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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 17, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the us military admits one of its drone strikes in afghanistan killed ten innocent civilians, including seven children. we now assess that it is unlikely that the vehicle and those who died were associated with isis—k, or were a direct threat to us forces. england eases restrictions for international travel, scrapping the need for expensive covid tests for fully—vaccinated travellers arriving from abroad. after australia, the us, and britain agree a new security partnership, france recalls its ambassadors to washington and canberra. the un warns the world is failing to cut greenhouse gas emissions. it says temperatures could be on course to increase by nearly twice the agreed limit. and tennis�*s teenage sensation
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returns home from the us open — to re—watch her victory on tv with her mum and dad in london. last night, i actuallyjust re—watched the final and tried to relive a couple of the moments and remember how it felt. so, it is sinking in a little bit more. hello, and welcome. i'm martine croxall. the us military says it mistakenly killed ten afghan civilians in a drone strike in kabul last month, missing the intended target. seven of the dead were children. this is a major reversal of the pentagon's position — at the time, us officials had said the strike was justified and righteous, because it prevented militants from using a car bomb to attack the airport. here's the commander of the us central command, general ken mackenzie,
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speaking just a few hours ago. good afternoon. i'm here to brief the results of the investigation i directed following the report of civilian casualties from our strike in kabul on 29 august. having thoroughly reviewed the findings of the investigation and the supporting analysis by interagency partners, i am now convinced that as many as ten civilians, including up to seven children, were tragically killed in that strike. moreover, we now assess that it is unlikely that the vehicle and those who died were associated with isis—k, or were a direct threat to us forces. i offer my profound condolences to family and friends of those who were killed. this strike was taken in the earnest belief that it would prevent an imminent threat to our forces and the evacuees at the airport. but it was a mistake, and i offer my sincere apologies. as the combatant commander, i am fully responsible for this strike and its tragic outcome.
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our correspondent secunder kermani saw the aftermath of the drone strike. we were at the scene the morning after the strike, and it was a really terrible thing to see. family members combing through the wreckage, trying to find body parts of their loved ones that they could bury. they were, of course, utterly distraught, and also furious at the accusation they had anything to do with isis. in fact, a number of the family members who were killed had worked with american aid organisations, american troops, even, in afghanistan. the family had in fact been hoping to be relocated as part of the evacuation scheme to the us. now we know, and it's confirmed that the intelligence was wrong, of course. this is an incredibly grim end to a — largely bringing an end to american military involvement in afghanistan. one key thing to remember is that we know more about this strike because it took place in kabul. so many others in the past happened in more rural areas, much more difficult to get accurate information about them. and also, i think it's a reminder
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of how difficult these over the horizon counterterrorism strikes will be for us officials to carry out in the future. they've said that will be their biggest weapon in targeting groups like al-qaeda or isis in the future. afterfour weeks in power, the taliban have recast the ministry of women's affairs as a new department to enforce strict islamic moral law. the building in kabul now bears a sign saying, "ministry for the propagation of virtue and prevention of vice". it came as videos posted on social media showed a group of women employees outside the ministry building, urging the taliban to allow them to return to work. our reporter sodaba haidare explained the role of the ministry during the first taliban regime. so they are in charge of morality crimes — what they call morality crimes. and in the �*90s, during the taliban regime, they had imposed harsh restrictions on people, and they had police that would go out on the streets on patrols
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and monitored people's behaviours and their dress codes. the restrictions on women included monitoring their clothes and, if they showed even as little as their ankle, they would get a public whipping in front of everybody in the marketplace, on the streets. they had also banned things like music, dancing, playing chess, flying kites — but they were in charge of more serious crimes like public executions and floggings, as well. this ministry was abolished in 2001 after the us invasion of afghanistan, but it's made a comeback and it's terrified so many people who remember those harsh punishments, the notorious police out on the street. they've appointed someone to lead this ministry — he's not very well—known, but he seems to be a very religious, and he's a cleric. they haven't laid out guidelines in terms of what this new ministry would mean for people in afghanistan, and that something that we have to wait and see. but they have indicated
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that it won't be as harsh as it was during the first regime in the �*90s. here, the uk the government has announced major changes to rules for international travellers. among them is a simplified designation system defining countries as either "open" or on the red list, and a relaxation of the requirement for covid tests for people arriving in england. our transport correspondent caroline davis reports. travel has meant testing. across the country, centres like these have popped up to swab passengers, but things are about to change. throughout the summer, the travel industry and the government have disagreed about the use of these, pcr tests, for all travellers when they arrive in the uk. the government has always argued this is necessary to be able to identify variants of concern, but the travel industry say it is a barrier and too expensive. before the end of october, if you are double—jabbed, pcr tests are going to be replaced by the cheaper lateral flow tests. if you test positive, you will need to have a pcr test
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and isolate at home. it's a relief for hotels, who have struggled as families have stayed away because of the added cost. the uk market has dropped between 50—70% depending on the travelling month, especially forfamilies hard hit by the restrictions implemented and the traffic light system, which obviously every three weeks is sort of like, yeah, a surprise, what is going to happen. so we definitely believe this change is going to boost sales massively. it's not the only change. from the 4th of october, fully vaccinated travellers will also no longer need to take a pre—departure lateralflow test before they travel. if you are not double—jabbed, it's a very different story. you will need to take a test before you travel and self—isolate at home for ten days after every international trip, as well as pay for pcr tests. for the industry, this change can't come soon enough. very pleased with the announcement, just what we wanted to hear. i think the government has been listening to the industry. we have been interacting with them for some time.
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it's a great piece of news for us. it will give our customers the end of summer they deserve, abroad in the sun. so, yes, we welcome the announcement. but not everyone in the scientific community agrees that pcr tests should be removed. i would like to see pcr tests remain because they have given us so much information already from the sequencing. so we know when delta was introduced into the uk, when the delta variant came in, that this virus was imported over 500 times, and we wouldn't have the information if we weren't doing the screening and sequencing associated with that. after months of insisting pcr tests were needed, why has the government changed its mind now? the judgment of the scientists, of the experts, was that it would have been too soon without having the numbers of people vaccinated, not just at home where of course we had this very fast vaccination programme, but critically, abroad as well, at a level whereby, you know, we can now say with a lot of confidence,
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not only are nine out of ten adults vaccinated here but abroad also, they have caught up with the very high numbers that we saw earlier. and for those with loved ones in some red list countries, there was good news. this man has not seen his family in pakistan for more than three years. we are very happy to see our friends and families, and people can move on easily. the summer may be drawing to a close but today's announcement has given the industry some hope. for now, they are enjoying this moment in the sun. france is recalling its ambassadors to the us and australia for consultations, according to the french foreign minister the decision comes two days after australia cancelled a submarine deal with france in favour of a new indo—pacific alliance with the uk and the us. under the new agreement — dubbed aukus — the united states
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and britain will provide australia with the technology and capability to deploy nuclear—powered submarines. the bbc�*s north america editorjon sopel says the move is unprecedented. never in the history of the us—french relationship has france recalled its ambassador from washington. this is what you do with countries that you don't have close relations with. france has a very close relationship historically with the united states of america — and that shows the level of fury that there is in paris over this decision. and part of it is economic — france is going to lose $60 billion worth of sales to the australians in these diesel powered submarines as a result of this deal — but also the fact that this was all done behind france's back, and it was only moments before the announcement that the french learnt about it. and i think that the french are absolutely seething. well, for more analysis, i'm joined by benjamin haddad,
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the director europe centre at the atlantic council in washington, dc. welcome, we just heard john's analysis there. diplomacy is a strange old world, but recalling your ambassador is quite a move? it is quite a move, it is actually the first time in 200 years that france has recalled its ambassador to the united states. and it really shows i think the extent of the anger and frustration, and shock in paris over the us�*s move to ally with united kingdom and australia over this deal. and as your correspondentjust said, this is not mostly about the commercial nature or the money. this submarine deal that france had signed with australia four years ago with the underpinning of france's entire presence in the indo pacific. this is one of the two main european countries in the region that was conducting freedom of navigation
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operations in the south china sea. this is at a time when the biden administration said that it wants to work with european allies to confront china's assertiveness, that it wants to reach out within the transatlantic relationships. so this news really comes as a shock, the fact that it's been negotiated in absolute secrecy between the united states and australia i think we'll have long—term consequences on the french political establishment. haw french political establishment. how did the net french political establishment. how did they get beyond that, then? because as you said, if it is so significant, it's going to take quite a while for them to repair the damage they've caused.— damage they've caused. first, i think it's a _ damage they've caused. first, i think it's a huge _ damage they've caused. first, i think it's a huge blow— damage they've caused. first, i think it's a huge blow to - damage they've caused. first, i think it's a huge blow to the - damage they've caused. first, i - think it's a huge blow to the french — australian relationship. i think that would take a very long time to overcome this. this is a relationship where france has invested greatly in the last few years, it's one of the key partners with australia in the region, along with australia in the region, along with japan and india. with australia in the region, along withjapan and india. so i think this�*ll take a long time. when it
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comes to the us, of course the us is francoise ike main security and defence partner, —— france's. but we will see where france goes, you know, these decisions also have impacts in terms of budget priorities and procurement. france might think about its relationship with the united states within nato, and clearly as we heard the foreign minister say, the agenda for strategic autonomy, which is the european ability to act in its own defence, it would be pushed even further by france —— act on its own in defence. further by france -- act on its own in defence-— further by france -- act on its own in defence. �* ., ~ i. . in defence. ben, thank you so much for our in defence. ben, thank you so much for yourtime- _ stay with us on bbc news. still to come: a stark new warning on climate change from the un, as it says global temperatures could be on course to increase
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by nearly twice the agreed limit. 30 hours after the earthquake that devastated mexico city, rescue teams still have no idea just how many people have died. well, there's people alive, and there's people not alive. we're just helping and giving them whatever we've got. a state funeral has been held for princess grace of monacol at the church where she married prince rainier 26 years ago. - it looked as though they had come to fight a war, but their mission is to bring peace to east timor. and nowhere on earth needs it more badly. the government's case has been being forcefully presented by the justice minister. he's campaigned vigorously for abolition, having once witnessed one of his clients being executed. elizabeth seton spent much of her time at this grotto, and every year, hundreds of pilgrimages are made here. now that she's become a saint, it's expected that this area will be inundated with tourists. the mayor and local businessmen regard the anticipated boom as yet another blessing of saint elizabeth.
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this is bbc news, the latest headlines... the us military admits a drone strike in afghanistan last month killed tens innocent civilians, including seven children. england eases restrictions for international travel, scrapping the need for expensive covid tests for fully vaccinated travellers arriving from abroad. the un says despite all the promises to take action on climate change, the world is still on course to heat up to extremely dangerous levels. its experts have studied the carbon plans of more than 100 countries, and concluded that we're still heading in the wrong direction. scientists recently confirmed that to avoid the worst impacts of hotter conditions, global emissions need to be cut by 45% by 2030. but this new analysis shows
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countries are massively off target. shejoined she joined just shejoined just now from she joined just now from texas. thank you so much forjoining us. what should we make of that? the lanet is what should we make of that? tue: planet is warming what should we make of that? tte: planet is warming now faster than any time in at least the last 2000 years, and probably as long as human civilisation has been on the planet. what's at risk is not the planet itself, it will be orbiting the sun long after we're it's human civilisation that's most at risk. our economic systems, our infrastructure systems, or health and more. 50 infrastructure systems, or health and more. �* infrastructure systems, or health and more-— infrastructure systems, or health and more. �* ,, ., and more. so if we've missed our taruets, and more. so if we've missed our targets. what _ and more. so if we've missed our targets, what does _ and more. so if we've missed our targets, what does that - and more. so if we've missed our targets, what does that mean? i and more. so if we've missed our. targets, what does that mean? we have to redouble our efforts? we do, and that's why _ have to redouble our efforts? we do, and that's why the _ have to redouble our efforts? we do, and that's why the upcoming - have to redouble our efforts? we do, j and that's why the upcoming meeting in glasgow is so important. every country in the world will be there
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to talk about what they can bring to the global pot luck that is the paris agreement. right now we do not have enough food on the table for that pot luck. we need countries to step it up because, as the latest report showed, we are still able to meet our paris targets, but only if we act now. but meet our paris targets, but only if we act nova— meet our paris targets, but only if we act now-— we act now. but that requires olitical we act now. but that requires political will, _ we act now. but that requires political will, doesn't - we act now. but that requires political will, doesn't it, - we act now. but that requires politicalwill, doesn't it, as i we act now. but that requires . politicalwill, doesn't it, as much political will, doesn't it, as much as anything was back how concerned are you that late people willjust feel so pessimistic by these reports that they'll think it's too late, it doesn't matter what we do? —— laypeople. doesn't matter what we do? -- laypeople-_ doesn't matter what we do? -- la --eole. �* , . laypeople. i'm very concerned about that because — laypeople. i'm very concerned about that because i _ laypeople. i'm very concerned about that because i live _ laypeople. i'm very concerned about that because i live here _ laypeople. i'm very concerned about that because i live here in _ laypeople. i'm very concerned about that because i live here in texas, i that because i live here in texas, and you might think that people in texas don't care — they do. most people here are worried about climate change, but they feel helpless. like there's nothing they can do about it. in reality, everything one of us has a role to play, and it begins with using our voice to talk about why this matters and how we need solutions. because we aren't doing that. so and how we need solutions. because
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we aren't doing that.— we aren't doing that. so what should countries he — we aren't doing that. so what should countries be doing _ we aren't doing that. so what should countries be doing that _ we aren't doing that. so what should countries be doing that they - we aren't doing that. so what should countries be doing that they aren't i countries be doing that they aren't doing to make a difference? of course the cop 26 meeting in glasgow in november is the thing that is meant to really concentrate minds. up meant to really concentrate minds. up their ambition. every country might look different. continuing the potluck analogy, one person brings a salad, and other brings a dessert or a bread. we need each country to offer what they can in terms of cutting carbon emissions, clean energy, efficiency and nature —based solutions. and that portfolio, or that dish, will look different for every country. but we need every country to up its ambition if we have any chance not of saving the planet, but of saving us. in have any chance not of saving the planet, but of saving us.- planet, but of saving us. in the meantime. _ planet, but of saving us. in the meantime, what _ planet, but of saving us. in the meantime, what can _ planet, but of saving us. in the meantime, what can we - planet, but of saving us. in the meantime, what can we do - meantime, what can we do individually? or is itjust such a small contribution that we can make, it's barely worth the bother?- it's barely worth the bother? that's what i hear — it's barely worth the bother? that's what i hear everywhere. _ it's barely worth the bother? that's what i hear everywhere. i'm - it's barely worth the bother? that's what i hear everywhere. i'm from l what i hear everywhere. i'm from canada were people say, we are such a small country, why do we matter? people in ireland say the same
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thing. the reality is all of us matter, and ijust wrote a new book called saving us which is about how every single one of us has a role, because the world has changed before. when it did, it wasn't because prime ministers and presidents decided it had to, it was because ordinary people raised their voice and said the world can be different, and it must be different, and we must all change. professor, thank ou and we must all change. professor, thank you very _ and we must all change. professor, thank you very much _ and we must all change. professor, thank you very much for _ and we must all change. professor, thank you very much for talking - and we must all change. professor, thank you very much for talking to l thank you very much for talking to us. google and apple have removed a tactical voting app from their online stores in russia on the first day of parliamentary elections. the app, devised by allies ofjailed kremlin critic alexei navalny, gives people recommendations on who to vote for in an effort to defeat the ruling united russia party. a source close to google said its removal followed threats of criminal prosecution. united russia, allied to president putin, is expected to win again, despite the country's struggling economy. the poll comes amid an unprecedented
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crackdown on political dissent. if it looks like a duck and walks like a duck, then probably it is a duck. but that doesn't necessarily apply to these russian elections. if you look at what's going on inside, it looks like a regular election — there are ballot boxes and people voting, and lists of candidates. but there are a lot of things about this vote which contradict the authority's assertion that the selection is free and fair. for a start, russia's most prominent opposition leader, alexei navalny, is imprisoned. his political movement has been banned, and anyone linked to it is barred from the ballot. in the run—up to the vote, some kremlin critics have even been forced out of the country. then there's the question of procedure. critics say that three days of voting and the use of online
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voting in places means there is a lack of transparency. now mr navalny has called the russians to vote tactically against the party of power, the ruling party. and his supporters have developed an app to support that initiative — but under pressure from russian authorities, apple and google have now removed that app from their online stores. security preparations have been ramped up in washington, dc ahead of a pro—trump rally scheduled for saturday. up to 700 protesters are expected to gather and they say they are demanding justice for the capitol insurrectionists. though donald trump has not endorsed the rally, he has claimed that the people charged overjanuary the i6h attack are being persecuted unfairly. —— january the 6th. the rally is the first the first large—scale security test since the deadly insurrection, and the biden administration as well as us capitol police are taking every preventative measure. there have been some threats of violence associated with the events for tomorrow,
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and we have a strong plan in place to ensure that it remains peaceful and, if violence occurs, that we can stop it as quickly as possible. we're not going to tolerate violence, and we will not tolerate criminal behaviour of any kind. the american public in the members of congress have an expectation that we protect the capitol. and i'm confident, with the plan we have in place, that we're going to be able to meet that expectation. british tennis star emma raducanu has revealed that on her first night back at home, she watched a replay of the us open final — and says her victory is "gradually sinking in." she's also spoken about how her parents�* strict approach helped her become a grand slam champion. natalie pirks reports, and a warning there are flashing images in her report since she burst onto our screens at wimbledon last summer, life has been a whirlwind for emma
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raducanu. but as she arrived home in bromley yesterday, there were no parties. instead, she did the one thing she hadn't yet managed to do since her astonishing us open win. last night i actuallyjust re—watched the final and tried to relive a couple of the moments and remember how it felt. it is sinking in a little bit more. it is something that is very difficult to fully comprehend. for the rest of us watching, it was nail—biting stuff, but not for a teenager with nerves of steel. personally, i didn't feel any stress. i was just having a lot of fun out there and i think that's what helped. i wasn't thinking at all about anything that was out of my control. after the final, it was a really nice moment after winning and leaving the club. there was sort of a party bus going on in a sprinter van with a lot of music. good tunes and we were alljust singing along. since then, she's not out of the headlines and was dressed
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in chanel at the prestigious met gala. her earning potential has rocketed, and her bank account is now £1.8 million better off. but she says she is leaving it to her parents to decide what to do with the money and credits them with being where she is now. it's probably tough love and at the time, i am probably not as grateful as i am in hindsight, but theyjust gave me a hug when i came back, really, nothing crazy, no big celebration. my mum made some really good home—made dumplings, but there was nothing crazy or over—the—top. i think they are staying discreet and, yeah, just some reassurance and saying they are proud of me is enough. her new world ranking of 23 has opened up a lot of new tournaments for her. she and her team have some planning to do. i think ijust really need some time to rest and recover, because it has been very demanding physically and also just emotionally to withstand seven weeks on the road. but when wimbledon rolls
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around, might we need a new monikerfor henman hill? i think that one should stay with tim henman. i think he's a great inspiration and he's helped me so much. but, yeah, i'm obviously looking forward to wimbledon, but it's still some time away and i've still got so much learning to do. learning she will no doubt take in her stride. natalie pirks, bbc news. before we go, we have good news for penguin lovers. the arrival of eight baby penguins has been delighting crowds at this zoo in peru. the chicks were born in the summer, and as zookeepers in lima are waiting for six more eggs to hatch in october. these are humboldt penguins, native to coastal peru and chile. scientists estimate there are fewer than 10,000 of them left in the world — so these newborn chicks are a cause for celebration. you can
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reach me on twitter. thanks for watching. hello there. many of us yesterday had a decent day of weather. temperatures reached 22.3 celsius in the warmest spots, but it wasn't like that everywhere. in argyll and bute, cloudy for much of the day with rain and mist and fog patches over the high ground until this happened. late on, as the weather fronts started to clear through, some of the cloud from the front was lit up by the setting sun, and it was a glorious end to the day. here's that weather front on the satellite picture, this stripe of cloud you can see here. the weather fronts associated with this cloud are particularly slow—moving, and they're going to take the whole of the weekend before they reach right the way across to the eastern side of the country. so, this weekend, mixed picture — could be a bit of rain around on saturday, but for many areas, it's a dry day. by sunday, outbreaks of rain become a bit more extensive, heavy, and thundery as well for some.
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so, as i say, a mixed fortune, really. for southern and eastern scotland, western areas of england and wales, it's a cloudy start to the day with outbreaks of light rain and drizzle, probably some mist and fog patches mixed in as well. to the east of our weather front, perhaps east wales, but definitely central and eastern england, there'll be a lot of dry weather, sunny spells and warm in that september sunshine — highs up to 23 celsius. brighter slice of weather as well for west scotland and northern ireland, but here, a fresher feel to the weather, temperatures 17—19. now, saturday night sees heavy, thundery rain start to break out across wales, moving in across northern england, into scotland as well, so there will be some heavy downpours around. and then, through sunday, this area of heavy and potentially thundery rain will continue to push eastwards and become really slow—moving across parts of central and eastern england. there's a risk of some localised flooding, 30—110 mm possible in one 01’ two areas. in the wettest areas, that's enough to cause some localised surface water flooding. at the same time, the western side of the country will turn brighter and drier and a bit sunnier through sunday afternoon.
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by monday, could still be a little bit of rain left over across east anglia and the far southeast of england, but otherwise, pressure will be building across the country for a time for monday and for tuesday as well, and that means for most of us, we're looking at a fine spell of weather with sunny spells. temperatures into the high teens or even the low 20s. however, it's not going to stay that way because, into the middle part of next week, we're going to see low pressure move in, bringing some heavy rain across the country and some much windier weather on the way as well.
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this is bbc news. our headlines...
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the us military says a drone strike in afghanistan last month against a suspected car bomb attacker killed an innocent aid worker and nine members of his family. seven of those killed were children. england has scrapped the need for fully—vaccinated travellers to take expensive pcr tests when they arrive from abroad. they'll be allowed to use cheaper lateral flow tests instead. the un has warned it'll be impossible to keep global warming to 1.5 degrees celsius unless huge cuts to greenhouse gas emissions are implemented immediately. in the wake of australia, the us and britain agreeing a new security partnership, france is recalling its ambassadors to washington and canberra. australia cancelled a multi—billion dollar submarine deal with france as part of the new security pact.

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