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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 30, 2021 5:00pm-5:31pm BST

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of that cloud still there, a loss of dry weather. it is the weekend, particularly as we moved or sunday that we begin to see the first signs of significant change, the high declines, low pressure comes in, and it turns a bit more unsettled. this is bbc news i'm martine croxall. the headlines at 5 the bbc is told 10 people from one family — including six children were killed by a us drone attack in the afghan capital, kabul. the us says it is taking reports of civilian deaths very seriously. how... sobbing. why they killed our family, our children. seven children. we're investigating this, i'm knocking to get ahead of it. but if we have verifiable information that we did in fact take innocent life here then we will be transparent about that too. as the taliban say it's a more moderate force than before, we investgates report of revenge killlings and ask if the reality
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on the ground is very different to what its leaders claim. warnings of life—threatening floods and dangerous storm surges as tropical storm ida churns its way along the coast of louisiana and mississippi. more paralympics success for great britain as lee pearson, andrew small and phoebe paterson pine claim golds. good afternoon. the us says it is taking reports of civilian deaths from a drone strike it carried out in kabul very seriously. it comes after the so—called islamic state group said it was behind a missile attack on the us forces remaining at the airport in kabul. the missiles were intercepted by the us defence systems and no us or afghan casualties were reported.
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meanwhile, british ministers and officials are taking part in a number of international meetings aimed at defining a joint approach to the taliban in afghanistan. rajini vaidya nathan reports. the aftermath of a rocket attack close to kabul airport. eye—witnesses say the missiles were launched from a car this morning. it's still unclear who's responsible. us officials have been warning another terror attack is highly likely, as the country's troops prepare to depart afghanistan. last night the pentagon launched a drone strike on a car packed with explosives close to the airport, saying it had thwarted a plot by islamic state. a family living close to the airport say they lost ten members in the drone strike — including six children. the us says it's now investigating. translation: we live in this neighbourhood. | a rocket came and hit a house, we know that people died. i have nothing to say,
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we're distraught. despite security concerns, america says its continuing evacuation flights up until tuesday's deadline. the uk's already wrapped up its operations but there are still many eligible for resettlement in the uk who are left behind. i talked to a man who couldn't get on his flight to britain because of the crowds at the airport. now he's in fear after the taliban, and is moving to a different safe house almost every day. nowadays, if there is a knock on the door, your heart stops beating because you're worried it's the taliban. what would you message be to the uk government right now? we are fighting to stay alive. it's not a matter of hours, not a matter of days — it's a matter of seconds. the uk government says the end of the mission makes evacuations much harder, but says it's working with allies to find a way to get people out
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through other means. we will not end our repatriation and evacuation effortjust because kabul airport has fallen, although we have to understand that losing that as an exit route severely limits — and has severely limited — our ability to evacuate people. those left behind don't have much hope to hold onto. many are in fear — others displaced, struggling to find food. tomorrow marks the end of america's longest war. its legacy is as uncertain as the future of afghanistan. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news. as we've been hearing, the us launched a drone strike on suspected militants planning a suicide bombing near the airport. well a resident of kabul resident ramin yousufi has been telling us his cousin returned from work and went outside with his children when the drone strike happened — killing 10 of his relatives
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including the cousin, and six of the children. a warning that some of what you hear may be distressing. he was the head of our family. he had a0 years and he was engineer in a charity organisation. the other one, from the youngest, he was 30 years and he was an officer of international army. and the other was 19 and he was a student. and the seven others, they have four, five, two and 12, three and 11 years. they were all children. but they have killed them in this attack in kabul. how would a person who is an engineer and who works, who hasjobs, charity organisation, they serve about two decades for the poor people,
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for those people that they... the north part of our country in kabul, how can he be part of a daesh or a suicide attack? it is not possible. we see how, in our lives... sobbing: we gather with our parts of our members of our... _ how... why they killed our family, our children? seven children. they are all gone now. they cannot find. . .faith. .. their bodies. ramin yousufi there, a resident of kabul. at a news briefing in the past half an hour, the pentagon press secretary, said the united states is investigating whether there were any civilian casualties in that us drone strike targetting a suspected suicide bomber from islamic state.
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we are assessing and we are investigating. make no mistake, no military— investigating. make no mistake, no military on— investigating. make no mistake, no military on the face of the earth works_ military on the face of the earth works harder to avoid civilian casualties_ works harder to avoid civilian casualties in the united states militarx — casualties in the united states military. and nobody wants to see innocent _ military. and nobody wants to see innocent life taken. we take it very. — innocent life taken. we take it very. very— innocent life taken. we take it very, very seriously. and when we know _ very, very seriously. and when we know that — very, very seriously. and when we know that we have because innocent life to _ know that we have because innocent life to be _ know that we have because innocent life to be lost in the conduct of our operations, we are transparent about— our operations, we are transparent about it. — our operations, we are transparent about it. we — our operations, we are transparent about it. we are investigating this, i'm about it. we are investigating this, i'm lucky— about it. we are investigating this, i'm lucky to — about it. we are investigating this, i'm lucky to get ahead of it but if we have — i'm lucky to get ahead of it but if we have verifiable information that we have verifiable information that we did _ we have verifiable information that we did in _ we have verifiable information that we did in fact take innocent life here _ we did in fact take innocent life here then — we did in fact take innocent life here then we will be transparent about— here then we will be transparent about that too. nobody wants to see that happen. but you know what else we didnt— that happen. but you know what else we didn't want to see happen? we didn't_ we didn't want to see happen? we didn't want— we didn't want to see happen? we didn't want to see what we believe to be _ didn't want to see what we believe to be a _ didn't want to see what we believe to be a very— didn't want to see what we believe to be a very real, very specific and a very— to be a very real, very specific and a very imminent threat to the international airport into our
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troops — international airport into our troops operating at that airport as well as— troops operating at that airport as well as civilians around it and in it. well as civilians around it and in it and — well as civilians around it and in it and it — well as civilians around it and in it. and it was another thing that we were _ it. and it was another thing that we were very. — it. and it was another thing that we were very, very concerned about. gary o'donoghue is in washington. they say that they take great care but many people will point out that us drones had killed civilians over many years. yes us drones had killed civilians over many yew-— many years. yes and of course the nature of this _ many years. yes and of course the nature of this strike _ many years. yes and of course the nature of this strike was _ many years. yes and of course the nature of this strike was in - many years. yes and of course the nature of this strike was in the - nature of this strike was in the city. and that is going to be something that is gonna carry some inherent risk. interestingly they went from saying initially that they didn't believe that there were civilian casualties do now saying they're not in a position to dispute that they were. i think they are edging towards a position where they think they may have to confirm some of theirs. you heard john kirby there for transparency but it will raise questions of course in what is already a very messy and difficult
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situation. not least in terms of the airport but they're insistent here that they were trying to neutralise an imminent threat to civilians and troops at the airport. and they believe the secondary explosions that took place that may have caused these other injuries that they were an indication that they got the person they were trying to get. it looks as though rather doing that rather tragedy two tragically that killed other people and process was up killed other people and process was up there was also in the east of the country and the taliban have said the united states needs to be talking to us before it's taking any action now in the country. the us is talking to the taliban. it says all the time trying to de—conflate and smooth the passage of people to the airport. it's a very difficult position. there are very few people on the ground left now going to the
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airport it's winding down. we'd seen the figures of that happening over the figures of that happening over the last 2a hours come down in terms of the numbers. they are getting ready for tomorrow where they are still planning to get everyone out. anyone who wants to get out and the military presence will end. thank ou ve military presence will end. thank you very much- _ since they took control of afghanistan two weeks ago, the taliban have sought to portray an image more moderate than when they seized power in the 1990s. the group has said it is not going after people who worked for western militaries or the previous administration. but there is growing evidence that the reality on ground is different than what's announced by taliban leaders. the bbc has investigated cases of revenge killings of police personnel and soldiers, and spoken to multiple people, some in hiding, who strongly refute taliban claims of amnesty. a warning you may find some of the details and images in yogita limaye's report distressing. a site that strikes fear
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in hearts of of afghans. the taliban back on the streets, back in control. people willing to take extreme risks for a chance to leave the country. it's more dangerous, they believe, to stay behind. taliban assurances of amnesty for everyone where an ounce from the chair of a government spokesman killed by the group a few weeks ago and justified as punishment for his deeds. even since the pledge of pardon, others have been killed. this man, the security director of a province, executed by the taliban just over a week ago. multiple sources have told the bbc... as was this man, a security head for a province. we spoke to a soldier
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from afghan special forces who is in hiding with his family. we have heard similar accounts from other soldiers as well, and also spoke to a high—ranking police official who said the taliban were searching for him and his family.
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if you were to come face—to—face with the taliban, what do you think would happen? —— would happen? many like this man have fled after threats from the taliban —— this woman. afghanistan's first female mayor. governing any province bordering kabul. she says her father was killed by the taliban last year and now they are looking for her. the taliban took my car away,
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they took the guards and the weapons, and then they were searching for me. the taliban were searching for me, especially those taliban who came from the province. forced to leave her country, she is now in germany. taliban did this to me. i did nothing to them. i was not part of their war. but they destroyed my everything and more importantly they made me leave the country that was more important to me always. this police woman, out of afghanistan now, says she is still being threatened by the taliban and her colleagues back home have told her similar stories.
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some believe retaliation could be the result of a gap between the thinking of taliban leaders and their foot soldiers. but if the group does not react to mounting evidence of reprisals, it will damage the moderate face the taliban have been trying to project. back now to the news that the us says it is taking reports of civilian deaths from a drone strike it carried out in kabul very seriously. it comes after the so—called islamic state group said it was behind a missile attack on the us forces remaining at the airport in kabul. i'm joined now from kabul by our chief international correspondent lyse doucet.
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what are people saying about this in the city? absolutely heartbreaking. you cannot listen to the accounts of the family members who lost ten members of theirfamily the family members who lost ten members of their family and minutes. including seven children just as they were waiting to go to the airport with us visas to start a new life in america. they are cut down by an american drone strike. viewers may have already seen on the channel today that heart stoping, heartbreaking interview with one of the relatives who cannot understand how is it possible that at this hour his family which is work for the us military, work for international charities, children's whose faces were so burned they couldn't
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recognise them. no one expected this pain at this hour. there haven't been that many political reactions. this is such a painful, personal and human moment. and the taliban now of course, itjust affirms their view that what they see as the foreign occupation of afghanistan has to end as soon as possible. and you may hearin as soon as possible. and you may hear in the skies above me the warplanes, us warplanes constantly circling overhead. it's been like that all day providing cover for the last military flights to leave afghanistan, closing this chapter of the afghan war.— the afghan war. right up until the last minute _ the afghan war. right up until the last minute then. _ the afghan war. right up until the last minute then. there _ the afghan war. right up until the last minute then. there is - the afghan war. right up until the last minute then. there is peril, l last minute then. there is peril, there is a risk of terror attack and risk of response to that. haifa there is a risk of terror attack and risk of response to that.— risk of response to that. how can ou beain risk of response to that. how can you begin to _ risk of response to that. how can you begin to convey the - risk of response to that. how can l you begin to convey the enormity, the intensity, the art, the horror of this moment? if you said 20 years
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ago with the us led invasion would lead to the ousting of the taliban come at the end of this unprecedented international engagement in afghanistan is would not be the best of days but the worst of days. you would be accused of being cynical, too dark, too gloomy. afghans are reeling from what is happening. 0f gloomy. afghans are reeling from what is happening. of course it is those, i still get messages and i'm only one person, i'm sure there's countless people receiving messages in britain and around the world help me, help me, i'm trapped. my boss was stopped at the airport, the taliban will let me leave. i'm so scared for my life. but tens of millions of afghans on september the 1st, which will work but not marked ist, which will work but not marked the first day without the us presence will get up and live the life they have been living in what is one of the poorest countries in the world. a country which is still reeling from a drought, a country where people still find it hard to get enough food to eat. and their lives will not have changed a jot but they will hope against hope that
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the international community and he promises that are also made in london that the world will not take his eye off afghanistan and that the humanitarian aid will still keep coming no matter who is in power. those are what they cling onto in these final hours.— very much. you're watching bbc news. it's 19 past five. it's 19 past five. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's chethan. the us open is under way in new york. six british players are in first round action today, including the british number one dan evans, who's reached the third round at flushing meadows on three occasions. he's taking on thiago monteiro the world number 93. this is court ten, which is packed with brits today as you can see. in nine previous attempts,
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heather watson is yet to make it make it into the second round. she's facing slovenia's kaja juvan who reached ten of us got some work to do. packed with british players nine previous plays. heather watsonjust to make it into the second round. just to make it into the second round. the women's british number one jo konta faces kristinia mldenovic and cam norrie's up against the exciting spanish teenager carlos alcaraz. 0n court 15, harriet dart takes on france's caroline garcia. the 2012 champion andy murray faces a tough opening match against the third seed stefanos tsitsipas. murray's unseeded at the tournament, with injury concerns forcing him to pull out of the singles at the tokyo 0lympics. 0n the first day of equestrian action in tokyo, lee pearson has won his 14th paralympic title as great britain won eight medals on day six. three of them were gold, with success on the track and in archery, too. rounding up the action,
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here's ben croucher. in para—dressage it is less about horse power, more horse poise and elegance. few command such artistry as lee pearson. gold in the freestyle competition was his third in tokyo, the 14th in his illustrious career. 0n breezer, a horse bred from birth, few will have been as sweet. team gb trotted off with bronze and silver too in the shape of natasha baker and georgia wilson. 0n the track, it is raw power in wheels. andrew small weighed less than a kilogram when he was born, but has grown into a paralympic heavyweight. a lightning start to get him first in that race... ..any extra momentum from the family cheering back in the uk. my family are my biggest supporters. they see a lot of ups and downs and there have been a
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lot of long, hard training sessions in a cold, dark garage at night, but the combination of that is it. double paralympic champion jonnie peacock couldn't make it three in tokyo. he was edged out into bronze in his final, but vowed to win next time. an event where jessica stretton's crown was ended by her team—mate, phoebe paterson pine. her target is always gold in archery and her precision won her victory by a single point in the final. louise sugden represented team gb in beijing, rio and london, and these days it is more... her lift is 131 kilograms and her first paralympic bronze. the sun newspaper has paid damages to england cricketer ben stokes and his mother after the newspaper published a story that detailed a family tragedy. deborah stokes took legal
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action over the september 2019 front—page article, saying it exposed private information that was not in the public interest. the sun initially defended the story, but has now apologised to the family for causing "great distress". that is all your support for now. —— sport. let's return now to afghanistan and a number of international meetings have been convened, to try and agree a joint approach to dealing with the taliban. foreign secretary dominic raab has been meeting his counterparts from the g7 nations, nato, qatar and turkey, emphasising the importance of working together on safe passage and exit arrangements for eligible afghans remaining in the country. later today the five permanent members of the un security council will be getting together. i'm joined now by sir mark lyall grant, who's a former uk ambassador to the un, and former uk national security adviser. thank you forjoining us. the government here saying they are
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sceptical of promises made by the taliban. to what extent can they afford to trust them? i taliban. to what extent can they afford to trust them?— taliban. to what extent can they afford to trust them? i don't think one can trust _ afford to trust them? i don't think one can trust what _ afford to trust them? i don't think one can trust what the _ afford to trust them? i don't thinkj one can trust what the taliban has said. but having made that point, it is worth noting that 120,000 people have been evacuated in the last two weeks and not a single one would've been safely evacuated had it not been safely evacuated had it not been for the taliban allowing that to happen and indeed in some cases facilitating it to happen. so they have kept their word in not attacking foreign forces. and they have kept their word in allowing foreigners and those who work for foreigners and those who work for foreign governments to leave the country. so that's a relatively good start. but of course one cannot entirely trust what they say and we have to wait and see what they will do. if have to wait and see what they will do. ., , do. if then the intention is get more people _ do. if then the intention is get more people out _ do. if then the intention is get more people out of— do. if then the intention is get l more people out of afghanistan do. if then the intention is get - more people out of afghanistan where they are eligible, who are the key nations here who are likely to bring some influence or pressure to bear on the taliban?—
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on the taliban? there are some countries that _ on the taliban? there are some countries that have _ on the taliban? there are some countries that have an - on the taliban? there are some countries that have an influence with the taliban. the three countries that recognise the first taliban government back in the 19905, taliban government back in the 1990s, pakistan, one of the key neighbours obviously. saudi arabia the next saudi arabia and the uae. turkey who been operating at the airport and have some links with the taliban. qatar who hosted the political office of the taliban over the last few years and also china and to some degree russia and iran. so we are talking here of the neighbouring countries and some of the islamic countries that have had traditional links with the taliban. and if britain, america and the west want to influence events on the ground, it's very difficult and virtually impossible for them to do so directly and they will need to do so directly and they will need to do so vicariously through these other countries that do have direct links with the taliban. how then will the un security council play a part? the
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un security council play a part? the un security council of course hasn't played much of a part of the last two weeks. the last time they issued any statement was on the 3rd of august which condemned this growing violence in the country. since then it's been completely overtaken by events. but i think the permanent members of the security council, the so—called p5 of russia, china, the united states, france and the uk are meeting later today as you mentioned. and they do have at least a degree of overlapping interests in afghanistan. and that is on the counterterrorism agenda. because all of those countries which normally have very different objectives and look at afghanistan and a very different way, none of them want afghanistan to be a crucible for terrorism externally. all have reasons to fair if the taliban allawi says, al-qaeda and other extremist groups to operate in afghanistan. back is a basis for a
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degree of understanding between the five countries. to degree of understanding between the five countries.— five countries. to what extent is money or _ five countries. to what extent is money or finance, _ five countries. to what extent is money or finance, loans - five countries. to what extent is money or finance, loans going l five countries. to what extent is| money or finance, loans going to five countries. to what extent is - money or finance, loans going to be money orfinance, loans going to be critical in dealing with the taliban? , ., ,., taliban? there will be a potent element. taliban? there will be a potent element as— taliban? there will be a potent element. as an _ taliban? there will be a potent element. as an economic- taliban? there will be a potent element. as an economic crisis taliban? there will be a potent i element. as an economic crisis in the country clearly as a result of what is happen. there's also a humanitarian crisis. the taliban want to be able to demonstrate that they can run a government and run it more effectively than they did 20 years ago. and to do that they will need external assistance. at the moment the existing government, still the legitimate government in many peoples eyes have money overseas particularly in the united states. and that money has been frozen. there is a deal to be done if they want that money released in support of their own efforts of governance in kabul. also, afghanistan is one of the poorest countries in the world and it's something like 60%, 70% of its gdp
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is an overseas aid. if they don't get any future aid and that means mainly from the west and the international institutions then the country will degenerate very fast and the taliban will find themselves under domestic pressure. harper and the taliban will find themselves under domestic pressure. how likely is the international _ under domestic pressure. how likely is the international community, - is the international community, particularly the un security council, international monetary fund going to be in insisting on good governance and better human rights if they want that cash? i governance and better human rights if they want that cash?— if they want that cash? i think in the first instance _ if they want that cash? i think in the first instance i _ if they want that cash? i think in the first instance i think- if they want that cash? i think in the first instance i think that - the first instance i think that these countries and institutions will want an assurance on the taliban. firstly that they will allow those that are still in the country that want to leave to be able to leave in safety. then they will want assurances about the counterterrorism agenda that they won't allow isis or al-qaeda to operate freely in the country. and thirdly, they will want to try and establish some elements of governance. but it's the third one that becomes more difficult because i would expect the neighbours,
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russia, china having a very similar approach on the first two as us but on the third those countries really don't have a great interest in democracy, human rights, women's rights or participation in the workforce. i think will be more difficult to get conditions based on the human rights aspects that it will on the other two.— the human rights aspects that it will on the other two. for your time. there's a warning of life—threatening flooding in the southern united states — as hurricane ida moves from louisiana into mississippi. the storm brought winds of 150 miles an hour when it made landfall yesterday, ripping roofs from buildings and killing a man whose house was hit by a falling tree. these are the latest pictures in new orleans of the debris and damage brought by the hurricane. there are reports that flash flooding has trapped residents in their homes there, where defences were strengthened following hurricane katrina sixteen years ago. president biden has declared a major disaster in louisiana — releasing extra resources for rescue
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and recovery efforts. nada tawfik reports from new orleans. this is the destructive power of ida. oh, my gosh! easily lifting the roof clear off this hospital in cut—off louisiana. these coastal areas have been the hardest hit so far. besides ferocious winds, there have been tidal surges as high as 16 feet, and flash flooding. this fire station in delacroix, louisiana, posted footage before and after the storm, as water rushed in. 0fficials warned some of the most affected parts may be uninhabitable for weeks. in comparison, much of new orleans is protected by the levees and flood walls of a newly built hurricane defence system. that is being put to the test now. in the iconic french quarter, debris such as this roof and fallen tree branches litter the streets. and at nightfall, power went out across the entire city. just as new orleans was plunged into darkness, hurricane ida

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