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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 23, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak with the latest headlines. borisjohnson's message to the united nations and ahead of the cop26 summit on climate change — the world must take radical and urgent action. we will see desertification, drought, crop failure, and mass movements of humanity on a scale not seen before. nearly 1.5 million customers affected by the collapse of energy firms could now face higher bills. business minister, paul scully, says failed companies will not be bailed out — but consumers will be protected. what we're not going to do, is we're
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not going to bail out companies. we are not going to bail out companies that haven't got a business model that can't be sustained. what we are interested in doing is protecting consumers. and if you're one of the people affected by the collapse of your energy provider and would like to share your experience or concerns — we'd like to hear from you. do get in touch on twitter @lukwesaburak — or by using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. also in today's news... police investigating the murder of 28—year—old primary school teacher sabina nessa in south london release details of her last movements tenants are being evicted due to rent arrears built up during the pandemic, an investigation finds. that's despite a government commitment that the crisis would not leave anyone without a home. hairdressers express concern of clients having new allergic reactions to hair dye after contracting coronavirus.
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"it's time for humanity to grow up and take responsibility for climate change." that was borisjohnson�*s message to the united nations general assembly as he gave his speech. with just a0 days to go until the uk hosts a set piece summit on climate change, the prime minister called on leaders to sign up for big reductions in their carbon emissions. it would mean developing countries phasing out power generation from coal, with help from richer nations. our correspondent barbara plett usher has more from new york. it was not for the faint—hearted, this frenetic trip. the prime minister
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covered a lot of ground. he shook a few hands. conducted a few interviews. visited a few sites. even took a train ride. final stop, back to the united nations, where he used his address to press for a stronger commitment to end global warming, with a stark warning of the enduring consequences if countries didn't step up. we will see decertification, drought, crop failure and mass movements of humanity on a scale not seen before, not because of some unforeseen natural event or disaster, but because of us, because of what we are doing now. and our grandchildren will know that we are the culprits. the prime minister chose to focus solely on the subject of climate change. he used this global stage to make a strong speech ahead of the climate
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conference coming up soon in glasgow, which he said would be a critical turning point for humanity. it helped to have an american president on side. joe biden pledged to double us contributions for developing nations to tackle climate change. that was a big win for mrjohnson, who was determined to cement a crucial relationship that has had its rocky moments. he wasn't able to tuck the promise of a new trade deal into his suitcase, but it was still a largely successful trip that showcased the two leaders working together on shared priorities. and nowhere is that more evident than when it comes to climate crisis. mr president, see you in glasgow. thank you. barbara plett—usher, bbc news, new york. let's get more on this now with the environmentalist and guardian columnist george monbiot. thank you forjoining us here this morning. very quickly, what were your thoughts on what you heard
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yesterday?— yesterday? what he said was all riuht. he yesterday? what he said was all right. he said _ yesterday? what he said was all right. he said some _ yesterday? what he said was all right. he said some pretty - yesterday? what he said was all right. he said some pretty good i right. he said some pretty good things. please don't forget this is borisjohnson things. please don't forget this is boris johnson saying things. please don't forget this is borisjohnson saying it. the things that come out of his mouth, they have little relationship to what he then bears. when we look at web the uk is in terms of dealing with climate breakdown, we are a very long way behind where we should be. and yet he was saying we were more or less leading the way. all we have met certain deadlines or points. historically, the uk has done quite well. they've had an almost 50% cut against 1990 levels of greenhouse gases. but it is stalled. it is almost completely stored. previous governments did the most of the work. they switched from gas to renewables. that doesn't really affect us. you turn on the lights, the lights come on. the other stuff
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is more difficult. transport, changing the way we travel, eating less meat, flying less, insulating our homes, that requires the government to engage with mobilised people. governments have been extremely reluctant to do this. boris johnson's extremely reluctant to do this. borisjohnson�*s and above all. we have pretty much come to a grinding halt. all the good stuff is in the past and none of the good stuff is happening today. flan past and none of the good stuff is happening today-— happening today. can the uk or governments — happening today. can the uk or governments around _ happening today. can the uk or governments around the - happening today. can the uk or governments around the world | happening today. can the uk or - governments around the world afford to make these changes for climate change? indie to make these changes for climate chance? �* ., , ., to make these changes for climate chane?~ �* ., to make these changes for climate chane2. �* ., ., . change? we can't afford not to. we are facin: change? we can't afford not to. we are facing the _ change? we can't afford not to. we are facing the greatest _ change? we can't afford not to. we are facing the greatest catastrophe | are facing the greatest catastrophe humankind has ever faced, are facing the greatest catastrophe humankind has everfaced, which is the collapse of our life support systems. i think it is hard for people to get their heads around what this involves. it means very large parts of the planet becoming uninhabitable to humans. it means the generalised collapse of civilisation. the idea that we can't afford to deal with this... i
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civilisation. the idea that we can't afford to deal with this. . .- afford to deal with this. .. i was thinkin: afford to deal with this. .. i was thinking more _ afford to deal with this. .. i was thinking more about _ afford to deal with this. .. i was thinking more about what - afford to deal with this. .. i was thinking more about what it. afford to deal with this. .. i was thinking more about what it is l thinking more about what it is actually going to cost. hard cash. what i'm saying is it is going to cost all the hard cash in the world if we don't sort this out. so, yeah, it will probably cost less than the pandemic cost to actually get ourselves on track, but the money is not currently forthcoming. 0ur governments have constantly told that they don't have the money. when the pandemic struck, suddenly they found the money. turns out there is a magic money tree after all. we need to start pouring the same sort of money into tackling our climate and technological emergencies. what and technological emergencies. what do ou think and technological emergencies. what do you think will _ and technological emergencies. what do you think will come out of cop26? realistically? hat do you think will come out of cop26? realistically?— realistically? not half as much as ou:ht realistically? not half as much as ou . ht to realistically? not half as much as ought to come — realistically? not half as much as ought to come out. _ realistically? not half as much as ought to come out. what - realistically? not half as much as ought to come out. what we - realistically? not half as much asi ought to come out. what we need realistically? not half as much as i ought to come out. what we need to come out of it is to make country commitments mandatory. at the moment, they've got voluntary commitments to take action and the paris agreement. those commitments don't have nearly as much action as we need to prevent catastrophic
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climate change. we need to to see those turned into mandatory agreements, which will actually take things much further, much faster. unfortunately, there's been very little move towards that. the uk's leadership has been quite weak. that hasn't been the massive diplomatic mobilisation had of cop26 that we need to see. find mobilisation had of cop26 that we need to see-— mobilisation had of cop26 that we need to see. and how do you think the fact that _ need to see. and how do you think the fact that uk _ need to see. and how do you think the fact that uk is _ need to see. and how do you think the fact that uk is looking - need to see. and how do you think the fact that uk is looking to - need to see. and how do you think the fact that uk is looking to open | the fact that uk is looking to open a new coal mine is going to sit once we get to glasgow? 15 a new coal mine is going to sit once we get to glasgow?— we get to glasgow? is going to sit ve badl we get to glasgow? is going to sit very badly indeed. _ we get to glasgow? is going to sit very badly indeed. the _ we get to glasgow? is going to sit very badly indeed. the same - we get to glasgow? is going to sit i very badly indeed. the same applies to opening up new gas fields and oil in the north sea and west of shetland. the government also seems committed to do that. this is the opposite of what we need to be doing. the science shows very clearly we need to be retiring existing reserves of fossil fuels, let alone developing new ones, otherwise we have got absolutely no hope of meeting our climate targets
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and the paris agreement of 2015. thank you very much for your time. the boss of the energy regulator 0fgem is warning that more firms are likely to go bust — leaving almost one and a half million customers facing a switch to new suppliers and more expensive bills. two companies — avro energy and green — with more than 800,000 customers between them — ceased trading yesterday, after the price of wholesale gas soared to unprecedented levels. our business reporter, ramzan karmali has the details. soaring gas prices have led to the collapse of two more energy suppliers, meaning six firms have gone bust in september alone and left 1.5 million customers facing higher bills. those customers will still receive energy while a new supplier is appointed by 0fgem. its boss warned it was likely more
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firms would go bust. it's not unusual for suppliers to go out of the market. i think what's different this time is the dramatic change in the costs those suppliers are facing. we do expect more, we do expect more not to be able to face the circumstances we are in, but it is genuinely hard to say more than that, partly because that means predicting the gas price. this is a significant impact on the sector and it is something we are working with government to manage, but we can't make predictions. energy firms have been hit by a massive rise in wholesale prices. they are apparently around four times higher than normal. the body that represents them has warned the market is not working. the government has promised the energy price cap will remain in place during the winter, and it hopes this will protect millions of customers. but from 0ctober1st, that cap is set to rise by 12%, meaning around 15 million households will still end up paying more. razman karmali, bbc news.
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we're just hearing from our business editor that the government is cooling on supplying state backed loans energy companies. let's get more on this with adam fleming, our chief political correspondent. put this into context for us please. it's good that simon has been hearing the same thing i have been hearing. at the start of the week, there is talk that the government would step in and help energy companies that were taking on for thousands of new customers from the collapsed energy companies. the reason that the energy companies needed help, was because of the energy price cap which limits how much they could charge customers. they can charge these new customers the real cost of gas and the global market, which means they were taking them on at a loss. there was a suggestion that there would be government backed loans to
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incentivise governments to do that. ministers are now not skin wanting to do that. they seen this system working, and they think it's pretty robust. the business minister explained why they are thinking that way. what we're not going to do, is we're not going to bail out companies. we're not going to bail out companies that haven't got a business model that can be sustained. but what we are interested in doing is protecting consumers. we want to make sure that they have continuity of supply, we want to make sure that we can keep their prices as keen as possible. we doing that through the price cap, through the warm homes discount, and through cold weather payments as well. i quickly, you've mentioned the price cap. remind us what it isn't what it willjump to. if price cap. remind us what it isn't what it willjump to.— what it will “ump to. if you are in a variable — what it willjump to. if you are in a variable rate _ what it willjump to. if you are in a variable rate tariff, _ what it willjump to. if you are in a variable rate tariff, not - what it willjump to. if you are in a variable rate tariff, not a - what it willjump to. if you are in a variable rate tariff, not a fixed | a variable rate tariff, not a fixed rate, then the government sets this price cap. it's the level above which the average bill can't go up. it was calculated and applied in
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october and april. it will go up next month to reflect the increase in wholesale gas prices. it will probably go up again next april, to reflect the fact we are living through another period of increased gas prices. it means a lot of people's bills will go up, irrespective of whether they have had to move supplier because their existing energy company has gone bust. ., existing energy company has gone bust. . , ., , ., bust. there are questions about credit and _ bust. there are questions about credit and adapt _ bust. there are questions about credit and adapt and _ bust. there are questions about credit and adapt and what - bust. there are questions about credit and adapt and what will. credit and adapt and what will happen to that. they don't want to go to british gas, for example. how do they switch? what should they be doing? do they switch? what should they be doinu ? , ., , do they switch? what should they be doinu ? , . , ., , doing? they have been told they should move _ doing? they have been told they should move to _ doing? they have been told they should move to another- doing? they have been told they| should move to another supplier. they should hold tight and see what happens. then you should get information about your new tariff. if you don't like it, you are free to go back into the market and shop around for a different tariff. that's the practical thing. if you are in credit with your energy supply and they go bust, the system
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is designed to protect that credit, so it goes with you to that new supplier. but often have set again, keep hold of all your paperwork so you can prove what position you are in a something goes wrong. all those questions and plenty more will hopefully be what dealt with today. you can also go to the 0fgem website. has your energy provider collapsed ? later this morning we'll be answering your questions. you've still got time to send them in by emailing yourquestions@bbc.co.uk or on twitter using the hash tag bbc your questions. that's coming up at 11:30 with annita mcveigh right here on bbc news. police investigating the murder of 28—year—old sabina nessa, say they think she was killed
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on her way to meet a friend ata pub. her body was found by a member of the public in a london park on saturday morning and a vigil will be held tomorrow in her memory. the family of the primary school teacher say they've been left "devastated" by her death. she honestly was the most caring person, kindest, sweetest girl you could meet. sabina's heart was good as gold. she never had a bad thing to say about anyone. her sisters are going to miss her so much. we'rejoined now byjamie klingler of reclaim these streets, which is organising tomorrow's vigil. thank you forjoining us here. you are angry. thank you for “oining us here. you are an: . , ., , thank you for “oining us here. you angry.—
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are angry. yes, furious. we are sopporting _ are angry. yes, furious. we are sopporting the _ are angry. yes, furious. we are supporting the women - are angry. yes, furious. we are supporting the women in - are angry. yes, furious. we are supporting the women in the i are angry. yes, furious. we are i supporting the women in the area with the vigil they are planning rather than a reclaim these streets event. we are amplifying their message. we were told that violence against women is not in the police's top priorities and we are not considered as important as gangs or terrorism. itjust underlines that violence against women's and girls act that was in the government has been pushed away. it's not happening. you get more time for kidnapping a dog or stealing a dog than for strangling a woman. some things really got to change. women are getting killed left, right and centre and it's got to stop. the government have to take more seriously, the police have to take more seriously, and our safety is more seriously, and our safety is more important.— more seriously, and our safety is more important. you've described this as an epidemic— more important. you've described this as an epidemic of— more important. you've described this as an epidemic of violence - more important. you've described|
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this as an epidemic of violence and floating in front of our eyes. it's always been there, hasn't it? its not new? ., �* , ., ,, . not new? no, it's not new. since sarah everard _ not new? no, it's not new. since sarah everard was _ not new? no, it's not new. since sarah everard was killed - not new? no, it's not new. since sarah everard was killed in - not new? no, it's not new. since | sarah everard was killed in march, 70 more women have been killed at the hands of men. women of colour are covered a lot less than white women on the front pages of newspapers. i'm almost speechless. was so tired, and so angry. she was outside for five minutes going to meet herfriends. herfamily outside for five minutes going to meet her friends. her family will be devastated forever because of this action. ., ., ., , , ., , action. information sheets have been distributed within _ action. information sheets have been distributed within the _ action. information sheets have been distributed within the community. - distributed within the community. surely, more has to be done. in a much shorter, more. the council is handing out panic alarms. it's the whole idea that we should take our own defence classes. it's not on women to protect themselves. we need perpetrators to be stopped. it is
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very little done about indecent exposure defences. people don't go out and murder right away. there are signs, histories, reports made over time. ., signs, histories, reports made over time. . , ., , signs, histories, reports made over time. . , .,, signs, histories, reports made over time. . , ., time. there are people scared of these men _ time. there are people scared of these men before _ time. there are people scared of these men before they _ time. there are people scared of these men before they commit l time. there are people scared of- these men before they commit these crimes. ~ ., these men before they commit these crimes. . , , these men before they commit these crimes. . . , , , ., these men before they commit these crimes. . , , crimes. what practically needs to be done? the met _ crimes. what practically needs to be done? the met police _ crimes. what practically needs to be done? the met police have - crimes. what practically needs to be done? the met police have up - crimes. what practically needs to be done? the met police have up to - done? the met police have up to patrols in the community. what needs to be done in the long term? the patrols in the community. what needs to be done in the long term?— to be done in the long term? the met olice have to be done in the long term? the met police have apt _ to be done in the long term? the met police have apt controls _ to be done in the long term? the met police have apt controls after - to be done in the long term? the met police have apt controls after they - police have apt controls after they found the body, not before. the idea they were put undercover cops in bars that will keep us safe, when a serving police officer killed sarah everard. they're not listening to the violence against women and girls sector, which has done hundreds of years of research on this, who know where they need to go in terms of education. ~ , ., , education. where is that, very cuickl ? education. where is that, very quickly? it _ education. where is that, very quickly? it is _ education. where is that, very quickly? it is a _ education. where is that, very quickly? it is a community - education. where is that, veryj quickly? it is a community and education. _ quickly? it is a community and education, and _ quickly? it is a community and education, and stopping - quickly? it is a community and education, and stopping the i quickly? it is a community and - education, and stopping the lower level things. harassment doesn't
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happen right now if you don't report it it's not a crime. you get more of a fine for littering than catcalling or getting out of your car and harassing a woman. that's problematic.— harassing a woman. that's roblematic. . , , problematic. that vigil is being held for sabina _ problematic. that vigil is being held for sabina nessa - problematic. that vigil is being held for sabina nessa on - problematic. that vigil is being l held for sabina nessa on friday. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson's message to the united nations and ahead of cop26 summit on climate change — the world must take radical and urgent action: this nearly one and a half million customers affected by the collapse of energy firms could now face higher bills. police investigating the murder of 28—year old primary school teacher sabina nessa in south london release details of her last movements. the government is insisting that consumers will be protected after two more energy companies
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went bust yesterday. joining me now is dale vince 0be, owner of energy company ecotricity. thank owner of energy company ecotricity. you forjoining seven thank you forjoining us. this is seven companies within six weeks. how are you feeling?— seven companies within six weeks. how are you feeling? well, you know, this is not new — how are you feeling? well, you know, this is not new to _ how are you feeling? well, you know, this is not new to us. _ how are you feeling? well, you know, this is not new to us. in _ how are you feeling? well, you know, this is not new to us. in the _ how are you feeling? well, you know, this is not new to us. in the last - this is not new to us. in the last two years, one small energy gone bankrupt every six weeks. the regulator is well oiled machine for this and sharing debts amongst those less well standing. fundamentally, our problem is a country is that we are not making our own electricity and gas. we are entirely dependent on global markets and price shocks, jets such as this when we're having now. we need to change that. cannot be chanced now. we need to change that. cannot be changed because _ now. we need to change that. cannot be changed because like _ now. we need to change that. cannot be changed because like how- now. we need to change that. cannot be changed because like how doing? | now. we need to change that. cannotl be changed because like how doing? ? how is your company doing? we
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be changed because like how doing? ? how is your company doing?— be changed because like how doing? ? how is your company doing? we make a lot of our electricity _ how is your company doing? we make a lot of our electricity ourselves _ lot of our electricity ourselves stop they are about to make gas from grass to put into the grid. we have the answers in terms of technology. that insulates us as a company. we need to insulate the whole company in that way so that we are no longer dependent on foreign markets. these crazy events that happen all the time, the biggest one in my time as energy sector. it will be the last one until we fix the underlying problem. white might view case appears to be performing really badly when it comes to storage. this shorta . e badly when it comes to storage. this shortage and — badly when it comes to storage. this shortage and gas is a global thing. it was a coordinated reaction with the economy is starting up after the pandemic, or rather after we get out of the pandemic. there are countries in europe that have adequate stores. what is wrong with the uk on that? we have 1% of europe's storage
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capacity. that is just a failure of government to plan the right infrastructure for our country. this crisis, in particular, began in the electricity centre. we just had a summer that was the least windy for 60 years, so our winter fleet also underperformed. a cable which connects it to france for which we need power when we need it burnt down. that will take six months to fix. they will come back, and went will come back, but we tend to gas to fix that. we have chronic shortage of storage. these are factors. some of them will unpick themselves, but the underlying problem is that we are utterly dependent on the rest of the world for ever we get our energy. we have to change that. is a for ever we get our energy. we have to change that-— to change that. is a small energy su lier, to change that. is a small energy supplier. what — to change that. is a small energy supplier, what will _
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to change that. is a small energy supplier, what will happen - to change that. is a small energy supplier, what will happen when | to change that. is a small energy. supplier, what will happen when it comes to being competitive within the market. statistics say we started with 70 energy supplies for the beginning of this year and by winter there will only be time left. i've seen those projections, and i don't know if they are true or not. right now, six or seven small energy companies in the pipe about to go bankrupt. there are fundamental problems here. the price cap was meant to aid competition, but the only competition on the market was only competition on the market was on price. imposing a one size fits all price, it destroyed competition and took away the ability of companies to react to external events. countries going bust right now put their prices up to compensate for the income and price of gas. the government say they won't move the gap to protect consumers, but that's naive. it's like being on a beach and trying to
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resist incoming tide. as these are globalfacts. if companies resist incoming tide. as these are global facts. if companies don't react, they go bust. previously the government have jumped react, they go bust. previously the government havejumped in react, they go bust. previously the government have jumped in with hundreds of pounds and tempting. but energy companies aren't allowed to put their prices up and reopen. an investigation has found that tenants are being evicted due to rent arrears built up during the pandemic — despite a government commitment that coronavirus would not leave anyone without a home. analysis of 270 possession orders issued by courts in england and wales this summer, found that in one third of cases, covid was stated as the reason for the missing payments. 0ur social affairs correspondent, michael buchanan has the details. michael calder is a musician and pre—pandemic a guitar teacher.
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my work was all based around contact with people, in and out of people's houses daily. as he prepared for his son's birth, the country went into lockdown and his income plummeted. michael fell into rent arrears and has now been served with an eviction notice. it's kind of like weighing up, when can i meet my rent, put food on the table, you know, paying the bills, gas and electricity? and bit by bit the moneyjust increased and decreased to the point where i did just end up in arrears. there was no way around it. since the ban on evictions was lifted, landlords have been rushing to county courts seeking permission for bailiffs to evict their tenants. of the 270 possession orders analysed by the bureau of investigativejournalism, one third of them, 88 cases, explicitly cited covid as the reason why rent arrears had arisen. what strikes you about sitting in the hearings is exactly
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how short they are. people are losing their homes in a matter of minutes. that's because the law is really clear. if you owe at least two months of rent arrears, then the landlord will almost certainly get a possession order. 0nejudge told the bbc, however, that some tenants have taken advantage of the evictions ban and had simply refused to pay the rent. well, i had to wait six months. landlord michelle dighton is owed a fortune by tenants she can't get rid of due to the eviction ban and court delays. i was still having to pay my mortgages, look after the kids. and it's just really frustrating that no one wants to give me an update on when i should get my own property back. ministers in westminster say they took unprecedented action to keep people in their homes, and with the economy reopening, it was now time to deliver a fair rental market. what this investigation highlights, however, is that both landlords and tenants feel the system is not fair. michael buchanan, bbc news.
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joining me now is chris norris, director of policy at the national residential landlords association. good morning. just how big is the arrears crisis right now? it is good morning. just how big is the arrears crisis right now?— arrears crisis right now? it is a really big _ arrears crisis right now? it is a really big problem. _ arrears crisis right now? it is a really big problem. rent - arrears crisis right now? it is a really big problem. rent thatl arrears crisis right now? it is a | really big problem. rent that is arrears crisis right now? it is a i really big problem. rent that is a significant issue in our sector. most recent polling that we conducted showed that there were £400 million worth of rent unpaid at the moment. a lot of that comes about as a result of the challenges people have faced in a year or so. we hear a lot about the impact on the tenants. 0ur landlord scoping? because obviously we are running a business. irate because obviously we are running a business. ~ ., , because obviously we are running a business. ~ . , _ , ., business. we have every sympathy for --eole business. we have every sympathy for eo - le who business. we have every sympathy for people who are _ business. we have every sympathy for people who are experiencing - people who are experiencing unprecedented challenges of the last 18 months, but landlords are running businesses and they are not receiving payment for the services and terms they are providing. i think you need to remember the
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context that around half of landlords in england and wales are actually individuals who own only one property. their typical rental income for the year is less than four point £5,000. the amount of arrears in that that this investigation has uncovered means that some of those individuals have not had an income for the last year in respect of these businesses. i understand the welsh government have extended their periods, haven't they, for allowing six months notice before an eviction. would that help? extending notice periods in the way that the welsh government has done yesterday is kicking the can down the road. these areas were arrears have been built on are getting worse. ratherthan have been built on are getting worse. rather than tackling the symptom, they need to tackle the records. and that's why we are, and a lot of other organisations in our sector and charity supporting households, have been calling for hardship loans, have been calling
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for changes to the welfare system. certainly, the withdrawal of the £20 universal credit will not help this. we need to tackle hassled abilities to change that might pay the rent. frankly, landlords can't absorb this debt. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. good morning. it's looking nice out there for most of the country. it's not the maverick. it's been a wild morning because parts of northern scotland. patchy rain and drizzle. the same in wales and the south—west at the moment is edging its way southwards. it could be damp and drizzly at times. in between, there is a big gap of sunshine
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developing through wales, the midlands, the southeast. temperatures potentially 23 degrees. they could be sunny spells but it will be around ten or 11 celsius in the shetlands. state spending across tonight with outbreaks of rain. not as windy as last night. clear skies elsewhere. in south—east wales and parts of england, could get down to an end to his senses. lotz mcleod tomorrow. patchy rain or drizzle starting to pushing erratically across the country tomorrow. up to 21 degrees in aberdeenshire. a warmer day than today. hello this is bbc news. the headlines. borisjohnson's message to the united nations and ahead of cop26 summit on climate change — the world must take radical and urgent action.
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nearly one and a half million customers affected by energy firms collapsing under soaring gas prices could now face higher bills. police investigating the murder of 28—year old primary school teacher sabina nessa in south london release details of her last movements. tenants are being evicted due to rent arrears built up during the pandemic, an investigation finds. that's despite a government commitment that the crisis would not leave anyone without a home. and hairdressers express concern of clients having new allergic reactions to hair dye after contracting coronavirus. more now on our top story — that borisjohnson has urged world leaders to take urgent action to tackle climate change, saying it's time for humanity to �*grow up'. speaking to the un general assembly in new york, the prime minister said there would be irreversible damage
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if action was not taken quickly. joining me now isjohn ashton, a former uk climate envoy and independent speaker and commentator thank and commentator you for joining thank and commentator you forjoining us. were you impressed thank you forjoining us. were you impressed and convinced by what the prime minister had to say? the prime minister is absolutely _ prime minister had to say? the prime minister is absolutely right _ prime minister had to say? the prime minister is absolutely right to - prime minister had to say? the prime minister is absolutely right to say - minister is absolutely right to say we need to step up our efforts dramatically, we need to get the car moving at 80 mph and it is currently moving at 80 mph and it is currently moving at 80 mph and it is currently moving a ten mph. what is more troubling is that that starts with actions, not speeches. and the reality is that the uk is still not walking is walk or talking to talk. you can't do it all with markets and boosterism and unique leadership and policy and we're still doing too many of the things that lock us further into a climate emergency and are not enough of the things that will give us a chance of getting out
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one... ~ ., ., will give us a chance of getting out one... ~ . ., , ., one... what are those things that are looking _ one... what are those things that are looking thing? _ one... what are those things that are looking thing? well, - one... what are those things that are looking thing? well, the - are looking thing? well, the international _ are looking thing? well, the international energy - are looking thing? well, the international energy agency | are looking thing? well, the - international energy agency has said recently that we really can't afford to be getting more coal, oil or gas out of the ground, so why is the uk still contemplating a new coal mine in cumbria and giving out new offshore oil and gas —— gas licenses offshore oil and gas —— gas licenses off shetland, for example? there are lots of areas in which we continue business as usual. we need to get out of them. our tax system depends on revenues from oil and gas, for example. but the good news is that the public is on the front line and is way ahead of politicians and they want more ambition and that is a source of huge political energy which governments, politicians can now channel to expand the limits of the possible and that is really the
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opportunity in glasgow and that's what they need to do at the summit and going on from there. i will what they need to do at the summit and going on from there.— and going on from there. i will get that in a moment. _ and going on from there. i will get that in a moment. just _ and going on from there. i will get that in a moment. just to - and going on from there. i will get that in a moment. just to put - and going on from there. i will get that in a moment. just to put the l that in a moment. just to put the government line forward on the new coal mine. they will argue that this is not about energy production, it is not about energy production, it is what the steel industry. that is there line on the new coal mine. let's turn now to glasgow. comparing it to paris, what tangible agreements do you think will possibly come out of that. u? agreements do you think will possibly come out of that. --? if we want a modern _ possibly come out of that. --? if we want a modern steel— possibly come out of that. --? if we want a modern steel industry - possibly come out of that. --? if we want a modern steel industry in - possibly come out of that. --? if we want a modern steel industry in the| want a modern steel industry in the uk, we need to be leading the transition from coal intensive steel to hydrogen —based steel. that is one of the opportunities that we need to be taken. there is absolutely no need for a new coal mine to get more metallurgical coal out of the ground. i think for glasgow, it's notjust about the text. it's a shame that we won't get as much ambition out of glasgow as
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we probably could have done if we had been better prepared, if we had done the hard work over the last two years. it wasn't a brilliant move to cut our overseas a's —— might aid when the key condition for glasgow is to give the sense that we are all in the same boat. there is some momentum building now with the chinese announcement of financing... the announcement of president biden about financing the climate investment around the world. so i am not sure. the promises when you add them together in the text are still going to be well short of what we need to say that we are confident that we can keep climate change while under 2 degrees down to 1.5 degrees. what it needs to do is give us a sense that coming out of glasgow we are going to continue stepping up our efforts and that is all to play for. you stepping up our efforts and that is all to play for-— all to play for. you mentioned hydrogen _ all to play for. you mentioned hydrogen and _ all to play for. you mentioned hydrogen and l— all to play for. you mentioned hydrogen and i suspect - all to play for. you mentioned hydrogen and i suspect we - all to play for. you mentioned| hydrogen and i suspect we are all to play for. you mentioned - hydrogen and i suspect we are going to hear more and more about this as an alternative over time. there are some people who are saying that it
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is actually not the best alternative. elon musk, for example, when it comes to cars and car technology says it's mind—bogglingly stupid. tell us a hydrogen in the uk. i stupid. tell us a hydrogen in the uk. 4' ., ., , uk. i think we have to be careful not to be too _ uk. i think we have to be careful not to be too exclusive - uk. i think we have to be careful not to be too exclusive about. not to be too exclusive about different technologies. there will be contacts in different sectors between which is the best technology to use. elon musk makes electric cars so he is probably not going to be too enthusiastic about hydrogen fuel cells, for example. but there are other sectors such as steel—making which it is very hard to see a net zero alternative that is not based on hydrogen. the role for government is to enable and put in place the policy and public investment to enable a much larger flows of capital so that all of those technology options can be explored and compete against each other, but within a constraint that
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says this has to get us to net zero very quickly. says this has to get us to net zero very quickly-— says this has to get us to net zero ve uickl. a ., . very quickly. john ashton, thank you for our very quickly. john ashton, thank you for yourtime- _ sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. and here is mike. it was the second time in four days manchester united had faced west ham, this time at home, with much changed teams in the league cup, and this time it was the hammers who came out on top. so revenge for their defeat in the league this to united at the weekend. manuel lanzini's first half goal, was the difference. united had the lion's share of possesion and a lot more of the attempts on goal — but they couldn't find a way through at old trafford, and it's west ham, who advance to the fourth round, where they will face the holders manchester city, who've won this cup four years running now. reece james scored the winning penalty for chelsea, as they beat aston villa, to extend their unbeaten start to the season.
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they'll face southampton next, as they chase the title, they last won six years ago. tottenham are also through. they narrowly beat wolves on penalties. wolves captain connor coady missing the decisive penalty after the match finished level at 2—2. they face burnley next. and arsenal are also through. they continued their good form with a comfortable 3—0 win over wimbledon, to make it three wins in a row now, in all competitions, for mikel arteta. arsenal were drawn at home to leeds in the fourth round. details of all last night's games are on the bbc sport website. while in scotland, celtic will aim to put their poor league form to one side tonight as they play, second—tier raith rovers, for a place in the semi—finals of the scottish league cup. stjohnstone and rangers are already there — alfredo morelos took full advantage of a goalkeeping error to help rangers to a 2—0 win over livingston. derby county have been deducted 12 points by the english football league, after going into administration.
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that leaves them bottom of the championship on minus two points and facing a very uncertain future. players and staff are in danger of losing theirjobs, including manager wayne rooney. it seems all that can save them, now is finding a buyer. current owner mel morris, says the club has lost him in excess of £200 million to date. from the new year, football fans will be able to legally stand at selected grounds in the premier league and championship, after a pilot scheme was given the go—ahead. standing has been banned since 1994, after recommendations made in the taylor report, into the 1989 hillsborough disaster. but barrier seating, has been developed which can be converted to standing areas, and campaigners say that safe standing should be allowed in grounds, as a matter of common sense following the lead of scotland. people have been standing ever since
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taylor and the problem with that is when clubs can't manage the process, you end up in the way ends with people standing in front of people who don't want to or can't stand and it generates a bunch of problems that needn't be there. it’s it generates a bunch of problems that needn't be there.— it generates a bunch of problems that needn't be there. it's easy to have standing _ that needn't be there. it's easy to have standing areas _ that needn't be there. it's easy to have standing areas at _ that needn't be there. it's easy to have standing areas at the - that needn't be there. it's easy to have standing areas at the back i that needn't be there. it's easy to| have standing areas at the back or designated standing areas. as the excitement builds for the start of the ryder cup tomorrow, team europe have been attempting to win over the home fans at whistling straits. the players appeared in �*cheeseheads' — a nod to the local nfl side, the green bay packers. on paper, the usa, are favourites to win, with nine of the top 11 players in the world on their team, but ian poulter is no stranger to upsetting the odds on foreign soil. he was part of the miracle in medinah, back in 2012, the last time europe won in the united states. i think it's on each player to work out how he's going to use that energy to spur them on to get the best out of them. so, it's different.
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we don't always have it that way and this is going to be a new one, but i think there's the ability to use theirjuice. andy murray charged into the quarterfinals of the moselle open in france, with a straight—sets win over canada's vasek pospisil. murray is ranked 113th in the world, with pospisil 66th — and he could face the top seed hubert hurkacz next. murray said his body felt good, he's gaining confidence, and the results are coming. that's great to see. that's all the sport for now. hairdressers say they're seeing an increasing number of clients having new allergic reactions to hair dye after contracting coronavirus. some have reported suffering from rashes and burns, despite using the same hair dye for years. the trade body is now urging professionals to carry out patch skin tests on all customers. frankie mccamley has more.
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for 15 years, gemma has been going to this salon to get her hair dyed. despite choosing the same colour by the same brand, she says her skin changed after contracting coronavirus. so, in april, when the salon reopened, stacey had made it compulsory that you had to have a patch test 48 hours before you were to have any colour on your hair. to start with i had a much forgotten i had the patch test because it was so far in the back of my mind that i would react to it. under the manufacturer's guidelines, gemma's hairdresser stacey says she didn't have to carry out a patch test. she took extra precautions which turned out to be the right thing to do. it was really itchy, really sore. as it started to get worse
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i was thinking, oh my goodness, i am really reacting to this patch test. i felt a really hot burning sensation behind my ear, which progressively got worse, to the point where it had taken layers of skin from behind my ear. it was so painful. and really scary. i had never experienced anything like that before. in south—east london at the charlotte's salon, one of her regular clients had a reaction so severe she had to call an ambulance. from the second i started applying, because she had her gown slightly undone, i noticed a rash creeping up her chest and starting to creep upwards to her neck. it was actually quite aggressive. i said, do you feel 0k? no, not particularly. got her straight back to the backwash and then just really just started shampooing it off with a hypoallergenic shampoo. that day she went on to social media to raise awareness of what had happened to her client. she felt quite giddy, she was quite hot and cold,
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quite shaky and just generally, generally unwell. she felt like she was going to pass out. the skin test is still in date. there is nothing at the moment within our industry to state that we do need skin tests. but i am literally going to spend my whole weekend trying to get in touch with anyone and everyone that will listen. both women who suffered a new reaction to hair dye had contracted coronavirus or long covid. some scientists believe the two could be linked, but many other serious illnesses can affect your immune system and cause new allergic reactions. folks like me who spend a lot of time thinking about covid, immunity to covid and vaccines, are now starting to think about long covid. somewhere on that list you think about the allergic responses. what it means is you may have been reprogrammed, if you like. so compared to what you knew before, i am allergic to lobster,
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but i am not allergic to nuts or vice versa, all bets are off. you have to rethink what your allergies might be. whether it is how die or anything else, studies are now being carried -- hair —— hairdye... out into new allergic responses following covid. industry experts say they want to be science proven before taking action. we are hearing reports of people saying they have found their clients more sensitive. so far there is no definitive evidence of causation. hairdressers have to follow specific guidance from each hair dye manufacturer. this could include things like questionnaires and patch test. if they don't follow those, then their insurance could be invalid and they could be liable. that's why charlotte is going the extra mile to patch test all clients who have had covid before dying their hair. and she wants the industry to follow. frankie mccamley, bbc news.
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the headlines on bbc news. borisjohnson's message to the united nations and ahead of cop26 summit on climate change — the world must take radical and urgent action. nearly one and a half million customers affected by energy firms collapsing under soaring gas prices could now face higher bills. police investigating the murder of 28—year old primary school teacher sabina nessa in south london release details of her last movements. climate change is one of the most important issues for german voters as they head to the polls this weekend. even so, germany's green party — which had initially surged in the opinion polls is now lagging behind other parties who propose a less stringent approach to tackling the problem. 0ur berlin correspondent
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jenny hill reports. it's getting harder for germans to ignore climate change. the fairytale forests which carpet the country are dying. this bug which proliferates in warmer, drier conditions is boring into and killing that weakened trees. nothing the foresters can do but cut down the affected trees, try to stop the spread. translation: we never thought the forest would react _ so quickly to climate change. what shocked us was that it was not just the conifers badly affected but also old oak and beech trees. time is running out for the planet and for germany's green party which had high hopes for the election. support has grown in recent years, boosted by younger voters. but the chancellor candidate is lagging behind in the polls.
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there is no doubting how passionately germans feel about climate change but that alone might not be enough to put annalena baerbock into the chancellery. who this, after all, is the country which invented the motorcar. some worry about the pace of change and how to protect the environment without killing off industry. translation: i would like to know who is going to pay for this. - if the car industry gets kneecapped and tens or may be hundreds of thousands, maybe a million people lose theirjobs, maybe they should be a slower solution. together, perhaps, we can slow down global warming but when i see china opening up 200 airports and a thousand coal power stations, i do wonder how small germany is supposed to save the world. it is widely acknowledged that
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angela merkel has not done enough to tackle climate change, despite her initial efforts to address the problem on the world stage. but germany's politicians have come under pressure from a new generation of activists. most parties have tailored their manifestos after this summer's deadly floods, they know that voter priorities are changing. none of the party really have enough measures to reach the goals of planet protection. —— climate protection... only the greens have the large amount of measures that come close to the goals and the targets we have to reach, but the others not. they come close? they come close. but not sufficient? not sufficient. in the german forest they are planting different species that they hope will point the way to a warmer, drier future. change it seems inevitable for a country which must decide now how best to safeguard its future. new performance figures
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for the welsh nhs are due out shortly. in recent months waiting times have reached record levels, with waits for ambulances, accident and emergency and other hospital treatments growing since the start of the pandemic. the welsh ambulance has told the bbc he's concerned about pressures on the service moving into the winter. nicola hidden—ryan's mum elaine died three years ago in north wales. an inquest found an ambulance took over an hour to arrive after three calls to 999. her family believes the wait contributed to her death. the welsh ambulance service said that even if paramedics had arrived sooner, there was little they could have done to help her. let's talk to nicola now. nicola, just laying out their the context of
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what happened, but let us start off. what actually happened to your mother? fin what actually happened to your mother? ~ ., , ., , mother? on the 26th of february, 2018, mum _ mother? on the 26th of february, 2018, mum took— mother? on the 26th of february, 2018, mum took ill _ mother? on the 26th of february, 2018, mum took ill suddenly - mother? on the 26th of february, 2018, mum took ill suddenly and i mother? on the 26th of february, i 2018, mum took ill suddenly and she collapsed, hit her head and she went unconscious. my dad and sis de —— system are luckily at home at the time and they made a phone call to the ambulance service... . —— sister. they were sure an ambulance was sent and they waited and waited and 20 minutes later mum deteriorated and got noisier and she had complex and breathing difficulties and this was called to the call handler and they waited and waited and nothing came and they made another phone call and by this time, mum had gone downhill quite quickly, again, they called the ambulance, went through the whole spiel and they were ensured again that an ambulance had been sent and they waited again and it's got to a point where mum went downhill again
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and she stopped breathing and this was 26 minutes after the second call and she stopped breathing and so my dad and neighbour had to perform cpr on my mum whilst they waited for an ambulance to arrive and i think it was, after the third call it was 20 minutes for the ambulance to arrive. did you ever find minutes for the ambulance to arrive. did you everfind out minutes for the ambulance to arrive. did you ever find out why it took them so long to get to your house? the call handler of the second call had done the call wrong so he entered some incorrect information into the state system and that caused a delay. they sent an ambulance on the second call and then they stood it down and at the inquest we found that that ambulance they stood down was sat at the ambulance station in wrexham. it was just parked up for 26 minutes until the third call was made and that same ambulance then attended. i note that we are unable _
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same ambulance then attended. i note that we are unable to _ same ambulance then attended. i note that we are unable to speak _ same ambulance then attended. i note that we are unable to speak to - same ambulance then attended. i note that we are unable to speak to the people who led the inquest, but what reason were you given as to their conclusion that she would have died anyway? conclusion that she would have died an a ? �* , , ., conclusion that she would have died an ., anyway? because she had complex breathin: anyway? because she had complex breathing difficulties, _ anyway? because she had complex breathing difficulties, they - anyway? because she had complex breathing difficulties, they said i breathing difficulties, they said that on the balance of probability, she would have died. but as a family, we don't believe that to be true because she wasn't given that chance, she wasn't given the opportunity to survive and had an ambulance, after the first call say, they would have got her to hospital as she would have been receiving life—saving treatment when she stopped breathing. how the abbey must come after the second call, they would have been at the house seven minutes before she stopped breathing and they had trained medical professionals with all the equipment to provide life—saving care. equipment to provide life-saving care. y equipment to provide life-saving care. , ,. , ., care. sorry, you described how you had to perform _ care. sorry, you described how you had to perform cpr. _ care. sorry, you described how you had to perform cpr. that - care. sorry, you described how you had to perform cpr. that is - care. sorry, you described how you had to perform cpr. that is a i had to perform cpr. that is a traumatic experience. it’s
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traumatic experience. it's absolutely _ traumatic experience. it�*s absolutely horrendous. i didn't have to perform it. my dad and neighbour target in turn to perform cpr and if i'm honest, they are all still struggling. i was on the phone listening it go on and it was traumatic for me, but to actually be there and witness it, it was absolutely horrendous and still now, they are living with the consequences of this. was there an hint consequences of this. was there anything positive _ consequences of this. was there anything positive that _ consequences of this. was there anything positive that has i consequences of this. was there anything positive that has taken | anything positive that has taken place or changed since the inquest, for example, within the ambulance service? i for example, within the ambulance service? ., �* , service? i don't believe so. obviously. _ service? i don't believe so. obviously, we _ service? i don't believe so. obviously, we made - service? i don't believe so. obviously, we made a i service? i don't believe so. i obviously, we made a complaint service? i don't believe so. - obviously, we made a complaint to the ambulance service and we got a letter with a generic response saying lessons have been learned and i don't believe lessons have been learnt because the delays are increasing, they are still waiting outside hospitals at locations and because on the day my mum died there
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were 32 ambulances servicing the whole of north wales, which is a huge area. 21 of those ambulances were sat and waiting to off—load patients and ambulances and paramedics are spending over half of their shifts sat and waiting to off—load these patients. it doesn't seem like anything is changing and because of anything because of the pandemic things have got worse. sorry, what do you think should and could be done to make things better, from the perspective of a patient or a family? from the perspective of a patient or a famil ? ., from the perspective of a patient or a famil ? . ., from the perspective of a patient or afamil ? . ., ., , a family? having an absolute overhaul of— a family? having an absolute overhaul of the _ a family? having an absolute overhaul of the structure i a family? having an absolute i overhaul of the structure starting from the top and working your way down. there has to be people using the ambulance service as a gp service because they can't get their treatments of the doctors, so they are going to a&e and this is clogging up the a we should have been sat outside and could there be a way of off—loading patients into the hospital from the ambulance through a different entrance? and
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then having a designated personal working just for patients coming in via ambulance? but i think it's the public as well that need to be aware that by ringing them for a cut or a grades or a head cold, you are stopping them from attending life ending treatment. they can't go to those because they need to go to. is that it now now that the conclusions were presented by the inquest? any other options for you as a family? as a family, we have to now grieve and grieve for the loss of my mother and grieve for the loss of my mother and we are trying to do everything we can to bring awareness and bring awareness to the ambulance service to bring changes. for mum's funeral we did a collection and we managed to put a defibrillator into the village, and had we known there was a defibrillator in the next village we possibly could have used it. now if someone does get into difficulty there is a defibrillator in the
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local area. there is a defibrillator in the localarea. but there is a defibrillator in the local area. but we have to break —— and we want mum's story out there and we want mum's story out there and we want it to make it aware that the service is so bad and at what point, it is at breaking point now and they need to make a change. nicola, thank you very much and take care to both you and your family. you're watching the weather and now we are flying in and swooping in. very good morning to you. i have regained my space overlooking the weather balcony and i need to tell you of another day in which some of you of another day in which some of you are going to see sunshine and others are more in the way of cloud and rain. it has been a blistering start to the beginning of the day, particularly in the north and northern scotland, but it has brightened up and this was a short while ago in the highlands with cloud hogging the mountains, but there was sunshine. winds are picking at the moment and this is
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due to an area of low pressure and there is cloud here in the satellite image and it is pushing to norway and strongest of winds hitting shetland at the moment and they will ease away but we will see sunshine. winds of 60 or 70 mph. blustery across the west of scotland and now it is down across central and southern scotland and lighter, patchy rain which will come and go in the morning. and also into northern ireland and some parts will be dry and cloud for northern england. another winnerfrom pushing england. another winner from pushing to england. another winnerfrom pushing to the south—west and brightness in some parts but drizzle across the south—west of england and the best of the sunshine will be in the midlands and parts of wales and east anglia. ten or 11 degrees ins shetland and a slight zone of cold air and we shetland and a slight zone of cold airand we will shetland and a slight zone of cold air and we will have another blustery night tonight but we will not be as windy as last night with outbreaks of rain at times. further rain and cloud in western scotland and in wales and england for the morning. clears cloud across or
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temperatures will drop to meet single figures in one or two rural spots. that is how we start friday. temperatures are not bad for most of you and are in double figures and thatis you and are in double figures and that is because we have an area of low pressure in the north which was not as potent as last night and wins are not as strong but we are drugging the winds from the west and it is mild in the direction and warmer air coming it is mild in the direction and warmeraircoming in it is mild in the direction and warmer air coming in across the country but it is moisture laden and that will feed in across the western fringes of the uk. patchy rain and drizzle, particularly in the hills and coast and getting away from that breeze in central and eastern areas we will have sunny spells and it could get up to 20—21 in aberdeenshire and 23 or 24 in east anglia and we should be around 14—17 this time of year so significantly above the norm. notice the changing colours in that area mass chart as a fresh starts to push its way in from the west and so on saturday, we will
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stay in the mild area and showers in the west and temperatures in the east of 20—21 and maybe 22 and in the east it will be sunny on sunday. that is it. this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. borisjohnson's message to the united nations and ahead of cop26 summit on climate change — the world must take radical and urgent action. we will see desertification, drought, crop failure, and mass movements of humanity on a scale not seen before. nearly 1.5 million uk customers affected by energy firms collapsing under soaring gas prices could now face higher bills. and if you're one of the people affected by the collapse of your energy provider and would like to share your
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experience or concerns — we'd like to hear from you. do get in touch on twitter @lukwesaburak — or by using

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