, especially when republicans form the
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very beginning have, and said you have got to do on your own. a lot of progressive say why are we kneeling at all? �* , ., , at all? let's turn to the debt ceilinu. at all? let's turn to the debt ceiling. senate _ at all? let's turn to the debt ceiling. senate majority - at all? let's turn to the debt i ceiling. senate majority leader chuck schumer says this is the best example ever of... of this debt, each eluent was run up by donald trump's tax cuts and the cost of the pandemic. don't republicans have a responsibility to honour a check so they have about? == responsibility to honour a check so they have about?— they have about? -- 8 trillion. i think about _ they have about? -- 8 trillion. i think about all _ they have about? -- 8 trillion. i think about all members - they have about? -- 8 trillion. i think about all members of - they have about? -- 8 trillion. i - think about all members of congress have an _ think about all members of congress have an obligation to honour it. we have _ have an obligation to honour it. we have had _ have an obligation to honour it. we have had at— have an obligation to honour it. we have had at the debt ceiling raised 78 times _ have had at the debt ceiling raised 78 times since 1960, 49 times under republican— 78 times since 1960, 49 times under republican presidents, 29 times under— republican presidents, 29 times under a — republican presidents, 29 times under a democrat. republican presidents, 29 times undera democrat. 0r republican presidents, 29 times undera democrat. or not republican presidents, 29 times under a democrat. or not george w bush _ under a democrat. or not george w bush came into office, you are talking — bush came into office, you are talking about 5.95 children. now we are talking — talking about 5.95 children. now we are talking about something in
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relevant — are talking about something in relevant or $28.5 trillion. this isn't _ relevant or $28.5 trillion. this isn't a _ relevant or $28.5 trillion. this isn't a donald trump problem. the credit— isn't a donald trump problem. the credit card — isn't a donald trump problem. the credit card is maxed out. both sides need _ credit card is maxed out. both sides need to— credit card is maxed out. both sides need to address this, rather than republicans and democrats pointing fingers _ republicans and democrats pointing fingers at _ republicans and democrats pointing fingers at one another. just republicans and democrats pointing fingers at one another.— fingers at one another. just so we are clear. — fingers at one another. just so we are clear, there _ fingers at one another. just so we are clear, there are _ fingers at one another. just so we are clear, there are not _ fingers at one another. just so we are clear, there are not raising . fingers at one another. just so we | are clear, there are not raising the debt ceiling so they can passjoe biden's spending bills. this is money that was already spent. when you look at the obstructionism within the democratic party and on the fight, they can even work to honour the debt. this is not how it is supposed to work. ida. honour the debt. this is not how it is supposed to work.— is supposed to work. no, it is not. this just shows _ is supposed to work. no, it is not. thisjust shows you _ is supposed to work. no, it is not. this just shows you it _ is supposed to work. no, it is not. this just shows you it is _ is supposed to work. no, it is not. this just shows you it is a - is supposed to work. no, it is not. thisjust shows you it is a rare - thisjust shows you it is a rare visit _ thisjust shows you it is a rare visit live — thisjust shows you it is a rare visit live reflection of where we are right — visit live reflection of where we are right now politically. they should — are right now politically. they should be a bipartisan vote. they should _ should be a bipartisan vote. they should find a way to sit down together— should find a way to sit down together and find a way to say, lets— together and find a way to say, let's raise _ together and find a way to say, let's raise this by half a children dollars. — let's raise this by half a children dollars, but you don't want to start
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messing _ dollars, but you don't want to start messing around with the full faith and credit— messing around with the full faith and credit of united states without the need _ and credit of united states without the need to make your social security— the need to make your social security checks go out, that the military— security checks go out, that the military for outs are paid for. if you default on these debts, it has tremendous economic ramifications that i_ tremendous economic ramifications that i think — tremendous economic ramifications that i think both parties should be ashamed — that i think both parties should be ashamed of, if they can't meet their basic— ashamed of, if they can't meet their basic duty— ashamed of, if they can't meet their basic duty to balance the budget, as well as— basic duty to balance the budget, as well as dealing with our existing financial— well as dealing with our existing financial obligations. this well as dealing with our existing financial obligations.— well as dealing with our existing financial obligations. this is what ou an financial obligations. this is what you an arm _ financial obligations. this is what you an arm and _ financial obligations. this is what you an arm and amanda - financial obligations. this is what you an arm and amanda should l financial obligations. this is what. you an arm and amanda should be financial obligations. this is what - you an arm and amanda should be in congress. —— why you and amanda should be in congress. we look at the policies today, 48% of respondents say they have a positive view of donald trump, compared to 46% who have a favourable opinion of his successor, joe biden. this in a week when we have learnt that donald trump's lawyer effectively put out a memo for a soft kick, a six—point bullet plan of how to steal an
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election. in that week, he is more popular thanjoe biden. election. in that week, he is more popular than joe biden.— election. in that week, he is more popular than joe biden. welcome to artisan popular than joe biden. welcome to partisan politics. _ popular than joe biden. welcome to partisan politics. i— popular than joe biden. welcome to partisan politics. i all. _ popular than joe biden. welcome to partisan politics. i all. the - partisan politics. i all. the misinformation out there, there is a lot that we are all working through. something is different right now, which has people are hearing different kinds of information, different kinds of information, different channels of information, and that is adding to a difficulty for biden to see let's unify when you're not speaking in at the same circles at all. that is really what you're seeing in a lot of these polls. biden still president right now, so his emotion goes through these next steps of bringing it all together. it is imperative that he continues to talk about the unity message, but also goes on a proactive campaign to address any misinformation out there, keep talking about what trump did. i think it is important people not give up on the facts at hand in order to bring people back together. it is going to be a while before you
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can really bring down the intensity. in that period of time, we will all be watching congress. it is important that the leaders of our country come together and say we cannot let this economy fall. good evening. we have had an unusually warm september so far, there is some more warmth in the forecast over the next few days. we have this lozenge of kodiak that worked way in, pretty windy earlier on as well stop but that doesn't last. the winner goes round to westerlies, southerlies about the weekend, bringing plenty of warm and humid weather our way. through this evening, heavy rain will move across
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the northern ireland, that will then clear. lots of cloud feeding into western scotland, northern ireland. clear spells further south, allowing it to get a little bit chilly in places, the majority will hold up in double digits. tomorrow, the pressure to the north, high pressure to the south, driving westerly wind. the wind will be quite strong across the northern half of the uk, feeding in quite a lot of cloud across western scotland, north—west england, may be the south—west as well. eastern scotland should see some spells of sunshine. with a shout out from that westerly wind, temperatures in parts of aberdeenshire are likely to get to 20 celsius. further south, aberdeenshire are likely to get to 20 celsius. furthersouth, navy aberdeenshire are likely to get to 20 celsius. further south, navy 24 degrees, quite unusualfor 20 celsius. further south, navy 24 degrees, quite unusual for this time of year. into the weekend, one frontal system trying to push up from the south that could introduce some showers into the forecast.
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quite a lot of clouds around on saturday, but also a few sunny spells here and there. the best of the sunshine likely to be across northern scotland. for the second half of the weekend, a frontal system is starting to squash its way in the from the west, that will start to strengthen at the wind, so an increasingly risk suddenly wind blowing during sunday. —— southerly wind. late in the day, that with the front makes its move and will turn things wet, especially across parts of northern ireland. ahead of that, another relatively warm day with highs of 23 degrees.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. joe biden's envoy to haiti quits, telling the president his policies towards haitian migrants are inhumane. stung by the criticism, the white house says it will no longer use horses to round up 5000 migrants who are massed at the texan border. the leaders of germany's main parties hold a final televised debate ahead of sunday's election, including the three frontrunners to succeed angela merkel as chancellor. i'm ros atkins, live in berlin, with an assessment of how the candidates fared. we will look through the major talking points of the debate and what the candidate said about what might happen when a coalition needs to be built. and the european commission unveils plans to force manufacturers to use a �*universal charger�* for mobile
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phones and other devices. we�*ll get reaction. we are into the home straight of the german election. the vote is on sunday, which will mark the end of angela merkel�*s 16 years as chancellor. and the latest poll shows it�*s the social democrats�* leading narrowly her conservative cdu. this is the latest kantar poll, the spd — led by 0laf scholz — are down one point at 25%. support for the cdu/csu alliance — led my armin laschet, who is running in place of angela merkel — is up one point at 22%. the greens — led by annalena baerbock — slip one point to 16%. and the business—friendly free democrats — of christian lindner — remain on 11%. guiding you through the election this weekend here on the bbc
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will be our colleague ros atkins who is berlin for us tonight. big event tonight. seven of the leaders on stayed done backstage. 25% of the electorate, i read, still undecided. it 25% of the electorate, i read, still undecided. . , 25% of the electorate, i read, still undecided. ., 25% of the electorate, i read, still undecided-— 25% of the electorate, i read, still undecided. ., , ., , , undecided. it was a big opportunity and it was an _ undecided. it was a big opportunity and it was an opportunity _ undecided. it was a big opportunity and it was an opportunity for - undecided. it was a big opportunity and it was an opportunity for all. undecided. it was a big opportunity and it was an opportunity for all of| and it was an opportunity for all of the representatives of the parties. there have been three previous debates but they have just featured the candidates of the top three in the candidates of the top three in the polls that you have just listed, the polls that you have just listed, the cdu, social democrats and the greens. this time we had seven parties on the stage. a big opportunity for them to speak to all of those undecided voters. i think i would split my thoughts on this into two. the predictable part of it and the perhaps more interesting part of it. the predictable thing was they are actually all quite nice to each other because they know the way the polls are going, they know they are going to have to work with each other to form a coalition. they do not want to fall out very publicly with people they may need to get
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along with just a few days�* time when those coalition negotiations begin. the other thing, and you will know this from having covered lots of televised debates, when you have that many readers on stage, it can be quite hard for any person to get a point across. 0ne german journalist saying, when everyone talks, no one listens. perhaps it was a little inconclusive for that point of view. that was predictable. let�*s look at the interesting stuff. i would pick out two things, climate change is a big issue, all of the parties are saying they get that, but the cdu is under pressure, angler merkel is criticised as not having done enough in climate change. armin laschet is going to replace, and he says it will take an entire industrial revolution to do this. that is going to be a long process. it was still interesting to hear them talk about the scale of the project and to be engaging with that. that seems significant. lastly, the three primary candidates, the greens, social
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democrats and christian democrats all talked about wanting to engage more with the european union. you will know this from your time as correspondent in paris. in recent years, france has seen or engage with the evolution of the eu than germany has. they are the big two within the eu. all three were saying in different ways we need to crank up in different ways we need to crank up our engagement with the european union. that seems to be significant. the temperament is interesting. we have just been talking about the state of affairs in congress, how they could do with a bit of german politics there. it is certainly less divisive. germany burns a lot of coal. they have turned away from nuclear. if they are going to meet some of these climate targets, as you see, there will be going to have to step up, aren�*t they? thea;r you see, there will be going to have to step up, aren't they?— to step up, aren't they? they are auoin to to step up, aren't they? they are going to have _ to step up, aren't they? they are going to have to _ to step up, aren't they? they are going to have to step _ to step up, aren't they? they are going to have to step up. - to step up, aren't they? they are going to have to step up. it - to step up, aren't they? they are going to have to step up. it is - to step up, aren't they? they are | going to have to step up. it is not really a question of whether that needs to happen. all of the candidates, perhaps with the exception of the far right, acknowledge that this is an issue thatis acknowledge that this is an issue that is right now and is coming. it is all reallyjust about timing. you�*ve got the cdu saying we
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acknowledge we are using too much coal, we are going to stop it by 2038. i've coal, we are going to stop it by 2038. i�*vejust coal, we are going to stop it by 2038. i�*ve just interviewed a candidate for the greens, she said thatis candidate for the greens, she said that is not good enough. it needs to happen in 2030. earlier in the day, interviewed a woman from greta thornburg�*s movement, she said none of the parties are getting on with it enough. this needs to happen sooner still. it enough. this needs to happen soonerstill. no it enough. this needs to happen sooner still. no one is disputing that germany needs to get itself of coal, the question is about the timing. how quickly can germany do this without jeopardising jobs timing. how quickly can germany do this withoutjeopardising jobs and established industries question mark the parties to have different answers on that. we the parties to have different answers on that.— the parties to have different answers on that. ~ . , , answers on that. we have 'ust been talkin: to answers on that. we have 'ust been talking to a — answers on that. we have 'ust been talking to a man i answers on that. we have 'ust been talking to a man from _ answers on that. we have 'ust been talking to a man from a h answers on that. we have just been talking to a man from a gas - answers on that. we have just been. talking to a man from a gas company who says it is not windy enough in europe. then i saw the video of your life point. it is quite barmy in berlin tonight!— life point. it is quite barmy in berlin toniuht! �* ., berlin tonight! believe me, i have not all the berlin tonight! believe me, i have got all the ones _ berlin tonight! believe me, i have got all the ones you _ berlin tonight! believe me, i have got all the ones you could - berlin tonight! believe me, i have| got all the ones you could possibly need here. ., .., ., need here. you could power the whole of euro e! need here. you could power the whole of europe! exactly. _ need here. you could power the whole of europe! exactly. believe _ need here. you could power the whole of europe! exactly. believe me, - of europe! exactly. believe me, there is no _ of europe! exactly. believe me, there is no issue _ of europe! exactly. believe me, there is no issue on _ of europe! exactly. believe me, there is no issue on the - of europe! exactly. believe me, there is no issue on the sixth i of europe! exactly. believe me, i there is no issue on the sixth floor of this community centre. it has
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come down a bit, but earlier it was blowing a gale and we were holding onto our studio lights and cameras forjuly. onto our studio lights and cameras forjul . ~ ., .,, onto our studio lights and cameras forjul . ~ ., ~ ,, , forjuly. well done. ros atkins will auide ou forjuly. well done. ros atkins will guide you through _ forjuly. well done. ros atkins will guide you through what _ forjuly. well done. ros atkins will guide you through what will- forjuly. well done. ros atkins will guide you through what will be - forjuly. well done. ros atkins will guide you through what will be a l guide you through what will be a fascinating election for the thank you very much for that. matt qvortrup is professor of political science and international relations at coventry university. he�*s also the author of angela merkel: europe�*s most influential leader. we are going to talk about her in a second. but i want to ask, if you�*re a middle—class german, who has done pretty well, let�*s face it, under angler merkel over the last 16 years, who would they see as the continuity candidate?— years, who would they see as the continuity candidate? many people sa mat, we have got problems with your line. we will try to reboot that because i want to talk more about
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the german election. we will see if we can re—establish that. let�*s turn very quickly where we do that to israel. a battle is being fought for custody of a six—year—old boy, who was the only survivor of a cable car crash in italy which killed 14 people. his parents, brother and great—grandparents all died in the disaster, and his aunt, who lives in italy, was granted custody of the boy. but last week his maternal grandfather brought him to israel without permission. yolande knell reports from tel aviv. a family day out at a beauty spot in northern italy turned into tragedy back in may. a cable car took a deadly fall to the ground, tumbling down this slope. the parents and brother of six—year—old eitan biran were killed, and 11 others. his survival was hailed as a miracle and he went to live with his paternal aunt, a doctor in italy. so there was shock last week when his maternal grandfather visited and didn�*t return. instead, taking the boy on a private plane to israel. you can get an idea of how
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much media attention there is around this boy�*s case. his relatives who brought him to israel have been defending their actions are to journalists, trying to gain support in the court of public opinion. meanwhile, his italy—based family has said to us that this is alljust a nightmare. the boy�*s grandfather denies kidnapping him and says he acted in his best interests. the boy�*s aunt doesn�*t agree he should stay here. she told us she was living a nightmare. today, a family once united by grief is locked in an acrimonious legal row. that challenges international conventions to which israel and italy have signed up. a judge will now review the case, with another hearing set for next month. in the meantime, she is asking for steps to protect the six—year—old from further trauma. yolande knell, bbc news, tel aviv.
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stay with us on bbc news, still to come: why not having the right phone charger could soon be a problem of the past. we�*ll have a look at the eu�*s new one size fits all rule proposalfor phone eu�*s new one size fits all rule proposal for phone chargers. tenants are being evicted because of rent arrears built up over the pandemic — despite the government saying that covid wouldn�*t leave anyone without a home. one third of eviction hearings monitored in england and wales over the summer stated covid as the reason that rent hadn�*t been paid. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports. have got lots of favourites. in liverpool, joanne, marshall and little roman have two weeks to leave their home. all our incomesjust kept going down and down and down, and then we ended up in a bit of spiralling debt, to be fair. marshall�*s newjob as a chef fell through due to the lockdown. he did not qualify for furlough with his previous employer.
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and he couldn�*t find any work for one year. why is it not working? their bills racked up, they owe their landlord £4000, and have been served with an eviction notice. it is not how it is supposed to be, do you know what i mean? it makes me feel a bit sick. like, we both grew up coming from, you know, poverty, so we tried our best to get out of that. you know, we have always been working people. we wanted to, like, change the tide and things like that, and it is not easy to get out of. and then ijust feel like obviously roman hasjust been born into the exact same situation. it�*s not nice to feel. it�*s embarrassing. county courts have been inundated with landlords seeking to remove tenants since the ban on evictions was lifted in the summer. of the 270 possession orders analysed by the bureau of investigative journalism, one third of them, 88 cases, explicitly cited covid as the reason that rent arrears had arisen. he loves it.
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joanne and marshall are frantically trying to find another home, but have no deposit, a poor credit score, and rents are rising. marshall now has a job and is looking for a second one. yeah, he is teething this month. the young couple determined to rebuild the lives they once had. michael buchanan, bbc news. welcome back. there are so many things our politicians debate that are frankly superflous. they might not us affect us directly, we don�*t take a great interest, we are indifferent. but on this next story, i am most definitely interested. the european commission plans to force manufacturers to use a �*universal charger�*. that�*s right, one chargerfor all phones. a charger you can borrow in the office that actually fits on your phone. they want us all to use the usb—c charger for phones and small electronic devices.
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it will cut waste — of course it will cost waste — i�*ve personally lost hundreds of them. in fact, the commission�*s research estimates that disposed of and unused charging cables generate more than 11,000 tonnes of waste every year. it�*s a massive market. some 420 million mobile phones and other portable electronic devices were sold in the eu in the past year. but apple — whose iphone doesn�*t use usb—c chargers — are not happy. they say it will harm innovation. no, it won�*t, says the internal market commissioner thierry breton. it is not at all against innovation. it�*s not against anyone. it is just like everything we do, and like everything i do as a commissioner, and everything we do in commission, it is for the consumers. joining me is birgitte anderson, ceo of big innovation centre, a london—based think—tank and innovation hub and professor of the economics and management of innovation at birkbeck here in london.
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you are the right person to talk to for this. why do you think apple says it would stifle innovation? i think clearly they have been focusing maybe on revenue from mobile phone chargers. that is channelled into innovation of better mobile phone networks. but i�*m more interested in actually... and i think it is about innovation and competition, so maybe apple might be adversely affected by it, but attain eu level it will not have any implications for innovation. in fact, the european union wants to increase innovation by allowing the whole eu can produce against. it is madness, whole eu can produce against. it is madness. isn't _ whole eu can produce against. it is madness, isn't it? _ whole eu can produce against. it is madness, isn't it? when you think madness, isn�*t it? when you think one end of the charter is universal, which we all plug into a plug or the computer, and the other end isn�*t. i mean, the amount of waste that
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creates tells you that actually, on a whole range of issues across electronics, industry is going to have to read, isn�*t it, if we are going to meet some of these climate change targets? i going to meet some of these climate change targets?— change targets? i think the innovation _ change targets? i think the innovation and _ change targets? i think the innovation and competitionj change targets? i think the - innovation and competition argument for the reason for it is really a profound one. the whole argument against waste of electronic devices is a huge sustainability problem. there are mountains of microelectronic waste, computers, mobile phones, screens, printers, keyboards, fitments, watches, etc, and the chargers. the chargers are just a little drop in the ocean of this huge problem of waste and microelectronics. i think the waste argument is used to mobilise, of course, this big social movement. but i do not think that is really achieved by looking at the phone charger. however, the regulation on one side fits all charger might be
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achieved. ., ., ., ,, ., , achieved. come on, we all know this, this is a massive _ achieved. come on, we all know this, this is a massive profit _ achieved. come on, we all know this, this is a massive profit arm _ achieved. come on, we all know this, this is a massive profit arm for - this is a massive profit arm for iphone, for apple. this is a massive profit arm for iphone, forapple. i this is a massive profit arm for iphone, for apple. i looked on the computer today. iphone, for apple. i looked on the computertoday. if iphone, for apple. i looked on the computer today. if you buy a lightning cable for your iphone, it is going to cost you £19. if you go on there and by a usb sea cable, which everybody stocks, £6. it will be a lot cheaper for us. an awful lot cheaper. i be a lot cheaper for us. an awful lot cheaper-— be a lot cheaper for us. an awful lot cheaper. i am sure it is a brick rofit for lot cheaper. i am sure it is a brick profit for apple- _ lot cheaper. i am sure it is a brick profit for apple. -- _ lot cheaper. i am sure it is a brick profit for apple. -- big _ lot cheaper. i am sure it is a brick profit for apple. -- big profit. - lot cheaper. i am sure it is a brick profit for apple. -- big profit. it. profit forapple. —— big profit. it might profit for apple. —— big profit. it might be cheaper to buy another charger. however, for the consumer, in some ways, it is a good thing. i want to say, this is really about the classic argument of competition of how standards are set in the united states and europe. i do not think people on an everyday basis
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are complaining about the price of chargers, although they should do. they�*re complaining about sustainability. the issue with government rules is that in the european union, we have what we call state regulated standards, but in the free—market usa, to use the free market mechanism. big companies in the usa standards are basically set through competition, where one standard is selected... and the european union, we have seven different —— 27 different countries having to agree on standards over the last 20, 30 years, the centres are usually set in committees and by state government regulation. it is the same in china and many other countries. i the same in china and many other countries. . ., ., ., ., countries. i am all in favour of it. i think it countries. i am all in favour of it. i think it is _ countries. i am all in favour of it. i think it is a _ countries. i am all in favour of it. i think it is a vote _ countries. i am all in favour of it. i think it is a vote winner. - countries. i am all in favour of it. i think it is a vote winner. thank| i think it is a vote winner. thank you very much indeed. let�*s look at some of the days other news. the
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prosecution has concluded its closing arguments in the six trafficking trial of our kelly. he is accused of abusing women and underage girls. he declined to testify in his own defence. 0nce underage girls. he declined to testify in his own defence. once the defence lawyers finish making the case, thejury defence lawyers finish making the case, the jury is expected to retire to consider its verdict. 45th day in a row, lover continues to flow from the volcano on the spanish island of timbuktu. although its pace is seemingly slowing down. toxic ash has quoted the surrounding area, prompting thousands of people to flee for shelter. just on that volcano, we came across a picture earlier. take a look at this. it is dubbed the miracle house. this picture shows the house surrounded on two sounds by rivers of lava from the volcano. the owners are apparently a retired danish couple. i think it is good to be quite a while before they get back to their house. —— going to be quite a while.
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let�*s hope it stays like that. we were talking about the german election. matt qvortrup from coventry university has written a book on to mac one. we were horribly disturbed by the election —— mac one. you are going to tell us which of these candidates would be the continuity candidate for middle—class germans. i continuity candidate for middle-class germans. i think it is robabl middle-class germans. i think it is probably all _ middle-class germans. i think it is probably all of _ middle-class germans. i think it is probably all of shots, _ middle-class germans. i think it is probably all of shots, he _ middle-class germans. i think it is probably all of shots, he has - middle-class germans. i think it is probably all of shots, he has been| probably all of shots, he has been finance ministerfor the probably all of shots, he has been finance minister for the last four years. she has introduced a minimum wage. a lot of middle—class voters, who also have children who are starting up on thejob market, are pretty thankful to 0laf scholz for that. he is from hamburg, which is the town where angela merkel was also born. in some ways, even if he is different, he is the continuity candidate. brute is different, he is the continuity candidate-— is different, he is the continuity candidate. ~ , ., ., candidate. we will try one more, it is not a candidate. we will try one more, it is rrot a great _ candidate. we will try one more, it is not a great line. _ candidate. we will try one more, it is not a great line. i _ candidate. we will try one more, it is not a great line. i was _ candidate. we will try one more, it is not a great line. i was going - candidate. we will try one more, it is not a great line. i was going to l is not a great line. i was going to ask you what angela merkel�*s
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greatest legacy would be, then i found a research ball that was out the other day. percentage of people who have confidence in angela merkel to do the right thing. 86% of people in spain think she would do the right thing, 82% in france, 73% in the uk. she is universally liked across europe. after 16 years in power. that is pretty remarkable. it is pretty remarkable. it is because she has taken politics out of the whole equation. there is a famous german saying that policy is where you define the difference between friend and enemy. a lot of politicians have made populist remarks, it is governed by a spreadsheet and treats politics in much the same way. i spreadsheet and treats politics in much the same way.— spreadsheet and treats politics in much the same way. i wish we could talk more. — much the same way. i wish we could talk more. but _ much the same way. i wish we could talk more, but it _ much the same way. i wish we could talk more, but it really _ much the same way. i wish we could talk more, but it really is _ much the same way. i wish we could talk more, but it really is not - much the same way. i wish we could talk more, but it really is not a - talk more, but it really is not a great line. we look forward to the election on sunday. thank you very much for coming on the programme.
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how many of you understand personalfinance, i mean really understand it. where to invest, how to invest, when not to invest? or even how to save money when you are out shopping? probably more people than we think could do with a simple explainer. and that�*s what17—year—old logan lin does, each week, on a podcast he broadcasts from california to the world. he teaches his generation gen z to be financially smart. it is a show he is recording in his final year of school, designed to simplify complex business terms and make them more engaging. and while he is doing that, he is interviewing some of the biggest finance gurus in the world. the podcast is called finanzee. and logan lin is with us. great to have you with us on the programme. why did you start this podcast? i programme. why did you start this odcast? , . ., . ~ podcast? i started it awhile back, mostly because _ podcast? i started it awhile back, mostly because i _ podcast? i started it awhile back, mostly because i learnt _ podcast? i started it awhile back, mostly because i learnt about - podcast? i started it awhile back, j mostly because i learnt about the great depression. i learned about the great depression back in tenth grade, and i read watched videos about how poor financial divorce or
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decision—making lead to bankruptcy and poverty. that made me realise i needed to educate myself and fellow students about what it means to be financially literate. as you and i both know, the great depression started with the stock market crash in 1929. people started borrowing money and they started being optimistic, and they kept investing, not realising that the stock market would eventually crash. eventually it all came crashing down, banks closed and lost theirjobs and money. ifound wall closed and lost theirjobs and money. i found wall street confusing. i honestly still find the great depression a little confusing, because there were so many causes. i realise that wall street can be intimidating for people my age, younger or older. i wanted to find a way to simplify the language of finance, simplify the language of business. my audience, gen z, could better understand and expand their knowledge. i better understand and expand their knowledue. ., , better understand and expand their knowledue. ~' , ., better understand and expand their knowledue. ., , . . , knowledge. i think there is a really im ortant knowledge. i think there is a really important point — knowledge. i think there is a really important point you _ knowledge. i think there is a really important point you make. - knowledge. i think there is a really i important point you make. someone was telling me, someone who travels in africa that there are lots of
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adults and people on that continent who do not understand personal finance. they are too afraid to ask because they think they probably should know. ithink because they think they probably should know. i think that is probably true for adults across the world. do you find that you have a lot of adults tuning in to watch, what is essentially a podcast for younger people?— what is essentially a podcast for younger people? yes, that i do. according _ younger people? yes, that i do. according to _ younger people? yes, that i do. according to my _ younger people? yes, that i do. according to my statistics, - younger people? yes, that i do. l according to my statistics, around 60 to 70% are people older than 25. that definitely is not gen z. that is shocking, but i am still thankful that people actually listen in. i think that is even cooler that people older than me and older than gen z are willing to tune in. 0bviously gen z are willing to tune in. obviously i talk about some simple concepts. i try to engage young people by asking simple questions. for example, withjohn paulson, i would ask what is a hedge fund? 0r for example, withjohn paulson, i would ask what is a hedge fund? or i would ask what is a hedge fund? or i would ask what is a hedge fund? or i would ask what is a crypto currency? for more advanced people, they would be like, 0k, why are you asking such brilliant people such simple questions? i think if i can
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establish the basics, then i can go into more complex topics and to give them a more simple idea of what is going to happen. as that continues and that further is, i feel like my audience will understand each concept, each topic, everything much better. ., . concept, each topic, everything much better. ., , ., ., better. your a 17-year-old high school student, _ better. your a 17-year-old high school student, you're - better. your a 17-year-old high school student, you're about i better. your a 17-year-old high j school student, you're about to better. your a 17-year-old high i school student, you're about to go school student, you�*re about to go off to college, and i am sitting here looking at the list of people you have interviewed. the billionairesjohn paulson, as you say, the government, howard marks, former chair of the us council of economic advisers, former best by chief executive. aside from the fact that i want your contact list, who have you encourage them to come and speak to your podcast question mercure broadcasting from your bedroom, why do they want to engage with you? i bedroom, why do they want to engage with ou? ., , , with you? i think it is definitely how i with you? i think it is definitely how i write _ with you? i think it is definitely how i write my _ with you? i think it is definitely how i write my e-mails. - with you? i think it is definitely how i write my e-mails. i i with you? i think it is definitely how i write my e-mails. i will. with you? i think it is definitely i how i write my e-mails. i will tell how i write my e—mails. i will tell you, it is not easy to convince these people. i have faced a lot of rejection. some of my post famous rejections, they completely signal, the former fed chairman of the
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federal reserve. the co—founder and ceo of door ——. the founder and ceo of sparta five. the first ceo of linkedin. the ceo and chairman of general motors. just getting a reply from them, it is really heart—warming, just knowing that they actually took the time out of their day to respond to me. i take each rejection with a light grain of salt and i think to myself, these billing people are willing to respond to some kid. why not keep going? —— that brilliant people. the thing is, you really have to put time and effort into your e—mail. it cannot be some e—mail saying, hey, join my podcast. it has to be sincere and genuine. i guess you could say i am an ok colt e—mail and ifocus a lot could say i am an ok colt e—mail and i focus a lot on my e—mails and why i focus a lot on my e—mails and why i want them, what i hope to accomplish. and what i believe they can share with the world. when i first reached out to john can share with the world. when i first reached out tojohn paulson, i was turned down and i had to learn from it. it was definitely heartbreaking because i was a big fan. ., ., ., ., ., ., .,
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fan. logan, i am going to have to teach you — fan. logan, i am going to have to teach you the _ fan. logan, i am going to have to teach you the first _ fan. logan, i am going to have to teach you the first rule _ fan. logan, i am going to have to teach you the first rule of - teach you the first rule of broadcasting. we are out of time. i am going to have to wrap you. thank you for coming on. i appreciate it. best of luck with it. we will see you next week. much of september so far has been a relatively dry and warm month, particularly towards the south. are things about to change as we head towards 0ctober? things about to change as we head towards october? you will find out in just a towards october? you will find out injust a moment. towards october? you will find out injusta moment. not towards october? you will find out in just a moment. not for the towards october? you will find out injust a moment. not for the here and out. friday and into the weekend, we have got the jet stream so well to the north of the uk. that is allowing us to say nice warm air moving its way in from a south—westerly direction. for friday, lots of dry weather, some sunshine around, southern and eastern england and eastern scotland. furtherwest, eastern england and eastern scotland. further west, you�*ve got a bit more cloud moving on from the atlantic, bringing if few splashes of light rain around some western coasts and hills. in the sunshine, towards the east, 23—24 are likely. still well above average for this time of year. 0vernight friday
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night, we have got a bit of cloud around, still male bear with us, a bit of rain moving into the north—west of scotland into the early hours of saturday. temperatures hovering in the mid teens in the south, perhaps a little colour across parts of scotland where you do keep those clearer skies. the weekend is shaping up to be mostly dry. sunny spells, still warm for the time of year. it will not be completely dry, we are likely to see a few do keep those clearer skies. the weekend is shaping up to be mostly dry. sunny spells, still warm for the time of year. it will not be completely dry, we are likely to see a few showers. low pressure close to the south of newquay on saturday. we have got a weather front waiting in the wings, as well. for saturday and into sunday, still less south—westerly were it went with us bringing the orange colours, the mild air mass. 0n with us bringing the orange colours, the mild air mass. on saturday, lots of dry weather, may well see a few are a silly teacher with me again from the south west later on in the day. for many northern and eastern cities, it could be staying dry and fine with light winds and temperatures somewhere between about 18-22 temperatures somewhere between about 18—22 on saturday. no great changes may on into sunday. saturday night into sunday, we have got an area of low pressure across france, just a chance i could spell a future were
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sent from the south. another when a friend waiting in the wings that is going to bring some rain late on sunday. forthat going to bring some rain late on sunday. for that arise from the west, a lot of dry weather, isolated showers, sunny spells, a bit of a noticeable southerly breeze, but that breeze lifting temperature to about 23—24 and a warm response. we are all looking somewhere between the high teens to the low 20s. it is really through sunday night and into monday things will start to change. this big area of low pressure pushing a weather front west to east across the uk. we are going to be seeing a bit of rain through sunday night or early on monday. that clear to leave sunshine and quite heavy blustery showers moving on from the west. the really different feel to things by this stage. read about 13-18 things by this stage. read about 13—18 on monday. at least 5 degrees cooler for some of us compared to sunday�*s weather. 0n cooler for some of us compared to sunday�*s weather. on day night into tuesday, first area of low pressure clear to east, the next one moves its way in on that conveyor belt from the west. during tuesday, although many places start off dry, we are likely to see an area of fairly heavy rain, some brisk points
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moving in across england and wales later in the day, perhaps doing a bit drier with sunshine and showers further north. again, 12—18, significantly cooler than it has been over the past week or two. beyond that, we are looking at later next week and what is happening with the jet stream, will start to see more troughs and peaks in the jet stream. that means area of low pressure are going to be moving their way in through the course of their way in through the course of the week. 0ften their way in through the course of the week. often quite wet and windy weather associated with winners of low pressure moving west to east. then some ridges of high pressure in between the areas of low pressure. not a complete wash—out through next week. we are going to say things turning cooler, windier, rain at times, but also some drier interludes. certainly feeling more autumnal than it has been. goodbye for now.
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ministers "prepare for the worst—case scenario" — in case gas prices stay high and more energy companies collapse. nearly 1.5 million people have been hit by firms going bust — they might now have to pay more for their energy. we�*re very unsure who�*s going to be taking the money next month, who we are going to be paying, who our actual supplier is, and it�*s very mixed messaging. bp and esso close some of their petrol stations because of a shortage of lorry drivers — downing street says people should buy fuel as normal. with the economy under pressure on various fronts, we�*ll be looking at how the cost of living looks set to rise. also tonight... the death of sabrina nessa — one man is arrested and police release this image of another man they are searching for. the mother, the father, and the baby who was taken from them in the 1970s — because they weren�*t married.

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