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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 30, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the bbc is told ten people from one family including six children were killed in a us drone attack. the us says the target was an islamic state suicide bomber. rockets have been fired towards kabul international airport as the us evacuation draws to a close. i am in kabul where _ us evacuation draws to a close. i am in kabul where you _ us evacuation draws to a close. i am in kabul where you may _ us evacuation draws to a close. i —n in kabul where you may hear us warplanes are in the sky as the hours are counted before a 20 year us military engagement in afghanistan ends.- us military engagement in afghanistan ends. us military engagement in afuhanistan ends. ~ ., afghanistan ends. also we are live in washington _ afghanistan ends. also we are live in washington to _ afghanistan ends. also we are live in washington to speak _ afghanistan ends. also we are live in washington to speak to - afghanistan ends. also we are live l in washington to speak to pakistan's ambassador to the united states about the situation in the country.
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i about the situation in the country. i billion people without power as hurricane ida turns into louisiana. 16 years to the day after hurricane katrina devastated new orleans. american forces are making their final preparations to pull out of afghanistan but in their last hours there are not passing without violence. directed at the withdrawing us military. security alerts have been issued and there appears to have been a missile attack launched towards kabul airport. it seems the projectiles were launched from this vehicle using industrial tubing to direct them. the vehicle was left burnt out. it is not clear who fired them for what they were trying to achieve. so far no details of any
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casualties and there are reports a us missile defence system intercepted the rockets. that comes a day after the us launched a drone strike on suspected militants planning a suicide bombing near the airport. howeverthe planning a suicide bombing near the airport. however the bbc has visited the site of that drone attack and spoken to the family who lived in the compound. they say they have no connection with islamic state militants and now attack was being planned. they also told us some of those killed had previously worked with international forces and that there were six children among the ten victims. all this happens as the last few american evacuation flights are preparing to take off from kabul�*s airport. it is clear not everyone who wants to leave have been able to. the taliban say there will be no danger but many don't believe that for their lives. 0n the line now with us from kabul is a man who says six of his cousins
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were killed in that drone strike. i want to ask you what happened. we lost want to ask you what happened. - lost about ten members of our family. i have a list here in my hand of the dead. seven were children. the head of ourfamily, he was a0 years old and he was an engineer. an officer of an army. another was
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19 and a student. seven others, i9 and a student. seven others, four, five, two, 12 years old. they were all children. they were killed in this shameful attack in kabul. we are 'ust in this shameful attack in kabul. we are just looking at some of the pictures of the children. can you tell us if you know about the moments that drone strike happened? what actually happened?— what actually happened? actually the head of the family, _ what actually happened? actually the head of the family, he _ what actually happened? actually the head of the family, he went _ what actually happened? actually the head of the family, he went to - what actually happened? actually the head of the family, he went to work l head of the family, he went to work and came back home. my cousin has four brothers, they all live together in one house. all the children gathered around the car and
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they want to go out with their father, their cousins but in the time he arrived from work, he wanted to go out with the children and this attack happened. it killed all of them. ~ , ., ~' attack happened. it killed all of them. ~ , ., ~ , them. why do you think this particular— them. why do you think this particular house _ them. why do you think this particular house was - them. why do you think this i particular house was targeted? them. why do you think this - particular house was targeted? the americans say they were looking for members of is who wanted another attack. ., , ., ., ., attack. how is an engineer who works for two decades _ attack. how is an engineer who works for two decades for _ attack. how is an engineer who works for two decades for poor _ attack. how is an engineer who works for two decades for poor people, -
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attack. how is an engineer who works for two decades for poor people, howj for two decades for poor people, how can he be a part of the suicide attack? it is not possible. i have a lot of documents, if you want i can submitted to you. i have a phone in my pocket, everyone has called me, how it is possible? it is wrong. it was a brutal attack. it was wrong information.— was a brutal attack. it was wrong information. are you worried now that there may — information. are you worried now that there may be _ information. are you worried now that there may be more - information. are you worried now that there may be more attacks l information. are you worried now. that there may be more attacks like this in kabul? that the american forces are leaving and there is now a different war in the country? yes. it is possible- _ a different war in the country? yes. it is possible. if— a different war in the country? yes. it is possible. if they _ a different war in the country? yes. it is possible. if they do _ a different war in the country? jazz it is possible. if they do not pay attention to people, there will be more tax. why it is not responsible
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for civilian people? all people killed in this attack were civilians. they were children. civilians were killed. these are not army. we lived in this area about 25 years. you can ask people. what we lived in this area about 25 years. you can ask people. what is our years. you can ask people. what is your family — years. you can ask people. what is your family feeling _ years. you can ask people. what is your family feeling today _ years. you can ask people. what is your family feeling today after - years. you can ask people. what is your family feeling today after this | your family feeling today after this attack? you have lost ten members of your family. attack? you have lost ten members of yourfamily. we attack? you have lost ten members of our famil . ~ . attack? you have lost ten members of yourfamily— your family. we see hell in our lives. your family. we see hell in our lives- we _ your family. we see hell in our lives. we gather _ your family. we see hell in our lives. we gather for _ your family. we see hell in our lives. we gather for our - your family. we see hell in our i lives. we gather for our members your family. we see hell in our - lives. we gather for our members who have passed away. how is it possible? i have passed away. how is it possible?—
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have passed away. how is it ossible? ., , ~ ., possible? i am sorry. what message do ou possible? i am sorry. what message do you have — possible? i am sorry. what message do you have for _ possible? i am sorry. what message do you have for the _ possible? i am sorry. what message do you have for the international- do you have for the international community?— community? why they killed our famil , community? why they killed our family. our— community? why they killed our family, our children, _ community? why they killed our family, our children, seven - family, our children, seven children? they were all burned out. he sobs. iam very i am very sorry. thank you very much for sharing your story. a devastatingly tragic situation in kabul. speaking to one member of a family who says ten members of their family who says ten members of their family including six or seven children were killed.-
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family including six or seven children were killed. what more is there to say? _ children were killed. what more is there to say? who _ children were killed. what more is there to say? who needs - children were killed. what more is there to say? who needs a - children were killed. what more is l there to say? who needs a reminder how war is so cruel, so unfair and so unjust. here is a citizen of afghanistan and you begin by asking him about what has happened. and he lists by age, by what they were doing the ten members of his family, the seven children who perished in an american drone strike. if anyone needed a reminder that, and no reminder is needed, that in these last 20 years of war, how afghan civilians have paid such a profoundly heavy price and notjust at the hands of the us and other nato armies but also at the hands of the taliban, anyone with a gun. none of them can say, i was an angel in
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this war. to have it happening now in these last hours of the us—led military engagement in afghanistan and as i am speaking to you, there is a constant rumble of aircraft overhead. the american warplanes in the sky circling over us, providing cover. this is the beginning of the end. this is of them securing the last flight out which will include the last of the us forces, any of the last of the us forces, any of the diplomats or other personnel here in afghanistan. who could have expected when this all started 20 years ago, afghans would have hoped that the end of the nato military engagement would be the best of days. instead they are the worst of days. instead they are the worst of days. and getting darker by the hour. ., . ~' days. and getting darker by the hour. ., ., ,, ., , ., hour. you talk of the beginning of the end. hour. you talk of the beginning of the end- i — hour. you talk of the beginning of the end. i suppose _ hour. you talk of the beginning of the end. i suppose that _ hour. you talk of the beginning of the end. i suppose that is - hour. you talk of the beginning of the end. i suppose that is a - hour. you talk of the beginning of the end. i suppose that is a focus| the end. i suppose that is a focus on the international community's
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engagement at this point in afghanistan but for the afghans, just listening to ramin, this could be the start of a different war for them and god knows, they have had a0 years orbit. fine them and god knows, they have had 40 ears orbit. �* . them and god knows, they have had 40 ears orbit. �* , years orbit. one august 31 it will mark the end — years orbit. one august 31 it will mark the end of _ years orbit. one august 31 it will mark the end of what _ years orbit. one august 31 it will mark the end of what some - years orbit. one august 31 it will mark the end of what some wellj mark the end of what some well described the end of the us—led military engagement in afghanistan. the taliban will describe it as the end of foreign occupation. let's remember this is a country of 38 million people and you have been emphasising that in your coverage. they will wake up and wait to see what is this new chapter. with every chapter of this a0 year war, afghans dared to hope the next chapter would be better than the last. i can say that of all the chapters i have witnessed over the last three decades, this is the most uncertain yet. the taliban are promising to
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rule for afghans, yet. the taliban are promising to rule forafghans, promising yet. the taliban are promising to rule for afghans, promising to give afghans the best education system in the world, to meet all their needs. there is a huge challenge to move from an insurgency to governing again. the world will be watching but watching most closely of all is the afghans, hoping they will have a life they can call their own in a country they still feel a sense of belonging to. country they still feel a sense of belonging to-— country they still feel a sense of belonauinto. , ,, ., , , belonging to. despite all the misery we have seen _ belonging to. despite all the misery we have seen in _ belonging to. despite all the misery we have seen in the _ belonging to. despite all the misery we have seen in the last _ belonging to. despite all the misery we have seen in the last few- belonging to. despite all the miseryj we have seen in the last few weeks, is there a sense of some kind of hope or is there more of a unpredictability, uncertainty about what next? it unpredictability, uncertainty about what next? . . unpredictability, uncertainty about what next? , , ., , ., unpredictability, uncertainty about what next? , , ., ., ,, what next? it depends who you talk to. this is what next? it depends who you talk to- this is a — what next? it depends who you talk to. this is a very _ what next? it depends who you talk to. this is a very divided _ what next? it depends who you talk to. this is a very divided country, i to. this is a very divided country, a torn country, a wounded country. there are those members of the taliban who support the taliban, are hailing this new chapter saying it was time to end the abuses of the
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foreign troops, time to end this occupation. it is very hard in a country of this size and this geography, this kind of political situation at the present to really have an accurate idea of what afghans across this vast country are thinking. they are hoping for peace, they are hoping for stability and it is a wait and see. afghans tend to say that they hold onto hope because it is the last thing they lose, but i had to say for the thousands who left, some of the best and brightest in this generation who were educated, trained and prepared during this window, the space provided by 20 years of international engagement, who now who have notjust left their country, they have lost their country. they have lost everything about their dreams, hopes, everything they built up in the last 20 years and it will be so painful for such a long time to come. thank ou so for such a long time to come. thank you so much — for such a long time to come. thank you so much for— for such a long time to come. thank you so much for that _ for such a long time to come. thank you so much for that analysis -
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for such a long time to come. thank you so much for that analysis and i you so much for that analysis and for your more than three decades of work and commitment to afghanistan. i'm joined now from washington by asad majeed khan. pakistan's ambassador to the united states. thank you very much forjoining us. we are speaking about some of the tragic events of the last week in kabul and across the country, but there is an exodus that is taking place and millions of afghans are trying to leave the country. what will pakistan do now to assist as this humanitarian crisis unfolds? thank you for having me. yes, i think our position all along has been that we should encourage and support all afghan parties to come to a common understanding, because getting to a common understanding and their ability to form an inclusive government would avoid
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such an exodus but at the same time pakistan has been providing every support that it could to facilitate the evacuation of all those wanting to leave afghanistan. we have worked with almost 2a countries in facilitating the evacuation of their nationals and we continue to stay engaged. as of today almost over 9000 people have actually transited through pakistan and we are still engaged with the international community to facilitate those evacuations.— community to facilitate those evacuations. �* ., , ., evacuations. but what is your actual strate: evacuations. but what is your actual strategy and — evacuations. but what is your actual strategy and policy _ evacuations. but what is your actual strategy and policy vis-a-vis - strategy and policy vis—a—vis afghanistan when we talk about the humanitarian side? is it and we are
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hearing that pakistan is saying we cannot have a flood of people arriving in pakistan, of course you host 3 million afghans already but is the policy we will shut the borders? ~ ., ., , borders? well, we have always maintained _ borders? well, we have always maintained pakistan _ borders? well, we have always maintained pakistan is - borders? well, we have always maintained pakistan is home . borders? well, we have always| maintained pakistan is home to borders? well, we have always - maintained pakistan is home to over 3 million afghan refugees already and therefore it is beyond our capacity to host any more refugees. but more importantly, it is notjust about pakistan hosting refugees. because if conditions are not conducive in afghanistan and if it falls apart and there is a civil war, we are going to see a flood of refugees notjust in pakistan but across the region and beyond. i think that is what demands a more concerted effort by the
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international community. so far as pakistan is concerned, as i said, we are helping all those who wish to evacuate but when it comes to the acceptance of refugees, i'm afraid pakistan is already overburdened and we would like other members of the international community to share the burden. but again, i think the best way of helping the situation in afghanistan is to avert the prospects of a civil war and the best way to do that... prospects of a civil war and the best way to do that. . .- prospects of a civil war and the best way to do that... what is the best way to do that... what is the best way to do that... what is the best way to _ best way to do that... what is the best way to do — best way to do that... what is the best way to do that, _ best way to do that... what is the | best way to do that, ambassador? your national security adviser worn to a british paper yesterday that if khalistan is forgotten again, we will see the same outcomes as the 90s. what does this mean and is pakistan accepting or legitimising
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the taliban? it is pakistan accepting or legitimising the taliban?_ the taliban? it is not really a question _ the taliban? it is not really a question of— the taliban? it is not really a question of legitimising - the taliban? it is not really a question of legitimising or. the taliban? it is not really a - question of legitimising or trusting the taliban. what is really important is the common interests. for now, right now what the taliban would want to see is peace throughout kabul and afghanistan. they would not want to see things completely, but. i am sure they are as much interested in avoiding a humanitarian catastrophe as those in the region do. and that is true for all parties. afghanistan is unfortunately one country and afghans are one people who have suffered so much for almost a0 years and this is really the time and opportunity for the international community to come together. we owe this to the people of afghanistan. will you hold the taliban
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accountable if there are human rights violations and atrocities? brute rights violations and atrocities? we are rights violations and atrocities? - are clearly monitoring and following developments in afghanistan and i think this is where the international media has a very important role to play in terms of helping international communities separate facts from fiction, because there is a lot that is coming out which may not be true. we're also hearing from ground that things are normal. we are seeing no exodus of afghan refugees on the border with afghanistan. we are seeing the restoration of commercial traffic. we are also hearing the situation is if not entirely normal, it is close to normal in all the major cities of afghanistan. brute to normal in all the ma'or cities of afghanistan.* to normal in all the ma'or cities of whammfi to normal in all the ma'or cities of afghanistan. we are getting those re orts afghanistan. we are getting those reports that _ afghanistan. we are getting those reports that there _ afghanistan. we are getting those reports that there is _ afghanistan. we are getting those reports that there is not _
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afghanistan. we are getting those reports that there is not the - afghanistan. we are getting those reports that there is not the level| reports that there is not the level of human rights violations that people expected, that there are incidents. we have spoken to people who said the taliban are going house to house and intimidating people and there have been revenge attacks in certain parts that we are trying to verify and i have been speaking regularly to the taliban who have said our policy is no revenge attacks. and serious analysts have come onto this programme and talked about the pakistani military�*s influence over the taliban and that is no longer an open secret. will you be talking to them all directly and putting pressure on them when need be? because in many ways the international community and leaders i have spoken to say they expect that from pakistan.— i have spoken to say they expect
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that from pakistan. again, i think the events _ that from pakistan. again, i think the events of _ that from pakistan. again, i think the events of the _ that from pakistan. again, i think the events of the past _ that from pakistan. again, i think the events of the past few - that from pakistan. again, i think the events of the past few weeks | the events of the past few weeks would make the assertion that we have been hearing for years now of our linkages with the taliban as i would say completely audacious and unfounded, because we can say that successive afghan governments have used unfortunately and are detractors in the region to malign pakistan and create those linkages. we do have relationships with the taliban and you can see all that today also. pakistan, no matter what the political orientation of those living in afghanistan is, for many, pakistan is still the destination of choice. 0urfate and destiny �*s have beenjoined and choice. 0urfate and destiny �*s have been joined and that is what motivates us to work even harder to
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secure peace in afghanistan. we have suffered. 80,000 lives after afghanistan. pakistan is one country and we will suffer more if this conflict continues. things are more complicated today than they were before. ~ ,,., , ., complicated today than they were before. �* , ., ., complicated today than they were before. , ., ., , , before. absolutely no one is denying that pakistan — before. absolutely no one is denying that pakistan has _ before. absolutely no one is denying that pakistan has suffered _ before. absolutely no one is denying that pakistan has suffered from - that pakistan has suffered from terrorism and terrorist attacks on civilians have been killed in pakistan, and you yourself, your government has a problem with dealing with extremism in the country. however, the pakistani security establishment has also come out and admitted their influence and control over the taliban. the interior minister of pakistan said, we treat the taliban and their families in our hospitals and we always have done so. the former president of the country and the
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army chief said, we use them as part of our proxy wars. those sorts of things have come from pakistani officials themselves but going forward, the question is, the kind of influence and perhaps control that you have over the taliban, you have kept an embassy there, you have evacuated your stuff. do you intend on putting pressure on them when need be? ~ . ., , ., ., need be? well, clearly we are not the only one _ need be? well, clearly we are not the only one country _ need be? well, clearly we are not the only one country that - need be? well, clearly we are not the only one country that has - the only one country that has embassies in kabul. there are a number of other important countries that have maintained embassies and i think as we speak, even the united states and britain is also closely coordinating and working with the taliban on the ground in terms of managing the situation. the united states has been in a form of conversation with the taliban for several years now, so it is really
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one way of looking at it because to have a relationship is one thing but to be, to control and the fore is something completely baseless. it is always something i have said, we do not control the taliban and our leveraged and influence has gone down. this is not the time to point fingers. i think we will have an international community, particularly here in the united states, people will have a lot of time to reflect and introspect and dustup all the reports that came out over the years in pointing out the corruption inefficiencies and deficiencies in afghanistan. now is the time for us to join hands and pull our resources to carry out a
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clear and accurate assessment of the situation on the ground. what we are seeing so far is that the taliban have at least so far demonstrated a clear desire and sensitivity to international communities concerned, and our national security committee, you were talking about past statements. i think it is time for you to look at what we are seeing today and our national security committee, which is headed by the prime minister and which includes the representatives of the armed forces, has very clearly laid out our expectations from the taliban which is to respect human rights, to not let the territory be used against any country. for all parties to come to a common understanding. unfortunately, i ambassador,
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to come to a common understanding. unfortunately, iambassador, i to come to a common understanding. unfortunately, i ambassador, i am told i have 15 seconds left but i have enjoyed talking to you. thank you forjoining us here. we will be backin you forjoining us here. we will be back in the next few minutes.
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the storm force winds of 150 miles an hour when it made landfall yesterday. ripping roofs from buildings and killing a man whose house was hit by a falling tree. there are reports that flash flooding has trapped residents in homes around new orleans where defences were strengthened after hurricane katrina 16 years ago. president biden has declared a major disaster in louisiana, releasing extra resources for rescue and recovery efforts there. this is the destructive power of ida. easily lifting the roof clear off this hospital in cut—off louisiana. these coastal areas have been the hardest hit so far. besides ferocious winds, there have been tidal surges as high as 16 feet, and flash flooding. this fire station in delacroix, louisiana, posted footage before and after the storm, as water rushed in.
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0fficials warned some of the most affected parts may be uninhabitable for weeks. in comparison, much of new orleans is protected by the levees and flood walls of a newly built hurricane defence system. that is being put to the test now. in the iconic french quarter, debris such as this roof and fallen tree branches litter the streets. and at nightfall, power went out across the entire city. just as new orleans was plunged into darkness, hurricane ida was downgraded to a category three hurricane, tracking northwest of new orleans with winds at 115mph. in washington, president biden received a briefing on ida at the federal emergency management agency, or fema. he made an appeal to people in the region. i want to emphasise again this is going to be a devastating, a devastating hurricane, a life—threatening storm. so please, all you folks in mississippi and louisiana,
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and god knows, maybe even further east, take precautions. listen, take it seriously. really very seriously. fema is sending 2000 emergency workers to assist local authorities. for now, though, residents are on their own for the duration of the storm. nada tawfik, bbc news, new orleans. the azores, switzerland, and canada are among seven destinations on the government's green travel list today. denmark, finland, liechtenstein and lithuania also move to the list which means travellers arriving in the uk won't have to quarantine. but thailand and montenegro are being added to the red travel list, meaning arrivals must enter a quarantine hotel. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has tested negative for covid 19 after being identified as close contact to someone with the virus.
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she had gone in to isolation yesterday but the negative pcr test means she no longer needs to isolate as she's double jabbed. an estimated eight—million—people in england can't get specialist mental health support, because they are not considered ill enough to qualify, according to new figures from nhs providers. the department of health says it has continued to provide support throughout the pandemic, but charities say more people than ever struggled with their mental health during lockdown. regulators in china have imposed restrictions on online video gaming. they are stopping anyone over 18 from restrictions on online video gaming. they are stopping anyone over 18 from playing restrictions on online video gaming. they are stopping anyone over 18 from playing more restrictions on online video gaming. they are stopping anyone over 18 from playing more than restrictions on online video gaming. they are stopping anyone over 18 from playing more than three restrictions on online video gaming. they are stopping anyone over 18 from playing more than three hours per week. from playing more than three hours perweek. under18 from playing more than three hours per week. under 18 have been told they will only be allowed to access they will only be allowed to access the games between atm and nine. the authorities in beijing say they want to protect the physical and mental health of young people. whether time now. let's get a look at the latest
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weather forecast.

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