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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  September 23, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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week some cooler weather for next week but much more unsettled with some rain at times. energy firms�* collapse because of soaring gas prices. two more firms go bust — consumers will be switched to other providers, but they might be more expensive. we're very unsure who's going to be taking the money next month, who we are going to be paying, who our actual supplier is, and it's very mixed messaging. ministers are warning the crisis means more energy companies are likely to go under. also this evening... a shortage of lorry drivers forces bp and esso to close some of their petrol stations. downing st says people should buy fuel as usual. the mother, the father, and the baby that was taken from them in the 1970s — because they weren't married. my baby had just been snatched away from me without a final goodbye. police investigate whether the south
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london teacher sabina nessa was killed by a stranger. her body was found near her home on saturday. # ole, ole, ole, ole...# and excitement mounts on the eve of the 43rd ryder cup, delayed by a year by covid. and coming up on the bbc news channel... the australian prime minister says no special deals for families of england cricketers to travel for the ashes. covid restrictions could lead to some players pulling out. good evening. nearly 1.5 million customers have been hit injust two weeks by energy firms collapsing due to rising gas prices.
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two firms — avro energy and green — ceased trading yesterday, and their combined customers of 830,000 will now be switched to other, potentially more expensive providers. it's not yet clear who their new providers will be — that's to be decided by the energy watchdog 0fgem — but all customers who are affected will still receive energy while an alternative supplier is found. here's our consumer affairs correspondent coletta smith. as the wholesale gas price goes up, suppliers are going under, and customers have been caught in the middle. 1.5 million people are now in the process of being transferred to a new energy company. jamie's supplier went bust at the weekend and he tried to switch himself so he didn't end up paying too much, but it has backfired.— it has backfired. to be able to take advantaae it has backfired. to be able to take advantage of— it has backfired. to be able to take advantage of any _ it has backfired. to be able to take advantage of any offer _ it has backfired. to be able to take advantage of any offer on - it has backfired. to be able to take advantage of any offer on the - it has backfired. to be able to take i advantage of any offer on the market place at any given moment, and not wait for a supplier to move me to a supply that 0fgem have put me in
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contact with. in supply that 0fgem have put me in contact with-— supply that 0fgem have put me in contact with. ., ~ ,�* , ., contact with. in two weeks' time you will be facing — contact with. in two weeks' time you will be facing another _ contact with. in two weeks' time you will be facing another bill _ contact with. in two weeks' time you will be facing another bill but - contact with. in two weeks' time you will be facing another bill but you . will be facing another bill but you don't know who it is coming from and you don't know how much it will be. we are not sure if we are paying people's energy next month, we are not sure if we are paying british gas because they have sent an e—mail saying they will collect a direct debit from us. we have set up a new direct debit with sainsbury�*s. we are very unsure who will we be paying this month, who have a supplier is. paying this month, who have a sunplier ia— paying this month, who have a su lier is. , . �*, , ., supplier is. jamie's frustrated he mi . ht end supplier is. jamie's frustrated he might and no — supplier is. jamie's frustrated he might end on paying _ supplier is. jamie's frustrated he might end up paying more, - supplier is. jamie's frustrated he might end up paying more, eveni supplier is. jamie's frustrated he i might end up paying more, even for supplier is. jamie's frustrated he - might end up paying more, even for a few months but the government says it only has one goal.— it only has one goal. protecting customers. _ it only has one goal. protecting customers, especially - it only has one goal. protecting i customers, especially vulnerable ones. _ customers, especially vulnerable ones, from price spikes, and the solution — ones, from price spikes, and the solution to— ones, from price spikes, and the solution to this crisis will be found — solution to this crisis will be found from the industry and the market. — found from the industry and the market, as is already happening. government, i repeat, will not be bailing _ government, i repeat, will not be bailing out— government, i repeat, will not be bailing out failed energy companies. labour_ bailing out failed energy companies. labour says the government have taken their eye off the ball. complacent about the crisis in the market, complacent about the impact on families, complacent about the cost of living crisis. the on families, complacent about the cost of living crisis.— cost of living crisis. the official advice is to _ cost of living crisis. the official advice is to wait _ cost of living crisis. the official advice is to wait to _
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cost of living crisis. the official advice is to wait to be - cost of living crisis. the official- advice is to wait to be transferred. if your supplier goes bust, the gas and electricity will keep flowing. within two weeks you will be transferred to a new supplier. right now most of those transfers are to british gas. that's the moment where most of us would jump on a price comparison site, but even they are telling customers to sit tight right now. you may be switched to a more expensive tariff but it should not be higher than the price cap, which is around £100 per month for the average household. the is around £100 per month for the average household.— is around £100 per month for the average household. the power to switch energy _ average household. the power to switch energy supplier _ average household. the power to switch energy supplier is - average household. the power to switch energy supplier is in - average household. the power to switch energy supplier is in your. switch energy supplier is in your hands... ~ ., switch energy supplier is in your hands... ~ . ., , ., hands... with all the warnings of rice hands... with all the warnings of price rises _ hands... with all the warnings of price rises and _ hands... with all the warnings of price rises and the _ hands. .. with all the warnings of price rises and the number- hands... with all the warnings of price rises and the number of. price rises and the number of companies going bust, it's no surprise people are still trying to switch because it's what we have been told to do for years. millions have already _ been told to do for years. millions have already switched... - been told to do for years. millions have already switched... the - have already switched... the government _ have already switched... the government is _ have already switched... the government is warning that more suppliers will go into administration but smaller companies say their hands are tied. the government _ say their hands are tied. the government say _ say their hands are tied. the government say they don't want to move _ government say they don't want to move the — government say they don't want to move the cat because they want to protect _ move the cat because they want to protect consumers but that's nine eve _ protect consumers but that's nine eve it's _ protect consumers but that's nine eve. it's like king canute on the beach_ eve. it's like king canute on the beach resisting the incoming tide.
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these _ beach resisting the incoming tide. these are — beach resisting the incoming tide. these are global events and if we don't _ these are global events and if we don't react— these are global events and if we don't react then we will go bust. it don't react then we will go bust. a slice don't react then we will go bust. slice of everyone's bills goes into a central pot. but because so many firms have hit the wall that charge will be going up, so whatever happens to your supplier, we will all end up paying more to cover the turmoil. colletta smith, bbc news. bp has warned that it has had to temporarily close some of its petrol stations due to a shortage of lorry drivers. the oil company said it was working hard to address the issues. esso has also said a small number of its sites have also been affected. downing street said there was no shortage of fuel and people should continue to buy it as normal. 0ur midlands correspondent phil mackie is in worcesterfor us. what has been happening where you are? t what has been happening where you are? ., ., what has been happening where you are? . . ., what has been happening where you are? . ., ., ., ., ., are? i am at one of the handful of bp stations _ are? i am at one of the handful of bp stations that _ are? i am at one of the handful of bp stations that has _ are? i am at one of the handful of bp stations that has run _ are? i am at one of the handful of bp stations that has run out of. bp stations that has run out of fuel. apparently yesterday. i have been here a few hours and spoke to staff and they said they had been expecting a delivery but then were
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told it would be cancelled because of driver shortages and they don't know when the next one is coming. the bbc has spoken to a pipette petrol shop owner and normally they would order a week in advance and even then they are being delayed and cancelled. all through the day cars have been coming on like this one, realising the pumps are closed and taped off and then driving off. it's not a shortage of fuel, we need to mention that. this is a shortage of lorry drivers. the same reasons we have seen empty supermarket shelves in recent weeks. within a few miles of here there are four other petrol stations that i assume are open. the government is keen to stress that you will not run out of fuel in the next few days. but it is a problem. a statement from most supermarkets said they are generally 0k a statement from most supermarkets said they are generally ok but logistics uk, that represents hauliers, say it is a serious issue that the government needs to get a handle on the soon.— handle on the soon. phil mackie, thank you- _ i'm joined by our business editor simonjack.
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energy companies, petrol stations, it feels like bad news on a number of fronts. , ., ' of fronts. they are quite different issues. of fronts. they are quite different issues- one _ of fronts. they are quite different issues. one is _ of fronts. they are quite different issues. one is an _ of fronts. they are quite different issues. one is an hgv _ of fronts. they are quite different issues. one is an hgv lorry - of fronts. they are quite different issues. one is an hgv lorry driver issues. one is an hgv lorry driver issue and the other is a massive global shortage of gas aggravated by some domestic factors. i think the simple thing to take away from this is that whether your supplier goes bust or not, we are all facing higher bills, as colletta smith was saying. because the cost of onboarding and transferring customers from loss—making companies onto the bigger companies will be recouped through an industrywide thing called the levy so we will see bills go up anyway. whether we like it or not, back in april of next year when they reset the energy price cap, everyone accepts, government, the regulator, the industry, that the price cap is going up. one mechanism that was going up. one mechanism that was going to be in place to provide state backed loans to the bigger companies so they could buy this gas and supply it and bleed it back into bills over a number of years, i have
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been told there has been put very much on the back burner, but they do accept that if one of the bigger challenge companies, one of those that has grown to between one and 2 million customers goes bust, that would not be ok so they would have to appoint a special administrator and that would be quasi—nationalisation. but a reminder that energy costs are very pervasive and the bank of england is starting to ratchet up its expectation for inflation next year because energy pushes all costs up throughout the economy.— because energy pushes all costs up throughout the economy. simon jack, thank ou. it's a practice that went on for decades — forcing women to give up their babies for adoption because they were unmarried — and it's now to be the subject of an inquiry by a parliamentary committee. it follows a number of reports here on bbc news earlier this year into how women were denied the right to keep their children by doctors, nurses and social workers. the scottish government is also
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looking at the issue after the bbc�*s reports. 0ur correspondent duncan kennedy has been talking to three members of a separated family about the pain they have suffered. this is the family that was never allowed to be a family. yvonne, the birth mother, andy, the birth father, and liz, their daughter, who was taken from them at birth. yvonne's story began in 1973 when she became pregnant with andy's baby out of wedlock. you're not married, so therefore you're not keeping the baby. which really hurt me. you wanted to have the baby? iwanted... to have my child. but in the �*50s, �*60s and �*70s, thousands of women like yvonne were pressured by social workers, doctors, nurses and churches into giving up their babies for adoption. yvonne says the nurses took her baby at birth. i never even got the chance
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to hold her, straightaway. i felt cross that i'd just been left like a piece of meat laying on a slab. later, yvonne asked for one final cuddle before her daughter was adopted. but her social worker refused. i felt that my baby had just been snatched away from me without a final goodbye. not knowing if i would ever see that child again. sorry. andy, the birth father, says he was never permitted to see liz, his newborn baby.
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i'd been told without a doubt that i wasn't going to be allowed into the hospital to see yvonne or the baby. so there was a huge chunk of her life where she didn't... ..have any relationship with her birth parents. and it was difficult, yeah. liz was adopted into a loving family, but says she was always confused by what had happened to her. what did you come to think of your birth mother? did you come to resent what she did? was there any anger? yes, idid. because i had no idea why. why would you give up a baby? i never understood that as a child. i just couldn't understand. since the bbc first broadcast the story of forced adoptions, dozens of other people have come forward to tell their stories.
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and today it was confirmed parliament's joint committee on human rights is to hold an enquiry. it took yvonne, andy and liz 29 years for them to reunite. and they say it's time now for an official apology. i was literally taken _ from my birth mother's arms. so i think an apology- wouldn't take away the pain, but it would certainly help, yes. my little daughter made a comment to say that... ..they'd been... they'd been denied a relationship. for so much of their lives. i will never, ever
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have another child. so i lost the only thing in my life that i ever wanted. yvonne laybrum ending that report by duncan kennedy. nhs waiting times in a&e departments in wales have been revealed as the worst ever. health is the responsibility of the devolved government, and in wales a fifth of the population is on some kind of health waiting list — again, the highest figure ever. in accident and emergency in august, nearly 69% of patients waited under four hours for treatment. the target is 95%. in a&e, nearly 8,000 people waited over 12 hours to be seen — the worst on record. the target is zero. and for ambulance call—outs, only 57.6% of the most urgent calls were responded to within eight minutes. the target is 65%. here's our wales correspondent, hywel griffith.
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it is a symptom of a system in crisis. ambulances queued outside a&e unable to hand over their patients or reach others in need. amy knows what that means. two weeks ago she fell from a horse and ruptured her spleen. unable to move, she waited nine hours for the paramedics to arrive. i got very disoriented because i wasn't allowed to move my legs. my legs were really aching and to not be able to move your legs for nine hours, it's not very nice at all. the ambulance did get called 11 times. and they didn't even send out a first aid person to come and see me. the ambulance service has apologised, but paramedics likejohn warn there is often little they can do if they are held outside a hospital, sometimes for an entire 11 hour shift. i think what we are facing
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is a lot of frustration, because we are waiting at hospitals and we are hearing the calls on the radio asking for any available crews to respond, and we're just not able to respond, and that is very frustrating. because at the end of the day we are there to provide care and that's what we want to do. waiting times inside a&e are now the worst on record. the four—hour target has never been hit. the pandemic has worsened what was already a decade—long problem. of course i apologise to people within wales who have been waiting for such a long time, but this is an unprecedented time, and of course we do hope that people will bear with us. the pressure is coming from every angle. more elderly patients who have become more frail during lockdown, but also younger people, whose mental health has suffered and find a&e the only place to turn. doctors on the front line here say it feels
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like winter has already hit, and warn even tougher times are ahead. we could see patients having to wait longer for admission to a bed. and we will see the hospital becoming more crowded as those admissions go up with patients, notjust with covid, but also with flu and other respiratory infections. the ambulance service has now called on the army for help, but few expect an instant cure for the nhs�*s ails. hywel griffith, bbc news. the high court has dismissed a challenge to the law that allows foetuses with down's syndrome to be aborted up to the point of birth. heidi crowter brought the case against the government with two other parties injuly, saying the legislation did not respect her life. her legal team had argued the rules were unlawfully discriminatory. detectives are investigating whether primary school teacher sabina nessa was killed by a stranger
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who is still at large. the body of the 28—year—old was found by a member of the public in cator park in kidbrooke in south—east london on saturday. officers believe she was attacked shortly after leaving her home on friday evening. lauren moss reports. a community in shock and looking for answers. what should have been a five—minute walk to meet a friend has become a murder investigation. primary school teacher sabina nessa may have been attacked by a stranger near her home in kidbrooke. we believe, as she walked through the park, she was approached by an individual and fatally attacked. sabina's body was sadly found by a member of the public and we are appealing for anyone who was here on friday evening and who thinks they saw anything unusual to come forward. a postmortem examination carried out on sabina was inconclusive and police say they're keeping an open mind about the motive of the attack. sabina had planned to meet a friend at this bar on friday night, but she never arrived. police believe she was attacked as she walked through cator park. it's understood the 28—year—old
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left her home on astell road around 8:30pm on friday. she walked through cator park heading towards the depot bar. her body was found near the community centre on saturday afternoon. sabina's sister has posted a tribute to her on social media, writing, "my beautiful, talented and caring sister. my inspiration to never let anybody put me down. never in my life did i or my sisters, or my mum and dad, think this could happen to us." six months after the murder of sarah everard in clapham, women's safety campaigners say the streets still aren't safe. this is not on women to protect ourselves. we need the perpetrators to be stopped. there is nothing done about harassment level offences. there's very little done about indecent exposure offences. people don'tjust go out and murder right away. a man in his 40s arrested on suspicion of murder has been released under investigation. a candlelit vigil will be held for sabina in kidbrooke tomorrow night. lauren moss, bbc news.
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the time is 6.18. our top story this evening... more than a million customers are hit by the latest energy firm's collapse. ministers are morning soaring gas prices means others are likely to go under. and coming up, i am here in wisconsin as europe and america's golfers face each other in the ryder cup. coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel... the line—ups for friday's ryder cup foursomes will be revealed later tonight. america have a stronger team and home advantage, but europe's track record is impressive. they're aiming for an eighth victory in ten meetings. tenants are being evicted because of rent arrears built up over the pandemic, despite a government commitment that covid wouldn't leave anyone without a home. one third of eviction hearings monitored in england and wales over the summer stated covid as the reason that rent hadn't been paid.
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0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan has been speaking to those affected. i've got lots of favourites! in liverpool, joanne, marshall and little roman have two weeks to leave their home. oh, thank you. all our incomejust kept going down and down and down, and then we ended up with spiralling debt, to be fair. marshall's newjob as a chef fell through due to the lockdown. he didn't qualify for furlough with his previous employer, and he couldn't find any work for a year. why is it not working? their bills racked up, they owe their landlord £4,000 and have been served with an eviction notice. it's not how it was supposed to be, do you know what i mean? and it makes me feel a bit sick. like, we both grew up coming from, you know, in poverty, so we tried our best to get out of that. you know, we've always been working people. we wanted to change the tide and things like that, and it's not easy to get out of.
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and then ijust feel like obviously roman has just been and then ijust feel like obviously roman hasjust been born into the exact same situation, and it is not nice to feel, it is embarrassing. county courts have been inundated with landlords seeking to remove tenant since the ban on evictions was lifted in the summer. of the 270 possession orders analysed, one third of them, 88 cases, explicitly cited covid as the reason for rent arrears. ht cited covid as the reason for rent arrears. �* , ., , ., ., ., arrears. if it's any more than two months rent. _ arrears. if it's any more than two months rent, they _ arrears. if it's any more than two months rent, they can _ arrears. if it's any more than two months rent, they can legally - arrears. if it's any more than two i months rent, they can legally apply to kick you out. which in a standard situation, it is fair enough, but it is not typical here. the government sa it is not typical here. the government say it provided _ is not typical here. the government say it provided unprecedented - is not typical here. the government say it provided unprecedented help| say it provided unprecedented help to keep people in their homes during the pandemic and there was now time to deliver a fair rental market, but now tenants and landlords feel let down. how much is the tenant in arrears? at the moment it probably stands at about 35,000. this at the moment it probably stands at
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about 35,000.— at the moment it probably stands at about 35,000. this landlord says she is owed a fortune _ about 35,000. this landlord says she is owed a fortune by _ about 35,000. this landlord says she is owed a fortune by a _ about 35,000. this landlord says she is owed a fortune by a tenant - about 35,000. this landlord says she is owed a fortune by a tenant she - is owed a fortune by a tenant she cannot get rid of due to the impact of the eviction ban and court delays. t of the eviction ban and court dela s. ., , , of the eviction ban and court dela s. , . of the eviction ban and court dela s. . , , ., ., of the eviction ban and court dela s. , ., ., of the eviction ban and court dela s. ., , delays. i was still having to pay my mortuaae delays. i was still having to pay my mortgage is _ delays. i was still having to pay my mortgage is and — delays. i was still having to pay my mortgage is and look _ delays. i was still having to pay my mortgage is and look after - delays. i was still having to pay my mortgage is and look after the - delays. i was still having to pay my| mortgage is and look after the kids, and it is really frustrating nobody wants to give me an update on when i should get my own property back. joanne and marshall are frantically trying to find another home, but they have no deposit, poor credit score and rent is rising. marshall now has a job and is looking for a second one. the young couple determined to rebuild the lives they once had. michael buchanan, bbc news. the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk show there were 36,710 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. that means in the past week, there was an average of 33,034 new cases per day. there were 7,588 people in hospital with covid, according to the latest data. another 182 deaths have been recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid
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test, taking the average number per day in the last week to 143. 0n vaccinations, 89.6% people aged 16 or over have had theirfirstjab, while 82.1%, are now double vaccinated. northern ireland's hospitality and entertainment industry has warned many businesses are on the brink of collapse. it remains the only part of the uk where bars and restaurants still have restricted numbers, while concert venues and nightclubs remain closed. ministers at stormont say while the health service is under pressure, they can't move forward. 0ur ireland correspondent emma vardy reports. it is more than two months since england's so—called freedom day. many more restrictions have also been moved in scotland and wales too, but for the entertainment and hospitality industry, northern
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ireland remains weeks behind. just very frustrated. we have reopening date all over the uk and ireland. it's costing us tens of thousands of pounds per week, but the biggest factor is we are cancelling a lot of concerts. , , .,. factor is we are cancelling a lot of concerts. , , .. ., factor is we are cancelling a lot of concerts. , ., , ., , concerts. this place would usually have lots of— concerts. this place would usually have lots of people _ concerts. this place would usually have lots of people on _ concerts. this place would usually have lots of people on the - concerts. this place would usually have lots of people on the dance i have lots of people on the dance floors, what is the current restriction?— floors, what is the current restriction? , ., ., restriction? there is a one metre social distancing _ restriction? there is a one metre social distancing requirement - restriction? there is a one metre i social distancing requirement which reduces our capacity to maybe 30% of what it was before the pandemic so it is not commercially viable to open. it is not commercially viable to 0 en. ., , it is not commercially viable to 0 en, ., , ., it is not commercially viable to oen. . , ., , it is not commercially viable to 0 n en, ., , ., , ., it is not commercially viable to men. ., , ., , ., , open. theatres have begun to put performances _ open. theatres have begun to put performances back _ open. theatres have begun to put performances back on _ open. theatres have begun to put performances back on but - open. theatres have begun to put performances back on but they i open. theatres have begun to put| performances back on but they are losing money, while bars and restaurants still cannot fill their spaces and nightclubs remain completely closed. health staff have told ministers hospitals remain under pressure here, notjust from covid but years of underfunding, and today northern ireland's department of health recommended restrictions stay as they are. of health recommended restrictions stay as they are-— stay as they are. every vaccination council so — stay as they are. every vaccination council so please _ stay as they are. every vaccination council so please encourage - council so please encourage everybody to take up the vaccine if you can. it will make a real
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difference to the healthcare workers over the winter months and we will keep trying to make steady progress mindful of the implications on the health service all the time. j mindful of the implications on the health service all the time. i think we in northern _ health service all the time. i think we in northern ireland _ health service all the time. i think we in northern ireland need - health service all the time. i think we in northern ireland need to - health service all the time. i think i we in northern ireland need to make sure what— we in northern ireland need to make sure what we are doing is supporting our economy, supporting those businesses, supporting our health service _ businesses, supporting our health service. ., ., �* , businesses, supporting our health service. ., ., �*, , , service. northern ireland's biggest arena. for them _ service. northern ireland's biggest arena. for them it's _ service. northern ireland's biggest arena. for them it's a _ service. northern ireland's biggest arena. for them it's a massive - service. northern ireland's biggest l arena. for them it's a massive blow. it was due to be packed out this weekend for a sold—out comedy gig which has now been cancelled. and belfast�*s ice hockey team have not been able to welcome back supporters at full capacity. with the furlough scheme ending this month, there is no many entertainment businesses in northern ireland looking at laying off staff. jt northern ireland looking at laying off staff. ., , , northern ireland looking at laying off staff. . , , ., off staff. it leaves us on the precipice — off staff. it leaves us on the precipice at _ off staff. it leaves us on the precipice at the _ off staff. it leaves us on the precipice at the moment. i off staff. it leaves us on the l precipice at the moment. we off staff. it leaves us on the - precipice at the moment. we have no public funding, so from that date we are on our own completely financially and at the moment we have no revenue coming in and no date when events start.— date when events start. covid passports _ date when events start. covid passports will _ date when events start. covid passports will soon _ date when events start. covid passports will soon be - date when events start. covid passports will soon be introduced in
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scotland and wales, and many in hospitality in northern ireland say they would support something similar here, but they are urging ministers not to leave entertainment out in the cold. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast. an independent report into the former labour mp keith vaz has found he subjected a member of parliamentary staff to sustained bullying and harassment. mr vaz likened jenny mccollough to a prostitute. she left herjob in 2011 because of the bullying. the report also criticised mr vaz�*s non co—operation on health grounds, despite his presenting a radio show and writing newspaper columns. manufacturers will be forced to create a universal charger for phones and small electronic devices under a new rule proposed by the european commission. the aim is to reduce waste by encouraging consumers to re—use existing chargers when they buy a new device. apple has warned that such a move would harm innovation. golf's ryder cup between europe and the us gets under way tomorrow with the opening ceremony taking place this evening. europe have won nine of the previous 12 meetings, including last
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time in paris in 2018. this year's event was scheduled to take place in 2020 but was delayed by the pandemic. andy swiss is in whistling straits, wisconsin, for us. yes, whistling straits is certainly living up to its name at the moment, pretty blustery conditions for the start of the ryder cup as europe look to continue that recent domination. but they are going to have to do it the hard way against a strong us team and a partisan crowd. relaxed and ready to go. if europe's players are feeling any nerves, well, judging by their team photo, you'd hardly have guessed it. but then spirit is their speciality. they've won four of the past five ryder cups, most recently in paris in 2018. inspired by the man known as the postman, ian poulter,
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they say, always delivers, and three years on, europe's talisman can hardly wait. any opportunity you have to grab hold of that trophy when it's on away soil is pretty magical. we're nearly go—time, and there's no better feeling that i've ever had than pegging it up on the first tee at the ryder cup. # god bless america! but can they silence america's fans? with european supporters unable to travel to the us, the home advantage is deafening. chanting: usa! usa! usa! europe's select few supporters here, like these us—based expats, know it'll be some challenge. there's going to be a lot of shouting against them, come to time, so hopefully they can come together and pull out another win. 0ne round of oles? # 0le, ole, ole, ole # 0le, ole!
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yeah, that's enough. we're getting some looks. well, here on the shores of lake michigan, the us will start as strong favourites. but can a team that have so often struggled in the ryder cup finally rise to the occasion? a long—running feud between bryson dechambeau and team—mate brooks koepka has once again put america's unity under scrutiny. but with eight of the world's top ten players, their confidence is clear. whatever people think about me is is not important. it's about the team this week. it's about riling us all up and getting that ryder cup back here on us soil. europe have been on the charm offensive in practice, wearing foam cheeseheads — the nickname for fans of the local american football team. but winning friends is one thing, winning this ryder cup will be far tougher. andy swiss, bbc news, whistling straits. time for a look at the weather — here's ben rich.
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but evening. it's been another unseasonably warm day for many but not quite everyone. central and southern parts of the uk have seen temperatures up to 23 degrees, but in shetland, despite some sunshine, we were languishing at 10 degrees this afternoon because of this cold air that blew down from the north. however, that is not a sign of things to come because over the next few days, the orange colours win out, and they will be warm conditions for the time of year. with that, quite a lot of cloud and splashes of rain. some spots of drizzle, some misty and murky conditions for western scotland and northern ireland, perhaps the north west of england by the end of the night. some clear spells in the south and east allowing it to get a little bit chilly, but for most it is a mild start tomorrow, particularly where there's lots of cloud. some of that getting down into wales, always with the potential for the odd spot of rain.
6:31 pm
quite windy across the northern

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