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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 23, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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the west and temperatures in the east of 20—21 and maybe 22 and in the east it will be sunny on sunday. that is it. this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. borisjohnson�*s message to the united nations and ahead of cop26 summit on climate change — the world must take radical and urgent action. we will see desertification, drought, crop failure, and mass movements of humanity on a scale not seen before. nearly 1.5 million uk customers affected by energy firms collapsing under soaring gas prices could now face higher bills. and if you're one of the people affected by the collapse of your energy provider and would like to share your experience or concerns — we'd like to hear from you.
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do get in touch on twitter @lukwesaburak — or by using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. also in today's news... police investigating the murder of primary school teacher sabina nessa in south london release details of her last movements. we're expecting to hear an update within the hour. germans head to the polls this weekend to elect their next government and choose who will take over from angela merkel as chancellor. we've been touring the country to get a feel for what is top of the agenda for voters. and hairdressers express concern of clients having new allergic reactions to hair dye after contracting coronavirus.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. "it's time for humanity to grow up and take responsibility for climate change." that was boris johnson's message to the united nations general assembly as he gave his speech. with just a0 days to go until the uk hosts a set piece summit on climate change, the prime minister called on leaders to sign up for big reductions in their carbon emissions. it would mean developing countries phasing out power generation from coal, with help from richer nations. our correspondent barbara plett usher has more from new york. it was not for the faint—hearted, this frenetic trip. the prime minister covered a lot of ground. he shook a few hands. conducted a few interviews. visited a few sites. even took a train ride. final stop, back to the united
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nations, where he used his address to press for a stronger commitment to end global warming, with a stark warning of the enduring consequences if countries didn't step up. we will see decertification, drought, crop failure and mass movements of humanity on a scale not seen before, not because of some unforeseen natural event or disaster, but because of us, because of what we are doing now. and our grandchildren will know that we are the culprits. the prime minister chose to focus solely on the subject of climate change. he used this global stage to make a strong speech ahead of the climate conference coming up soon in glasgow, which he said would be a critical turning point for humanity. it helped to have an american president on side. joe biden pledged to double us contributions for developing nations to tackle climate change.
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that was a big win for mrjohnson, who was determined to cement a crucial relationship that has had its rocky moments. he wasn't able to tuck the promise of a new trade deal into his suitcase, but it was still a largely successful trip that showcased the two leaders working together on shared priorities. and nowhere is that more evident than when it comes to climate crisis. mr president, see you in glasgow. thank you. barbara plett usher, bbc news, new york. well, bbc news, new york. earlier, i spoke to the environmentalist well, earlier, i spoke to the environmentalist and in full journalist, george monbiot. he gave me his reaction. what he said was all right. but please remember this is boris johnson saying it. the things that come out of his mouth bear little relation to what he does. when we
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look at where the uk is in terms of dealing with climate breakdown, we are a very long way behind where we should be. find are a very long way behind where we should be. �* , ., , are a very long way behind where we should be. �* , .,, , should be. and yet, he was saying, we were more _ should be. and yet, he was saying, we were more or _ should be. and yet, he was saying, we were more or less _ should be. and yet, he was saying, we were more or less leading - should be. and yet, he was saying, we were more or less leading the l we were more or less leading the way, we had met certain deadlines, certain points?— certain points? historically, the uk has done quite _ certain points? historically, the uk has done quite well. _ certain points? historically, the uk has done quite well. we _ certain points? historically, the uk has done quite well. we had - certain points? historically, the uk has done quite well. we had an - has done quite well. we had an almost 50% cuts since 1990 levels of greenhouse gases. that is stalled, it is almost completely stalled. successive governments did all the easy things first. they cut emissions from the power sector by switching from coal to gas and then gassed to renewables. it doesn't really affect us. it light, the lights come on. it doesn't matter where electricity is coming from. all the other stuff is more difficult. transport, changing the way we travel, eating less meat, flying less, insulating our homes, that requires the government to actually engage with immobilised people, and governments have been extremely reluctant to do this. boris johnson's extremely reluctant to do this.
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borisjohnson's government extremely reluctant to do this. boris johnson's government above all, borisjohnson's government above all, so, basically, we have come to all, so, basically, we have come to a grinding halt. all the good stuff is in the past, none of the good stuff is happening today. can the uk, can governments _ stuff is happening today. can the uk, can governments around - stuff is happening today. can the uk, can governments around the stuff is happening today. can the - uk, can governments around the world for that make these changes for climate change. irate for that make these changes for climate change.— for that make these changes for climate change. we can't afford not to. we climate change. we can't afford not t0- we are — climate change. we can't afford not to. we are facing _ climate change. we can't afford not to. we are facing the _ climate change. we can't afford not to. we are facing the greatest - to. we are facing the greatest catastrophe humankind has ever faced, which is the collapse of our life support systems. i think it is very hard for people to get their heads around what this involves, because it basically means very large parts of the planet becoming uninhabitable to humans. it means the generalised collapse of civilisation. so the idea that we can't afford to deal with this... i can't afford to deal with this... i was thinking more about the cost. you know, hard cash.— was thinking more about the cost. you know, hard cash. yes, what i'm sa inc, is you know, hard cash. yes, what i'm saying. is it — you know, hard cash. yes, what i'm saying. is it all _ you know, hard cash. yes, what i'm saying, is it all because _ you know, hard cash. yes, what i'm saying, is it all because all- you know, hard cash. yes, what i'm saying, is it all because all the - saying, is it all because all the hard cash in the world, if we don't sort this out. yes, it will probably cost less than the pandemic class to actually get ourselves on track, but
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the money is not currently forthcoming. governments have constantly told us we don't have the money. when the pandemic struck, somehow they found the money. somehow, there is a magic money tree, after all. we need to start pouring the same sort of money into tackling the climate and psychological emergencies. what do ou exect psychological emergencies. what do you exnect will _ psychological emergencies. what do you expect will come _ psychological emergencies. what do you expect will come out _ psychological emergencies. what do you expect will come out of - psychological emergencies. what do you expect will come out of tok- you expect will come out of tok cop26, realistically? hat you expect will come out of tok com, realistically?— you expect will come out of tok cop26, realistically? not half as much as ought _ cop26, realistically? not half as much as ought to _ cop26, realistically? not half as much as ought to come - cop26, realistically? not half as much as ought to come out. - cop26, realistically? not half as much as ought to come out. butj cop26, realistically? not half as i much as ought to come out. but we need to come out of it is to meet country commitments mandatory. the moment, they've got voluntary commitments to take action under paris agreement. those commitments don't add up to nearly as much action as we need to prevent catastrophic climate change. we need to see those turned into mandatory agreements, which will actually take things much further. unfortunately, the uk leadership is actually been quite weak. hasn't been the diplomatic mobilisation ahead of cop26 that we need to see. hagar
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diplomatic mobilisation ahead of cop26 that we need to see. how do ou think cop26 that we need to see. how do you think the _ cop26 that we need to see. how do you think the fact _ cop26 that we need to see. how do you think the fact that _ cop26 that we need to see. how do you think the fact that the - cop26 that we need to see. how do you think the fact that the uk - cop26 that we need to see. how do you think the fact that the uk wants to open a new coal mine will set once we get to glasgow? it to open a new coal mine will set once we get to glasgow?- to open a new coal mine will set once we get to glasgow? it will sit ve badl once we get to glasgow? it will sit very badly indeed. _ once we get to glasgow? it will sit very badly indeed. the _ once we get to glasgow? it will sit very badly indeed. the same - once we get to glasgow? it will sit| very badly indeed. the same apply once we get to glasgow? it will sit i very badly indeed. the same apply to new gas cds and oil in the north sea and the west of shetland, which the government also seems committed to do. this isjust the opposite government also seems committed to do. this is just the opposite of what we need to be doing. the science shows very clearly that we need to be retiring existing reserves of fossil fuels, let alone developing new ones, otherwise we've got absolutely no hope of meeting our climate targets under the paris agreement of 2015. with me now is the political scienctist manali kumar from the university of st gallen in switzerland. thank you forjoining us. first off,
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a lot of demands that we heard there from borisjohnson. is he being realistic? aha, from boris johnson. is he being realistic? �* ., ., , from boris johnson. is he being realistic? ., ., , ., , realistic? a lot of rising words from iz'oris — realistic? a lot of rising words from boris johnson _ realistic? a lot of rising words from boris johnson in - realistic? a lot of rising words from boris johnson in his - realistic? a lot of rising words - from boris johnson in his inimitable from borisjohnson in his inimitable style, but, you know, ithink it's admirable of him to admitted recently that he is not always supported acting on climate change, and like all people, politicians should also be able and willing to change their mind in light of new information. so, i hope he is really being more sincere now about what you're saying and what he is calling upon others to do. but, he has also started warning us about how tough it will be to convince allies to do more. that is not very encouraging at a time when we need bold action. it does not inspire much confidence in his ability to convince partners. 0bviously, climate change was top of his agenda. his entire speech was dedicated to climate change. this
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will not be a solo effort. what did you think of what president biden said in terms of his financial pledge? i said in terms of his financial ledue? ~ �* pledge? i think the biden administration _ pledge? i think the biden administration certainly l pledge? i think the biden - administration certainly takes the climate crisis a lot more seriously than its predecessor. rejoining the paris agreement on organising the climate, summit earlier this year were also very important. but i wonder if mr biden will be able to deliver in terms of policy. the us does not have a very good track record in terms of climate leadership. they have said for a long time they will act when others do so first. earlier this year, john kerry made a statement about how 50% of emissions reductions would come from technologies that don't even exist yet, and that is really not a very encouraging signal. now, i know that mr biden has said recently that he intends to double the us climate finance contributions for developing countries, but we also know that the us has really not delivered on that promise very much so far. so, all of
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it is going to depend on congressional approval, and we know that congress is also not very happy about spending money unless it involves giving tax breaks to corporations. so, a huge pinch of salt, and i will not be very surprised if the us backs down on some of its international climate commitments again. like matt lets turn to china now. a big line in the sand china promise it won't build any new coal powered projects abroad. how key is this pledge? we really need to start moving away from fossil fuels. really need to start moving away from fossilfuels. it really need to start moving away from fossil fuels. it is a very positive move that china said it will not build any more new plants abroad. but cole is still an important source of domestic energy for china. we have not seen new commitments from china yet. we have not seen new commitments from india yet. the recent pledges that have
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been announced by countries like brazil and russia are also... you know, they have targets that are lower than some of the previous commitments. unfortunately, none of this is very encouraging, looking forward to what is a meaningful change after cop26. we know from enough scientific studies by now, that everything that we are doing by now is not enough. climate change is not a problem that is going to happen in the future, it is already happening right now, and it is not going to go away. unfortunately, it seems like most of the efforts that countries are talking about doing right now involves merely tinkering around the edges of the system that has brought us here, and i don't see how that is going to bring us any different results. what we need right now, is notjust ambition, but courage and tenacity to meet this existential planetary crisis that is climate change, and it remains to be seen of any of our world leaders if they are really up to this
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challenge.— they are really up to this challenge. they are really up to this challenue. ~ ., ,, ., , challenge. when you talk about being u . challenge. when you talk about being u- to the challenge. when you talk about being up to the challenge, _ challenge. when you talk about being up to the challenge, he _ challenge. when you talk about being up to the challenge, he said - challenge. when you talk about being up to the challenge, he said that - up to the challenge, he said that many countries are tinkering around the edges. is that because there are no viable alternatives that would work right now? i no viable alternatives that would work right now?— no viable alternatives that would work right now? i mean, look, we need lsold — work right now? i mean, look, we need bold action. _ work right now? i mean, look, we need bold action. we _ work right now? i mean, look, we need bold action. we can't - work right now? i mean, look, we need bold action. we can't keep l need bold action. we can't keep kicking the can further down the road, just because there are other issues right now but higher prices, investing in clean technology right now, and changing the consumerist foundation of the global economy is necessary. it will be painful, but we need to radically change the system, if we want to be able to mitigate further warming and adapts to the effects of climate change that we are already seeing. a lot of these efforts, both adaptation, and mitigation, are going to cost a lot of money for every single country in the world. but these burdens are going to be even more severe for
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developing countries which, not only lack adequate infrastructure and technology, but when millions are already being pushed into poverty, due to the coronavirus pandemic. we are know already know from enough data, that developed countries are not meeting their financial contributions to world developing countries. if all countries started delivering on the pledges they have already made, it would still not be enough to stop the climate crisis. it is already with us, and we need to face up to that reality.- to face up to that reality. thank ou ve to face up to that reality. thank you very much _ to face up to that reality. thank you very much indeed. - the boss of the uk energy regulator 0fgem is warning that more firms are likely to go bust — leaving almost one and a half million customers facing a switch to new suppliers and more expensive bills. two companies — avro energy and green — with more than 800,000 customers between them — ceased trading yesterday, after the price
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of wholesale gas soared to unprecedented levels. this our business reporter, ramzan karmali has the details. soaring gas prices have led to the collapse of two more energy suppliers, meaning six firms have gone bust in september alone and left 1.5 million customers facing higher bills. those customers will still receive energy while a new supplier is appointed by 0fgem. its boss warned it was likely more firms would go bust. it's not unusual for suppliers to go out of the market. i think what's different this time is the dramatic change in the costs those suppliers are facing. this we do expect more, we do expect more not to be able to face the circumstances we are in, but it is genuinely hard to say more than that, partly because that means predicting the gas price. this is a significant impact on the sector and it is something we are working with government
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to manage, but we can't make predictions. energy firms have been hit by a massive rise in wholesale prices. they are apparently around four times higher than normal. the body that represents them has warned the market is not working. the government has promised the energy price cap will remain in place during the winter, and it hopes this will protect millions of customers. but from 0ctober1st, that cap is set to rise by 12%, meaning around 15 million households will still end up paying more. razman karmali, bbc news. earlier i spoke to adam fleming, our chief political correspondent, who told me that the government is cooling on the idea of providing state backed loans to energy companies. at the start of the week, there was talk that may be the government would start then and help the energy companies that were taking on thousands of new customers from collapse energy companies. the reason that _ collapse energy companies. the reason that the _ collapse energy companies. tue: reason that the energy collapse energy companies. tta: reason that the energy companies need help was because of the energy price clap, which limits how much they could charge customers, they
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can charge these new customers the real cost of gas on the global market. they were taking them out one at a loss. there were suggestions that they may be had to be government backed loans provided to incentivise companies to do that. it now seems ministers are not minded to do that. they've seen the existing system working and they think it is pretty robust. the business minister, paul scally, explained why the government sees it that way. explained why the government sees it that wa . ~ ., ., �* ., explained why the government sees it thatwa . ~ ., ., �* ., , explained why the government sees it thatwa .~ ., .,�* ., , that way. what we won't do is bail out companies. _ that way. what we won't do is bail out companies. we _ that way. what we won't do is bail out companies. we won't - that way. what we won't do is bail out companies. we won't be - that way. what we won't do is bail out companies. we won't be that l that way. what we won't do is bail. out companies. we won't be that that hevent— out companies. we won't be that that haven't got— out companies. we won't be that that haven't got a business model that can he _ haven't got a business model that can be sustained. what we are interested in doing is protecting consumers. we want to make sure they have continuity of supply, we want to make _ have continuity of supply, we want to make sure that they can keep their_ to make sure that they can keep their prices as keen as possible. we are doing _ their prices as keen as possible. we are doing that through the price cap, _ are doing that through the price cap, through the warm homes discount, _ cap, through the warm homes discount, and cold weather payments as welt _ discount, and cold weather payments as well. �* ., , ., ., as well. adam, you mentioned the rice ca - , as well. adam, you mentioned the price cap. remind _ as well. adam, you mentioned the price cap, remind us _ as well. adam, you mentioned the price cap, remind us what - as well. adam, you mentioned the price cap, remind us what it - as well. adam, you mentioned the price cap, remind us what it is. - as well. adam, you mentioned the price cap, remind us what it is. if. price cap, remind us what it is. tt you are on a variable rate tariff,
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not a fixed rate, then the government introduces this price cap set by the energy regulator. it is the level above which the average bill cannot go up. it is calculated and applied in october and april. so it is going to go up next month to in reflect the increase in wholesale gas prices. it will probably go up against bamako again next april because we are living through another period of increased gas prices. a lot of people's bills will go prices. a lot of people's bills will 9° up prices. a lot of people's bills will go up irrespective of whether they have moved supplier because their existing companies bust. t have moved supplier because their existing companies bust.— existing companies bust. i have followed some _ existing companies bust. i have followed some questions - existing companies bust. i have| followed some questions people existing companies bust. i have - followed some questions people have come up with. people asking what will happen to their debt and credit. people say they don't want to go to british gas, for example. how do they switch? what should people be doing? yell the advice from 0fgem is to take reading and
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sit tight to see what happens. you are free to go back into the market if you don't like what you're proposed energy supplier has offered. in proposed energy supplier has offered. , ., . offered. in terms of credit, the s stem offered. in terms of credit, the system is _ offered. in terms of credit, the system is designed _ offered. in terms of credit, the system is designed to - offered. in terms of credit, the system is designed to protect l offered. in terms of credit, the i system is designed to protect that credits so that it goes with you to your new supplier. but often just say again, people do all your paperwork so you've got a paper trail to prove exactly what position you are in in the small chance that something goes wrong. earlier i spoke with dale vince, the owner of ecotricity, an energy company which specialises in selling green energy to consumers. i asked him how he felt having seen two energy companies go bust yesterday. well, you know, this is actually not new to us. in the last two years, one small energy companies can banquet every six weeks. the regulator has a well oiled machine for dealing with this, handing customers at the best bet are among those best something
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showing that that's and those left standing, which is actually a problem. thisjust the standing, which is actually a problem. this just the way it is. the problem is that as a country may not making our own electricity and gas. we are entirely dependent on global markets and price shocks, such as this when we are entirely dependent on global markets and price shocks, such as this when we're having now. we need to change that. . , we're having now. we need to change that. ., , . ., ., we're having now. we need to change that. ., , ., , we're having now. we need to change that. ., , . ., ., , that. can be changed? how is your coman that. can be changed? how is your company coping? _ that. can be changed? how is your company coping? we _ that. can be changed? how is your company coping? we make - that. can be changed? how is your company coping? we make quite l that. can be changed? how is yourj company coping? we make quite a that. can be changed? how is your. company coping? we make quite a lot of our own electricity _ company coping? we make quite a lot of our own electricity ourselves. - company coping? we make quite a lot of our own electricity ourselves. we . of our own electricity ourselves. we are about to build our first gas mill which makes gas from grass to put into the grid. we have the answers in terms of technology. we can make your own electricity and gas here in britain. that insulates us to a degree as company. we need to insert its whole country in that way, so that we are not dependent on foreign markets for oil and gas in these crazy events that happen all time, but this is my biggest one in my time and energy sector, 25 years, but it's not the first of the last and it will continue until we fix
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the problem. and it will continue until we fix the problem-— and it will continue until we fix the problem. and it will continue until we fix the roblem. ., ,, ., , ., , the problem. the uk appears to be erformin: the problem. the uk appears to be performing really — the problem. the uk appears to be performing really badly _ the problem. the uk appears to be performing really badly when - the problem. the uk appears to be performing really badly when it - performing really badly when it comes to storage. this shortage and gas is a global thing. it's like coordinated reaction with the economy is starting up after the pandemic, or, rather, as we come out of the pandemic. there are countries in europe that have adequate stores. butcher with the uk on that? the statistics are _ butcher with the uk on that? "tt2 statistics are scary. butcher with the uk on that? tt2 statistics are scary. we have 1% of your�*s storage capacity and 10% of your�*s storage capacity and 10% of your�*s population. that is the failure of government planned the right infrastructure for our country. this crisis, in particular, the way affect britain, it began in the way affect britain, it began in the electricity sector. 0ur old nuclear power stations, two of them failed to come out of the end of the summer. we've had the east windy summer. we've had the east windy summerfor 60 summer. we've had the east windy summer for 60 years so our winter fleet underperform. the cable which connects us to france which brings us power burnt down. that would take six months to fix. the wind will come back and this will come back, but we tend to gas to fill the gap.
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the same time, the rest of the world turn to gas and the russians turned down supplies to europe by 25%. and we have a chronic shortage of storage. these are factors. some of them will unpick themselves, but the underlying problem is that we are utterly dependent on the rest of the world from where we get our energy, and we have to change that. has a small energy _ and we have to change that. has a small energy supplier, _ and we have to change that. has a small energy supplier, what - and we have to change that. has a small energy supplier, what will . small energy supplier, what will happen, when it comes to being competitive within the market? statistics say that we started at 70 energy supplies at the start of this year. by winter, they will only be time left. get casinos projections, and i don't have that true. we can see six or seven small energy companies in the pipe about to go bankrupt right now. there are fundamental problems here. the price cap that has been imposed on the sector was meant to aid competition, but the only real competition in the
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market was on price. ibm;r but the only real competition in the market was on price.— but the only real competition in the market was on price. by imposing a one size fits — market was on price. by imposing a one size fits all— market was on price. by imposing a one size fits all price, _ market was on price. by imposing a one size fits all price, i _ market was on price. by imposing a one size fits all price, i think- market was on price. by imposing a one size fits all price, i think it - one size fits all price, i think it destroyed competition, but it is also taking away the ability of companies to react to external events. so companies going bust right now cannot put their prices up to compensate for the incoming price of gas and they are going bust. the government are saying they don't want to move the gap to because they are protecting consumers, but that's naive. it's like being on the beach and trying to resist the tide. these are global events, and if we don't react, we will go bust. fertilising plants up north is shut down because it was simply an economic at that price. the governmentjumped in with millions plans to reopen it and set in a few weeks' time they would but they prices up and it be ok. energy companies come prices that can't and reopen. it's a crazy situation. has your energy provider collapsed ? later this morning we'll be answering your questions. you've still got time to send them in by emailing
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yourquestions@bbc.co.uk or on twitter using the hash tag bbc your questions. that's coming up at 11:30 with annita mcveigh right here on bbc news. police investigating the murder of 28—year—old sabina nessa, say they think she was killed on her way to meet a friend at a pub. her body was found by a member of the public in a south—east london park on saturday morning and a vigil will be held tomorrow in her memory. the family of the primary school teacher say they've been left "devastated" by her death. she honestly was the most caring person, kindest, sweetest girl you could meet. her heart was as good as gold. she never had a bad thing to say about anyone.
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her sisters are going to miss her so much. 0ur correspondent megan patterson joins us from kidbrooke in south east london. we have heard from police this morning and it was confirmed that sabina left the house. as a journey that took should have taken just five minutes, but she didn't complete that journey. five minutes, but she didn't complete thatjourney. her body was discovered on saturday afternoon in the park here. they believe she was attacked on friday night at around 8:30pm. the park to be relatively busy by then. it was a busy area, it was a nice evening. people were out jogging was a nice evening. people were out jogging and meeting theirfans. police say the investigation is making good progress. they are continuing to appeal for people to come forward to offer information,
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if you saw anything strange, if you saw anything the park, anything that might have seemed a bit odd, they want people to share that information. a man in his 40s was arrested on suspicion of murder, but he has since been released under investigation pending further inquiries. we are expecting a police press conference shortly this morning here. morning we press conference shortly this morning we have seen a drone in the park we've seen police officers looking for evidence. this is very much the focus of the investigation in this area. today, there was the news that she was taking a journey of just five minutes news that she was taking a journey ofjust five minutes to meet her friend. that key bits of information, people are being asked to get in touch and if they saw nothing strange to share that information. we'll have more from that press conference later today.
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voters go to the polls in germany this weekend to elect their next government and choose who will take over from angela merkel as chancellor. for millions of younger voters merkel is the only leader they have ever knownwith sixteen years in the top job. for some this stabiliity has stymied change with priorities now moving towards climate change and the digital future. 0ur europe editor katya adler has been speaking to young voters in berlin. this election is all about change. 16 years with the same chancellor, essentially the same prime minister, here in germany. those who shout most for change are definitely the young. we know that germany is an ageing population. time to talk to one of germany's best known social media influencers, thank you very much forjoining us this morning. hi. i'm so glad to be here. you know what really strikes me, i've been covering angela merkel for more than her 16 years in politics, but when i talk to people like you, or kids who are still at school, they are not negative about her, but they do want to change.
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yes. young people really strive for change. 0ur planet is burning. the climate crisis is happening right now and we in germany were hit really hard by it. we want to change. we want a chancellor who drives change, who drives digitalisation forward, who tackles the climate crisis, so i think we are all looking forward to change. but i'm not sure if this really will happen. when you say you want change, the fridays for the future protest, the environmental protest, they are huge here. you take part in them. there is a big one planned for tomorrow, just ahead of the election. you have been asking your followers, there's over 1 million of them in germany, the issues closest to their hearts. you already mentioned a couple. yeah. all of them are actually really disappointed by the politicians, especially during coronavirus, it seemed like the politicians were only addressing the older generations. nothing really changed a lot for the kids going to
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school, for students going to university, and it's so sad that coronavirus wasn't a change maker. it could have been, for digitalisation, for example, but it wasn't. and your name, as an influencer, we'll that is, but in german, there is the nickname, a sinnfluencer. it's a mixture of two words, isn't it. sinn is like a purpose, and meaning. you made to swap from covering fashion and make—up to getting really involved in politics. what moved you to do that? the older i got, the more i realised how important politics is and that it really changes lives. obviously, we see with the climate change, that we really need to act now, that we really have to be loud, as well, to use our reach on social media so that people see how important it is
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to engage in politics and also kind of make a shift when it comes to thinking about climate change are other topics. change and other topics. of the big three political parties in this election, the social democrats, the conservatives, and the greens, it's mainly the social democrats. they have a lot of young candidates in this election. but generally, the discourse has been aimed at much older people. pensions is a number one topic, for example. looking forward, after sunday's election, how confident are you that germany will get the changes that you and your followers asking for? i am really scared of the elections, because it doesn't seem that, especially with some topics, the chancellor candidate is not well equipped to tackle the climate crisis and the paris climate agreement. all parties don't do enough for this. i'm super scared that everything will stay the same. that's not what a lot of young people want. borisjohnson's message to the united nations and ahead
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of cop26 summit on climate change — the world must take radical and urgent action: nearly one and a half million uk customers affected by energy firms collapsing under soaring gas prices could now face higher bills. police investigating the murder of primary school teacher sabina nessa in south london release details of her last movements. we're expecting to hear an update in the next hour. and hairdressers express concern of clients having new allergic reactions to hair dye after contracting coronavirus. lava flowing in lipoma is causing
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massive disruption and now experts are warning of toxic gas and explosions when the latter hits the sea. this is as close as anyone was allowed since the volcano started erupting and here you get a sense of its power. it's an awesome site. these truly are natures strongest forces at work here and nobody could take them or —— attain or control them. that is spewing into the air and flowing downhill and that is why it has been so disruptive and destructive. that's a huge ash cloud is pouring into the sky, spreading across the island here on the east of la palma and we can show you what that volcanic dust is actually like. we are going to cross to the house of commons where an urgent question is being asked to the secretary of state for business energy and industrial strategy. let's listen
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in. t industrial strategy. let's listen in. . ., ., industrial strategy. let's listen in. ., ., , ., industrial strategy. let's listen in. i came for the house on monday to udate in. i came for the house on monday to update colleagues _ in. i came for the house on monday to update colleagues on _ in. i came for the house on monday to update colleagues on the - in. i came for the house on monday to update colleagues on the action | to update colleagues on the action we are taking and appear before the committee yesterday to discuss the matter in greater depth. the government has been clear that protecting consumers is our primary focus and shapes our entire approach to this issue. we will continue to protect consumers with the energy price cap. the global gas situation has had an impact on some energy suppliers and i have been in touch daily with them and as they set off yesterday, there are more than 15 suppliers in the domestic market and we may unfortunately see more suppliers exit the market in the coming weeks. but it is not unusual for energy suppliers to leave the market for various reasons, particularly when wholesale global prices are rising. 0ff gym and
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government have clear well rehearsed processes in place to ensure all customers are supplied with energy and our approach will be informed by the following principles, protecting customers, especially vulnerable ones from price spikes and the solution to this crisis will be found from the industry and the market is already happening and the government will not be bailing out failed energy companies. we would lastly like to see a competitive energy market which can deliver choice and lower prices and the energy cap and price cap which continues to protect customers will remain in place and very finely, consumers come first. and this has always been the centrepiece of our approach. fin always been the centrepiece of our auroach. ., approach. on monday i said to the secretary of _ approach. on monday i said to the secretary of state _ approach. on monday i said to the secretary of state that _ approach. on monday i said to the secretary of state that he - approach. on monday i said to the secretary of state that he was - approach. on monday i said to the i secretary of state that he was being far too _ secretary of state that he was being far too complacent about the situation _ far too complacent about the situation we are facing. events since _ situation we are facing. events since have _ situation we are facing. events since have unfortunately borne this
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out. complacent about the crisis in the market. — out. complacent about the crisis in the market, complacent about the impact _ the market, complacent about the impact on — the market, complacent about the impact on families and the cost of living _ impact on families and the cost of living crisis — impact on families and the cost of living crisis. he pretended on monday— living crisis. he pretended on monday and again today that it was normal— monday and again today that it was normal for— monday and again today that it was normal for a number of suppliers to id normal for a number of suppliers to go down _ normal for a number of suppliers to go down each winter but what we are dealing _ go down each winter but what we are dealing with is far from normal. 800.000 — dealing with is far from normal. 800,000 customers losing their suppliers— 800,000 customers losing their suppliers yesterday alone, 1.5 million — suppliers yesterday alone, 1.5 million in _ suppliers yesterday alone, 1.5 million in the last six weeks and so will he _ million in the last six weeks and so will he answer the question has so far failed _ will he answer the question has so far failed to answer? does he believe — far failed to answer? does he believe taxpayer money will be necessary to stabilise the market? if so, _ necessary to stabilise the market? if so, how — necessary to stabilise the market? if so, how will you ensure value for money— if so, how will you ensure value for money and — if so, how will you ensure value for money and that we do not end up with greater— money and that we do not end up with greater concentration of the big six suppliers? — greater concentration of the big six suppliers? next, i have a letter here _ suppliers? next, i have a letter here that — suppliers? next, i have a letter here that the energy ministry of 18 months _ here that the energy ministry of 18 months ago wrote warning, and i quote, _ months ago wrote warning, and i quote, about systemic risk of the energy— quote, about systemic risk of the energy sector as a whole. it is the usual— energy sector as a whole. it is the usual 0fgem mechanism that supplier of last— usual 0fgem mechanism that supplier of last resort may not be possible and it _ of last resort may not be possible and it make the failure of medium and it make the failure of medium and large — and it make the failure of medium and large supply will be placing
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significant burden and costs on government. when he answer the question— government. when he answer the question to say what planning was done _ question to say what planning was done for— question to say what planning was done for this eventuality following the letter? sure the government would _ the letter? sure the government would he — the letter? sure the government would be in a position now to know exactly _ would be in a position now to know exactly what needs to be done where there is— exactly what needs to be done where there is systemic risk to suppliers and haven't— there is systemic risk to suppliers and haven't we left the country dangerously exposed with them scrabbling around for solutions? finally, — scrabbling around for solutions? finally, we are seven days from the cut of— finally, we are seven days from the cut of universal credit. this is the last time — cut of universal credit. this is the last time a — cut of universal credit. this is the last time a government minister will be in last time a government minister will he in the _ last time a government minister will be in the house to explain to millions— be in the house to explain to millions of families why he is plunging _ millions of families why he is plunging them further into fuel poverty — plunging them further into fuel poverty. instead of warm words or platitudes, — poverty. instead of warm words or platitudes, can he not tell the british— platitudes, can he not tell the british people how you can possibly justify— british people how you can possibly justify this attack on their living standards? isn't the truth that there — standards? isn't the truth that there can _ standards? isn't the truth that there can be no defence for it and there can be no defence for it and the only— there can be no defence for it and the only right and proper and fair thing _ the only right and proper and fair thing to— the only right and proper and fair thing to do— the only right and proper and fair thing to do is to cancel the cut? obviously. _ thing to do is to cancel the cut? obviously, as usual, a number of issues that he raised. we haven't been complacent. the point of supply of last resort process which was
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interrogated last year is that it is an organised process, well established, which allowed existing strong companies to absorb customers in failure. and it is you might hear my answer or we have to remember the letter last year, we interrogated all through the covid process the systems we had in place and during that period, the supply of last resort was found to work. so far this year it has been found to work so i am not going, i am not going to try and talk ourselves to exacerbate the crisis. with regard to the special administrative regime, that is something that is in place and thankfully we haven't had to use it but he knows, as well as many people here that it is their should the case arise. with respect to universal credit, i will say what i said earlier in the week and that is a matter of cross government in
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terms of the budget and budgetary responsibility and there will be a budget at the end of october and there will be plenty of time to discuss that then. can there will be plenty of time to discuss that then.— there will be plenty of time to discuss that then. can i press the business secretary _ discuss that then. can i press the business secretary on _ discuss that then. can i press the business secretary on the - discuss that then. can i press the - business secretary on the government assumptions of pricing? it is evidence _ assumptions of pricing? it is evidence —— and in his evidence yesterday— evidence —— and in his evidence yesterday the head of 0fgem was here to suggest that he expected these hi-h to suggest that he expected these high prices to continue for some time _ high prices to continue for some time i_ high prices to continue for some time. i accept the government does have a _ time. i accept the government does have a crystal ball, but in making policy _ have a crystal ball, but in making policy choices, the government must be making _ policy choices, the government must be making assumptions about what it thinks _ be making assumptions about what it thinks is _ be making assumptions about what it thinks is the most likely path for prices _ thinks is the most likely path for prices can — thinks is the most likely path for prices. can the secretary settles out of _ prices. can the secretary settles out of the — prices. can the secretary settles out of the house please? i prices. can the secretary settles out of the house please?- out of the house please? i don't have a crystal — out of the house please? i don't have a crystal ball, _ out of the house please? i don't have a crystal ball, as _ out of the house please? i don't have a crystal ball, as my - have a crystal ball, as my honourable friend has suggested, i don't make predictions about the price but we prepare for every eventuality and i think the biggest help for consumers and customers at this current time is the price cut and which i repeatedly stated are staying in place. this
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and which i repeatedly stated are staying in place-— and which i repeatedly stated are staying in place. this isn't market failure, staying in place. this isn't market failure. its _ staying in place. this isn't market failure, its government _ staying in place. this isn't market failure, its government failure. i staying in place. this isn't market l failure, its government failure. why are we _ failure, its government failure. why are we now— failure, its government failure. why are we now in crisis management phase _ are we now in crisis management phase now? the tories promised us cheaper— phase now? the tories promised us cheaper energy bills but right now the prices — cheaper energy bills but right now the prices in the uk are the highest in the _ the prices in the uk are the highest in the whole of europe. meanwhile, as gas— in the whole of europe. meanwhile, as gas prices increase an increase in oil— as gas prices increase an increase in oil and — as gas prices increase an increase in oil and gas receipts so surely, there _ in oil and gas receipts so surely, there must— in oil and gas receipts so surely, there must be a redistribution to help hard—pressed bill payers? it is bill help hard—pressed bill payers? it is hill payers — help hard—pressed bill payers? it is bill payers that cover the additional costs of prices in energy suppliers. — additional costs of prices in energy suppliers, they cover the issue with failed _ suppliers, they cover the issue with failed companies. pick cap might stay with— failed companies. pick cap might stay with the cap doesn't stabilise bills stay with the cap doesn't stabilise hills and _ stay with the cap doesn't stabilise bills and so why should bill payers pay even — bills and so why should bill payers pay even more money? what are the estimated _ pay even more money? what are the estimated cost for bill payers? a
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quarter— estimated cost for bill payers? a quarter of— estimated cost for bill payers? a quarter of our electricity bills can -- as— quarter of our electricity bills can -- as we — quarter of our electricity bills can —— as we move away from fossil fuels we need _ —— as we move away from fossil fuels we need a _ —— as we move away from fossil fuels we need a fundamental shift about how that _ we need a fundamental shift about how that concession is paid for and that is— how that concession is paid for and that is something the treasury needs to address _ that is something the treasury needs to address as well. this means enteringm _ to address as well. this means entering... that so scotland is of the highest — entering... that so scotland is of the highest charges in europe. finally, — the highest charges in europe. finally, as _ the highest charges in europe. finally, as a secretary of state is heartsick — finally, as a secretary of state is heartsick to is he happy to plunge 500,000 — heartsick to is he happy to plunge 500,000 extra people into poverty and to— 500,000 extra people into poverty and to end — 500,000 extra people into poverty and to end the universal cut and release — and to end the universal cut and release extra money to help hard—pressed bill payers? release extra money to help hard-pressed bill payers? clearly there was a _ hard-pressed bill payers? clearly there was a lot _ hard-pressed bill payers? clearly there was a lot in _ hard-pressed bill payers? clearly there was a lot in the _ hard-pressed bill payers? clearly there was a lot in the question i hard-pressed bill payers? clearly. there was a lot in the question and statement and i will deal with a couple of things if i may. i'll deal with a couple of issues if i may. with respect to universal credit and why the budgetary considerations are repeatedly said, that is something for the chancellor and who have ample opportunity to discuss these
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things in the house. with respect to the move away from fossil fuels, he and i are in agreement and i think that we need a diverse supply of de—carbonised sources of energy and finally, i dispute the fact that we are ill—prepared. we have a solar process in place, we have the essay or process, we have stress tested those during the whole of the covid period and they are under constant contact with the industry and i feel that we have so far managed to accommodate such supply failure is that we have seen with existing structures. that we have seen with existing structures-— that we have seen with existing structures. ., , ., ., ., , structures. can my right honourable friend confirm _ structures. can my right honourable friend confirm that _ structures. can my right honourable friend confirm that the _ structures. can my right honourable friend confirm that the winter - friend confirm that the winter payment _ friend confirm that the winter payment scheme will remain in place? again, _ payment scheme will remain in place? again, further budgetary issues but i have always said that we are absolutely focused on customers and particularly the most vulnerable customers. this is something that we
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are staying and we are looking to secure and protect the most vulnerable customers in particular prepaid customers from the worst effects. ,, . ., , ., ,, ., effects. the secretary of state dismissed _ effects. the secretary of state dismissed a — effects. the secretary of state dismissed a lack _ effects. the secretary of state dismissed a lack of _ effects. the secretary of state dismissed a lack of gas - effects. the secretary of state | dismissed a lack of gas storage effects. the secretary of state - dismissed a lack of gas storage as not relevant. it is clearly left us vulnerable _ not relevant. it is clearly left us vulnerable so will he now admit that the closure — vulnerable so will he now admit that the closure of the rough storage facility _ the closure of the rough storage facility was a mistake? i the closure of the rough storage facility was a mistake?— facility was a mistake? i don't think it's relevant _ facility was a mistake? i don't think it's relevant because - facility was a mistake? i don't i think it's relevant because there facility was a mistake? i don't - think it's relevant because there is think its relevant because there is no way that any storage in the world is going to mitigate the effect of an issue of gas price in four months. and the answer to this is getting more diverse sources of supply, more diverse sources of electricity through non—carbon sources, through nuclear, which i'm still unclear as to what the opposition party view is on this and through other sources of decarbonise energy. mit? through other sources of decarbonise ener: . ~ , ., �* through other sources of decarbonise ener: . 2 , ., �* . through other sources of decarbonise
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energy. why don't we reduce vat on fuel as a temporary _ energy. why don't we reduce vat on fuel as a temporary measure? - energy. why don't we reduce vat on fuel as a temporary measure? we i energy. why don't we reduce vat on | fuel as a temporary measure? we did it for the _ fuel as a temporary measure? we did it for the hospitality industry which — it for the hospitality industry which was badly affected by covid and why _ which was badly affected by covid and why don't we abolish vat for consumers — and why don't we abolish vat for consumers and feel now? my honourable _ consumers and feel now? ij�*i honourable friend consumers and feel now? m1: honourable friend is consumers and feel now? m1 honourable friend is quite right and we have a whole range of interventions to alleviate the burden on consumers and also on businesses and these were fiscal interventions that my right honourable friend the chancellor pursued last year and i am sure that he is looking at all sorts of things this year but that is a matter for him to decide ahead of the budget. what are the implications of the situation — what are the implications of the situation for the exploitation and extraction of gas within the uk continental shelf? the extraction of gas within the uk continental shelf?— continental shelf? the right honourable _ continental shelf? the right honourable member - continental shelf? the right honourable member will. continental shelf? the right l honourable member will know continental shelf? the right - honourable member will know that as far as 2020 was concerned, 50%, 48% in fact of our natural gas came from the uk continental shelf and that is
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clearly a strong, sustainable source of gas into this country. however, i would suggest to him that gas is a transition fuel, it is something that in our pursuit of net zero 2050, that is something that we want to transition away from and that is why we are developing other sources. further to the question for my honourable friend from christchurch, i honourable friend from christchurch, l raised _ honourable friend from christchurch, l raised this— honourable friend from christchurch, i raised this the other day, i'm sure _ i raised this the other day, i'm sure the — i raised this the other day, i'm sure the conservative answer to this is to reduce — sure the conservative answer to this is to reduce vat on energy bills, something — is to reduce vat on energy bills, something that was pledged by those who supported brexit. he is a tax—cutting conservative and i know that if— tax—cutting conservative and i know that if he _ tax—cutting conservative and i know that if he went to see the chancellor, he would ensure that we would _ chancellor, he would ensure that we would get _ chancellor, he would ensure that we would get vat cut on energy bills.
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as my— would get vat cut on energy bills. as my right honourable friend knows, i see the chancellor on a regular basis and i'm dying delighted to inform him that those conversations are confidential. the inform him that those conversations are confidential.— are confidential. the uk suffers a hiuh are confidential. the uk suffers a high energy _ are confidential. the uk suffers a high energy costs _ are confidential. the uk suffers a high energy costs for _ are confidential. the uk suffers a high energy costs for both - are confidential. the uk suffers a - high energy costs for both consumers and our— high energy costs for both consumers and our businesses, our industries. why is— and our businesses, our industries. why is it _ and our businesses, our industries. why is it then that the storage capacity— why is it then that the storage capacity of the uk is just 2% of annual— capacity of the uk is just 2% of annual demand, versus 25% in europe is on average? is that part of the reason _ is on average? is that part of the reason we — is on average? is that part of the reason we don't have energy price reserves? — reason we don't have energy price reserves? , , , ._ reason we don't have energy price reserves? 1 y , ., ., , reserves? only yesterday, there was a conference — reserves? only yesterday, there was a conference of— reserves? only yesterday, there was a conference of eu _ reserves? only yesterday, there was a conference of eu energy _ reserves? only yesterday, there was a conference of eu energy ministers| a conference of eu energy ministers to discuss this very problem. it is not a function of storage to be able to mitigate a quadrupling of the gas price. this is a completely, it is a complete red herring and one of the reasons why we have less storage is because we have a greater diversity
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of energy supply, this is a strength, not a weakness. the secretary _ strength, not a weakness. the secretary of — strength, not a weakness. the secretary of state _ strength, not a weakness. the secretary of state is absolutely right _ secretary of state is absolutely right to — secretary of state is absolutely right to focus on consumers and try not to— right to focus on consumers and try not to trail— right to focus on consumers and try not to bail out energy firms that have _ not to bail out energy firms that have got — not to bail out energy firms that have got things wrong or are too fragile — have got things wrong or are too fragile. would he please explain to us how— fragile. would he please explain to us how he — fragile. would he please explain to us how he is dealing with customers who are _ us how he is dealing with customers who are currently with supplies that didn't— who are currently with supplies that didn't go— who are currently with supplies that didn't go bust or are on tariffs? sfm _ didn't go bust or are on tariffs? sem encountering resistance by the firms are _ sem encountering resistance by the firms are trying to take on those customers— firms are trying to take on those customers who may be therefore arriving _ customers who may be therefore arriving at — customers who may be therefore arriving at a loss to the acquiring firm? _ arriving at a loss to the acquiring firm? is— arriving at a loss to the acquiring firm? is he — arriving at a loss to the acquiring firm? is he seeing any resistance from _ firm? is he seeing any resistance from them — firm? is he seeing any resistance from them to transfer those customers? 335 from them to transfer those customers?— from them to transfer those customers? �* , �* ., ., customers? as i've said, we have a su -l of customers? as i've said, we have a supply of last _ customers? as i've said, we have a supply of last resort _ customers? as i've said, we have a supply of last resort process - customers? as i've said, we have a supply of last resort process which | supply of last resort process which has worked well in the last couple of years. it's not myjob to say what the terms on which customers are absorbed by companies. however,... no not have the process... but we feel that ultimately, most of these prices are at or just ultimately, most of these prices are at orjust below the cut price cap and that is fundamentally what is going to protect consumers in this
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period. going to protect consumers in this eriod. , ., , period. this government is responsible _ period. this government is responsible for _ period. this government is responsible for families i period. this government is i responsible for families facing a cost of— responsible for families facing a cost of living crisis due to the triple — cost of living crisis due to the triple whammy of rising gas prices, booming _ triple whammy of rising gas prices, booming tax rises and cuts to universal— booming tax rises and cuts to universal credit. will the minister finally— universal credit. will the minister finally acknowledge and accept that this is— finally acknowledge and accept that this is completely and utterly immoral— this is completely and utterly immoral to cut universal credit? what _ immoral to cut universal credit? what i _ immoral to cut universal credit? what i do — immoral to cut universal credit? what i do acknowledge is that there has a minute by dribbling of the gas price and we have an energy price cap will protect the customers from the spikes and we also have schemes that will protect these vulnerable customers. that is what i acknowledge.— customers. that is what i acknowledue. ., ,, customers. that is what i acknowled-e. ., ,, customers. that is what i acknowledt2e. ., ,, , acknowledge. what assessment has my ritht acknowledge. what assessment has my right honourable _ acknowledge. what assessment has my right honourable friend _ acknowledge. what assessment has my right honourable friend made - acknowledge. what assessment has my right honourable friend made to - right honourable friend made to structural dependency this country has on _ structural dependency this country has on gas — structural dependency this country has on gas as a result of sideline green _ has on gas as a result of sideline green technologies like nuclear and hydrogen? my green technologies like nuclear and h droten? g ., ., .,, , hydrogen? my honourable friend is absolutely right. _ hydrogen? my honourable friend is absolutely right. if— hydrogen? my honourable friend is absolutely right. if you _
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hydrogen? my honourable friend is absolutely right. if you take - hydrogen? my honourable friend is absolutely right. if you take the i absolutely right. if you take the example of nuclear, if you take nuclear power, the last labour government did absolutely nothing to drive nuclear power and of course nuclear power is a fundamental ingredient of security of energy supply. ingredient of security of energy su- tl . 2, ~ ingredient of security of energy suttl_ ., ' ingredient of security of energy su--l. ., ,, ~ supply. thank you, mr speaker. the fiture of supply. thank you, mr speaker. the figure of £139 _ supply. thank you, mr speaker. the figure of £139 per _ supply. thank you, mr speaker. the figure of £139 per year _ supply. thank you, mr speaker. the figure of £139 per year has - supply. thank you, mr speaker. the figure of £139 per year has been i figure of £139 per year has been floated — figure of £139 per year has been floated in — figure of £139 per year has been floated in the press as being the effect _ floated in the press as being the effect of— floated in the press as being the effect of the increase in the energy price cap _ effect of the increase in the energy price cap this year. but of course that refers — price cap this year. but of course that refers only to the variable rate and — that refers only to the variable rate and doesn't take into account the changes in bills people will face if— the changes in bills people will face if they move from one tariff to another~ _ face if they move from one tariff to another. and it is often against their— another. and it is often against their will— another. and it is often against their will in circumstances. will their will in circumstances. will the secretary of state consider asking — the secretary of state consider asking the regulator to direct energy— asking the regulator to direct energy suppliers to limit the price increase _ energy suppliers to limit the price increase to — energy suppliers to limit the price increase to any individual customer to a reasonable amount of the coming year? _ to a reasonable amount of the coming year? i— to a reasonable amount of the coming ear? 2, to a reasonable amount of the coming ear? ., ., , ,, , year? i have said we have the supply of last resort — year? i have said we have the supply of last resort process _ year? i have said we have the supply of last resort process and _ year? i have said we have the supply of last resort process and it - year? i have said we have the supply of last resort process and it would i of last resort process and it would be wrong of me to interfere in how
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that works. it has worked effectively over the last two years and as i have set this house the energy cap does give some help as you can imagine without this, many of these consumer prices would be exorbitant. the energy price cap does give support on the vulnerable end of the market and we continue to support this discount.— support this discount. people will be worried that _ support this discount. people will be worried that if _ support this discount. people will be worried that if there _ support this discount. people will be worried that if there energy i be worried that if there energy supply— be worried that if there energy supply does go bust, they potentially could be cut off from their— potentially could be cut off from their gas — potentially could be cut off from their gas and electricity. could the secretary — their gas and electricity. could the secretary of state explain in straightforward and understandable terms _ straightforward and understandable terms how the supplier of last resort— terms how the supplier of last resort process works to put customer's minds at rest? what hattens customer's minds at rest? what happens and — customer's minds at rest? what happens and it _ customer's minds at rest? what happens and it is _ customer's minds at rest? “t't'ngt happens and it is happening at customer's minds at rest? kinngt happens and it is happening at the moment is that there is a bidding process for the customers who would be exiting failing companies and the cost of absorbing those customers is taken on by the company that wins
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the bid and also across the industry and so these costs are neutralised but generally it has been seen as always continue to supply and it is always continue to supply and it is a key element of the system. the minister clearly _ a key element of the system. the minister clearly believes that the invisible — minister clearly believes that the invisible hand of the market will sort this— invisible hand of the market will sort this without doing anything. when _ sort this without doing anything. when he — sort this without doing anything. when he talks about customers, does only mean— when he talks about customers, does only mean domestic consumers or will he ensure _ only mean domestic consumers or will he ensure supply to the industry going _ he ensure supply to the industry going into — he ensure supply to the industry going into secure jobs? does he think— going into secure jobs? does he think that — going into secure jobs? does he think that it is acceptable that germany— think that it is acceptable that germany has some 90 days of gas storage _ germany has some 90 days of gas storage and we have nine days worth? will he _ storage and we have nine days worth? will he also _ storage and we have nine days worth? will he also committed to ensuring adequate _ will he also committed to ensuring adequate supplies under our control for the _ adequate supplies under our control for the future by licensing new gas hills? _ for the future by licensing new gas hills? he _ for the future by licensing new gas bills? , ., _ for the future by licensing new gas bills? , ., ., bills? he is quite right to say that while we protect _ bills? he is quite right to say that while we protect domestic - bills? he is quite right to say that i while we protect domestic consumers in the way i have outlined, it is a fair thing to raise the issue of industrial users of energy in business. people also know that we
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have schemes to protect industrial users of energy. we have the energy industry incentive scheme and yesterday we raised a new energy transformation fund of up to £200 million were businesses can bid in forfurther million were businesses can bid in for further support million were businesses can bid in forfurther support in million were businesses can bid in for further support in that way. thank you for your time over the last few— thank you for your time over the last few weeks, not just on the lack a-s last few weeks, not just on the lack gas prices _ last few weeks, not just on the lack gas prices but on the c02 shortage that followed and i would like to pay tribute to... but for people across — pay tribute to... but for people across cleveland, can the secretary of state _ across cleveland, can the secretary of state outline how supporting people — of state outline how supporting people will protect them from this prices? _ people will protect them from this prices? my people will protect them from this trices? g ., ., ., , people will protect them from this trices? g ., ., , prices? my honourable friend makes an excellent — prices? my honourable friend makes an excellent point. _ prices? my honourable friend makes an excellent point. the _ prices? my honourable friend makes an excellent point. the c02 - prices? my honourable friend makes an excellent point. the c02 crisis i an excellent point. the c02 crisis in hand was dealt with immediately. i spoke to the ceo of cff twice and we had a solution on tuesday and i am pleased that we had a consequence of the solution they have been able to get reduction up and running and getting people back to work in that
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plant. people know that after my many visits to teesside, this government is resolutely committed to helping your constituency and getting people will secure jobs. these skyrocketing gas prices will have a _ these skyrocketing gas prices will have a devastating impact, notjust on the _ have a devastating impact, notjust on the public, but on businesses and they will— on the public, but on businesses and they will eventually have to pass those _ they will eventually have to pass those rises back onto the public. does _ those rises back onto the public. does he — those rises back onto the public. does he understand that that particular double whammy for the public— particular double whammy for the public will see even more families being _ public will see even more families being pushed into fuel poverty and consequently also into food poverty? apart _ consequently also into food poverty? apart from _ consequently also into food poverty? apart from cutting universal credit very soon. — apart from cutting universal credit very soon, making it even worse for many— very soon, making it even worse for many of— very soon, making it even worse for many of these families, what is he doing _ many of these families, what is he doing to _ many of these families, what is he doing to support them? repeatedly, and he will have _ doing to support them? repeatedly, and he will have seen _ doing to support them? repeatedly, and he will have seen reports - doing to support them? repeatedly, and he will have seen reports that i and he will have seen reports that energy companies want the government to lift the energy price cap, i have
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repeatedly resisted that and very explicitly said on this floor and other places that the energy price caps days, while also reaffirming our commitment to the warm home discount and winter fuel payment. we are absolutely focused on keeping consumer's prices as low as possible. consumer's prices as low as possible-— consumer's prices as low as tossible. 2 ., ., ., , possible. we all hear of the number of businesses _ possible. we all hear of the number of businesses going _ possible. we all hear of the number of businesses going bust _ possible. we all hear of the number of businesses going bust in - possible. we all hear of the number of businesses going bust in this i of businesses going bust in this market. — of businesses going bust in this market, but you could assure me and my constituents that as we go forward — my constituents that as we go forward we anticipate this to be a short-term — forward we anticipate this to be a short—term shock and we will come out with— short—term shock and we will come out with this — short—term shock and we will come out with this with a robust market and a _ out with this with a robust market and a diversity of supply? my and a diversity of supply? m1 honourable friend knows the competition is the key to this market. we had a word which was aura does? we have introduced a price cut and we have lots of entrants coming in and driving innovation and dynamic system and i am absolutely committed to having a diverse market that i'm sure that after this process we will still have a vibrant and dynamic energy system. there are
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too many people _ and dynamic energy system. there are too many people who _ and dynamic energy system. there are too many people who have _ and dynamic energy system. there are too many people who have got - too many people who have got to watch _ too many people who have got to watch every single penny... that was the business — watch every single penny... that was the business secretary _ watch every single penny... that was the business secretary answering i watch every single penny... that was the business secretary answering a l the business secretary answering a number of questions regarding the hike in gas prices and also the number of companies that have gone bust as a result of this energy prices. really pushed on the storage, but he said it had nothing to do with it, it's about other sources of energy. also questioned about the possibility of reducing vat on fuel to try and help people out and he did stress that the energy price cut is staying in place. how long these high prices would last, when he says he doesn't have a crystal ball, but again, commended by a number of mps about not bailing out energy companies. ed
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miliband accusing the government of being complacent. a lot of complacency on the part of the government and really pushing on the value for money for taxpayers that we are going to have to pay for some of what is going on and what is going to happen when we have this concentration of the big six in the energy supplier market? questions also are planning on what planning was put in place in terms of the risk to suppliers. just some of the points in there that people and mps have been pressing on the energy secretary and him also trying to stress that the government's position on this current energy crisis. there will be plenty more coming up with and mcveigh shortly and we will also be answering your questions about what to do next when
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it comes to your energy supply. that will be coming up shortly as well as all the top stories right here on bbc news. don't go away. we just have some breaking news. a woman with down syndrome has lost a high court challenge against the government over legislation which allows the abortion of babies with a condition up until birth. she is 26 and from coventry and she was one of three claimants who had brought the legal action against the department of health and social care. anita would have more details on that and we will get more reaction in the meantime unless how see how the weather is looking. hello. it's all turned into another warm septembers a day, for many of you today across the half of scotland, it's got nothing other than autumn. strong to gale force winds, cut to the area of low pressure which is now moving its way off into norway.
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winds will ease but still remaining blustery here. northern side of this cold front, so the sunshine will be out this afternoon, but it will feel much chillier than it has done of late. a cold front itself which turns back into a warm front and turns back into western scotland, patchy light rain or drizzle. there will be some in northern ireland, but brightening up across the south. a bit more cloud in northern england this afternoon and an old weather front down to the south—west will bring some light rain and drizzle, clearing away from wales and the midlands to bring some afternoon sunshine and warmth here — temperatures here 22—23 compared to ten or 11 in shetland. the weather tonight will see more in the way of blustery winds and outbreaks of rain. not quite as wild as last night. brazier across the country, particularly to the north and west —— mike brazier... were more cloud will bring patchy drizzle later in the night. —— mike brazier... many other areas will stay dry and partly clear and cooler across the midlands and east anglia and the south, temperatures in those rural areas are down to single figures. the pressure chart for friday shows another area of low pressure to the north of the country. this time a bit further away, so not as windy. we have a weather front is just working their way in from the west
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and they are coming in on westerly winds off the atlantic. moisture laden and with a little bit of warmth in it. you can see the amber colours here. it's not going to be a cold day on friday, even further north across shetland it won't be as chilly as today. lots of cloud though at times across the western districts of the uk with some patchy rain or drizzle, some coasts and hills in particular, but central eastern areas, some sunny spells the best of which in the south—east at 23—24 is possible but even to eastern scotland, we could get up to around 20—21 c in aberdeenshire and angus. we keep with that warmer feel into the weekend the winds are switching to a southerly for a time, but there is an area of low pressure pushing and as we go into next week and notice the colours on the chart change and things will turn cooler. let's start with the weekend though first of all. a fair bit of cloud around on saturday and there will be some showery rain pushing its way northwards, particularly in the west, brightest in the south and east and temperatures are still high teens— the low 20s. sunday is probably the funniest of the two days for scotland, england and wales. isolated showers can't be ruled out, though, still warm in the sunshine, but a band of rain, heavy rain at that edges into the west later on.
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that will sweep through during sunday night and bring a change for next week. and much more autumnalfeel with ever changing skies and a mix of sunshine and skies and a drop in temperature.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: as the government warns more energy companies could go bust in the weeks ahead, labour accuses ministers of leaving the country "dangerously exposed". on monday i said the secretary of state he was being far too complacent about the situation we are facing. events since have unfortunately warned that this output is not complacent about the crisis in the market, complacent about the impact on families, complacent about the cost of living crisis. itaste complacent about the cost of living crisis. 2 ., ~' complacent about the cost of living crisis. 2 ., ~ ., , ., crisis. we would like to see a competitive _ crisis. we would like to see a competitive energy _ crisis. we would like to see a competitive energy market i crisis. we would like to see a i competitive energy market which crisis. we would like to see a - competitive energy market which can deliver— competitive energy market which can deliver choice and lower prices will stop the _ deliver choice and lower prices will stop the energy cap, the energy price _ stop the energy cap, the energy price cap, — stop the energy cap, the energy price cap, which continues to protect— price cap, which continues to protect millions of customers, will remain— protect millions of customers, will remain in— protect millions of customers, will remain in place and very finally, consumers. _ remain in place and very finally, consumers, mr speaker, confessed.
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police investigating the murder of primary school teacher sabina nessa in south london release details of her last movements. yesterday we had a street briefing to update the local community. later this week we are meeting again with individuals to continue those important conversations. we will also be having a virtual fur important conversations. we will also be having a virtualfur sabina on friday. —— having a vigil. borisjohnson's message to the united nations and ahead of cop26 summit on climate change — the world must take radical and urgent action. tenants are being evicted due to rent arrears built up during the pandemic, an investigation finds. that's despite a government commitment that the crisis would not leave anyone without a home. and hairdressers express concern of clients having new allergic reactions to hair dye after contracting coronavirus.
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hello, good morning and welcome to bbc news, thanks forjoining us this morning. the government warns more energy companies could go bust in the weeks ahead, labour accuses ministers of leaving the country "dangerously exposed". 0fgem fears almost one and a half million customers facing a switch to new suppliers and more expensive bills. two companies, avro energy and green, with more than 800,000 customers between them, ceased trading yesterday, after the price of wholesale gas soared to unprecedented levels. ramzan karmali reports. soaring gas prices have led to the collapse of two more energy suppliers, meaning six firms have gone bust in september alone and left 1.5 million customers facing higher bills. those customers will still receive energy while a new supplier is appointed by 0fgem.
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its boss warned it was likely more firms would go bust. it's not unusual for suppliers to go out of the market. i think what's different this time is the dramatic change in the costs those suppliers are facing. we do expect more, we do expect more not to be able to face the circumstances we are in, but it is genuinely hard to say more than that, partly because that means predicting the gas price. this is a significant impact on the sector and it is something we are working with government to manage, but we can't make predictions. energy firms have been hit by a massive rise in wholesale prices. they are apparently around four times higher than normal. the body that represents them has warned the market is not working. the government has promised the energy price cap will remain in place during the winter, and it hopes this will protect millions of customers. but from october 1st, that cap is set to rise by 12%, meaning around 15 million households will still end up paying more.
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razman karmali, bbc news. we have just had an urgent question on the energy crisis in the house of commons. let's get more with lone wells, our political correspondent. good morning. that urgent question was between two narratives, the government are saying it is handling this crisis and the people that has been caused by a result of it and labour accusing the government of leaving the country dangerously exposed. leaving the country dangerously extosed. 2, , leaving the country dangerously extosed. ., , ., , , exposed. that is right and this is the tension _ exposed. that is right and this is the tension that _ exposed. that is right and this is the tension that will _ exposed. that is right and this is the tension that will play - exposed. that is right and this is the tension that will play out i exposed. that is right and this is | the tension that will play out over the tension that will play out over the next couple of weeks. as we heard in that report, there are now about one and half million customers in the uk whose energy firms have gone bust and they all need a new home, new energy supplier to supply them through the winter months. the government is expecting that more small energy firms will also go bust, giving these rising gas prices and they are in constant dialogue with 0fgem about which firms might be next. the current system in place to deal with this is one that has
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beenin to deal with this is one that has been in existence for a while because there are firms that do tend to go bust every year. essentially what happens is the big pool of customers from some of those energy firms that do go and don't get it reallocated among the other firms that can afford to take people on. —— do get reallocated. given the scale ofjust how many firms may be at risk of going under, they may start to make a loss as a result because we have energy caps in the uk meaning there is a cap on the amount companies can charge people for their energy bills and that means some of these companies are fearing they may not be able to pass on their additional costs to the companies and as a result were fearing they might make a loss from it. earlierthis fearing they might make a loss from it. earlier this week, the government seemed to suggest they may be looking at providing some kind of loans to some of those bigger companies so they would be able to take on all of these customers that are now needing a new home essentially from the firms that are going bust stop now we have had are going bust stop now we have had a bit of a change of tune from government and they are hammering down on the fact that the current
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system is working. in the house of commons today, the business secretary said that they were stressing that they are still going to be prioritising the consumer. those energy caps are remaining in place but did not mention anything about any loans for some of those companies that are taking more people on. the global gas situation, mr speaker, has had an impact on some energy suppliers and i have been in touch daily with 0fgem and as they set out yesterday, there are more than 50 suppliers in the domestic market and we may unfortunately see more suppliers exit the market in the coming weeks. but it is not unusual for energy suppliers to leave the market for various reasons, particularly when wholesale global prices are rising. 0fgem and government have clear, well rehearsed processes in place to make sure all customers are supplied with energy. our approach will be informed by the following principles — protecting customers, especially vulnerable ones, from price spikes and the solution
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to this crisis will be found from the industry and the market, as is already happening and government, i repeat, will not be bailing out failed energy companies. lastly, we would like to see a competitive energy market which can deliver choice and lower prices. the energy cap, the energy price cap, which continues to protect millions of customers, will remain in place. and very finally, consumers, mr speaker, come first and this has always been the centrepiece of our approach. we have heard theirfamily we have heard their family business secretary two things, first a principle they have always stuck by that they do not want to use taxpayers motto—macro money to bail out some of those failing energy firms, but also as i said earlier, they do not currently want to provide loans for some of those bigger companies that may have to absorb some more customers. interestingly, this speech today comes after a warning today by the
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boss of green, one of the companies that has gone and i. he said the government has micro—approach of allowing this reallocation process will not work given he fears that biggerfirms are going will not work given he fears that bigger firms are going to start to face trouble soon as well. —— one of the companies that has gone under. ed miliband was saying the garment has gone into the crisis and prepared and the current approach does not take into account the scale of the problem when there are 800,000 people who havejust lost their energy supplier today. fin their energy supplier today. on monday are said to be secretary of state _ monday are said to be secretary of state he _ monday are said to be secretary of state he was being far too complacent about the situation we are facing — complacent about the situation we are facing. events since have unfortunately worn at this output is not complacent about the crisis in the market, complacent about the impact _ the market, complacent about the impact on — the market, complacent about the impact on families, complacent about the cost _ impact on families, complacent about the cost of— impact on families, complacent about the cost of living crisis. he pretended on monday and again today that it _ pretended on monday and again today that it was _ pretended on monday and again today that it was normal for a number of suppliers— that it was normal for a number of suppliers to — that it was normal for a number of suppliers to go down each winter, but what — suppliers to go down each winter, but what we are dealing with is a far from — but what we are dealing with is a far from normal. 800,000 customers losing _ far from normal. 800,000 customers losing their _
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far from normal. 800,000 customers losing their suppliers yesterday alone — losing their suppliers yesterday alone. titus losing their suppliers yesterday alone. �* , , ., losing their suppliers yesterday alone. a ., ., alone. as you had there, a fluid situation and _ alone. as you had there, a fluid situation and the _ alone. as you had there, a fluid situation and the expectation i alone. as you had there, a fluid situation and the expectation is| situation and the expectation is that many more firms than usual will be facing problems this winter and the government is in conversations with that regulator 0fgem about which ones may be the next to go and also what their response may be. i think there is an understanding amongst ministers that while they do have faith in this current system of reallocation, theirfear have faith in this current system of reallocation, their fear is essentially if the reallocating process continues in the way it would, it would not necessarily last if some of those bigger firms did that go under and face problems as well. if that happens, our understanding of the government may have to start looking at a special administrator to be brought in to try and help some of those bigger firms. 2, ~' , ., , . try and help some of those bigger firms. ., ,, i. , . ., try and help some of those bigger firms. 2, ~ ,, , . ., ., joining me now is lisa iron, who was a former avro customer until it seized trading yesterday. thank you so much forjoining us, you are one of obviously hundreds of thousands of people in this
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situation of uncertainty. tell us a little bit about the deal that you had and what has happened since you found out that avro had gone bust. i applied to switch energy providers last year and it was coming up with the anniversary of that change yesterday and hearing the news was just sort of quite surprising really, surprising but then again not surprising in this current climate that we have. so not surprising in this current climate that we have. so what is next? are _ climate that we have. so what is next? are you — climate that we have. so what is next? are you waiting _ climate that we have. so what is next? are you waiting to - climate that we have. so what is next? are you waiting to be i next? are you waiting to be allocated a new energy supplier? yes stot the allocated a new energy supplier? t2: stop the whole point of going through you switch as you have control of who you went with, looking for the cheapest deal. now i understand that we will be allocated another provider, but we do not have another provider, but we do not have a choice of who that provider is and we will not know what we will be
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paying per month. it will be considerably more than what we were paying previously, because obviously we wear with a provider who was offering a better deal at the time. yes, as you mentioned, you actively tried to avoid the bigger energy companies, so if you are allocated say one of the big six, will you immediately try and switch to another one, albeit with less choice in the market?— in the market? possibly, yes. it is about going _ in the market? possibly, yes. it is about going and — in the market? possibly, yes. it is about going and trying _ in the market? possibly, yes. it is about going and trying to - in the market? possibly, yes. it is about going and trying to be i in the market? possibly, yes. it is about going and trying to be very| about going and trying to be very savvy with your money, in particular the cost of living has gone up, everything is rising, fuel price etc, so you can make savings it is important to try and do so. so yes, we will definitely be looking to try and make the move again, but we will have to wait and see who we are with. luckily, i handed in a metre reading on tuesday, so i know exactly how much i had used up to that point before they went bust. that was a very good plan, a very goodidea
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that was a very good plan, a very good idea and certainly that is the advice to people if they have been able to in the last couple of days, to get a photograph evidence of their metre readings. but i think that when you try to log on to the avro website, you are not able to come is that right?— come is that right? yes, i can log straitht come is that right? yes, i can log straight in _ come is that right? yes, i can log straight in to _ come is that right? yes, i can log straight in to what _ come is that right? yes, i can log straight in to what would - come is that right? yes, i can log straight in to what would be i come is that right? yes, i can log straight in to what would be my l straight in to what would be my account, but it is completely blank, nothing actually filtered through, so i cannot see my statements, my readings, anything that would suggest i had had an account with them. it hasjust suggest i had had an account with them. it has just got the small blue doughnut of doom being shown. ii them. it has just got the small blue doughnut of doom being shown. if you wanted any history _ doughnut of doom being shown. if you wanted any history for— doughnut of doom being shown. if you wanted any history for reference, it is just not there at the moment? yes. i would advise people if they do use this sort of online accounting is to download your statements and keep them separate, because you never know when this might happen again. i because you never know when this might happen again.— because you never know when this might happen again. i understand you work from home. _ might happen again. i understand you work from home. how _ might happen again. i understand you work from home. how concerned i
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might happen again. i understand you work from home. how concerned are l work from home. how concerned are you about energy bills heading into the winter? i , you about energy bills heading into the winter? , , . ., . the winter? yes, very concerned. obviously, _ the winter? yes, very concerned. obviously, we — the winter? yes, very concerned. obviously, we have _ the winter? yes, very concerned. obviously, we have got _ the winter? yes, very concerned. obviously, we have got a - the winter? yes, very concerned. obviously, we have got a flexible j obviously, we have got a flexible working policy here at the university of northampton and i at work today but usually i am working from home a large majority of the time, so yes it does worry me that the amounts we will be spending on gas and electricity over the winter period is going to be considerably more, even more so now that we are going to have to swap to an energy provider who essentially was not giving the best deals in the past. even though you have shied away from the larger energy companies in the past and you have sought out better deals with smaller suppliers, do you think this might be the time to stick with a larger company, given the volatility at the moment? yes. the volatility at the moment? yes, it mitht the volatility at the moment? yes, it might be — the volatility at the moment? yes, it might be worthwhile. _ the volatility at the moment? t22, it might be worthwhile. previously we have been with one of the large companies and actually moved away from them last year, so it might mean that we will have to just bite
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the bullet so to speak for the next sought over 12 months until the market stabilises somewhat. t}i(. market stabilises somewhat. ok, thank ou market stabilises somewhat. ok, thank you so _ market stabilises somewhat. ok, thank you so much for sharing your story with our viewers. thank you so much. and in about half an hour, we'll be answering your questions on the energy crisis. you've still got time to send them in by emailing yourquestions@bbc.co.uk or on twitter you can reach me using annita—mcveigh. that's coming up at 11:30am. police investigating the murder of 28—year—old primary school teacher sabina nessa, have revealed she was attacked minutes from her home on the way to meet a friend in a pub. her body was found by a member of the public in a south—east london park on saturday morning. a vigil will be held tomorrow in her memory. in the past few minutes, the metropolitan police have been speaking from the scene in kidbrooke. our correspondent was at that news
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conference and joins us now. what is the latest the police have been saying about this investigation into her killing? tbss saying about this investigation into her killint? ~ , saying about this investigation into herkillint? a saying about this investigation into her killint? a ., her killing? as you say, we have heard in the _ her killing? as you say, we have heard in the last _ her killing? as you say, we have heard in the last few _ her killing? as you say, we have heard in the last few minutes i her killing? as you say, we have l heard in the last few minutes that the last movements the police understand of sabina nessa, she was the understand going on a night out to meet a friend on a friday night, a journey which should have taken her from a journey which should have taken herfrom her home a journey which should have taken her from her home to the pub about five minutes walking through this park, but we know now she never completed thatjourney. her body was found on a saturday afternoon by a member of the public. the police understand she was attacked here on a friday night around about 8:30pm and this morning they have again been appealing for witnesses was that they say they have a number of significant lines of enquiry and have had good information from the public so far, but they believe people might know more. this is a busy park, used well by the community that surrounds it. friday evening was a sunny evening in south—west london, lots of people
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out and about as sabina was, so they are asking people to come forward if they have seen anything that might have struck them as a little bit strange, anyone acting oddly that they have not already reported. believe that could be really helpful in understanding what happened to sabina nessa. she has been described by herfamily as sabina nessa. she has been described by her family as a sabina nessa. she has been described by herfamily as a caring, sabina nessa. she has been described by her family as a caring, sweet, beautiful young woman he was a teacher dedicated to her pupils. they are understandably absolutely devastated, as are a number of campaign groups who have been holding a vigil here on friday night and also to raise their anger against violence against women. tbshd against violence against women. and other people scared about what has happened to sabina? it is something man of us happened to sabina? it is something many of us have _ happened to sabina? it is something many of us have done _ happened to sabina? it is something many of us have done going - happened to sabina? it is something many of us have done going out i happened to sabina? it is something many of us have done going out on | happened to sabina? it is somethingj many of us have done going out on a friday night and you want to feel
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safe. the police came this morning to reassure people they are stepping up to reassure people they are stepping up patrols in this area, they are being as vigilant as they can be. they want to talk to people to see how they can make people feel safer, but the message this money was certainly that the streets are safe. this is a horrific incident, but the police want to work with people to make them feel safer and ultimately understand what happened to sabina nessa. 2i ~' m , . understand what happened to sabina nessa. ., ,, ,~2 , . �*, nessa. thank you very much. let's brint ou nessa. thank you very much. let's bring you a — nessa. thank you very much. let's bring you a clip _ nessa. thank you very much. let's bring you a clip of— nessa. thank you very much. let's bring you a clip of the _ nessa. thank you very much. let's bring you a clip of the police i bring you a clip of the police speaking from the scene. i am appealing for information into the tragic death of sabina nessa. sabina, we believe was walking from her home address and would have leftjust before 8:30pm. we now understand that sabina was planning on meeting a friend at the depot pub in the square which is just over five minutes walk away.
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herjourney would have seen her walk through the park and we believe, as she walked through the park, she was approached by an individual and fatally attacked. sabina's body was sadly found by a member of the public around 5:30pm the following day. as anyone who lives here will know, cator park is well used by the community and we are appealing for anyone who was here on friday and thinks they saw anything unusual, to come forward. maybe you saw someone acting strangely inside the park or running away from it. if you were in the area, please think back and let us know if you have any information. we have an extensive crime scene in place and we are expecting to be here for the next couple of days. we also have a number of high visibility patrols and would encourage anyone who has
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concerns to engage with those officers. they are here to listen to what you have to say. since the murder took place, we have been speaking even more regularly with our partners to ensure that we are doing everything we can to make those who live here feel safe, without the fear of violence. yesterday, we held a street briefing to update the local community and later this week we are meeting again with individuals to continue those important conversations. we will also be part of the vigil for sabina on friday. the officers that you see here are all your officers. they are part of the community and we wish to stand with the community at this time. one of sabina's sisters has tweeted. let's show that you. that tweet from one of sabina
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nessa's sisters as police continue the investigation into her murder. campaigners have lost a high court challenge against the government, over legislation which allows the abortion of babies with down's syndrome up until birth. they argued the law is unlawfully discriminatory in allowing terminations after 2a weeks. heidi crowter, who has down's syndrome, and maire lea—wilson, whose son has the condition, took legal action to call for a change in legislation. but two seniorjudges concluded that it aims to strike a balance between rights of the unborn child and of women. we hope to get some more reaction to that court case sooner. "it's time for humanity to grow up and take responsibility for climate change". that was borisjohnson's message to the united nations general assembly as he gave his speech. with just ito days to go until the uk hosts a set—piece summit on climate change, the prime minister called on leaders to sign up for big reductions
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in their carbon emissions. it would mean developing countries phasing out power generation from coal, with help from richer nations. our correspondent barbara plett usher has more from new york. it was not for the faint—hearted, this frenetic trip. the prime minister covered a lot of ground. he shook a few hands. conducted a few interviews. visited a few sites. even took a train ride. final stop, back to the united nations, where he used his address to press for a stronger commitment to end global warming, with a stark warning of the enduring consequences if countries didn't step up. we will see decertification, drought, crop failure and mass movements of humanity on a scale not seen before, not because of some unforeseen natural event or disaster, but because of us, because of what we are doing now. and our grandchildren will know
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that we are the culprits. the prime minister chose to focus solely on the subject of climate change. he used this global stage to make a strong speech ahead of the climate conference coming up soon in glasgow, which he said would be a critical turning point for humanity. it helped to have an american president on side. joe biden pledged to double us contributions for developing nations to tackle climate change. that was a big win for mrjohnson, who was determined to cement a crucial relationship that has had its rocky moments. he wasn't able to tuck the promise of a new trade deal into his suitcase, but it was still a largely successful trip that showcased the two leaders working together on shared priorities. and nowhere is that more evident than when it comes to climate crisis. mr president, see you in glasgow. thank you. barbara plett usher, bbc news, new york. an investigation has found that
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tenants are being evicted due to rent arrears built up during the pandemic, despite a government commitment that coronavirus would not leave anyone without a home. analysis of 270 possession orders issued by courts in england and wales this summer, found that in one third of cases, covid was stated as the reason for the missing payments. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan has the details. michael calder is a musician and pre—pandemic a guitar teacher. my work was all based around contact with people, in and out of people's houses daily. as he prepared for his son's birth, the country went into lockdown and his income plummeted. michael fell into rent arrears and has now been served with an eviction notice. it's kind of like weighing up, when can i meet my rent, put food on the table, you know, paying the bills, gas and electricity?
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and bit by bit the moneyjust increased and decreased to the point where i did just end up in arrears. —— decreased and decreased. there was no way around it. since the ban on evictions was lifted, landlords have been rushing to county courts seeking permission for bailiffs to evict their tenants. of the 270 possession orders analysed by the bureau of investigativejournalism, one third of them, 88 cases, explicitly cited covid as the reason why rent arrears had arisen. what strikes you about sitting in the hearings is exactly how short they are. people are losing their homes in a matter of minutes. that's because the law is really clear. if you owe at least two months of rent arrears, then the landlord will almost certainly get a possession order. onejudge told the bbc, however, that some tenants have taken advantage of the evictions ban and had simply refused to pay the rent. well, i had to wait six months. landlord michelle dighton is owed a fortune by tenants she can't get
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rid of due to the eviction ban and court delays. i was still having to pay my mortgages, look after the kids. and it's just really frustrating that no one wants to give me an update on when i should get my own property back. ministers in westminster say they took unprecedented action to keep people in their homes, and with the economy reopening, it was now time to deliver a fair rental market. what this investigation highlights, however, is that both landlords and tenants feel the system is not fair. michael buchanan, bbc news. care companies are facing the most acute staffing crisis in living memory — that's the warning from a group of major providers. in a letter to the prime minister, the not—for—profit companies, who support around 95,000 elderly people in the uk, have asked the government for immediate help to deal with staff shortages. the government says it will be investing more money in the sector. lava pouring from a volcano on the spanish island of la palma
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has damaged hundreds of homes and forced thousands to flee the area. the volcano erupted on sunday and scientists are now warning of the dangers of toxic gases and explosions — when the lava hits the sea. dan johnson reports. this is as close as anybody has been allowed since the volcano started erupting on sunday. and here, you really do get a sense of its power. it's an awesome sight. these truly are nature's strongest forces at work here. and nobody can tame them, nobody can control them. that is absolutely red hot lava that is spewing continuously into the air and then flowing downhill. that's why it is has been so destructive to the homes, the villages, the communities in the path of that lava. there is also a huge ash cloud that is pouring into the sky, spreading across the island here on the east of la palma. we can show you what that volcanic dust is actually like. it's more like gravel in places.
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it's really quite coarse. and there is a thick layer of that absolutely everywhere smothering everything. because of that ash, and because of the fact that the lava flowing downhill has cut off roads, it has ripped through the infrastructure here and may mean villages are uninhabitable. you get a sense of how much heat, how much noise it is generating. and the big unknown isjust how long that eruption will continue, how much more devastating it could be, and where that lava flow could end up. very dramatic pictures. the time is approaching 11:30am. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. another afternoon of warm september sunshine for quite a few, but patchy rain especially towards the south—west, more in the way of dampness towards the west of
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scotland returns and to the north of northern ireland, although brightening to the south. a bright afternoon, but less windy across parts of the north—east of scotland, ten or 11 degrees compared to 2223 in southern parts of wales, west midlands and east anglia. —— 22 or 23. not as strong the winds as last night, rain at times in shetland and across western areas to take you into friday. there will be a lot more in the way of low cloud around hugging the coast, hills, patchy light rain and drizzle. coming and going. sheltered from breeze, more septembersunshine. going. sheltered from breeze, more september sunshine. staying on in my dollar —— ma side before autumn arrives next week. —— staying on the milder side.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines...
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as the government warns more energy companies could go bust in the weeks ahead, labour accuses ministers of leaving the country �*dangerously exposed'. police investigating the murder of primary school teacher sabina nessa in south london release details of her last movements. borisjohnson's message to the united nations and ahead of cop26 summit on climate change — the world must take radical and urgent action. tenants are being evicted due to rent arrears built up during the pandemic, an investigation finds. that's despite a government commitment that the crisis would not leave anyone without a home. and hairdressers express concern of clients having new allergic reactions to hair dye after contracting coronavirus. sport and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good morning. dundee striker leigh griffiths could be in trouble after he kicked a flare into the crowd curing last
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night's scottish league cup defeat at home to stjohnstone. a blue smoke cannister was thrown onto the pitch and a video has appeared on social media showing him walking over to it and booting it towards the away fans. griffiths, who's on loan from celtic, had been on the receiving end of abusive chants during the game and the incident is likely to be investigated by the sfa. celtic will aim to put their poor league form to one side tonight, when the play second tier raith rovers, for a place in the semi—finals — dundee united also take on hibs later rangers are already through, after alfredo morelos, took full advantage of a dreadful goalkeeping error, to help them to a 2—nil win over livingston. manchester united faced west ham for the second time in four days last night — and this time it was the hammers who came out on top... gaining revenge for their defeat in the league — manuel lanzini's first half goal, was the difference — that gave west ham their first win at old trafford for 1h years.
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their reward is a fourth—round meeting with manchester city, who've won this cup four years running. reece james scored the winning penalty for chelsea, as they beat aston villa, to extend their unbeaten start to the season they'll face southampton next, as they chase the title, they last won six years ago. tottenham are also through... they narrowly beat wolves on penalties. wolves captain connor coady missing the decisive penalty after the match finished level at 2—all. they face burnley next. and arsenal are also through... they continued their good form with a comfortable 3—nil win over wimbledon, to make it three wins in a row now, in all competitions, for mikel arteta. arsenal were drawn at home to leeds in the fourth round. there are details of all last night's games on the bbc sport website.
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as the excitement builds for the start of the ryder cup tomorrow, team europe have been attempting to win over the home fans at whistling straits. the players appeared in �*cheeseheads' — a nod to the local nfl side, the green bay packers. on paper, the usa, are favourites to win, with 9 of the top 11 players in the world on their team, but ian poulter is no stranger to upsetting the odds on foreign soil he was part of the miracle in medinah, back in 2012 the last time europe won in the united states. i think it is on each player to work out how he will use that energy to spirit them on, to get the best out of them, it is different, we do not always have it that way and this will be a new one, but i think there
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is the ability to use theirjuice. andy murray will find out later who he'll face in the quarter—finals of the moselle open in france — it could be the top seed hubert hurkacz, who takes on lucas pouille this afternoon. murray moved into the last eight with a convincing win over canada's vasek pospisil, who's ranked 47 places above him in the world rankings — after winning 6—3 6—3, murray said his body felt good, he was gaining confidence and the results were coming. world rugby is issuing guidance to limit contact training across union competitions to just 15 minutes a week to try to prevent injuries. it follows consultation with 600 players in 18 competitions. research shows that 35—40% of injuries are sustained in training. the sports's governing body also hopes to cap "controlled contact" training — such as using shields and tackle pads — to ito minutes per week. something finally that will leave you open mouthed
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cliff diving and british—born gary hunt, has retained his world series title, with victory in poolia. the setting was spectacular — but the event, was shortened from 4 rounds to three, because of worsening weather conditions. it was sunny though, when hunt, who now competes for france, nailed a difficult, back three somersaults and four twists, to secure the world crown for the ninth time. that's all the sport — now on bbc news, it's your questions answered. welcome to your questions answered. you've been sending in your questions on the collapse of several energy providers. here's to try and answer just some of them is energy analyst, ellen fraser.
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hello to you. thank you forjoining us, so many questions to get to, your starter for ten us, so many questions to get to, your starterfor ten is us, so many questions to get to, your starter for ten is this one from ps lewis, why are energy firms going bust?— going bust? effectively energy firms are totin going bust? effectively energy firms are going bust _ going bust? effectively energy firms are going bust because _ going bust? effectively energy firms are going bust because of _ going bust? effectively energy firms are going bust because of the i are going bust because of the wholesale price spikes, they are limited in terms of what they can move on to consumers because of the energy cap but if they have not bought energy ahead, they are exposed to the wholesale market, they are buying the energy other more expensive because when they come sail on and they are therefore making a loss on many of them do not have the balance sheets to be able to continue. have the balance sheets to be able to continue-— have the balance sheets to be able to continue. , i, , i, , to continue. this one is from mandy who sa s to continue. this one is from mandy who says i — to continue. this one is from mandy who says i am _ to continue. this one is from mandy who says i am currently _ to continue. this one is from mandy who says i am currently with - to continue. this one is from mandy who says i am currently with a i to continue. this one is from mandy who says i am currently with a glue | who says i am currently with a glue but started to switch to avro which was due to take place in october and
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they have gone bust and take on an upfront payment of the same day they had announced they ceased trading, do i cancel my switch or is it too late? that is a really good question and there is quite a complex process that happens in the background. there is all the data that is exchanged between suppliers. my best guidance is absolutely to cancel that switch but there is a chance that switch but there is a chance that effectively, based on the industry rules kicked off but it will go ahead. if you can't, look to cancel the switch and keep a careful record of any payment you have made to avro to make sure that you can actually get that back once the new supplier has been appointed by the regulator. supplier has been appointed by the retulator. ii supplier has been appointed by the retulator. i, , i, regulator. that upfront payment should be transferred _ regulator. that upfront payment should be transferred to - regulator. that upfront payment should be transferred to her i regulator. that upfront payment| should be transferred to her new supplier, but she needs to check that. it supplier, but she needs to check that. ' i , supplier, but she needs to check that. 1 i , , i i, that. it will effectively be counted as a credit balance _
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that. it will effectively be counted as a credit balance by _ that. it will effectively be counted as a credit balance by the - that. it will effectively be counted as a credit balance by the new i as a credit balance by the new supplier and we know that 0fgem have said that they are protected and as long as people have a good record of credit balance and payment that they have made, that would transfer with the customer onto the new supplier, the customer onto the new supplier, the critical element is keeping a record of the payment you have made so that you can follow that through with the new supplier. you mentioned credit and we — with the new supplier. you mentioned credit and we have _ with the new supplier. you mentioned credit and we have so _ with the new supplier. you mentioned credit and we have so many _ with the new supplier. you mentioned credit and we have so many questionsj credit and we have so many questions on that subject. let me try and bring you a few of them. broadly on the same theme, we had from valerie maxwell, what happens if your provider goes down and you are in credit? david says will i lose my credit? david says will i lose my credit if the supplier goes into liquidation, and we have had similar questions on that. talk us through the subject of credit. the questions on that. talk us through the subject of credit. the sub'ect of credit. the guidance was the subject of credit. the guidance was simple — the subject of credit. the guidance was simple from _ the subject of credit. the guidance was simple from ofgem _ the subject of credit. the guidance was simple from ofgem and i the subject of credit. the guidance was simple from ofgem and the i the subject of credit. the guidance i was simple from ofgem and the credit was simple from 0fgem and the credit balances are protected. it comes back to the same point on the
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previous question, keep a good record of any credits you have on the accounts and that will be honoured by your supplier. the mechanisms we do not need to get into, and beer industry will manage the process, if the supplier has gone bust, the new supplier will have to offer the credit but the regulator says they are protected. there is a question around accessing information and i spoke to someone earlier who had been with avro and she had taken a reading on tuesday but now she cannot log in or get any history on line. a few questions about proving that credit statements. most energy companies have statements online and i was always able to access but did not download and now avro have gone bust, i have tried to download the statements, but i cannot, what should i do? a similar question from
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angela in derbyshire and also from frank saying consumers have been advised to gather information and he mentioned avro as well and they have suspended statements from their dashboard. 2 ii suspended statements from their dashboard. 2 i, i, i i, suspended statements from their dashboard.2 i, i, i i, dashboard. what advice do you have? it is a dashboard. what advice do you have? it is a really — dashboard. what advice do you have? it is a really unsettling _ dashboard. what advice do you have? it is a really unsettling period - dashboard. what advice do you have? it is a really unsettling period and i it is a really unsettling period and it is even more frustrating when you cannot get access to the data that effectively is your data. those records will still be there and your new supplier will get access to it. the critical thing is that metre read is really important and for anyone who supplier goes bust, the best thing is to take your mobile phone and take a picture of your metre with the latest mater —— metre read, essentially a time stamped record at the point that the supplier went bust. the new supplier will be able to back calculate what you owe them and the credit balance is difficult to prove in terms of what you would have seen in the
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statement, but that can be calculated and if you are on a direct debit and you pay a fixed amount each month, keep a track of what you have been paying and even if you are on a variable payment plan, keep a record under a new supplier will be able to help you back calculate what was owed to you in terms of credit balance. it is a great point, occasionally taking a screenshot of an online account is helpful to do, i appreciate that is all great with the benefit of hindsight but for anyone currently with a supplier to read that sounds like it might be at risk, logon to your account, take a picture of the credit balance, so you have it and keep the metre read as well. good advice, keep the metre read as well. good advice. all — keep the metre read as well. good advice, all about _ keep the metre read as well. good advice, all about the _ keep the metre read as well. good advice, all about the proof. - keep the metre read as well. good advice, all about the proof. the next question is from mike in shropshire who says i have a direct debit due to be paid to avro next month, what should i do? m1
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expectation is that a direct debit would not be taken by avro, they are effectively in administration and all of those payments effectively should be ceased relatively quickly, but my honest guidance would be to cancel it. make sure that payment does not go out of your account and once you get transferred to the new supplier, call them as quickly as you can to set up a new direct debit payment with them to make sure you stay in a positive routine of making regular monthly payments to manage the payment of your consumption over the payment of your consumption over the course of the year. cancel it now, get in touch with your new supplier and set that up afresh when you are on the other side of the process. i you are on the other side of the trocess. ii you are on the other side of the trocess. i, i, i, , i, process. i have got a question, it has 'ust process. i have got a question, it has just popped _ process. i have got a question, it hasjust popped up, _ process. i have got a question, it hasjust popped up, i— process. i have got a question, it hasjust popped up, i think- process. i have got a question, it i hasjust popped up, i think because it is something that lots of people will be asking, i pay £74 per month on variable and have been offered to
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fix for 2h months at £120 per month and i confirmed this with the energy company, do i stay on variable or do i move to fixed which is an increase of £46 and am i protected by the price cap if i remain on variable? that is interesting, a lot of people will be looking around, they might have to be placed with a new supplier initially, but they might be looking for a better deal. the trice cat be looking for a better deal. the price cap is _ be looking for a better deal. tt2 price cap is effectively based on average consumption. it does not mean that every single consumer in the uk will pay at that level, you pay based on your consumption but that gives you a good review if you are an average household what you can expect to pay. an increase of 50% is quite a sizeable hike, clearly, but if you can afford that, having the certainty of doing that over the winter period, when prices will be quite volatile, that is not a bad thing to do. before you do
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that, shop around and many price comparison websites have effectively stopped offering options in terms of tariffs because so many suppliers have removed them, but it is never a bad thing to make a few phone calls and check whether the deal you are getting is a good one before you then lock in. the critical thing, i know there is a huge sense of angst by consumers, hearing about the price hikes, but whether you make a move today or tomorrow, it is not going to make a massive amount of difference. give yourself the time to do the research, making sure you are getting the best deal you can in the market or let me refrain that, the market or let me refrain that, the less worst deal in the market, none of them are brilliant at the moment, at least that gives you some comfort that you are being offered something that is competitive. this one is from — something that is competitive. this one is from karel mackenzie brown asking, other parts of europe are
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experiencing higher your —— prices or is itjust the uk? yes experiencing higher your -- prices or is itjust the uk?— or is it 'ust the uk? yes they are havint or is itjust the uk? yes they are having the _ or is itjust the uk? yes they are having the same _ or is itjust the uk? yes they are having the same problem, i or is itjust the uk? yes they are having the same problem, a i or is itjust the uk? yes they are having the same problem, a lot| or is itjust the uk? yes they are i having the same problem, a lot of this is driven by global gas prices, but the global economy is effectively bouncing back from the pandemic and the global supply constraints that are happening as a result of that with russia for example exporting less gas, when that supply side is constrained globally, global prices push up. we have seen already be italian and spanish government make interventions to make sure they are protecting customer bills and obviously our government is in debate with industry about what to do but this is a pan european problem, obviously made worse in northern europe because we are entering winter and we are increasing demand further by turning on the heating in our homes. that is quite a material factor in this as well. ., , ., ., .,
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well. helen collins asks how do gas rices well. helen collins asks how do gas prices affect — well. helen collins asks how do gas prices affect liquid _ well. helen collins asks how do gas prices affect liquid petroleum - prices affect liquid petroleum prices? i prices affect liquid petroleum -rices? ., prices affect liquid petroleum rices? ., , ., ., prices? i will not pretend i am an exert in prices? i will not pretend i am an expert in that _ prices? i will not pretend i am an expert in that niche _ prices? i will not pretend i am an expert in that niche of _ prices? i will not pretend i am an expert in that niche of the - prices? i will not pretend i am an l expert in that niche of the market, but my assumption would be however that existing stocks that have already been purchased and are available in the wholesalers and retailers of that kind of gas product will stay stable in the short term until those stocks run out and then of course as they are being replenished, as they purchase them, they are obviously vulnerable to the same wholesale price and our expectation is that they would start to increase in line with the wholesale price as well. one more i have spotted _ wholesale price as well. one more i have spotted on _ wholesale price as well. one more i have spotted on twitter, _ wholesale price as well. one more i have spotted on twitter, is - wholesale price as well. one more i have spotted on twitter, is there i wholesale price as well. one more i have spotted on twitter, is there a l have spotted on twitter, is there a risk of being cut off if energy suppliers do not wish to supply customers from a failed energy company, if it will cost them more to take on that customer, is there a risk of being cut off? ida. to take on that customer, is there a risk of being cut off?— risk of being cut off? no, no risk and i think— risk of being cut off? no, no risk and i think we _ risk of being cut off? no, no risk and i think we need _ risk of being cut off? no, no risk and i think we need to _ risk of being cut off? no, no risk and i think we need to be - risk of being cut off? no, no risk. and i think we need to be categoric about that in terms of, for a
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customer that has a credit metre, it is not even physically possible to cut off that supply and we need to give customers peace of mind, if there are supplier goes bust, and their supply will continue, the challenge is around who you pay the bill too. similarly if you're on a prepayment metre and you top it up regularly, that continuity of supply is important and that is guaranteed by the regulator. there will be debates and there is some tension of who takes on the supply and who pays the price between the price cap and the price between the price cap and the real wholesale price, but continuity of supply into homes is guaranteed. continuity of supply into homes is guaranteed-— continuity of supply into homes is uuaranteed. ., ., ., guaranteed. ellen, great to have you with us, guaranteed. ellen, great to have you with us. thank— guaranteed. ellen, great to have you with us, thank you _ guaranteed. ellen, great to have you with us, thank you for _ guaranteed. ellen, great to have you with us, thank you for answering - guaranteed. ellen, great to have you with us, thank you for answering the | with us, thank you for answering the questions. ellen frames, energy analyst. thank you to our reviewers for sending your questions in. —— ellen fraser.
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climate change is one of the most important issues for german voters as they head to the polls this weekend. even so, germany s green party — which had initially surged in the opinion polls is now lagging behind other parties who propose a less stringent approach to tackling the problem. our berlin correspondent jenny hill reports. it's getting harder for germans to ignore climate change. the fairytale forests which carpet the country are dying. this bug which proliferates in warmer, drier conditions is boring into and killing that weakened trees. nothing the foresters can do but cut down the affected trees, try to stop the spread. translation: we never thought the forest would react _ so quickly to climate change. what shocked us was that it was not just the conifers badly affected
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but also old oak and beech trees. time is running out for the planet and for germany's green party which had high hopes for the election. support has grown in recent years, boosted by younger voters. but the chancellor candidate is lagging behind in the polls. there is no doubting how passionately germans feel about climate change but that alone might not be enough to put annalena baerbock into the chancellery. this, after all, is the country which invented the motorcar. some worry about the pace of change and how to protect the environment without killing off industry. translation: i would like to know who is going to pay for this. if the car industry gets
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kneecapped and tens or may be hundreds of thousands, maybe a million people lose theirjobs, maybe they should be a slower solution. together, perhaps, we can slow down global warming but when i see china opening up 200 airports and a thousand coal power stations, i do wonder how small germany is supposed to save the world. it is widely acknowledged that angela merkel has not done enough to tackle climate change, despite her initial efforts to address the problem on the world stage. but germany's politicians have come under pressure from a new generation of activists. most parties have tailored their manifestos after this summer's deadly floods, they know that voter priorities are changing. none of the party really have enough measures to reach the goals of planet protection. only the greens have the large amount of measures that come close to the goals and the targets we have to reach, but the others not.
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they come close? but not sufficient? not sufficient. in the german forest they are planting different species that they hope will point the way to a warmer, drier future. change it seems inevitable for a country which must decide now how best to safeguard its future. hairdressers say they're seeing an increasing number of clients having new allergic reactions to hair dye, after contracting coronavirus. some have reported suffering from rashes and burns, despite using the same hair dye for years. the trade body is now urging professionals to carry out patch skin tests on all customers. frankie mccamley has more. for 15 years, gemma has been going to this salon to get her hair dyed. despite choosing the same colour by the same brand, she says her skin changed after contracting coronavirus.
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so, in april, when the salon reopened, stacey had made it compulsory that you had to have a patch test 48 hours before you were to have any colour on your hair. to start with i had a much forgotten i had the patch test because it was so far in the back of my mind that i would react to it. under the manufacturer's guidelines, gemma's hairdresser stacey says she didn't have to carry out a patch test. she took extra precautions which turned out to be the right thing to do. it was really itchy, really sore. as it started to get worse i was thinking, oh my goodness, i am really reacting to this patch test. i felt a really hot burning sensation behind my ear, which progressively got worse, to the point where it had taken layers of skin from behind my ear. it was so painful. and really scary. i had never experienced anything like that before.
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in south—east london at the charlotte's salon, one of her regular clients had a reaction so severe she had to call an ambulance. from the second i started applying, because she had her gown slightly undone, i noticed a rash creeping up her chest and starting to creep upwards to her neck. it was actually quite aggressive. i said, do you feel 0k? no, not particularly. got her straight back to the backwash and then just really just started shampooing it off with a hypoallergenic shampoo. that day she went on to social media to raise awareness of what had happened to her client. she felt quite giddy, she was quite hot and cold, quite shaky and just generally, generally unwell. she felt like she was going to pass out. the skin test is still in date. there is nothing at the moment within our industry to state that we do need skin tests.
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but i am literally going to spend my whole weekend trying to get in touch with anyone and everyone that will listen. both women who suffered a new reaction to hair dye had contracted coronavirus or long covid. some scientists believe the two could be linked, but many other serious illnesses can affect your immune system and cause new allergic reactions. folks like me who spend a lot of time thinking about covid, immunity to covid and vaccines, are now starting to think about long covid. somewhere on that list you think about the allergic responses. what it means is you may have been reprogrammed, if you like. so compared to what you knew before, i am allergic to lobster, but i am not allergic to nuts or vice versa, all bets are off. you have to rethink what your allergies might be. whether it is hair dye or anything else, studies are now being carried
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—— hair dye... out into new allergic responses following covid. industry experts say they want to be science proven before taking action. we are hearing reports of people saying they have found their clients more sensitive. so far there is no definitive evidence of causation. hairdressers have to follow specific guidance from each hair dye manufacturer. this could include things like questionnaires and patch test. if they don't follow those, then their insurance could be invalid and they could be liable. that's why charlotte is going the extra mile to patch test all clients who have had covid before dying their hair. and she wants the industry to follow. frankie mccamley, bbc news. hello. it will turn into a warm
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september day across the north of scotland. — september day across the north of scotland, it has felt nothing other than autumn. strong to gale—force winds, _ than autumn. strong to gale—force winds, moving into... northern side ofthe _ winds, moving into... northern side of the cold — winds, moving into... northern side of the cold front, the sunshine will be out this— of the cold front, the sunshine will be out this afternoon but it will feel chillier. the cold front turns into a _ feel chillier. the cold front turns into a warm front and turns into the west— into a warm front and turns into the west of— into a warm front and turns into the west of scotland, patchy light rain, some _ west of scotland, patchy light rain, some in_ west of scotland, patchy light rain, some in northern ireland but brightening in the south. cloud in the north— brightening in the south. cloud in the north of england and a weather front in_ the north of england and a weather front in the north west will bring rain, _ front in the north west will bring rain, clearing away from wales and the midlands to allow afternoon sunshine — the midlands to allow afternoon sunshine and warmth. tonight, more blustery— sunshine and warmth. tonight, more blustery winds in shetland and outbreaks of rain, not as wide as last night, — outbreaks of rain, not as wide as last night, brazier across the country. _ last night, brazier across the country, particularly in the north and west. — country, particularly in the north and west, patchy drizzle later in the night, — and west, patchy drizzle later in the night, many areas will stay dry. temperatures in rural areas down into single — temperatures in rural areas down into single figures. the pressure chart— into single figures. the pressure chart for— into single figures. the pressure chart for friday shows low pressure in the _ chart for friday shows low pressure in the north, — chart for friday shows low pressure in the north, not as windy. weather
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fronts _ in the north, not as windy. weather fronts working in from the west and they are _ fronts working in from the west and they are coming in on westerly winds from the _ they are coming in on westerly winds from the atlantic, moisture laden and with— from the atlantic, moisture laden and with a — from the atlantic, moisture laden and with a bit of form, you can see the amber— and with a bit of form, you can see the amber colours, it will not be cold _ the amber colours, it will not be cold and — the amber colours, it will not be cold and further north in shetland, not as— cold and further north in shetland, not as chilly as today. lots of cloud — not as chilly as today. lots of cloud in — not as chilly as today. lots of cloud in the west of the uk with patchy— cloud in the west of the uk with patchy rain and drizzle, some coasts and hills, _ patchy rain and drizzle, some coasts and hills, but central eastern areas. — and hills, but central eastern areas, sunny spells, the best in the south-east — areas, sunny spells, the best in the south—east. but even in the east of scotland _ south—east. but even in the east of scotland we — south—east. but even in the east of scotland we could get up to 21 degrees — scotland we could get up to 21 degrees in aberdeenshire and angus. one degrees in aberdeenshire and angus. 0ne fell_ degrees in aberdeenshire and angus. one fell into the weekend, the windsor— one fell into the weekend, the windsor switch around, an area of low pressure pushing insight into next week, notice the colours change. — next week, notice the colours change, things will turn cooler. let us stop— change, things will turn cooler. let us stop at— change, things will turn cooler. let us stop at the weekend, cloud on saturday, — us stop at the weekend, cloud on saturday, showery rain pushing north pa rticuta rty _ saturday, showery rain pushing north particularly in the west, brightest in the _ particularly in the west, brightest in the south and east, temperatures low in the south and east, temperatures tow teens _ in the south and east, temperatures low teens and high —— low teens and low teens and high —— low teens and low 20s _ low teens and high —— low teens and low 20s. isolated showers cannot be
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ruled out, _ low 20s. isolated showers cannot be ruled out, a — low 20s. isolated showers cannot be ruled out, a band of heavy rain edges— ruled out, a band of heavy rain edges into _ ruled out, a band of heavy rain edges into the west later and that will sweep through during sunday night _ will sweep through during sunday night and bring a change for next week, _ night and bring a change for next week, a — night and bring a change for next week, a much more autumnal feel, ever changing skies with sunshine and showers and a drop in temperature.
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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines: as the government warns more energy companies could go bust in the weeks ahead, labour accuses ministers of leaving the country "dangerously exposed". on monday i said the secretary of state was being far too complacent about the situation we are facing. events since have unfortunately borne this out. complacent about the crisis in the market, complacent about the impact on families, complacent about the cost of living crisis. we would like to see a competitive energy market which can deliver choice and lower prices. the energy cap, the energy price cap, which continues to protect millions of customers, will remain in place. and — will remain in place. very and will remain in place. very finally, consumers, mr speaker, and very finally, consumers, mr speaker, come first. police investigating the murder
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of primary school teacher sabina nessa in south london release details of her last movements. yesterday we held a street briefing to update the local community. later this week we are meeting again with individuals to continue those important conversations. we will also be having a vigil for sabina on friday. borisjohnson's message to the united nations ahead of cop26 summit on climate change — the world must take radical and urgent action. and campaigners lose a high court challenge to laws which allow the abortion of foetuses with down's syndrome up until birth. hello and welcome to bbc news.
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the government has confirmed it will not bail out energy companies collapsing under the pressure of soaring gas prices. speaking in the house of commons, the business secretary said the market, not the tax payer, would find a solution to the problem. labour accused ministers of leaving the country "dangerously exposed". the energy regulator 0fgem says almost one and a half million customers now face having to switch to new suppliers and more expensive bills. two companies, avro energy and green, with more than 800,000 customers between them, ceased trading yesterday, on top of the four others who've gone bust in recent weeks. ramzan karmali reports. soaring gas prices have led to the collapse of two more energy suppliers, meaning six firms have gone bust in september alone and left 1.5 million customers facing higher bills. those customers though will still receive energy while a new supplier is appointed by the regulator, 0fgem. its boss warned it was likely more firms would go bust.
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it's not unusual for suppliers to go out of the market. i think what's different this time is the dramatic change in the costs those suppliers are facing. we do expect more, we do expect more not to be able to face the circumstances we are in, but it is genuinely hard to say more than that, partly because that means predicting what may happen to the gas price. all i want to say here is this is a significant impact on the sector and it is something we are working with government to manage, but we can't make predictions as to how that will play out. energy firms have been hit by a massive rise in wholesale prices. they are currently around four times higher than normal. the body that represents them has warned the current market is not working. the government has promised the energy price cap will remain in place overwinter, and it hopes this will protect millions of customers. but from october 1st, that cap is set to rise by 12%, meaning around 15 million households will still end up paying more. razman karmali, bbc news. let's get more with lone wells,
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our political correspondent. we had that urgent question on this issue in the house of commons a little earlier. what did we learn from that?— little earlier. what did we learn from that? . , , ., , from that? that is right, this was an opportunity — from that? that is right, this was an opportunity for— from that? that is right, this was an opportunity for mps _ from that? that is right, this was an opportunity for mps to - an opportunity for mps to essentially grow the business secretary on the government's response to the crisis that is going on at the moment. as we had in that report, there is now about one and a half million customers in the uk whose energy firms have gone bust and they essentially now need to find a new supplier. the weight this usually works in the uk as there is a of reallocation where the regulator 0fgem is able to reallocate people new suppliers if the firm they receive their energy from goes bust. they had been concerns earlier this week and over the last couple of weeks as this crisis developed from some of those larger firms that while in normal years, with a small amount of firms going bust, it would be affordable for them to then take on new customers from some of those companies, this year, some were worried that could lead to losses
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for them because if they have to take on suddenly large amount of customers, they are only allowed to charge of those customers up to the energy cap that exists for energy bills in the uk. their worry was they would not be able to take on they would not be able to take on the sheer number of people that are needing new suppliers. earlier in the week i did look like the government were suggesting they may look at some kind of government loans to some of those bigger firms to help them take on some of these hundreds of thousands of customers that now needed new suppliers. government seems to have changed as course on this and today in the house of commons, the business secretary kwasi kwarteng said the energy cap would remain and also that he does have confidence in the current system of reallocating customers to bigger firms. the global gas situation, mr speaker, has had an impact on some energy suppliers and i have been in touch daily with 0fgem and as they set out yesterday, there are more than 50 suppliers in the domestic market and we may unfortunately see more suppliers exit the market in the coming weeks.
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but it is not unusual for energy suppliers to leave the market for various reasons, particularly when wholesale global prices are rising. 0fgem and government have clear, well rehearsed processes in place to make sure all customers are supplied with energy. our approach will be informed by the following principles — protecting customers, especially vulnerable ones, from price spikes and the solution to this crisis will be found from the industry and the market, as is already happening and government, i repeat, will not be bailing out failed energy companies. lastly, we would like to see a competitive energy market which can deliver choice and lower prices. the energy cap, the energy price cap, which continues to protect millions of customers, will remain in place. and very finally, consumers, mr speaker, come first and this has always been the centrepiece
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of our approach. that is not necessarily something new, the fact the government doesn't want to use taxpayers' money to bail bailout confirms that are failing, some of those smaller firms we have seen go bust in the last few days. but is something the government have always argued, what is new is that they are now saying is what they do not really intended to provide any kind of loans for the biggerfirms that are hopefully going to be absorbing some of the customers from the ones that have collapsed. that is something that has been criticised a bit today, we had people like the former boss of green, one of the smaller firms that do go bust, warning that some of the biggerfirms would start do go bust, warning that some of the bigger firms would start to face problems too. we also have the shadow business secretary, ed miliband, in the house of commons responding to this, keys and the goblet of not being prepared and given the sheer scale of customers that you now need to be reallocated. —— accusing the government of not
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being prepared. on monday i said to the secretary of state he was being far too complacent about the situation we are facing. events since have unfortunately borne this out. complacent about the crisis in the market, complacent about the impact on families, complacent about the cost of living crisis. he pretended on monday and again today that it was normal for a number of suppliers to go down each winter, but what we are dealing with is far from normal, mr speaker. 800,000 customers losing their suppliers yesterday alone. 1.5 million in the last six weeks. away from this, an independent investigation into complaints against former labour mp keith has reported back, what is it so? just in the last _ reported back, what is it so? jut in the last couple of minutes, last half an hour, we have had this report into the behaviour into the former leicester east mp. he is accused of bullying by a former clerk and house of commons while he was chair of the home affairs committee in the house of commons. this report is pretty damning and said he committed sustained and
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unpleasant bullying, had a real and enduring the impacts, leaving them to leave it their career in the house of commons. it also says that the parliament standards commissioner had received significant complaints about the mp on other matters but that these complaints specifically referred to incidents from 2007 to 2010 and just to list a couple that the report touches on about what exactly has bullying behaviour was, it mentions inappropriate anger, inappropriately loud and aggressive speech, foul language, demeaning references to the women involved, inappropriate instructions to her and overly demanding behaviour. it also its very specific examples such as talking about an incident where he threatened to take photos of her drinking alcohol to then pass on to her manager. also talks about certain comments he made regarding her religion but also about her age and lack of children as well. numerous incidents that are outlined in this report. there are not
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necessarily that many sanctions that could apply to him, but what the report does recommend is that if he had a still a parliamentary pass, essentially the pass that allows people to go on to the parliamentary estate here in westminster, it should be removed and it says the pass he did have should never be restored. it also says essentially he is due to be severely reprimanded for his behaviour which is how the report concludes saying his behaviour was hostile, harmful and unworthy of an mp and that he should be ashamed of it.— be ashamed of it. thank you very much for that. _ police investigating the murder of 28—year—old primary school teacher sabina nessa have revealed she was attacked minutes from her home on the way to meet a friend. her body was found by a member of the public in a south—east london park on saturday. a vigil will be held tomorrow in her memory. in the last hour, the metropolitan police have been speaking from the scene in kidbrooke. i am appealing for information into the tragic death of sabina nessa.
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sabina, we believe was walking from her home address and would have leftjust before 8:30pm. we now understand that sabina was planning on meeting a friend at the depot pub in pegler square which is just over five minutes walk away. herjourney would have seen her walk through cator park and we believe, as she walked through the park, she was approached by an individual and fatally attacked. sabina's body was sadly found by a member of the public around 5:30pm the following day. as anyone who lives here will know, cator park is well—used by the community and we are appealing for anyone who was here on friday evening and who thinks they saw anything unusual to come forward. maybe you saw someone acting strangely inside the park or running away from it.
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if you were in the area, please think back and let us know if you have any information. you will see that we have an extensive crime scene in place and we expect it to be here for the next couple of days. we also have a number of high visibility patrols and would encourage anyone who has concerns to engage with those officers. they are here to listen to what you have to say. since the murder took place, we have been speaking even more regularly with our partners to ensure that we are doing everything we can to make those who live here feel safe, without the fear of violence. yesterday, we held a street briefing to update the local community and later this week we are meeting again with individuals to continue those important conversations. we will also be part of the vigil for sabina on friday. the officers that you see here are your officers. they are part of the community and wish to stand with the community at this time.
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the latest from police investigating the murder of teacher sabina nessa. her sister has made this statement on twitter. that is from one of sabina's sisters. campaigners have lost a high court challenge against the government, over legislation which allows the abortion of babies with down's syndrome up until birth. they argued the law is unlawfully discriminatory in allowing terminations after 2a weeks. heidi crowter, who has down's syndrome, and maire lea—wilson, whose son has the condition, took legal action to call for a change in legislation. but two seniorjudges concluded that it aims to strike a balance between rights of the unborn child and of women.
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just to let you know, we will be talking to our correspondent who has been following that case in the next short while. you're watching bbc news. an investigation has found that tenants are being evicted due to rent arrears built up during the pandemic, despite a government commitment that coronavirus would not leave anyone without a home. analysis of 270 possession orders issued by courts in england and wales this summer found that in one third of cases, covid was stated as the reason for the missing payments. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan has the details. michael calder is a musician and pre—pandemic a guitar teacher. my work was all based around contact with people, in and out of people's houses daily. as he prepared for his son's birth, the country went into lockdown and his income plummeted.
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michael fell into rent arrears and has now been served with an eviction notice. it's kind of like weighing up, when can i meet my rent, put food on the table, you know, paying the bills, gas and electricity? and bit by bit the moneyjust decreased and decreased to the point where i did just end up in arrears. there was no way around it. since the ban on evictions was lifted, landlords have been rushing to county courts seeking permission for bailiffs to evict their tenants. of the 270 possession orders analysed by the bureau of investigativejournalism, one third of them, 88 cases, explicitly cited covid as the reason why rent arrears had arisen. what strikes you about sitting in the hearings is exactly how short they are. people are losing their homes in a matter of minutes. that's because the law is really clear. if you owe at least two months of rent arrears, then the landlord will almost
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certainly get a possession order. onejudge told the bbc, however, that some tenants have taken advantage of the evictions ban and had simply refused to pay the rent. well, i had to wait six months. landlord michelle dighton is owed a fortune by tenants she can't get rid of due to the eviction ban and court delays. i was still having to pay my mortgages, look after the kids. and it's just really frustrating that no one wants to give me an update on when i should get my own property back. ministers in westminster say they took unprecedented action to keep people in their homes, and with the economy reopening, it was now time to deliver a fair rental market. what this investigation highlights, however, is that both landlords and tenants feel the system is not fair. michael buchanan, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: as the government warns more energy companies could go bust in the weeks ahead, labour accuses ministers of leaving
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the country "dangerously exposed". police investigating the murder of primary school teacher sabina nessa in south london release details of her last movements. borisjohnson's message to the united nations ahead of cop26 summit on climate change — the world must take radical and urgent action. sport and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. dundee striker leigh griffiths could be in trouble after he kicked a flare into the crowd curing last night's scottish league cup defeat at home to stjohnstone. a blue smoke cannister was thrown onto the pitch and a video has appeared on social media showing him walking over to it and booting it towards the away fans. griffiths, who's on loan from celtic, had been on the receiving end of abusive chants during the game and the incident is likely to be investigated by the sfa. as the excitement builds for the start of the ryder cup tomorrow,
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team europe have been attempting to win over the home fans at whistling straits. the players appeared in "cheeseheads" — a nod to the local nfl side, the green bay packers. wisconsin the green bay packers. is known of the amount of dairy wisconsin is known of the amount of dairy it produces in the us. on paper, the usa, are favourites to win, with 9 of the top 11 players in the world on their team, but ian poulter is no stranger to upsetting the odds on foreign soil. he was part of the miracle in medinah, back in 2012, the last time europe won in the united states. i think it is on each player to work out how he will use that energy to spur them on, to get the best out of them. it is different, we do not always have it that way and this will be a new one, but i think there is the ability to use theirjuice. that will be an exciting tournament.
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contract training is to be drastically reduced in rugby union, to try to prevent injuries and protect player welfare. world rugby is issuing guidance to limit full contact training to just 15 minutes a week, after research showed up 35—40% of injuries are sustained during training. a new organisation has been launched to provide support to athletes experiencing long—term affects from concussion. 2003 rugby world cup winner steve thompson, who has early on—set dementia, announced today he will be the first professional athlete to pledge his brain to the concussion legacy project. i have the privilege and honour to be the number one pledge of my brain and as much as i have made the decision and i'm here today, it is my wife who has really backed me up with it and i cannot thank her enough for doing this, because when you come out with diagnosis and banging the drum at saint more needs to be done, this isjust a very tiny part of what i can do, pledging my brain so when i do pass away, for
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them to be able to do research on it is massive for the massive big picture going forward of looking after my children and other people's children. ., ., , ., children. you wonder 'ust how crucial that h children. you wonder 'ust how crucial that move _ children. you wonderjust how crucial that move could - children. you wonderjust how crucial that move could be - children. you wonderjust how crucial that move could be in i children. you wonderjust how. crucial that move could be in the future. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. "it's time for humanity to grow up and take responsibility for climate change". that was borisjohnson's message to the united nations general assembly as he gave his speech. with just a0 days to go until the uk hosts a set—piece summit on climate change, the prime minister called on leaders to sign up for big reductions in their carbon emissions. it would mean developing countries phasing out power generation from coal, with help from richer nations. our correspondent barbara plett usher has more from new york. it was not for the faint—hearted, this frenetic trip. the prime minister covered a lot of ground. he shook a few hands. conducted a few interviews. visited a few sites.
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even took a train ride. final stop, back to the united nations, where he used his address to press for a stronger commitment to end global warming, with a stark warning of the enduring consequences if countries didn't step up. we will see decertification, drought, crop failure and mass movements of humanity on a scale not seen before, not because of some unforeseen natural event or disaster, but because of us, because of what we are doing now. and our grandchildren will know that we are the culprits. the prime minister chose to focus solely on the subject of climate change. he used this global stage to make a strong speech ahead of the climate conference coming up soon in glasgow, which he said would be a critical turning point for humanity. it helped to have an american
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president on side. joe biden pledged to double us contributions for developing nations to tackle climate change. that was a big win for mrjohnson, who was determined to cement a crucial relationship that has had its rocky moments. he wasn't able to tuck the promise of a new trade deal into his suitcase, but it was still a largely successful trip that showcased the two leaders working together on shared priorities. and nowhere is that more evident than when it comes to climate crisis. mr president, see you in glasgow. thank you. barbara plett usher, bbc news, new york. here with me now is adrienne buller who is an environmental economist at the common wealth think tank. hello to you, thanks so much for joining us. what did you make of the prime minister's message? j joining us. what did you make of the prime minister's message?— prime minister's message? i think it is uuite prime minister's message? i think it is quite interesting _ prime minister's message? i think it is quite interesting to _ prime minister's message? i think it is quite interesting to see _ prime minister's message? i think it is quite interesting to see the - is quite interesting to see the prime minister having changed his tune at quite a bit on the climate
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crisis. this is someone who as recently as 2015 used his column in a national newspaper to question the science of climate change. so it is quite encouraging in that respect to see him taking quite a serious and hard—line stance on this, but on the other hand, he is now saying it is high time we listen to scientists and they have been screaming from the rooftops that one thing that really means and it is not expanding any new fossil fuel projects and the is currently on track to approve a massive new oil field is currently on track to approve a massive new oilfield off is currently on track to approve a massive new oil field off the west coast of shetland that would absolutely crash through our own climate targets, so i think for all this to take credibility and prove he is serious as he clearly wants to be perceived, it will take some serious changes at home, not pushing ahead with any new fossil fuel projects. ahead with any new fossil fuel ro'ects. _, ., , ., projects. the economy of the environment _ projects. the economy of the environment absolutely - projects. the economy of the - environment absolutely underpins how successful or not, 26 can when that gets under way in glasgow in
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november, doesn't it? —— cop26. countries must make good on their promises to mobilise at least $100 million, £73 billion of climate finance per year. how far along the route to that goal are we? yes. finance per year. how far along the route to that goal are we? yes, some unfortunately — route to that goal are we? yes, some unfortunately we _ route to that goal are we? yes, some unfortunately we have _ route to that goal are we? yes, some unfortunately we have not _ route to that goal are we? yes, some unfortunately we have not yet - route to that goal are we? yes, some unfortunately we have not yet met. unfortunately we have not yet met that commitment which was as he said £73 billion per year by 2020 from the world's richest countries, including the uk and us will stop to poorer countries around the world to help them in this transition as well is to build up resilience to the impact they are already feeling. to the last tally, we only reached about 79 billion us dollars, but a lot of that finance, we think of it has cash grants to these countries,
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but the vast majority, more than three quarters is in the form of loans, often at market rates, so in effect it means that these poor governments and of having to pay back these loans with interest when really if we were to actually help them with this transition, should be taken the form primarily of grants is with transfers of technology to account for the fact that not only do we have lots of capacity, we are fortunate to be among the world's wealthiest nations, we also have a really strong historical responsibility here. the cumulative nations that countries like the us and uk have committed absolutely massive compared to a lot of the smaller countries that are the hardest and fastest hit by the impacts of climate crisis but cut the cumulative emissions. boris johnson has made it clear he is interested in that being a key point of these talks but for me it is not enough just to be of these talks but for me it is not enoughjust to be meeting of these talks but for me it is not enough just to be meeting that target, it needs to be in the form of grants so we are notjust bringing money back into our own economy is in the long run in the
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form of really expensive loans with these already struggling governments and countries. the these already struggling governments and countries— and countries. the will is there but it has to be — and countries. the will is there but it has to be matched _ and countries. the will is there but it has to be matched by _ and countries. the will is there but it has to be matched by the - and countries. the will is there but | it has to be matched by the finding, funding with no strings attached in effect. in orderfor funding with no strings attached in effect. in order for developing nations to cut their carbon emissions, including very importantly phasing out coal power generation, how crucial is that to the bigger project? float generation, how crucial is that to the bigger project?— the bigger pro'ect? coal is absolutely — the bigger project? coal is absolutely pivotal. - the bigger project? coal is absolutely pivotal. there i the bigger project? coal is| absolutely pivotal. there is the bigger project? coal is - absolutely pivotal. there isjust no absolutely pivotal. there is just no place for it going forward in the energy mix. on the other hand, that is quite hard to do, because until very recently, a lot of high income countries like ourselves, the united states, china, we have been sending finance to actually continue developing new carbon intensive and very polluting fossil fuel projects in these developing countries, so i think we need to be making sure that any assistance that we give is a dedicated to renewable energy and to probably make up the fact that we
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have financed to profit—making projects that have locked a lot of these countries into reliance on fossil fuels, these countries into reliance on fossilfuels, so these countries into reliance on fossil fuels, so absolutely no new coal and no new oil or gas eye that going forward. i will bring it back to the oilfield going forward. i will bring it back to the oil field in shetland, coal is absolutely vital but so are oil and gas and so both of these things would be vital to this transition and the climate finance would be a huge part of that in helping to chance for these energy systems away. opening up patterns a lot of the time which could procure countries from using these because the costs are so high, so all sorts of things like that can make this transition a lot easier and a lot fairer. 50 transition a lot easier and a lot fairer. transition a lot easier and a lot fairer, ., ., “ transition a lot easier and a lot fairer. ., ., ~ ., ., transition a lot easier and a lot fairer. . ., ., fairer. so when we look ahead to november. _ fairer. so when we look ahead to november, took _ fairer. so when we look ahead to november, took up _ fairer. so when we look ahead to november, took up 26 _ fairer. so when we look ahead to november, took up 26 and - fairer. so when we look ahead to november, took up 26 and that i november, took up 26 and that ultimate aim of securing a global aim to keep global temperature down to no greater than 1.5 degrees, higher than preindustrial levels,
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listening to everything you have been saying, it is very much about following the money, let's's what what pledges made and see whether the money is really there to back up the money is really there to back up the ideas and the plans that are needed to be in place in order to achieve this.— achieve this. yes, absolutely. peo - le achieve this. yes, absolutely. people tend _ achieve this. yes, absolutely. people tend to _ achieve this. yes, absolutely. people tend to frame - achieve this. yes, absolutely. people tend to frame the - achieve this. yes, absolutely. - people tend to frame the transition to green and clean energy economy in terms of upfront cost and a bitterly costs are high, but they are absolutely rewarded by the benefits we get in areas of growth and particularly not wreaking havoc in countries all around the world, displacing millions of people. every year that we delay this action, we encourage that in the future, so the more decisively we act, in the long run the lower the costs will be. that of the framework we need in mind here, follow the money as you said at this conference. it is about bearing in mind that every moment of
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delay will it cost us down the line and impact an untold number of lives. this conference is really an opportunity for us to change course, a massive opportunity for the uk to facilitate that and i think some good can really come out of it, but it will take people being bold and being credible and consistent in what they say and what their actions actually are at home.— what they say and what their actions actually are at home. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather. let's cross to the newsroom. it isa it is a bit ofa it is a bit of a mixed picture out there today. for many, temperatures are still doing quite well for this stage in september, so still above average for most places, but things have been a little breezy and call up have been a little breezy and call up with eight few showers across some northern parts of the uk. relief through the rest of today, sunny spells were many areas. are still quite breezy through the north but not as windy as early today across parts of scotland. sunny spells, temperatures up to 21 or 22
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degrees. into this evening and overnight we have a summer rain for a time across scotland which clears off towards the east and then a little bit more cloud later in the night and a few showers working on for northern ireland, south of scotland but clearer skies in the south and east its equity single figures to start your friday. three tomorrow, still quite a lot of fine and dry weather for much of the uk, best of the sunshine per southern and eastern england and eastern scotland. cloudy it was the west with a few showers but temperatures still doing well, 22 degrees or so and mostly dry and settled through the weekend before things turn more terminal as we head into next week. —— more autumnal. hello this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines... as the government warns more energy companies could go bust in the weeks ahead, labour accuses ministers of leaving the country 'dangerously exposed'. police investigating the murder of primary school teacher
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sabina nessa in south london release details of her last movements. borisjohnson's message to the united nations and ahead of cop26 summit on climate change — the world must take radical and urgent action. and campaigners lose a high court challenge to laws which allow the abortion of foetuses with down's syndrome up until birth. campaigners have lost a high court challenge against the government, over legislation which allows the abortion of foetuses with the condition up until birth. they argued that allowing terminations in certain cases after 2a weeks is unlawfully discriminatory, butjudges today dismissed the case, following a two day hearing injuly. our correspondent, helena wilkinson, is outside the high court in central london and joins me now...
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tell us a little bit more about the people who brought this case and what the judges said. yes. people who brought this case and what the judges said.— what the judges said. yes, three claimants in _ what the judges said. yes, three claimants in this _ what the judges said. yes, three claimants in this case _ what the judges said. yes, three claimants in this case and - what the judges said. yes, three claimants in this case and huge i claimants in this case and huge disappointment outside court and a number of the supporters came to hear thejudgment today, number of the supporters came to hear the judgment today, the number of the supporters came to hear thejudgment today, thejudges hear the judgment today, the judges dismissed hear thejudgment today, thejudges dismissed the case. under the law in england and wales and scotland there is a 2k week limit in which that period, in which a woman can have a termination, but terminations can be allowed until birth if there is a substantial risk of the child having serious physical or mental abnormalities, that includes downes syndrome and that claim came to court, taking the government to court, taking the government to court arguing that that provision, within the abortion legislation was unlawful, but thejudges within the abortion legislation was unlawful, but the judges today dismissed the case and one of the claimants is with us now. thank you for talking to us, first of all, you
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have two children, your son, aidan, has down's syndrome, why did you bring this case? j has down's syndrome, why did you bring this case?— bring this case? i am a mother of two fantastic _ bring this case? i am a mother of two fantastic little _ bring this case? i am a mother of two fantastic little boys, - bring this case? i am a mother of two fantastic little boys, tom - bring this case? i am a mother ofj two fantastic little boys, tom and aidan _ two fantastic little boys, tom and aidan and — two fantastic little boys, tom and aidan and i love and value both of them _ aidan and i love and value both of them equally. the law as it stands and its _ them equally. the law as it stands and itsjudgment effectively them equally. the law as it stands and its judgment effectively has ruled _ and its judgment effectively has ruled today that my children are not equal— ruled today that my children are not equal and _ ruled today that my children are not equal and that is so wrong. there is no reason _ equal and that is so wrong. there is no reason that aidan should not be afforded _ no reason that aidan should not be afforded the same rights and protection as any other child. the law powerfully communicates that his life is of— law powerfully communicates that his life is of lesser value and i believe _ life is of lesser value and i believe that that perpetuates negative stereotypes about disability and we came to really try and change that today and unfortunately it did not go our way. how do _ unfortunately it did not go our way. how do you — unfortunately it did not go our way. how do you feel?— unfortunately it did not go our way. how do you feel? incredibly hurt and disappointed- _ how do you feel? incredibly hurt and disappointed- i— how do you feel? incredibly hurt and disappointed. i think _ how do you feel? incredibly hurt and disappointed. i think what _ how do you feel? incredibly hurt and disappointed. i think what was - disappointed. i think what was surprising was that the judgment actually— surprising was that the judgment actually gave little consideration to the _ actually gave little consideration to the thoughts and feelings of people — to the thoughts and feelings of people with down's syndrome and their families, who do feel it
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really— their families, who do feel it really hurt and upset why this law, and try— really hurt and upset why this law, and by this— really hurt and upset why this law, and by thisjudgment. it condones discrimination. very disappointing. we will— discrimination. very disappointing. we will do — discrimination. very disappointing. we will do what we keep on doing, we will keep— we will do what we keep on doing, we will keep on— we will do what we keep on doing, we will keep on fighting for equality, because — will keep on fighting for equality, because that is what this is, it is a civil— because that is what this is, it is a civil rights— because that is what this is, it is a civil rights movement, it is about equality— a civil rights movement, it is about equality and that people with down's syndrome _ equality and that people with down's syndrome and other disabilities are viewed _ syndrome and other disabilities are viewed on — syndrome and other disabilities are viewed on an equal footing with the rest of— viewed on an equal footing with the rest of society. tell viewed on an equal footing with the rest of society-— rest of society. tell us a bit about our rest of society. tell us a bit about your experience, _ rest of society. tell us a bit about your experience, give _ rest of society. tell us a bit about your experience, give our - rest of society. tell us a bit about your experience, give our viewers rest of society. tell us a bit about i your experience, give our viewers an understanding of what happened during your pregnancy, you were told on a number of occasions, weren't you, when you were pregnant with aidan, whether you wanted to consider termination, aidan, whether you wanted to considertermination, right aidan, whether you wanted to consider termination, right up until a couple of days before his birth? there was no indication throughout the pregnancy that aidan would have down's _ the pregnancy that aidan would have down's syndrome but up until 34 weeks _ down's syndrome but up until 34 weeks when i had a scan that showed that it _ weeks when i had a scan that showed that it was _ weeks when i had a scan that showed that it was likely that he would have _ that it was likely that he would have the — that it was likely that he would have the condition. at that stage, the whole — have the condition. at that stage, the whole discussion of my pregnancy went from _ the whole discussion of my pregnancy went from excited mother, expecting
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her second _ went from excited mother, expecting her second child, to this is a great tragedy— her second child, to this is a great tragedy you — her second child, to this is a great tragedy you are facing, your life will he — tragedy you are facing, your life will he so — tragedy you are facing, your life will be so much more challenging, your child — will be so much more challenging, your child is going to have all these — your child is going to have all these problems and issues, and the first thing _ these problems and issues, and the first thing we wanted to talk about was termination. despite all the same _ was termination. despite all the same up — was termination. despite all the same up for us that was not the way we wanted _ same up for us that was not the way we wanted to do, we were repeatedly asked _ we wanted to do, we were repeatedly asked the _ we wanted to do, we were repeatedly asked the question, the last time being _ asked the question, the last time being two— asked the question, the last time being two days before he was born and the _ being two days before he was born and the context of my own fear and this medical negative information, i felt like _ this medical negative information, i felt like that was the route we were being _ felt like that was the route we were being encouraged to take. some up for us what — being encouraged to take. some up for us what this _ being encouraged to take. some up for us what this means, _ being encouraged to take. some up for us what this means, not - being encouraged to take. some up for us what this means, not just i being encouraged to take. some up for us what this means, not just for| for us what this means, notjust for you, three of you as claimants, but also the wider community for people who have down's syndrome? j also the wider community for people who have down's syndrome? i cannot seak who have down's syndrome? i cannot s - eak for who have down's syndrome? i cannot speak for people _ who have down's syndrome? i cannot speak for people with _ who have down's syndrome? i cannot speak for people with down's - speak for people with down's syndrome but i think heidi herself will tell— syndrome but i think heidi herself will tell you, this is incredibly painful. — will tell you, this is incredibly painful. it _ will tell you, this is incredibly painful, it is hurtful. i have a lot of friends — painful, it is hurtful. i have a lot of friends who are parents of children— of friends who are parents of children with down's syndrome and i know today — children with down's syndrome and i know today that they all really are hurt and _ know today that they all really are hurt and upset. we have these wonderful children and we just want the world _
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wonderful children and we just want the world to see our children the same _ the world to see our children the same way— the world to see our children the same way we do, which is that they are not— same way we do, which is that they are not very— same way we do, which is that they are not very different from any other— are not very different from any other child, aidan is amazing, and, you know. — other child, aidan is amazing, and, you know. it— other child, aidan is amazing, and, you know, it is hard to constantly be told _ you know, it is hard to constantly be told that your child is a burden or someone — be told that your child is a burden or someone that needs to be coped with _ or someone that needs to be coped with. ., ~ or someone that needs to be coped with. . ~ i. or someone that needs to be coped with. ., ~' ,, , or someone that needs to be coped with. . ~ i. , . with. thank you very much indeed. one of the — with. thank you very much indeed. one of the three _ with. thank you very much indeed. one of the three claimants - with. thank you very much indeed. one of the three claimants and i with. thank you very much indeed. one of the three claimants and we| one of the three claimants and we also heard outside court from heidi who was one of the other claimants and she described today as a very sad day and she said that she felt discriminated against. the claimants, we understand, from the three of them, they are going to be appealing thisjudgment three of them, they are going to be appealing this judgment or intending to appeal and taking it to the court of appeal. to appeal and taking it to the court ofa eal. ., ~ to appeal and taking it to the court ofa eal. . ~ i. to appeal and taking it to the court ofa--eal. . ~ , to appeal and taking it to the court ofa--eal. ., ~' , . lava pouring from a volcano on the spanish island of la palma has damaged hundreds of homes and forced thousands to flee the area. the volcano erupted on sunday and scientists are now warning of the dangers of toxic gases and explosions — when the lava hits the sea. dan johnson reports.
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this is as close as anybody has been allowed since the volcano started erupting on sunday, and here you really do get a sense of its power. it's an awesome sight. these truly are nature's strongest forces at work here. and nobody can tame them, nobody can control them. that is absolutely red—hot lava that is spewing continuously into the air and then flowing downhill. that's why it's been so destructive to the homes, the villages, the communities that lie in the path of that lava. that's also a huge ash cloud that is pouring up into the sky, spreading across the island here on the east of la palma. we can show you what that volcanic dust is actually like. it's more like gravel in places. it's really quite coarse. and there is a thick layer of that absolutely everywhere, smothering everything. uninhabitable because of that ash and because of the fact that the lava flowing downhill has cut off roads, it has wiped
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through the infrastructure here and may mean villages are uninhabitable. but being here so close, you get a sense of how much heat that volcano is generating, how much noise it is generating. and the big unknown isjust how long that eruption will continue, how much more devastating it could be, and where that lava flow will eventually end up. let us show you live pictures from la palma and you can see clearly that ash in the air, that haze over everything, caused by the eruption of the volcano. as we were mentioning in the introduction to the report, many homes destroyed, many people having to leave their homes and seek shelter. lava is continuing to flow from that volcano and warnings from scientists, as we mentioned, about the concerns around
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toxic gases and explosions, as the larva meets the sea. those are the latest pictures we have of the situation in la palma. hairdressers say they're seeing an increasing number of clients having new allergic reactions to hair dye, after contracting coronavirus. some have reported suffering from rashes and burns, despite using the same hair dye for years. the trade body is now urging professionals to carry out patch skin tests on all customers. frankie mccamley has more. for 15 years, gemma has been going to this salon to get her hair dyed. despite choosing the same colour by the same brand, she says her skin changed after contracting coronavirus. so, in april, when the salon reopened, stacey had made it compulsory that you had to have a patch test 48 hours before you were to have any colour on your hair.
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to start with i had almost forgotten i had the patch test because it was so far in the back of my mind that i would react to it. under the manufacturer's guidelines, gemma's hairdresser stacey says she didn't have to carry out a patch test. she took extra precautions which turned out to be the right thing to do. it was really itchy, really sore. as it started to get worse i was thinking, oh my goodness, i am really reacting to this patch test. i felt a really hot burning sensation behind my ear, which progressively got worse, to the point where it had taken layers of skin from behind my ear. it was so painful. and really scary. i had never experienced anything like that before. in south—east london at charlotte's salon, one of her regular clients had a reaction so severe she had to call an ambulance. from the second i started applying, because she had her gown slightly undone, i noticed a rash creeping up her chest and starting to creep
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upwards to her neck. it was actually quite aggressive. i said, do you feel ok? no, not particularly. got her straight back to the backwash and then just really just started shampooing it off with a hypoallergenic shampoo. that day she went on to social media to raise awareness of what had happened to her client. she felt quite giddy, she was quite hot and cold, quite shaky and just generally, generally unwell. she felt like she was going to pass out. the skin test is still in date. there is nothing at the moment within our industry to state that we do need skin tests. but i am literally going to spend my whole weekend trying to get in touch with anyone and everyone that will listen. both women who suffered a new reaction to hair dye had contracted coronavirus or long covid. some scientists believe
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the two could be linked, but many other serious illnesses can affect your immune system and cause new allergic reactions. folks like me who spend a lot of time thinking about covid, immunity to covid and vaccines, are now starting to think about long covid. somewhere on that list you think about the allergic responses. what it means is you may have been reprogrammed, if you like. so compared to what you knew before, i am allergic to lobster, but i am not allergic to nuts or vice versa, all bets are off. you have to rethink what your allergies might be. whether it is hair dye or anything else, studies are now being carried out into new allergic responses following covid. industry experts say they want to be science proven before taking action. we are hearing reports of people saying they have found their clients more sensitive. so far there is no definitive evidence of causation.
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hairdressers have to follow specific guidance from each hair dye manufacturer. this could include things like questionnaires and patch tests. if they don't follow those, then their insurance could be invalid and they could be liable. that's why charlotte is going the extra mile to patch test all clients who have had covid before dying their hair. and she wants the industry to follow. frankie mccamley, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... as the government warns more energy companies could go bust in the weeks ahead, labour accuses ministers of leaving as the government warns more energy companies could go bust in the weeks ahead, labour accuses ministers of leaving the country 'dangerously exposed'. police investigating the murder of primary school teacher sabina nessa in south london release details of her last movements. and campaigners lose a high court challenge to laws which allow the abortion of foetuses
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with down's syndrome up until birth. now on bbc news, it's your questions answered. hello and welcome to your questions answered. you've been sending in your questions on the collapse of several energy providers. here to try and answer just some of them is energy expert ellen fraser from the company baringa. thank you so much forjoining us, so many questions to get through, your starter for ten is this one from ps lewis, why are energy firms going bust? effectively energy firms are going bust because of the wholesale price spikes, they are limited in terms of what they can charge consumers because of the energy cap but if they have not bought energy ahead, they are exposed to the wholesale market, so they are buying the energy
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at more expensive because when they come sell on and they are therefore making a loss and many of them do not have the balance sheets to be able to continue. this one is from mandy who says i am currently with igloo but started to switch to avro which was due to take place in october and they have gone bust and they have taken an upfront payment of the same day they had announced they ceased trading, do i cancel my switch or is it too late? that is a really good question and there is quite a complex process that happens in the background. there is all the data that is exchanged between suppliers. my best guidance is absolutely to cancel that switch but there is a chance that effectively, based on the industry rules kicked off but it will go ahead.
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if you can, look to cancel the switch and keep a really careful record of any payment you have made to avro to make sure that you can actually get that back once the new supplier has been appointed by the regulator. that upfront payment should be transferred to her new supplier, but she needs to check that. it will effectively be counted as a credit balance by the new supplier and we know that 0fgem have said that they are protected and as long as people have a good record of credit balance and payments that they have made, that would transfer with the customer onto the new supplier, the critical element is keeping a record of the payment you have made so that you can follow that through with the new supplier. you mentioned credit and we have so many questions on that subject. let me try and bring you a few of them. broadly on the same theme, we had from valerie maxwell,
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what happens if your provider goes down and you are in credit? david says will i lose my credit if the supplier goes into liquidation, and we have had similar questions on that. talk us through the subject of credit. the guidance was simple from 0fgem and the credit balances are protected. it comes back to the same point on the previous question, keep a good record of any credits you have on the accounts and that will be honoured by your supplier. the mechanisms we do not need to get into, and beer industry will manage the process, if the supplier has gone bust, the new supplier will have to offer the credit but the regulator says they are protected. there is a question around accessing information and i spoke to someone earlier who had been with avro and she had taken a reading
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on tuesday but now she cannot log in or get any history on line. a few questions about proving that credit statements. most energy companies have statements online and i was always able to access but did not download and now avro have gone bust, i have tried to download the statements, but i cannot, what should i do? a similar question from angela in derbyshire and also from frank saying consumers have been advised to gather information and he mentioned avro as well and they have suspended statements from their dashboard. what advice do you have? it is a really unsettling period and it is even more frustrating when you cannot get access to the data that effectively is your data. those records will still be there and your new supplier will get access to it. the critical thing is that metre read is really important
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and for anyone whose supplier goes bust, the best thing is to take your mobile phone and take a picture of your metre with the latest metre read, essentially a time stamped record at the point that the supplier went bust. the new supplier will be able to back calculate what you owe them and the credit balance is difficult to prove in terms of what you would have seen in the statement, but that can be calculated and if you are on a direct debit and you pay a fixed amount each month, keep a track of what you have been paying and even if you are on a variable payment plan, keep a record under a new supplier will be able to help you back calculate what was owed to you in terms of credit balance. it is a great point, occasionally taking a screenshot of an online account is helpful to do, i appreciate that is all great with the benefit of hindsight but for anyone currently
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with a supplier to read that sounds like it might be at risk, logon to your account, take a picture of the credit balance, so you have it and keep the metre read as well. good advice, all about the proof. the next question is from mike in shropshire who says i have a direct debit due to be paid to avro next month, what should i do? my expectation is that a direct debit would not be taken by avro, they are effectively in administration and all of those payments effectively should be ceased relatively quickly, but my honest guidance would be to cancel it. make sure that payment does not go out of your account and once you get transferred to the new supplier, call them as quickly as you can to set up a new direct debit payment with them to make sure you stay in a positive routine of making regular monthly payments to manage the payment of your consumption over the course of the year.
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cancel it now, get in touch with your new supplier and set that up afresh when you are on the other side of the process. i have got a question, it has just popped up, i think because it is something that lots of people will be asking, i pay £74 per month on variable and have been offered to fix for 24 months at £120 per month and i confirmed this with the energy company, do i stay on variable or do i move to fixed which is an increase of £46 and am i protected by the price cap if i remain on variable? that is interesting, a lot of people will be looking around, they might have to be placed with a new supplier initially, but they might be looking for a better deal. the price cap is effectively based on average consumption. it does not mean that every single consumer in the uk
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will pay at that level, you pay based on your consumption but that gives you a good review if you are an average household what you can expect to pay. an increase of 50% is quite a sizeable hike, clearly, but if you can afford that, having the certainty of doing that over the winter period, when prices will be quite volatile, that is not a bad thing to do. before you do that, shop around and many price comparison websites have effectively stopped offering options in terms of tariffs because so many suppliers have removed them, but it is never a bad thing to make a few phone calls and check whether the deal you are getting is a good one before you then lock in. the critical thing, i know there is a huge sense of angst by consumers, hearing about the price hikes, but whether you make a move today or tomorrow, it is not going to make a massive amount of difference. give yourself the time to do
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the research, making sure you are getting the best deal you can in the market or let me refrain that, the less worst deal in the market, none of them are brilliant at the moment, at least that gives you some comfort that you are being offered something that is competitive. this one is from karl mackenzie—brown asking, other parts of europe are experiencing higher prices or is itjust the uk? yes they are having the same problem, a lot of this is driven by global gas prices, but the global economy is effectively bouncing back from the pandemic and the global supply constraints that are happening as a result of that with russia for example exporting less gas, when that supply side is constrained globally, global prices push up. we have seen already be italian and spanish government make interventions to make sure they are protecting customer bills
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and obviously our government is in debate with industry about what to do but this is a pan european problem, obviously made worse in northern europe because we are entering winter and we are increasing demand further by turning on the heating in our homes. that is quite a material factor in this as well. helen collins asks how do gas prices affect liquid petroleum prices? i will not pretend i am an expert in that niche of the market, but my assumption would be however that existing stocks that have already been purchased and are available in the wholesalers and retailers of that kind of gas product will stay stable in the short term until those stocks run out and then of course as they are being replenished, as they purchase them, they are obviously vulnerable to the same wholesale price and our expectation is that they would start to increase in line
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with the wholesale price as well. one more i have spotted on twitter, is there a risk of being cut off if energy suppliers do not wish to supply customers from a failed energy company, if it will cost them more to take on that customer, is there a risk of being cut off? no, no risk and i think we need to be categoric about that in terms of, for a customer that has a credit metre, it is not even physically possible to cut off that supply and we need to give customers peace of mind, if there are supplier goes bust, and their supply will continue, the challenge is around who you pay the bill too. similarly if you're on a prepayment metre and you top it up regularly, that continuity of supply is important and that is guaranteed by the regulator. there will be debates and there is some tension of who takes on the supply and who pays the price between the price cap and the real wholesale price,
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but continuity of supply into homes is guaranteed. ellen, great to have you with us, thank you for answering the questions. ellen fraser, energy analyst. thank you to our reviewers for sending your questions in. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. hello. we started off today on quite a windy note, particularly in the north. quite a lot of cloud in many areas. the cloud is breaking, there is some sunshine out there. this is the picture taken by one of our weather watchers in cambridgeshire recently. still quite a breeze blowing across some northern parts of the uk, particularly for scotland, but the breeze is tending to ease out through the rest of today and there will be a mix of sunny
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spells for many areas and just a few showers around as well. the showers will be courtesy of a couple of weather fronts we have here which are slipping their way gradually further south, both quite weak affairs, so just the odd spot of rain, particularly for northern and western parts of scotland. also just the chance of one or two showers further south as we head into the evening hours as well, but most areas, things are looking dry. clear spells through this evening and overnight the cloud tending to build in from the north—west. the breeze also picking up too with a a few splashes of rain for northern ireland and western scotland first thing tomorrow morning. further south and east though there are clearer skies. a little bit cooler and fresher, temperatures down into single figures in the countryside. but to start off your day on friday, still some sunshine around for much of southern and eastern england. eastern scotland also seeing some sunshine through the day. elsewhere, a fair amount of cloud and with that westerly breeze, just a few showers coming into western scotland, perhaps north wales, north—west england seeing a few of those showers too. but in the sunshine towards the south and east, 23, possibly 24 degrees, so temperatures are still doing very
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well for this stage in september. we have the breeze coming in from a south—westerly direction, and as we head in into the weekend, that will still be very much the picture. a largely dry day for many of us on saturday. we have got a few splashes of rain for perhaps the north of scotland and perhaps one or two showers coming in from the south—west to south wales as well, but most places looking dry. temperatures up to 21 or 22 degrees on saturday. a similar day for many of us on sunday, again predominantly dry with some spells of sunshine. temperatures doing reasonably well, but you will notice this area of rain moving in from the west later in the day and that may well push some rain into northern ireland and western scotland and then overnight sunday and on into monday, this weather front continues its progress gradually further eastwards, so it is going to bring some rain and it is going to change the feel to the weather too. some cooler air and more unsettled conditions moving in. as we head into next week, not as warm as it has been certainly. a mix of still some sunshine, but plenty of blustery showers too. bye— bye.
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britain's gas crisis — nearly 1.5 million customers now face being switched to another provider, with much higher bills. the government has again warned that more energy companies are likely to go bust within the next few weeks. there are more than 50 suppliers in the domestic market, and we may unfortunately see more suppliers exit the market in the coming weeks. complacent about the crisis in the market, complacent about the impact on families, complacent about the cost of living crisis. we'll get the latest analysis from westminster and from our business editor. the murder of 28—year—old teacher sabina nessa — detectives make a new appeal for information from the public. maybe you saw someone acting strangely inside the park, - or running away from it.
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if you were in the area, _ please think back and let us know

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