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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 11, 2021 7:00pm-7:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at seven... commemoration services have taken place across the united states of america, 20 years since the nine 11 terror attacks. the names of the almost 3000 victims were read out at events in new york, washington and pennsylvania. bell rings six moments of silence have been held, marking the times each of the four hijacked planes crashed and when the world trade center buildings collapsed on that day in 2001. former presidents clinton and 0bama joined joe biden in new york, as george w bush spoke in pennsylvania, calling for people to come together much of our politics has become a naked appeal to anger, fear and resentment. that leaves us worried about our
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nation and our future together. in other news, the bbc understands prince andrew's staff do not believe legal papers from lawyers for the woman who has accused him of sexual abuse have been successfully served. virginia giuffre launched a civil case against the prince, he denies the claims. an arson attack at a mosque in manchester is being investigated as a hate crime. cctv footage from before the attack late on friday night has been released by didsbury mosque, nobody was hurt. 18—year—old briton, emma raducanu, is preparing for her first ever grand slam final. she takes to the court at the us open in new york later today. and cristiano ronaldo scores
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on his return to manchester united, reaction to that and the rest of the day's action coming up in sportsday at quarter to 8 good evening. events commemorating 20 years since the 9/11 attacks are taking place in the us. the ceremony in new york started with a minute's silence at the exact time the first plane hit the north tower of the world trade center in 2001, and the names of the nearly 3,000 people who were killed there were read out. president biden is travelling to all three attack sites — new york, pennsylvania, and the pentagon in virginia. with more on the day's events, here's our north america
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editorjon sopel. drumbeat on this stunning clear september morning, they gathered in solemnity and sadness in lower manhattan. # 0h, say, can you see by the dawn�*s early light... # the weather identical to that fateful tuesday morning 20 years ago, but everything else was different. # and the rockets�* red glare... # at 8:46 this morning, the tolling of a bell. bell rings the moment the first plane struck the twin towers. bell rings and the bells rang out at the pentagon... bell rings ..and shanksville, pennsylvania, the other sites of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. gordon m aamoth, junior. edelmiro abad.
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and then the haunting, harrowing recitation of the names of those who died. ronald philip kloepfer. and my husband, joseph reina junior. and my uncle, james francis quinn. with the readers pausing to pay tribute to the loved ones. continue to watch over us and your family. 20 years feels like an eternity, but yet it still feels like yesterday. until we meet again, my love, rest in peace. the president, who is visiting all the 9/11 sites today, released this message. and george w bush, who was president in 2001, contrasted america today
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with america then. so much of our politics has become a naked appeal to anger, fear and resentment. 0n america's day of trial and grief, i saw millions of people instinctively grab for a neighbour's hand and rally to the cause of one another. that is the america i know. but today belongs to the people whose lives were rent by these unfathomable acts. i was sleeping when the first tower hit, and my mum woke me up because my dad worked there, so...he was a victim, and i saw the second plane hit and ijust hopped in my car. i was here the next morning. he sobs excuse me. you can't ever explain this horrible thing. . you know, and you i re—live it every year, but, i mean, ithink- for the families it's worse. # tis grace has brought me safe thus far... # 0n anniversaries,
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america can feel a kinder, 0n anniversaries, america can feel a kinder, less harsh place to be, but though the a united states may still be united in grief and sorrow by the events of 9/11, it's not united by much else. jon sopel, bbc news, new york. with me now is our correspondent nada tawfik in new york. i nada tawfik in new york. understand just above th zero i understand just above the ground zero site. tell me what things have been like. 0bviously zero site. tell me what things have been like. obviously we are seeing things winding down for now. yes. thins things winding down for now. yes. things have _ things winding down for now. yes. things have started _ things winding down for now. yes. things have started to _ things winding down for now. 133 things have started to get a things winding down for now. iezs things have started to get a little busyin things have started to get a little busy in the streets now that families have started filing out of the memorial plaza but still very much a sombre moment and i was like to say that on anniversaries like
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this people are gently to each other, a bit kinder to each other given the gravity of the day and not far from where we have a simple chapel they have also been tying white ribbons on the fence near one of the gravesites there in the area so everyone, kind of, really marking the day in the best way they feel comfortable. there were even families i spoke with who decided not to come down here who instead wanted it to be a more intimate experience with their family members because of the trauma of reliving what happened because as we saw there injohn�*s piece this is really still a raw day for many where those emotions come back, right back from that day. it kind of transport them back to september 11 2001 and we saw people really struggling to just get by. people really struggling to just get by, to read their loved ones names and to give those few words telling about how they missed them and will never forget them. and about how they missed them and will neverforget them. and it about how they missed them and will never forget them. and it was about how they missed them and will neverforget them. and it was really striking to see justice 20 years have passed how those kids have now grown up into adults and how those
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who were still so young and now speaking for their fathers, mothers, grandparents, and in saying what they know about then they have learned from the oral history passed down from family members and it really was a beautiful and very simple ceremony, commemorating which really focus on the families themselves.— really focus on the families themselves. ., , themselves. one of the themes, i think, for this _ themselves. one of the themes, i think, for this significant - think, for this significant anniversary was ensuring that the names, the event, the legacy, the history, the significance of 9/11 was not forgotten. did you get a sense that this particular year more of america was engaged with 9/11 and what it meant?— what it meant? absolutely. i mean, there's a command _ what it meant? absolutely. i mean, there's a command in _ what it meant? absolutely. i mean, there's a command in new- what it meant? absolutely. i mean, there's a command in new york - what it meant? absolutely. i mean, | there's a command in new york that really resonates across the country, never forget. really resonates across the country, neverforget. and i think the really resonates across the country, never forget. and i think the true test of that really was this 20th anniversary because, you half of the victims had kids under the age of
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18. we've seen how many have now been born after 9/11 who had no lived experience of that day and you have just seen across television, across schools, if the education of that day through programming. schools watching videos put out by the 9/11 museum, taking tours of the site. again, people putting their stories out there through the news media and also special documentary so that people do not forget what happened on this day because, really, america change completely after 9/11. when it comes to camino, our statements don't make sense of safety, personal liberties, america's foreign—policy —— when it comes to, you know, i sense of safety, personal liberties, america's foreign—policy committal change after 9/11 and you really have to come back to 9/11 and the reactions to it. we have to come back to 9/11 and the reactions to it.—
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reactions to it. we had a lot of speeches _ reactions to it. we had a lot of speeches today _ reactions to it. we had a lot of speeches today discussing - reactions to it. we had a lot of speeches today discussing the | speeches today discussing the importance of unity particularly across different cultures and groups within america and yet when you listened carefully to the reading of the names it really gave you an idea of a snapshot of modern america, didn't it? ~ ,,., y of a snapshot of modern america, didn't it? ~ ,,., , ., ~ didn't it? absolutely, and i think look, we have _ didn't it? absolutely, and i think look, we have to _ didn't it? absolutely, and i think look, we have to remember- didn't it? absolutely, and i think look, we have to remember thatj didn't it? absolutely, and i think- look, we have to remember that there were people from over 90 nations who died in the twin towers. this was always a tragedy that affected people of different faiths, of different cultures, and i myself as a muslim american, i was in high school at the time of 9/11 and yes i can tell you there was absolutely a lot of unity and particularly here in new york but there was also a lot of fear that was aimed towards muslim americans and we see now with the country and the rise of nationalism and xenophobia we are seeing a lot of that, kind of, come to the surface again so i think it was really poignant, for example, when you had the former president george w bush who of course led the country during 9/11 and his
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presidency was defined by 9/11 speak about how americans came together at that time and even did speak as president, really pointing how it wasn't the muslims who were responsible for 9/11 but a select group of people, but, as i say, it really is this kind of complicated history that the united states has after 9/11 and how it's treats americans from all different stripes and as we kind of reflect back on that and also look at the last few years in america and the divisions i think this call for unity is as important as ever.- think this call for unity is as important as ever. thank you very much for that. _ staying in america we are going to cross to gary 0'donoghue. where are you and why you there and what are we expecting to see later today? $5 we expecting to see later today? is you can probably tell from this tell—tale building behind me i am at the pentagon and of course this is one of the sites where one of those
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aircraft crashed on 9/11. 184 people died, 124 on the ground and those crew members and passengers on the plane itself. we had a memorial service this morning and in about an hour and a half to two hoursjoe biden will come here, in that sort of time window, to lay a wreath at a ceremony here so really some big thoughts at this moment for people inside the pentagon, notjust because of that anniversary, and this is done every year, they have a ceremony and they unfurl the flag and all that kind of thing, but because, of course, weekend, week out, month in, month out, your in, year out, people inside this building as acutely aware of the sacrifices service personnel make around the world in defence of the united states and they know that the costs have been high in afghanistan and many of them are, you know, i question, if you like on the extent to which it was all worth it given
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that the person who sponsored the 9/11 attacks was protected by the taliban and here we are with them backin taliban and here we are with them back in power in afghanistan. gary o'donoghue. _ back in power in afghanistan. gary 0'donoghue, thank you very much. just let viewers know thatjoe biden and the first lady are currently at shanksville. they will be departing, as gary said, heading to the pentagon. we can speak now to sir christopher meyer, uk ambassador to the us at time of the attacks. thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. it has been a very emotional day for many, very raw and also in education for loss of people who don't know the story and who don't know the history. can you take us back to 9/112001, know the history. can you take us back to 9/11 2001, please, know the history. can you take us back to 9/112001, please, just know the history. can you take us back to 9/11 2001, please, just tell us what you were doing and how you heard that news? 93�*11 us what you were doing and how you heard that news?— us what you were doing and how you heard that news? 9/11 came as a bolt from the blue- _
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heard that news? 9/11 came as a bolt from the blue. it _ heard that news? 9/11 came as a bolt from the blue. it was _ heard that news? 9/11 came as a bolt from the blue. it was entirely - from the blue. it was entirely unexpected and we were having breakfast on the morning of 9/11 with the prime ministerjohn major and it was while we were sitting there and drinking our coffee that there and drinking our coffee that the plane hit the twin towers. 0ur the plane hit the twin towers. our first reaction to the twin crash was that this was a pilot who had lost his way and crashed into another towers. it was only later when the second aircraft hit the second tower that we realised that there was something of enormous significance both the united states and notjust for the americans but for the world at large. for the americans but for the world at larae. for the americans but for the world at lare, ., ., for the americans but for the world at larae. ., ., ,., for the americans but for the world at larie. ., ., ,., ., at large. so, at that point, what was the main — at large. so, at that point, what was the main priority, _ at large. so, at that point, what was the main priority, then? - at large. so, at that point, what| was the main priority, then? the main priority _ was the main priority, then? tie: main priority was to find out what had happened, followed by is the threat still there all is that it, and the only way i could find out what was going on was speaking to the americans and this was during a time when senior americans who were in the know were easy to get hold of
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because everybody was running for cover and taking refuge in various bunkers around washington, dc but in that morning i managed to get hold of the national security advisor, congolese advice, and she told me immediately that the suspicion was the prime suspect was al-qaeda under the prime suspect was al-qaeda under the leadership of a son of bin laden. there was some mention of iraq in is a possibility. —— under the leadership of 0sama bin laden. so the first thing was was the threat still there? for a while we thought of the plane was coming towards washington, dc. i mean, it was, and it hit the pentagon and that hit home very hard indeed because the pentagon is only a very few miles from the embassy as the crow flies. some people heard the noise of the plane hitting the pentagon in the embassy. a crump,
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they said to me, and we all smelt they said to me, and we all smelt the drifting odour of kerosene, burning aircraft fuel, coming up from the pentagon over the river towards us in the embassy. but it wasn't until the aircraft that crashed in the field in pennsylvania we were told by the americans as far as they could see and as far as they could tell the attack was over and then i had to decide what to do with then i had to decide what to do with the embassy staff to keep them in the embassy staff to keep them in the embassy staff to keep them in the embassy and to send them back home and i had chosen to send them back home and then of course the other thing was to maintain communications not only with the united states at senior level but also with london and number 10 downing street. band also with london and number10 downing street.— also with london and number10 downin street. �* ., , downing street. and of course there were the british _ downing street. and of course there were the british nationals _ downing street. and of course there were the british nationals to - downing street. and of course there were the british nationals to look i were the british nationals to look after and their families because were the british nationals to look after and theirfamilies because i not yet. not enough to stay. 0n after and theirfamilies because i not yet. not enough to stay. on that first day we had to establish immediately over that i should say
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as fast as possible where their pits in the twin towers, if so many had disappeared? and that took a few days to find out and we could not have done it without the help of the new york authorities and it was only a few days later that we had to make plans, have everything in place, for the arrival of relatives and friends, loved ones of those who had disappeared in the twin towers to try and help them establish whether they had lots of relatives are not and that was the most... the most harrowing moment for me personally was knocked on the day of 9/11, it was knocked on the day of 9/11, it was when brits started arriving in the united states in new york city to try and find out what had happened to their loved ones. that was a very difficult time. this week we heard from _
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was a very difficult time. this week we heard from mis's _ was a very difficult time. this week we heard from mis's ten _ was a very difficult time. this week we heard from mis's ten mcallen . was a very difficult time. this week l we heard from mis's ten mcallen and we heard from mis�*s ten mcallen and he was talking about the terrorism threat to the united kingdom and the way in which that had transformed over the years, over the decades. but he said that there was this knowledge of 0sama bin laden, he was known to the security services. was that a sense that an attack of the scale, something was expected? something was expected but we only know this now, we did not know this at the time. i would certainly was not expecting a terrorist attack on mainland united states and have to say to you that the night before 9/11, or 9-10, i had say to you that the night before 9/11, or 9—10, i had forsupper in the embassy with the national security adviser kaunda lisa faes and tony lepers might �*s new foreign policy adviser —— kaunda lisa faes and tony blair's new foreign policy adviser and we discovered all the interest around the world affecting our interest together and i have to say international terrorism wasn't very high on the agenda. ——
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condoleezza rice. although i think inside the intelligence establishment in uk intelligence establishment in uk intelligence establishment is there was some knowledge that a big attack was coming up in the united states it was not something at the time of our four front of our concerns in the embassy. four front of our concerns in the embassy-— embassy. intelligence sharing obviously became _ embassy. intelligence sharing obviously became paramount| embassy. intelligence sharing i obviously became paramount at embassy. intelligence sharing - obviously became paramount at this time and over the years we have just expected this was taking place automatically. how are we describing the state of intelligence today particularly after what we have seen in gunnison? peek the thing about intelligence agencies is they work secretly. i am no longer a member of the british diplomatic service. i am no longer a working british ambassador in the foreign office. i cannot tell you that i am privy to the sequence of m16 and the cia and their various subdivisions! what i
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would say to you, though, is that when people talk about special relationship between the us and the united kingdom, which i personally am not terribly enthusiastic about, one of the areas where we work unbelievably closely, we, the brits, work unbelievably closely with the united states as opposed to any other country in the world is on intelligence. you can be pretty sure that any time of the day or night british intelligence, us intelligence are working very closely together but more intelligence then analysed and passed on to government and politicians can become something quite different, so you may have an agent in the field he discovered something very significant but by the time that piece of intelligence is processed or modularised, passes through all the levels and finally arrives on the desk of the prime minister or the president it may be something quite different so you have got to be very careful how you
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talk about intelligence because there are not many people who really know what is going on. talking about what is going on, let'sjust know what is going on. talking about what is going on, let's just go to what is going on, let's just go to what has taken place in afghanistan and the taliban re—establishing themselves. what are your thoughts and that? well, i look back on the last 20 years and i think that it has been... i'm not going to mince my words about this, it has been largely, largely, an exercise in futility. we have ended up in 2021 almost exactly where we started in 2001 and that the intervening 20 years while, as it were, creating a new, aspiring class of afghans bringing them into the modern western world educating women, giving women properjobs in government and in the judiciary, allowing all kinds of entrepreneurial activity to take
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place in the cities of afghanistan, which didn't exist before, all that was good, but it depended on nato forces led by the united states holding the ring in afghanistan over the babble of a gun and once it was decided it was an unforgiving, unending warfor which we had to withdraw, all those things that were created, like women's rights, were immediately vulnerable to the idiot logical religious beliefs of the taliban, as we now see today. do you think that is — taliban, as we now see today. do you think that is one _ taliban, as we now see today. do you think that is one of _ taliban, as we now see today. do you think that is one of the _ taliban, as we now see today. do you think that is one of the challenges - think that is one of the challenges of diplomacy today? also the challenges of these new forms and a more nuanced form of terrorism in that a loss of this, as we heard from ken mccallan, is taking place individually. people are being
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inspired at a distance? i don't think there — inspired at a distance? i don't think there anything - inspired at a distance? i don't think there anything you - inspired at a distance? i don't| think there anything you about inspired at a distance? i don't - think there anything you about that. terrorism is terrorism, violence is violence, whether it is carried out by organisations or individual wild wolves or whatever the raises. you want to use. the thing that i think we have to decide as governments, as nations in the west is that if we want to stamp out terrorism it does no good at all trying to do that with enormous armies of 100,000 men in afghanistan, 150,000, however many was, because that doesn't change beliefs. that doesn't win hearts and minds. as i said, you cannot deliver this, these more peaceful, more western—style societies out of the barrel of a machine gun. 5ir societies out of the barrel of a machine gun-— societies out of the barrel of a machine un. ,, , ., , .., societies out of the barrel of a machine iun. ,, , ., , .., machine gun. sir christopher, can i 'ust “um- machine gun. sir christopher, can i justjump in — machine gun. sir christopher, can i justjump in very —
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machine gun. sir christopher, can i justjump in very quickly, _ machine gun. sir christopher, can i justjump in very quickly, this - machine gun. sir christopher, can i justjump in very quickly, this ideal justjump in very quickly, this idea of hearts and minds, we heard about this so much in years gone by. does it look like today? is at the right approach? i it look like today? is at the right a- roach? .. it look like today? is at the right a- iroach? .. it look like today? is at the right a- iroach? ~' ., ,, approach? i think the right approach with forei i n approach? i think the right approach with foreign countries _ approach? i think the right approach with foreign countries is _ approach? i think the right approach with foreign countries is not - approach? i think the right approach with foreign countries is not to - with foreign countries is not to interfere in their internal affairs. there are countries around the world which have totally different customs and beliefs, histories and ideas from our own. we have, when i say way, i mean the transatlantic world is what i mean, the united states and the major eu countries, we have broadly speaking a very similar set of beliefs about how we should organise ourselves, organise our politics, organise our democracy. there is no reason on gods earth why afghanistan over the country should follow the same precepts as we do and the notion that we have some right to go into foreign countries and tell them how to run their affairs i think is one of the reasons why things have gone badly wrong in afghanistan and why we have been defeated there, politically and
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militarily, and why went wrong in iraq and is still going on wrong in iraq, white has gone wrong in libya and still is going wrong in libya it is because we believe we can create other countries in our image.- other countries in our image. would ou talk to other countries in our image. would you talk to the _ other countries in our image. would you talk to the taliban? _ other countries in our image. would you talk to the taliban? would - other countries in our image. would you talk to the taliban? would you | you talk to the taliban? would you talk to the telephone? yes. you talk to the taliban? would you talk to the telephone?— talk to the telephone? yes, of course i would. _ talk to the telephone? yes, of course i would. because - talk to the telephone? yes, of course i would. because we i talk to the telephone? yes, of - course i would. because we would talk to the taliban. the taliban are the authority in afghanistan now. you have to deal with facts, not with dreams. if you want to get stuff still drawn in afghanistan, like getting people out across land borders, which i think was one example, you have to deal with the powers that they. it is a simple as that! the question is, how do you get from a to b and that is how you do it. sir get from a to b and that is how you do it. ., , ., , ~ , get from a to b and that is how you do it. ,, , .,, ~ , ., ,, do it. sir christopher meyer, thank ou ve do it. sir christopher meyer, thank you very much _ do it. sir christopher meyer, thank you very much for _ do it. sir christopher meyer, thank you very much for your— do it. sir christopher meyer, thank you very much for your time. - do it. sir christopher meyer, thank| you very much for your time. thank you. former uk ambassador to the united states. thank you!-
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you. former uk ambassador to the united states. thank you! the bbc understands that lawyers for prince andrew are challenging a claim that court papers, relating to allegations against him of sexual assault, have been properly served. representatives of virginia giuffre — who has made the claims — say that they were. a us judge will decide if the case can proceed on monday. the duke of york has always strongly denied the accusations. an arson attack at a manchester mosque is being investigated as a hate crime. no—one was injured in the blaze, late last night, at didsbury mosque. police are trying to find this man in connection with the incident. greater manchester fire service said they were at the scene for more than two hours british teenager emma raducanu will make history tonight as she plays in the us open final. as the first qualifer to ever reach this stage of the competition, she'll face canada's leylah fernandez — also a teenager — in new york. i'm joined now by claire
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curran who was a former professional tennis player — and represented both great britain and ireland during her career. hello again. we spoke earlier this week. how are you feeling about tonight's match? i week. how are you feeling about tonight's match?— week. how are you feeling about tonight's match? i think everybody, i said it yesterday, _ tonight's match? i think everybody, i said it yesterday, we _ tonight's match? i think everybody, i said it yesterday, we are - tonight's match? i think everybody, i said it yesterday, we are pinching | i said it yesterday, we are pinching ourselves that emma is actually in the final. i mean, it was not so long ago, a year ago, that she was playing just a couple of miles away in weybridge in a british tour tournament and today she is walking around the club at st george's hill —— whilst i was walking around the club at saint georges hill i had member saying she was playing here a year ago and it is a was beyond belief that she is now in america. what she has done since wimbledon when she played the fourth round, went off to the states, had a very
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long tip there but this will be her tenth match this evening and because much of her life and probably the biggest match in british tennis certainly on the winning side for so long so we're also excited about it. but will she be doing to prepare, then, for this huge match? it is a really good _ then, for this huge match? it is a really good question _ then, for this huge match? it is a really good question because - then, for this huge match? it is a really good question because she then, forthis huge match? it s —. really good question because she has had quite a few days to think about playing in the final and camino, thinking, obviously, is the type of thing that she doesn't want to do too much of because she is wanting too much of because she is wanting to just enjoy the last couple of days and the fact that she is going to be playing in the final this evening but, as we know, nevada carnot, she does her homework. i'm sure all the people on her team in new york but also the people in her team outside new york that maybe we might hear a little bit more about this evening, we don't know, after the final, they've been doing the research, scouting reports on their opponent tonight and really she's goes, just going to be feeling that when she walks onto the court in just over an hour's time or she will
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want to feel is that she is really well—prepared and if she is prepared, just like she has been for her a—levels five months ago, she will feel that she has the game to beat leylah fernandez this evening in new york. white went because of course we have seen two teenagers face each other tonight. what sort of energy do you think they bring to tennis? some people are saying that this is a new era for the world tennis? . ., �*, , ., .,, tennis? women's tennis for the last, i would tennis? women's tennis for the last, i would say. — tennis? women's tennis for the last, i would say. for— tennis? women's tennis for the last, i would say, for two _ tennis? women's tennis for the last, i would say, for two years _ tennis? women's tennis for the last, i would say, for two years there - tennis? women's tennis for the last, i would say, for two years there has | i would say, for two years there has been a real change in regard with seeing so many young grand slam champions. bianchi and vestry won the us open two years ago. —— bianca andreescu. we've had various people who are young winning. tennis on the women's side is exciting because there are so many different players haveit there are so many different players have it any different state can go in and, obviously, win a grand slam but i think the error and thought
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leila fernandez it is inspirational, isn't it? i have three daughters, all three of them are playing tennis and they are under the age of 11 and for them it isn't inspiration and it is something for them to aspire to be, notjust as tennis players but also as people and it is just a wonderful story and i think on the back of what we have all been through certainly sport suffered a lot through crazy times and we were playing tennis and went on the court, on the back of everything we have gone through, to have this story at the end of it all and hopefully things are looking much more positive ahead it is just, everybody has needed it and everybody has needed it and everybody seems so excited about it. changing of the old guard, i've heard. i know you are going to be sitting down at nine o'clock this evening. not long gone now. for now, thank you very much. thank you, thank you very much. thank you, thank you. as i said, nine o'clock and you can follow it on bbc radio 5 live but also we will be keeping a
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