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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 10, 2021 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

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today at five... the head of mi5 tells the bbc that the return of the taliban in afghanistan is likely to have emboldened lone wolf terrorists in the uk. we do face a consistent global struggle to defeat extremism and to guard against terrorism. this is a real problem. he was speaking on the eve of the anniversary of 9/11, as people across the united states and the world prepare to reflect on and remember those affected by the september 11th attacks. 18—year—old emma raducanu reaches the final of the us open, the first british woman to do so for more than four decades. honestly, ijust can't believe it. a shock, like, crazy, all of the above.
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eight years after her death, the family of suzanne van hagen new figures show the covid infection rate in scotland has again risen to its highest level since estimates began in october 2020, with about one in 45 thought to have had the virus last week. you can't tell anyone. and coming up at 5.45, it's the film review, where mark kermode will be giving his verdict on herself, a drama about a single mother who escapes from her abusive husband. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. we start with a warning
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from the head of mi5, who says there is no doubt that recent events in afghanistan and the rise of the taliban are likely to have emboldened so—called "lone wolf" terrorists. ken mccallum told bbc news that 31 late—stage attack plots have been foiled in the uk in the last four years. the taliban has promised that afghanistan would never again be a base for terrorists after taking over the country last month. the mi5 warning comes on the eve of the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. we'll have more that in a moment, but first, here's our security correspondent gordon corera on ken mccallum's comments. for 20 years, the work of the security service has been dominated by dealing with terrorist threats to the uk. today, the head of mi five told the bbc what the threat looks
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like. we told the bbc what the threat looks like. ~ ., w ., told the bbc what the threat looks like. ., ., ,, like. we do face a consistent global stru: ale to like. we do face a consistent global struggle to defeat _ like. we do face a consistent global struggle to defeat extremism - like. we do face a consistent global struggle to defeat extremism and l like. we do face a consistent global| struggle to defeat extremism and to guard against terrorism. this is a real problem, and in the last four years, working with the police has disrupted 31 late stage attacks in great britain. even during the pandemic period, we've had to disrupt six late stage attack plots. the taliban takeover has changed the landscape. the chief warned this would embolden those wanting to carry out attacks and said there was a risk that the country could once again become a safe haven for groups planning more sophisticated attacks. evenif planning more sophisticated attacks. even if the taliban is absolutely in good faith about preventing terrorism, that will be a difficult task to accomplish. afghanistan is not an easy country to govern and ensure perfect security. b, not an easy country to govern and ensure perfect security.— ensure perfect security. a new counterterrorism _ ensure perfect security. a new counterterrorism operations i ensure perfect security. a new- counterterrorism operations centre was launched this summer, but the
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type of threat the uk faces has also been evolving. the headset... since 9/11, we been evolving. the headset... since 9/11. we have _ been evolving. the headset... since 9/11, we have had _ been evolving. the headset... since 9/11, we have had a _ been evolving. the headset... since 9/11, we have had a continued - 9/11, we have had a continued evolving huge challenge of extreme terrorism. we have the rise of right—wing terrorism and a resurgence of sharp complex state threats. the only major national security threat which has been comparatively better across those 20 years is northern ireland. is comparatively better across those 20 years is northern ireland. is the comparatively better across those 20 years is northern ireland.— years is northern ireland. is the uk safer today — years is northern ireland. is the uk safer today than _ years is northern ireland. is the uk safer today than it _ years is northern ireland. is the uk safer today than it was _ years is northern ireland. is the uk safer today than it was 20 - years is northern ireland. is the uk safer today than it was 20 years - safer today than it was 20 years ago? there was no simple answer from the mi five chief, with concerns that his service will need to be vigilant for uncertainty ahead. gordon is here with me now. very, very sobering, of course. i wonder sadly whether we should be particularly surprised by some of the things pointed out. i particularly surprised by some of the things pointed out.— the things pointed out. i think ou're the things pointed out. i think you're right- _ the things pointed out. i think you're right. you _ the things pointed out. i think
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you're right. you would - the things pointed out. i think| you're right. you would expect the things pointed out. i think- you're right. you would expect the mis you're right. you would expect the m15 chief to be worried. 0n the 20th anniversary, and provides an interesting moment to look at how it's evolved over those 20 years, and to look at the pattern. and it certainly fluctuated. it's not been even. there was a period around 911 and the years after where we saw others of coulds dedicated a plots coming out of afghanistan —— sophisticated plots. then you had isis coming along, around about a decade later. causing a new type of threat with people inspired. i think there was some hope that perhaps with isis having been diminished, that threat might start to dip once again. and m15 could focus on some of the other issues it deals with. a few months ago, that was the message
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coming from m15, but now it looks a bit more uncertain. for coming from m15, but now it looks a bit more uncertain.— bit more uncertain. for now, thank ou ve bit more uncertain. for now, thank you very much. _ bit more uncertain. for now, thank you very much, gordon _ bit more uncertain. for now, thank you very much, gordon corera. - tomorrow marks 20 years since 9/11, the deadliest foreign attack ever on us soil which killed nearly 3,000 people. on september 11th, suicide attackers highjacked four us passenger planes, crashing two into the skyscrapers of the world trade center in new york. 0ur north america editorjon sopel has been hearing the stories of three people impacted by the horror of that day, and a warning — his report does include footage of the attack on the twin towers. morning the one thing that time hasn't told is how profoundly shocking the sights and sounds were
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that tuesday morning. this terrorist attack change the world. nearly 3000 died and thousands more had their lives on —— upended. this is the story of three of those people who found themselves at the vortex of the storm. m? found themselves at the vortex of the storm. ~ , . found themselves at the vortex of the storm. g . ., , ., ., ., the storm. my dad was an amazing human being- _ the storm. my dad was an amazing human being. this _ the storm. my dad was an amazing human being. this man _ the storm. my dad was an amazing human being. this man was - the storm. my dad was an amazing human being. this man was a - human being. this man was a ten-year-old _ human being. this man was a ten-year-old schoolboy - human being. this man was a ten-year-old schoolboy when j human being. this man was a i ten-year-old schoolboy when he human being. this man was a - ten-year-old schoolboy when he was ten—year—old schoolboy when he was called to the principal�*s office. his fatherjoseph worked at the world trade center. i his fatherjoseph worked at the world trade center.— his fatherjoseph worked at the world trade center. i went down the hallway and — world trade center. i went down the hallway and my _ world trade center. i went down the hallway and my mum _ world trade center. i went down the hallway and my mum was _ world trade center. i went down the hallway and my mum was standing l hallway and my mum was standing there with tears in her eyes. she told me what had happened and we had a moment in the hallway. i was very confused at first. you're an innocent ten—year—old thinking," the world's great." and then you find out someone killed your father. hundreds of miles in florida, and he was also an elementary school. the chief of staff to president bush knew he had to interrupt him. that's when i walked _ knew he had to interrupt him. that's when i walked up _ knew he had to interrupt him. that's when i walked up to _ knew he had to interrupt him. that's when i walked up to the _ knew he had to interrupt him. that's when i walked up to the president and whispered to him, "a second
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plane _ and whispered to him, "a second plane hit— and whispered to him, "a second plane hit the second tower. america is under_ plane hit the second tower. america is under attack." this plane hit the second tower. america is under attack. "— is under attack." this woman was in her car when _ is under attack." this woman was in her car when she _ is under attack." this woman was in her car when she heard _ is under attack." this woman was in her car when she heard the - is under attack." this woman was in her car when she heard the news, l is under attack." this woman was in i her car when she heard the news, and she knew as people were trying to escape the twin towers, her firefighter husband bruce would be heading in. mr; firefighter husband bruce would be headin: in. y ~ , firefighter husband bruce would be headin: in. g ~ , ., , heading in. my kids went to bed. emil and heading in. my kids went to bed. emily and megan _ heading in. my kids went to bed. emily and megan were _ heading in. my kids went to bed. emily and megan were 17 - heading in. my kids went to bed. emily and megan were 17 and - heading in. my kids went to bed. emily and megan were 17 and 14| emily and megan were 17 and 14 at the lime — emily and megan were 17 and 14 at the time i— emily and megan were 17 and 14 at the time. i stayed _ emily and megan were 17 and 14 at the time. i stayed dressed, - emily and megan were 17 and 14 at the time. i stayed dressed, i- emily and megan were 17 and 14 at the time. i stayed dressed, i laid i the time. i stayed dressed, i laid down _ the time. i stayed dressed, i laid down with— the time. i stayed dressed, i laid down with them _ the time. i stayed dressed, i laid down with them but _ the time. i stayed dressed, i laid down with them but didn't - the time. i stayed dressed, i laid down with them but didn't go - the time. i stayed dressed, i laid down with them but didn't go toi down with them but didn't go to sleep _ down with them but didn't go to sleep because _ down with them but didn't go to sleep because i— down with them but didn't go to sleep because i figured - down with them but didn't go tol sleep because i figured someone down with them but didn't go to - sleep because i figured someone was coming _ sleep because i figured someone was coming to— sleep because i figured someone was coming to the — sleep because i figured someone was coming to the house. _ sleep because i figured someone was coming to the house. it's— sleep because i figured someone was coming to the house. it's where - sleep because i figured someone was coming to the house. it's where the i coming to the house. it's where the things— coming to the house. it's where the things you — coming to the house. it's where the things you worry— coming to the house. it's where the things you worry about. _ coming to the house. it's where the things you worry about. at - coming to the house. it's where the things you worry about. at about i things you worry about. at about midnight, — things you worry about. at about midnight, somebody— things you worry about. at about midnight, somebody came - things you worry about. at about midnight, somebody came to - things you worry about. at about| midnight, somebody came to the things you worry about. at about - midnight, somebody came to the house to say— midnight, somebody came to the house to say that _ midnight, somebody came to the house to say that bruce — midnight, somebody came to the house to say that bruce was _ midnight, somebody came to the house to say that bruce was unaccounted - to say that bruce was unaccounted for. , ., ., ., for. this memorial, with great restraint. _ for. this memorial, with great restraint, does _ for. this memorial, with great restraint, does justice - for. this memorial, with great restraint, doesjustice to - for. this memorial, with great restraint, doesjustice to the l restraint, does justice to the terrible events of that day. but nothing can capture the sense of chaos, anger, disbelief of what was unfolding. then there was a steely resolve, and americans were united
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and most of the rest of the world stood with america. the taliban in afghanistan, who had harboured the al-qaeda terrorists who were driven from power. the us would try to replace the warlords with democracy. but 20 years on, america has abandoned afghanistan. i but 20 years on, america has abandoned afghanistan. i think we're still... but we _ abandoned afghanistan. i think we're still... but we are _ abandoned afghanistan. i think we're still... but we are not _ abandoned afghanistan. i think we're still... but we are not shining - abandoned afghanistan. i think we're still... but we are not shining the - still... but we are not shining the way we _ still... but we are not shining the way we used to sign. yes, we are tired~ _ way we used to sign. yes, we are tired~ i_ way we used to sign. yes, we are tired i do — way we used to sign. yes, we are tired. i do think it has been a defeat — tired. i do think it has been a defeat for— tired. i do think it has been a defeat for the pride of america and the respect that we have had around the respect that we have had around the world _ the respect that we have had around the world. 20 the respect that we have had around the world. :: , ., , ., ., ~ the world. 20 years ago, america was never more — the world. 20 years ago, america was never more united. _ the world. 20 years ago, america was never more united. two _ the world. 20 years ago, america was never more united. two decades - the world. 20 years ago, america was never more united. two decades on, | never more united. two decades on, and the terrorist threat largely quelled and america has never been more divided. the quelled and america has never been more divided-— more divided. the way we came toaether more divided. the way we came together was. — more divided. the way we came together was, it _ more divided. the way we came together was, it was _ more divided. the way we came - together was, it was awe-inspiring. together was, it was awe—inspiring. in together was, it was awe—inspiring. in 20 _ together was, it was awe—inspiring. in 20 years. — together was, it was awe—inspiring. in 20 years. the _ together was, it was awe—inspiring. in 20 years, the pendulum - together was, it was awe—inspiring.
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in 20 years, the pendulum has - together was, it was awe—inspiring. i in 20 years, the pendulum has swung, in my— in 20 years, the pendulum has swung, in my opinion, — in 20 years, the pendulum has swung, in my opinion. the _ in 20 years, the pendulum has swung, in my opinion, the other— in 20 years, the pendulum has swung, in my opinion, the other way. - in 20 years, the pendulum has swung, in my opinion, the other way. eater?- in my opinion, the other way. every da , i in my opinion, the other way. every day. i miss — in my opinion, the other way. every day. i miss my _ in my opinion, the other way. every day, i miss my dad. _ in my opinion, the other way. every day, i miss my dad. whether it's i day, i miss my dad. whether it's 9/11, whether it's january 13th, whether it's july seven. i 9/11, whether it's january 13th, whether it'sjuly seven. i miss my dad and that will never change. 50. dad and that will never change. so, to 2021, dad and that will never change. so, to 2021. and _ dad and that will never change. so, to 2021, and the most powerful country in the world seems to be suffering a crisis of confidence. in the manner of its departure from afghanistan, the kabul debacle, a crisis of competence. just off the tip of manhattan, lady liberally symbolises america opening its arms to the world —— lady liberty. 20 years on, the us feels much more introspective pace. jon sopel, bbc news, new york. lauren manning was rushing for a lift when the plane struck the world trade center and was badly injured. moran, it is so good of you to talk
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to us here at the bbc. —— lauren. the fact that tomorrow is 20 years, is that for you and your family any more significant than any other date? what are your reflections about the fact that 20 years have now passed?— now passed? that's an extraordinarily - now passed? that's an extraordinarily threat l now passed? that's an | extraordinarily threat of now passed? that's an - extraordinarily threat of time, now passed? that's an _ extraordinarily threat of time, and yet the payment and the agony of all of my friends and colleagues in so many others who were murdered remains vivid —— pain and agony. it no way disables from my memory. my bodyis no way disables from my memory. my body is disabled and my limbs are contorted and i suffer 82 and a half percent burned. i had been in the trade centre in 93 as well, so i classify myself as a survivor twice lucky in a relative sense. certainly far more than all of my brave
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colleagues and friends that fought, and i'm sure sought to help each other that day.— and i'm sure sought to help each other that day. because you worked to exolained- -- _ other that day. because you worked to explained... you _ other that day. because you worked to explained... you worked - other that day. because you worked to explained... you worked for - to explained... you worked for fitzgerald, and that company was very badly hit and lost a huge number of people on that dreadful day. i'm interested as to why you speak so openly about everything that happened to you, your many months you had to spend in hospital. is it helpful for you talking about it or is it about teaching future generations, making sure they don't forget? i’m generations, making sure they don't foraet? �* ., ., generations, making sure they don't fortet? �* ., ., ., forget? i'm a former partner of fitzgerald. _ forget? i'm a former partner of fitzgerald, and _ forget? i'm a former partner of fitzgerald, and we _ forget? i'm a former partner of fitzgerald, and we lost - forget? i'm a former partner of fitzgerald, and we lost 658 - fitzgerald, and we lost 658 employees that day. the reason why i am open, and that's a relative word, because there is so much that is really unsalable and unknowable to all, otherthan really unsalable and unknowable to all, other than those who died that day or lived between that small
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margin, as i did, between life and death. the reason why i speak it all is to give a name and homage to the characters and in essence the nameless, because although their individual memories, of their loved ones and children and mothers and fathers who'd done extraordinary things, too much of its life in this miasma of 9/11. thousands are killed and it is to this past and perfect, as we move forward and reminded those of us are part of it every day, but for most, one day during the year. but day, but for most, one day during the ear. �* , ., ., ., the year. but you never forget, and our the year. but you never forget, and your family — the year. but you never forget, and your family never _ the year. but you never forget, and your family never goes. _ the year. but you never forget, and your family never goes. you - the year. but you never forget, and your family never goes. you had . the year. but you never forget, and your family never goes. you had a i yourfamily never goes. you had a little boy who was not even a
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—year—old when this happened, so i per —— he's perhaps out of college. what do you say to him? how much of you spoke to him as he's been growing up and asking about that day? growing up and asking about that da ? ~ , , ., , , day? well, my younger son tyler is in college- — day? well, my younger son tyler is in college- he _ day? well, my younger son tyler is in college. he was _ day? well, my younger son tyler is in college. he was the _ day? well, my younger son tyler is in college. he was the absolute - in college. he was the absolute beacon in the centrifuge of what i focused on in my fight. for so little time, he was so young. i screamed and i fought for years at a time to return to him as a mum. didn't look the same, but i saw the grace and the opportunity to fight for so many others. he suffered through late psd which was highly see disabling in so many ways, that trauma that so many fall prey to.
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and he is a resilient and strong and terrific young kid, and i say you're the only one getting older, hopefully not me. but the mirror tell a different story! but hopefully not me. but the mirror tell a different story!— tell a different story! but your face lights _ tell a different story! but your face lights up _ tell a different story! but your face lights up when _ tell a different story! but your face lights up when you - tell a different story! but your face lights up when you talk. face lights up when you talk about him, and it'sjust so face lights up when you talk about him, and it's just so very moving to see. how will you and your family spend tomorrow? is it... how difficult a day? that's a silly question, but how difficult a day? what will you be able to do? fin what will you be able to do? on 9/11, as what will you be able to do? 0“! 9/11, as every year, ijoined my family at fitzgerald and we have our memorial. the most difficult part of it all isjust,
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memorial. the most difficult part of it all is just, as memorial. the most difficult part of it all isjust, as it memorial. the most difficult part of it all is just, as it is for any memorial service that day, the unending listing of names. and their images of people that i worked with that were friends, that were pregnant, that were younger and older. whoever they were, just untouched and unscathed. hopefully in the moment of their departure by the pain they were encountering during those moments. so, it's a day of recollection where everyone says never forget, of recollection where everyone says neverforget, but of recollection where everyone says never forget, but what i choose to do and hope that we can all engage in is an understanding of what we as the world, most of the world did, which was lean in towards each other and give a brother and a sister a smile, words and prayers. at the end
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of the day, that's all you've got. the rest of it is either the past or something we can't predict. lauren mannin: , something we can't predict. lauren manning. thank — something we can't predict. lauren manning, thank you _ something we can't predict. lauren manning, thank you so _ something we can't predict. lauren manning, thank you so much. - something we can't predict. lauren | manning, thank you so much. we're very grateful and send our very best to you and your family.— to you and your family. thank you very much- _ to you and your family. thank you very much- the — to you and your family. thank you very much. the time _ to you and your family. thank you very much. the time is _ to you and your family. thank you very much. the time is 17 - to you and your family. thank you j very much. the time is 17 minutes ast five. we turn to tennis an extraordinary �*s story. teenage tennis sensation emma raducanu has become the first british woman to reach a major singles tennis final for 44 years. 18—year—old emma beat the 17th seed maria sakkari in the semis of the us open in new york and afterwards called her achievement "absolutely mind—blowing". she's the first qualifier to ever reach a grand slam final and the youngest british player ever to reach the finals of the us open, and she's done it
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without dropping a set. 0ur sports reporter laura scott has more. commentator: great britain, emma raducanu. _ commentator: from great britain, emma raducanu. i even in emma raducanu's wildest dreams, walking out to a grand slam semifinal under the lights on arthur ashe atjust 18 would have surely seemed far—fetched. no qualifier in the men's or women's game had ever reached a majorfinal, but raducanu did maths a—level, not history, and was confident she had the formula to do it. the 17th seed, maria sakkari of greece, had the experience, and said the electric atmosphere would only enhance her start and her spirit. but that was diminished as raducanu rose to the occasion, holding her nerve and her serve. sakkari tried everything, even a change of skirt. after half an hour, she was finally on the board, but it was too little, too late, and raducanu soon sealed the set 6—1.
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the second set was considerably closer, but raducanu's focus and force didn't falter. still, the crowd got louder. there's going to be no doubt about that one. 0ne match point was all she needed, and she wasn't the only one whose mind was blown by what she'd done. i've just been taken care of each day, and before you know it, three weeks later, i'm in the final and i can't actually believe it. i mean, is there any expectation? i'm a qualifier, so technically, on paper, there's no pressure on me. pressure, perhaps not, but back in bromley, excitement levels are reaching fever pitch... so, who's going to try extra hard in pe now that you have seen emma? yeah? ..with children at her primary school now desperate to follow in her footsteps. i think emma is an inspiring tennis player. she always inspires everyone
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because she always tries her best. i because she always tries her best. i will definitely be cheering for her. ithink— will definitely be cheering for her. i think it's — will definitely be cheering for her. i think it's amazing because she kept _ i think it's amazing because she kept on — i think it's amazing because she kept on trying _ i think it's amazing because she kept on trying really _ i think it's amazing because she kept on trying really hard - i think it's amazing because she kept on trying really hard and l i think it's amazing because she i kept on trying really hard and she actually _ kept on trying really hard and she actually made _ kept on trying really hard and she actually made it _ kept on trying really hard and she actually made it to _ kept on trying really hard and she actually made it to the _ kept on trying really hard and she actually made it to the final. i kept on trying really hard and shel actually made it to the final. fromm actually made it to the final. from bein: actually made it to the final. from being presented _ actually made it to the final. from being presented with _ actually made it to the final. from being presented with their - actually made it to the final.m being presented with their medals to watching her rapid rise at wimbledon and the us open on their tvs, it's no wonder tennis club is now so popular. saturday's final will be a battle of the team queen's, with raducanu up against layla fernandez. raducanu up against layla fernandez. radu cano's young fans are hoping if they shout loudly enough, she just might hearyou. 0ur tennis correspondent russell fullerjoins me now from new york. he's been following the us open throughout. you have followed many grand slam �*s in your time, and i'm interested to know what was going
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through your mind when you watched that matched and all the matches that matched and all the matches that in my raducanu has played. i that in my raducanu has played. i was reflecting on the first time i found her. —— saw her. it was an oppressively hot day and she was on court five. i remember thinking she really is something quite special. the fourth—round looked like it wasn't going to be... but she came through qualifying. we didn't expect she would come all the way to the final. she has taken everything in her stride. that is the most remarkable thing. she says she's playing without pressure. but it's also the way she's handled the interactions of the fans and with the media. she's done a string of media interviews. there was even a
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german reporter... becoming quite a well—known name. iher german reporter... becoming quite a well-known name.— well-known name. her composure is really remarkable, _ well-known name. her composure is really remarkable, but _ well-known name. her composure is really remarkable, but it's _ well-known name. her composure is really remarkable, but it's your i really remarkable, but it's your thoughts about the final because she's playing someone of a very, very similar age, she's playing someone of a very, very similarage, perhaps she's playing someone of a very, very similar age, perhaps a player people don't know maybe huge amount about. what's your assessment of the two women and what we might expect on saturday evening? i two women and what we might expect on saturday evening?— on saturday evening? i think they miaht on saturday evening? i think they might both _ on saturday evening? i think they might both feel— on saturday evening? i think they might both feel a _ on saturday evening? i think they might both feel a little _ on saturday evening? i think they might both feel a little bit - on saturday evening? i think they might both feel a little bit more l might both feel a little bit more relaxed because they are playing each other rather than one of the established champions in the game. they know each other. fernandez is only two months older than raducanu. they played at the junior wimbledon championships three years ago. emma won that match. i'm sure they'll both be feeling nervous today. we expect emma to be a long site in just over half an hour for a practice session. she'll be
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practising on the same court that novak djokovic will be on later as he prepares for his men's singles. leylah fernandez will be later in the afternoon. four o'clock in the afternoon. sometimes players like to play at the same time to get themselves ready.— themselves ready. russell, fantastic. _ themselves ready. russell, fantastic. enjoy _ themselves ready. russell, fantastic. enjoy it, - themselves ready. russell, fantastic. enjoy it, thank. themselves ready. russell, l fantastic. enjoy it, thank you themselves ready. russell, i fantastic. enjoy it, thank you very much indeed. and you can follow emma raducanu's final against leylah fernandez tomorrow night on bbc radio 5 live and the bbc sounds app. coverage starts at 8pm. match itself, i don't think until nine, but so much to talk about, so all the from eight o'clock on five live tomorrow. the scientist behind the 0xford—astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine has said the world needs a bigger supply of vaccines so they can be offered to people in developing countries. professor dame sarah gilbert said
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not everyone in the uk will need a boosterjab. a decision about boosters is expected next week from the advisory body thejcvi, thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. 0ur health correspondent katharine da costa reports. while some countries like israel have already started rolling out third doses of covid vaccines, most people in africa are still waiting for their first. the debate on giving boosters or donating more vaccines has ramped up, but one leading scientist says it is not an either/or decision. the problem we really have is that the world needs greater vaccine supply. we need more doses of all of the vaccines that are currently licensed and we need more vaccines to be licensed so we're not talking about choices between vaccinating in one country or another country. the good news is that supply is increasing. data is still being gathered on whether boosters might be needed for everyone, but professor gilbert said there was evidence vaccines
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were still providing strong protection a year on from the initial doses. infections are expected to increase across the uk this autumn with a return to schools and offices. the latest estimates from the office for national statistics suggests a sharp rise in scotland and wales in the week to last friday, but rates remained level in england and northern ireland. infection rates are highest among teenagers and young adults, and with nightclubs now open, there is a greater risk of the virus spreading. scotland is the first in the uk to confirm vaccine passports will be needed from next month. despite concerns among nightclub bosses and some tory mps, proof of vaccination is expected in england, too. by the end of this month, every adult will have had an opportunity to have had two jabs. secondly, we will almost certainly be doing it for night clubs. we will make a determination as to whether we need to move
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more broadly than that, or whether we can hold the position and wait to see if it's necessary at a later point. the government says the nhs is ready to start offering boosters to the most vulnerable and first doses to 12 to 15—year—olds if they get the go—ahead. decisions on both are expected next week. katharine da costa, bbc news. the government has released the latest coronavirus figures for the uk. in the latest 24—hour period, the uk has recorded 37,622 cases and 147 deaths. that's within 28 days of a positive test. 48.3 million people have received the first dose of the vaccine, and 43.8 million the second dose. that's 81% of the adult population has been fullyjabbed. the covid infection rate in scotland has risen to its highest level since estimates began,
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with about one in 45 people thought to have had it in the week to third september, up from one in 75 the previous week. let's try to untangle all of that. joining me now is our head of statistics, robert cuffe. 0ne one in 45 in scotland, talk us through that.— one in 45 in scotland, talk us throu~h that. .,. . , . , through that. those are christmas numbers. through that. those are christmas numbers- we _ through that. those are christmas numbers. we were _ through that. those are christmas numbers. we were seeing - through that. those are christmas numbers. we were seeing about l through that. those are christmas i numbers. we were seeing about 2% of people infected with coronavirus. scotland never quite reach that, so those were the highest numbers. they've been rising rapidly. this is the 3rd of september, about a week ago. the case numbers we've seen have started to flatten a bit. we really hope that they do, because the number of people going to hospital has been going up steadily as well. it's now about half the level that we saw at the peak in scotland, so it's one doubling away from the worst case scenario. we
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really hope the inception �*s numbers start to fall —— infection. nicola sturgeon told the bbc that she's never seen the nhs in scotland under such intense pressure. they're also trying to figure... fingers crossed those trends play out. we trying to figure. .. fingers crossed those trends play out.— those trends play out. we wait to see what happens. _ those trends play out. we wait to see what happens. some - those trends play out. we wait to see what happens. some stories| see what happens. some stories around that some people might�*ve picked up on about vaccinations, people over the age of 40 who have been vaccinated, apparently, according to what we hear, more likely to have covid. i according to what we hear, more likely to have covid.— likely to have covid. i think this is probably _ likely to have covid. i think this is probably a — likely to have covid. i think this is probably a bit _ likely to have covid. i think this is probably a bit of— likely to have covid. i think this is probably a bit of a _ likely to have covid. i think this is probably a bit of a point i likely to have covid. i think this is probably a bit of a point in i likely to have covid. i think this | is probably a bit of a point in the data. the analysis came back yesterday, and when they look at people dying or going into hospital with covid, the rates and vaccination were lower than people who hadn't been vaccinated. vaccines are much better at preventing sickness than preventing infection,
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so the thing that's flipped it is there's a bigger uncertainty. we don't actually know how many people over 40 haven't been vaccinated. the census was ten years ago. we don't have the 2021 census. if you overestimate the size of the population, the cases that you see look like a much smaller proportion. that makes not being vaccinated... if you think they are too many on vaccinated people, that makes it look as if those cases are a small number and it's safer to be on than it really is. you look at the deaths and hospitalisations and think about all the uncertainty, it's more likely that this is a bit of a fluke or a glitch in the data than something people should be worried about. . , . much more coming up, but it's heading to the weekend. let's catch
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up heading to the weekend. let's catch up with the weather prospects. the weekends not looking as unsettled as that has been the last couple days. you can see here we've got lots of those across eastern parts of england. that's where we've seen some of the heaviest showers and those will continue as we go through the rest of this evening and overnight. really quite wet across parts of northern scotland. that's a weather front hanging around. 15—16 degrees, and muggy in the south, so a great start. a little bit of mist and fog to clear. fewer showers on the whole, but a soaking for northern scotland. 17—22, 23, not too bad at all. that weather front is weakening of the pushes away from scotland, so drier weather comes in. nor the rent —— northerly breeze.
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that's a question mark, how far north and east that's going to push. that's one for us to work on. more on the website including all the warnings. this is bbc news. the headlines... the head of m15 tells the bbc that the return of the taliban in afghanistan is likely to have emboldened lone wolf terrorists in the uk. we do face a consistent global struggle to defeat extremism and to guard against terrorism. this is a real problem. he was speaking on the eve of the 20th anniversary of the september 11th attacks,
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as people across the united states and the world prepare to reflect and remember. 18—year—old emma raducanu reaches the final of the us open — the first british woman to do so for more than four decades. honestly, ijust can't believe it. a shock, like, crazy, all of the above. new figures show the covid infection rate in scotland has again risen to its highest level since estimates began in october 2020, with about one in 45 thought to have had the virus last week. let's catch up with all the sports news with 0lly foster. india have offered to play the cancelled final test against england at old trafford
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on another date. possibly next summer. the match was called offjust hours before the start of play this morning, india unable to field a team with some of their players reluctant to take to the field after another positive covid case in their backroom staff. the match may yet be awarded to england which would level the series. here's our sports correspondentjoe wilson. 0ld old trafford, new world. a test match cancelled because of covid. those who had paid to fill the seats had already made the journey. i haste had already made the “ourney. i have been working _ had already made the “ourney. i have been working all— had already made the journey. i have been working all night, _ had already made the journey. i have been working all night, so _ had already made the journey. i have been working all night, so i - had already made the journey. i have been working all night, so i have i been working all night, so i have not slept a wink all night to get here today the wit to be cancelled at the last minute, which i find shocking. at the last minute, which i find shockina. ~ . we stayed here last night and we booked a hotel last night for when we came _ booked a hotel last night for when we came for tonight. inaudible. it has been a complete nightmare, taking a day off work and then... who is to blame for the fact this match won't happen? it is who is to blame for the fact this match won't happen?— match won't happen? it is not a lain match won't happen? it is not a plain thing. _ match won't happen? it is not a plain thing. we _ match won't happen? it is not a plain thing, we are _ match won't happen? it is not a plain thing, we are still - match won't happen? it is not a plain thing, we are still living i match won't happen? it is not a plain thing, we are still living inj plain thing, we are still living in
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a very— plain thing, we are still living in a very difficult environment for elite _ a very difficult environment for elite sports performance, so to go from _ elite sports performance, so to go from one — elite sports performance, so to go from one anxiety inducing... at the moment— from one anxiety inducing... at the moment is— from one anxiety inducing... at the moment is very, very difficult and sometimes — moment is very, very difficult and sometimes that goes past the point where _ sometimes that goes past the point where players are comfortable going out on _ where players are comfortable going out on the _ where players are comfortable going out on the field and that is what we are seeing — out on the field and that is what we are seeing in this case.— are seeing in this case. new's -la ers are seeing in this case. new's players recorded _ are seeing in this case. new's players recorded negative i are seeing in this case. new's i players recorded negative covid tests yesterday and then announced they couldn't. .. tests yesterday and then announced they couldn't... the team. what is nextin they couldn't... the team. what is next in cricket? the super ipl, indian premier league, will resume later this month. do india want their star players involved in that? of course they do. i their star players involved in that? of course they do.— their star players involved in that? of course they do. i will be honest, i think all of course they do. i will be honest, i think all of— of course they do. i will be honest, i think all of this _ of course they do. i will be honest, i think all of this is _ of course they do. i will be honest, i think all of this is about _ of course they do. i will be honest, i think all of this is about money. i i think all of this is about money. i think all of this is about money. i completely get players, what they have gone through in the last year and a half, it has been difficult, the bubbles... the mental health side that is very important and we have to look at that. i believe this week was about money, you know, making sure those players get to the ipl because they want to earn those big checks, which again i get, but i
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don't get it when it is at the expense of the test match. these performers. _ expense of the test match. these performers, booked _ expense of the test match. these performers, booked to _ expense of the test match. these performers, booked to attend, i expense of the test match. these l performers, booked to attend, did. it can't be forgotten that a test match is, was, about entertainment. bbc news, old trafford. some exciting news, britain's cyclist has retained the... britain's ethan hayter has retained the overall lead after stage six of the tour of britain. but only just. after taking four and a half hours to cover 123 miles it boiled down to a sprint finish in gateshead between the top riders. belgium's wout van art won the stage just ahead of hayter and now trails him byjust four seconds with two stages left. the great and good in tennis have been lining up to heap the 18—year—old is yet to drop a set at the us open and the 18—time grand slam champion martina navratilova says it's even more impressive that she has reached the final as a qualifier, which has never been done before. the speed with which she did it...
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inaudible it is really... she didn't get the wall wild card, she didn't wilson hear, saying,... and i think it paid off because she didn't play that well at the beginning of the tournament in the qualifying, but it grew and each match got better and better... but again she has just taken it to another level here and it is very impressive. lots more on the rise of raducanu on the bbc sport website. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website.
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that's it from me, lizzie will have a fabulous sports day for you at 6:30pm. thank you. more sports news a bit later in the evening. now we will take a look at a few other stories here tonight. it's been confirmed that the current metropolitan police commissioner, dame cressida dick, will serve another two years when her current contract expires next spring. it emerged this week that she was being offered an extension and she has agreed to continue in the role. dame cressida, who became the first woman to lead the met when she was appointed in 2017, has been involved in a series of controversies which led to questions over her future. a number of her high profile critics had sent an open to the prime minister calling for her contract not to be extended. 0ur news correspondent, helena wilkinson, has more. the contract was going to be extended, we knew that already from this week. we were just waiting
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for that confirmation, but also waiting to see whether that was something that she was going to accept. as you say, she took on the top job at the metropolitan police as commissioner, the first female to take on that role, in 2017. that was a five—year contract, that was due to come to an end this coming april. but we have now had confirmation from the home secretary, priti patel, in a statement that dame cressida will have her contract extended. that will take her up to 2024, april 2024. the commissioner has in a statement said, relating to that extension of her contract, that she is immensely honoured and humbled to have been asked to extend her time as commissioner for the next two years and she goes on to say that in the last 4.5 years, met teams have dealt with some extraordinary challenges, including most recently the pandemic, and delivered some
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fantastic results, critically, in reducing violent crime. that was her statement following confirmation she has had her contract renewed. 0ur correspondent, helena wilkinson. food shortages could be permanent, the food and drink federation has warned. ian wright, ceo of the food and drink federation, which represents more than 800 food and drink companies in the uk, said labour shortages meant consumers may no longer be able to expect to find a full range of products on supermarket shelves or in restaurants. he also warned that supply chains issues would get worse and wont get issues would get worse and won't get better "any time soon". ministers say they expect stock levels to " return to normal" by christmas. up up to 50,000 more hgv driving tests will be made available to streamline the testing process and tackle the driver shortage. the transport secretary grant shapps is that there are enough people in the workforce, but there needs to be the system to
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allow recruits to get the tests. i allow recruits to get the tests. i understand one solution could allow recruits to get the tests. i understand one solution could be just to undercut our lorry drivers, import people to do the driving. it is probably one of the things that has kept the long term salary lower for drivers, but that also has an implication. for example, we don't attract enough people from across society into driving lorries. 99% of lorry drivers at the moment, for example, are men. we want to get more women driving. we know the facilities need to be better and frankly be paid needs to be better. we have 1.6 million people coming off furlough in september. some people will perhaps be attracted perhaps by a new profession, so have got the people, but what we need is perhaps a system to allow people to get those tests, and in addition by already increasing the testing capacity by 50% today's extra 50,000 test should go a long way to doing that. ., , ,., test should go a long way to doing that. ., , ,, . ., , , ., that. the transport secretary, grant sha s. that. the transport secretary, grant shapps- the — that. the transport secretary, grant shapps. the family _ that. the transport secretary, grant shapps. the family of— that. the transport secretary, grant shapps. the family of a _ that. the transport secretary, grant
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shapps. the family of a woman i that. the transport secretary, grant shapps. the family of a woman who | shapps. the family of a woman who was subjected to violence by a bar and have received a public apology... from the chief constable of west midlands police, following failings by the force both before and after her death. the body of suzanne van hagen, who was 34, was found along with that of her partner, by her 9—year—old daughter in february 2013. herfamily have fought for more than 8 years to get to the truth behind her death. they've been speaking exclusively to our midlands correspondent, sian lloyd. our world just ended that day, just absolutely heartbreaking. i just thank god that we've still got her daughter. suzanne van hagen was a much loved sister, daughter and mother. she died aged 34. her body was found along with that of her partner by her nine—year—old daughter. sometimes i can think that suzanne is still here, but she's... you know, she's somewhere else. and i think to think like that is easier, you know, to cope with it. because we do miss her.
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prior to suzanne's death in 2013, allegations of domestic violence by her partner, john worton, against her, had been reported to west midlands police. after suzanne's death, a postmortem examination revealed marks on her neck and traces of drugs in her system. west midlands police issued an inaccurate press release to the media saying her death was believed to be due to an accidental overdose. they saw and assumed what they wanted to. it was like when she had drugs in her system, that was it then, everything else was forgotten about and suzanne wasn't like that. and that is when our fight began, really, because we were adamant. that's not what happened, and that's it. yeah. today, more than eight years after suzanne died, the force has said sorry to herfamily who never gave up their battle to get to the truth. the apology by the chief constable of west midlands police acknowledges
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that there were failings by the force in its handling of suzanne's case both before and after her death, and it acknowledges the additional distress this caused suzanne's family. we could and should have done more to protect suzanne and her daughter from the abuse they were suffering. to compound the family's pain, they were let down by a failure to properly investigate suzanne's death. suzanne's family say she will never be forgotten but they now feel they can begin to move forward. the truth is out there now and that means everything to us. sian lloyd, bbc news, birmingham. the headlines on bbc news... the head of m15 tells the bbc that the return of the taliban in afghanistan is likely to have emboldened lone wolf terrorists in the uk.
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he was speaking on the eve of the anniversary of 9/11 — as people across the united states — and the world — prepare to reflect on and remember. 18—year—old emma raducanu reaches the final of the us open — the first british woman to do so for more than four decades. coming up on bbc news, teenage takeover at the us open tennis, we live in new york ahead of emma raducanu's historic final. and the final cricket test is cancelled after india say the team won't play because of fears of the spread of covid. the test at old trafford was due to start today. we will also be looking ahead at cristiano bernardo's match against chester united. all that and more later on bbc news, but now it is time for the film review.
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hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. look who is here! he is real, it is mark kermode really here in the studio, not an avatar!— mark kermode really here in the studio, not an avatar! fabulous to be back in — studio, not an avatar! fabulous to be back in the _ studio, not an avatar! fabulous to be back in the studio _ studio, not an avatar! fabulous to be back in the studio with - studio, not an avatar! fabulous to be back in the studio with you, i be back in the studio with you, jane, lovely to see you again. a packed show coming up, reviews of the collini case, which is a german crime thriller... we have respect, which is the biopic of aretha franklin, withjennifer hudson, and we have herself, a new film by phyllida lloyd, which we have different opinions about. we start with the collini _ different opinions about. we start with the collini case. _ different opinions about. we start with the collini case. yes, - different opinions about. we start with the collini case. yes, based | different opinions about. we start i with the collini case. yes, based on a book by ferdinand von schirach, which i confess i have not read and it is a very famous book. the story is a young lawyer is assigned to a case in which he has to defend
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