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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 29, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. more explosionsin afghanistan, as the us carries out another air strike, this time in kabul. officials say an "imminent isis—k threat" has been stopped. with the us withdrawal due to conclude on tuesday, time is running out for afghans still desperate to leave. flights are almost over. what do you want to do now? what about us? we are working with them, we support them. the last planes carrying uk troops home from afghanistan, have been landing at raf brize norton. their arrival marks the end of britain's 20—year military campaign in the country. hurricane ida makes landfall on the louisiana coast with wind speeds of up to 150 miles per hour.
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thousands of people left their homes ahead of its arrival. this is going to be a devastating hurricane, a life—threatening storm. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. us defence officials say they've carried out an air strike on a vehicle in the afghan capital to prevent another bomb attack by the islamic state group. a spokesman said the target was a car bomb that had posed an imminent threat to kabul�*s international airport. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet reports.
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a house on fire in a fast—burning crisis, said to be a rocket attack streets away from kabul airport. it may have been the target. the us says it unleashed a drone strike, too — hitting a vehicle of suicide bombers heading to the airport. and next to the airfield, gunfire. this a likely salvo from taliban guards struggling to control the crowds. today, military flights are still taking off but britain's airlift has ended. not long now before america packs up, too. in a fleeting twilight, afghans hold fast to documents, to hope. my life is in danger injalalabad. but the flights are almost over. what are you going to do now? what about us? we work with them. we support them.
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i'm a cia agent. i have documents. this man tells us he worked for us intelligence. some people, like this man, received an e—mail saying going to the gate. other people say they don't have access to e—mails. they hear the news that the military flights are all but over. but even in these last few hours, they still keep trying. on the basis of what they have heard. the new face of security in this city. many taliban fighters wearing the same uniform and driving the same vehicles as the afghan government forces they ousted. a new order takes shape. and on a plane out, a new life starts. this 26—year—old gave birth to a girl as she flew to britain. a baby named eve, who may now
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have a better future. it is so clear now that so many afghans did get out in this extraordinary operation, but it is equally clear that so many did not. even now, we are receiving urgent sos even now, we are receiving urgent 505 messages from musicians, university students, female politicians, the kind of afghans who feel vulnerable, who have been threatened by the taliban and at the very least now feel they cannot have the kind of future, though kind of life here that two decades of international engagement trained, educated and prepared them for. many say the taliban are stopping them from leaving. taliban officials say young women will be allowed to study at afghanistan's universities in the future, but only if they're taught separately from male students. addressing an all—male gathering,
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the newly appointed minister for higher education said the taliban wanted to create a curriculum in line with islamic values. some afghans have reacted with dismay, suggesting that segregated classes and the need for young women to have only elderly or female lecturers would prove impractical for many institutions. meanwhile, a taliban official has told the bbc that the militant group's supreme leader, mullah hibatullah akhundzada, is in the southern afghan city of kandahar and expected to appear in public soon. the last planes carrying uk troops home from afghanistan, have been landing at raf brize norton in south—east england with more expected over the coming hours. their departure from kabul marked the end of 20 years of a british military presence in the country, during which a57 service personnel were killed. prime minister, borisjohnson has warned the taliban that any future
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diplomatic relationship would depend on whether it allowed afghans who want to leave out of the country and whether women's rights will be respected as iain watson reports. one of the last british flights from kabul landing in the uk this morning. the prime minister said we would not have wished to leave in this way. 20 years of military involvement in afghanistan concluded with a frantic evacuation. the first uk ground forces arrived in afghanistan in 2001, in the wake of 9/11. few would have predicted that the campaign would become so protracted. a57 british service personnel lost their lives. borisjohnson said their sacrifice hadn't been in vain, but in a government—issued video, he also pledged not to abandon those left behind. if the new regime in kabul wants diplomatic recognition, or to unlock the billions that are currently frozen, they will have to ensure safe
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passage for those who wish to leave the country, to respect the rights of women and girls, to prevent afghanistan from again becoming an incubator for global terror. in a literally heroic effort, 15,000 people, the majority of them afghan citizens, have been airlifted from kabul. but hundreds more who are eligible for relocation to the uk are still in the country, and the taliban haven't yet guaranteed safe passage. some of borisjohnson�*s own mps have expressed anger and shame. this former british army officer told me refugee camps and processing centres need to be set up urgently. i'm not aware of any of these camps, of any of these processes, of any of the grander strategy that is actually required. and again it goes back to the bigger decision to withdraw, that all these things were not thought through. it's been catastrophic what has happened in afghanistan. all the more reason why the united nations need to lean into this. and i really do see britain as a permanent member of the un security council,
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to lead forward and lean into this with some sense of urgency. labour said the process of evacuation should have started sooner, and cooperation now from neighbouring countries isn't guaranteed. there are many, many people that i've been in contact with only over the last few days who are currently in hiding, who have no safe route out of afghanistan, as well as hundreds of people who have been trying to make their way to the border and get across, particularly the border with pakistan. when i spoke to officials from the pakistani government in the last couple of days, there was an element of pessimism about how much pakistan is going to be able to do. the british ambassador to afghanistan is stepping down from kabul, but operations will continue from qatar. while british troops and diplomats have now arrived home safely, many of those who helped uk forces
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are still in harm's way. president biden has honoured the 13 us troops who were among those killed in thursday's suicide attack at kabul airport. mr biden was at dover air force base in delaware where virtually all us military personnel killed in afghanistan arrive back on american soil. he also met the families of some of those who died. hurricane ida has made landfall louisiana, slamming into the us coast with winds around 150 miles an hour. president biden has warned the category four storm posed a danger to life with the prospect of immense devastation. we'll hearfrom him in a moment — first, nada tawfik reports. it's past time to prepare as the skies darken with hurricane ida's approach. all new orleans can do now is wait. the fear of what's to come has paralysed this otherwise carefree city.
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earlier, masses rushed to the airport to evacuate before it shut down, as ida grew rapidly in strength. many others took to the road. we have two kids in the car — they're both 12 months. we really wanted to evacuate for them. like, best case scenario is, like, power outages and some minor flooding. worst case, i don't even want to think of that. for those who stayed, like ella and charles with their newborn son, storm preparation has become a way of life. every year, it's on the back of your mind that a big storm could and probably will come. each year, the number of storms increases, their intensity increases. the governor of the state has warned this could be an historic hurricane. we're absolutely doing everything that we can now to get people to take those last—minute steps, but really we asked people to make sure that when they went to bed last night they were prepared to ride out the storm and that they would go
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to bed where they intended to ride out the storm. the region's new storm defences, which failed during hurricane katrina in 2005 on this exact date, will be tested like never before. even with protections in place, ida is expected to have a catastrophic impact. that was our reporter nada tawfik. she spoke to us a little while ago and brought us up to date on the situation. well, conditions are deteriorating rapidly now that ida has made landfall. the wind gusts are clocking in at about 60mph here in new orleans where the storm is headed, but this isjust a tiny preview of what is expected and this is on a day 16 years to the day that hurricane katrina devastated new orleans, a day filled with so much trauma for the residents here. this storm, though, could be one of the strongest
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to hit the united states. the mayor has already warned residents that emergency services will not be able to reach them, to stay inside and complicating all of the efforts of recovery, of course, is a surge in covid cases here. it is a dangerous mix here in louisiana. joe biden said americans should be preparing for the worst as the hurricane moves across louisiana. the storm made landfall a few hours ago and it continues to rage and ravage everything it comes in contact with. the storm is a life—threatening storm. governor edwards, an old friend, has characterised it as one of the strongest hurricanes, the strongest in louisiana history since 1850. and the devastation is lucky to be immense. we shouldn't kid ourselves. and so the most important thing i can say right now is that everyone, everyone should listen to the instructions from local and state officials just how dangerous this
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is an take it seriously. it is notjust the costs, it is notjust new worlds, it is the north as well. the rainfall is expected to be exceedingly high. and to the people of the gulf coast, i want you to know that we are praying for the best and planning and prepared for the worst. jerry dicolo, is the city editor for the times—picayune — an american newspaper published in new orleans, and has made the decision to stay. i spoke to him earlier about the latest. the storm made landfall a couple of hours _ the storm made landfall a couple of hours ago _ the storm made landfall a couple of hours ago along the coast of louisiana. it came on land as a category— louisiana. it came on land as a category four, so winds of about 150 mph _ category four, so winds of about 150 mph we _ category four, so winds of about 150 mph. we are about 50—70 miles away from where _ mph. we are about 50—70 miles away from where it— mph. we are about 50—70 miles away from where it made landfall here in downtown — from where it made landfall here in downtown new orleans, so right now,
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everyone _ downtown new orleans, so right now, everyone is _ downtown new orleans, so right now, everyone isjust bracing.— everyone is “ust bracing. obviously, ou are everyone isjust bracing. obviously, you are staying _ everyone isjust bracing. obviously, you are staying in — everyone isjust bracing. obviously, you are staying in new _ everyone isjust bracing. obviously, you are staying in new orleans? . everyone isjust bracing. obviously, l you are staying in new orleans? you have not decided to leave? into. you are staying in new orleans? you have not decided to leave?— have not decided to leave? no, our newsroom — have not decided to leave? no, our newsroom is _ have not decided to leave? no, our newsroom is in _ have not decided to leave? no, our newsroom is in our _ have not decided to leave? no, our newsroom is in our emergency - newsroom is in our emergency newsroom _ newsroom is in our emergency newsroom in a downtown hotel, so we are in _ newsroom in a downtown hotel, so we are in a _ newsroom in a downtown hotel, so we are in a safe _ newsroom in a downtown hotel, so we are in a safe place, but many, many thousands— are in a safe place, but many, many thousands of— are in a safe place, but many, many thousands of people have already evacuated the city. many, many others _ evacuated the city. many, many others are — evacuated the city. many, many others are now hunkered down, they are in— others are now hunkered down, they are in their— others are now hunkered down, they are in their homes. tens of thousands have lost power so far, so we are _ thousands have lost power so far, so we are in— thousands have lost power so far, so we are in the — thousands have lost power so far, so we are in the process ofjust waiting _ we are in the process ofjust waiting it _ we are in the process ofjust waiting it out. did we are in the process of 'ust waiting it outi we are in the process of 'ust waiting it out. did you get the feelin: waiting it out. did you get the feeling that — waiting it out. did you get the feeling that people _ waiting it out. did you get the feeling that people took - waiting it out. did you get the feeling that people took the l feeling that people took the mandatory evacuation order seriously?— mandatory evacuation order seriousl ? , , ,, . ., , seriously? yes, they did, especially in the coastal _ seriously? yes, they did, especially in the coastal parishes. _ seriously? yes, they did, especially in the coastal parishes. there - seriously? yes, they did, especially in the coastal parishes. there are l in the coastal parishes. there are always— in the coastal parishes. there are always people who stay despite the warnings _ always people who stay despite the warnings that local officials give to them, — warnings that local officials give to them, but people know that when a category— to them, but people know that when a category four storm is bearing down on them, _ category four storm is bearing down on them, that is catastrophic damage. _ on them, that is catastrophic damage, potentially16 on them, that is catastrophic damage, potentially 16 feet of storm surge _ damage, potentially 16 feet of storm surge above sea level. that is un—survivable as many of our parish
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officials _ un—survivable as many of our parish officials have — un—survivable as many of our parish officials have said recently, so people — officials have said recently, so people outside of the levy system have evacuated and then, like i said, _ have evacuated and then, like i said. tens _ have evacuated and then, like i said, tens of thousands within the levy system have evacuated as well. i levy system have evacuated as well. i presume _ levy system have evacuated as well. i presume that those floodgates closed quite early on.— i presume that those floodgates closed quite early on. yes, everyone within the levy _ closed quite early on. yes, everyone within the levy system _ closed quite early on. yes, everyone within the levy system was - within the levy system was completely closed as of early yesterday, so right now, we have the post hurricane protection system completely in place, $15,000 system that was— completely in place, $15,000 system that was prison after the flood walls — that was prison after the flood walls collapsed during hurricane katrina — walls collapsed during hurricane katrina and now we are behind that parameter — katrina and now we are behind that parameter. this katrina and now we are behind that arameter. , , �* ., ., ., parameter. this is brize norton and that is one of _ parameter. this is brize norton and that is one of the _ parameter. this is brize norton and that is one of the last _ parameter. this is brize norton and that is one of the last flights - that is one of the last flights which left cabo earlier. so brize norton in oxfordshire in england and that plane which touched down a couple of seconds ago from kabul and those arrivals that we have been seeing at this base really marking
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the end of britain's presents within afghanistan. borisjohnson also afghanistan. boris johnson also spoke afghanistan. borisjohnson also spoke earlier. he warned the taliban that if they wanted a diplomatic relationship in the future, they had to guarantee that any afghans who wanted to leave should be allowed to do so. women's rights should also be respected and just to remind you that during that campaign following 9/11 in the country, britain lost 457 9/11 in the country, britain lost a57 service personnel. so that is one of the latest flights taxiing at brize norton in the south—east of england is in the county of oxfordshire. a residential skyscraper in milan has been engulfed in fire. emergency services say the blaze is now under control but smoke can still be seen rising from many floors of the block.
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local media say that it is not yet clear whether anyone has been injured in the blaze, which is said to have spread to the entire structure within minutes. around 70 families are believed to live in the block. the headlines on bbc news: more explosions in afghanistan, as the us carries out another air strike, this time in kabul. officials say an "imminent isis—k threat" has been stopped. the last planes carrying uk troops home from afghanistan, have been landing at raf brize norton. their arrival marks the end of britain's 20—year military campaign in the country. hurricane ida has reached the coast of the us state of lousiana, bringing winds of up to 150 miles—an—hour.
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sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's mark. just be it make to be one of the peter davies of all time batlle in all messy�*s story at psg has begun. he came on to a rapturous welcome to both sets of fans from their matchett reims. hejoined both sets of fans from their matchett reims. he joined the french capital club from barcelona earlier this month after spending all of his playing days at the spanish side. mmbappe a put psg ahead in the first half before making it 2—0 after an hourjust before the arrival of the mercurial messi. it is 2—0 now with 15 minutes left on the clock. barcelona's life 15 minutes left on the clock. ba rcelona's life after 15 minutes left on the clock. barcelona's life after messi saw them beat gaddafi. memphis depay scored the winner, his goal coming
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after half—an—hour. the defending champions atletico madrid kicked off at home to villa realjust over 15 minutes ago. tottenham are top of the ingrid premier league. we are the ingrid premier league. we are the only side with a 100% winning record. they won 1— 01 sunday thanks to some's free kick. harry kane made his first premier league start of the season, so spurs lead the way on nine points going into the international break. meanwhile, manchester united beat wolves in their first game since announcing that they had reached an agreement to re—sign cristiano ronaldo. the portuguese forward was not there but the fans sang his name. ole gunnar solskjar's sign won six illegal. the -la ers solskjar's sign won six illegal. the players are _ solskjar's sign won six illegal. tie: players are excited, some solskjar's sign won six illegal. tt9: players are excited, some have played with him in the international team. we have worked with him and you see the fans, they are excited and that is what it does, he is a
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special, special player and we hope to get it sorted.— special, special player and we hope to get it sorted. sunday was another bum er to get it sorted. sunday was another bumper day — to get it sorted. sunday was another bumper day at _ to get it sorted. sunday was another bumper day at the _ to get it sorted. sunday was another bumper day at the paralympics. - to get it sorted. sunday was another bumper day at the paralympics. 63 l bumper day at the paralympics. 63 medal events on the fifth day of the competition and from the powerlifting to the athletics tracks, we saw a number of records smashed along the way. here is rachel from tokyo. great britain was mechanical craft picked up britain was mechanical craft picked up her seventh paralympic gold—medal. she went in the wheelchair racing 100 metres and before the race, she said nothing else but gold we do. she did not just get the goal, she did it in a world record time. she also goes in the 800 metres next week where she will be hoping to pick up another gold—medalfor will be hoping to pick up another gold—medal for great britain. over in the swimming, while records were also falling full stops�*s michelle alphonso marella scotty world record and a gold medal in the 100 metres restaurant. not a leader she defend her paralympic title but also picked up her paralympic title but also picked up a first gold—medal of these games for spain in the pool. great britain also made history in the wheelchair rugby before coming to tokyo, great
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britain had never won a medal at the paralympic games in wheelchair rugby but tonight they went against the usa and got a goal. two afghan athletes have also made it to the athletes' village here in tokyo. after omission from the international paralympic committee, they out of afghanistan and have arrived and will be competing in the athletics and tae kwon do on september two and third. formula 1 and maxima straffan was declared the winner of a belgian grand prix that lasted two laps behind the safety car. heavy rain prevented any competitive racing at the track, so everyone getting half points based on qualifying. first app points based on qualifying. first app and therefore cuts lewis hamilton's read.— app and therefore cuts lewis hamilton's read. , ~ :, hamilton's read. they knew that the track wasn't — hamilton's read. they knew that the track wasn't any _ hamilton's read. they knew that the track wasn't any good _ hamilton's read. they knew that the track wasn't any good and _ hamilton's read. they knew that the track wasn't any good and we - hamilton's read. they knew that the | track wasn't any good and we started to laps behind the safety car which is the minimum requirement for a race. i hope the fans get their money back today.— race. i hope the fans get their money back today. that is all the sort for money back today. that is all the
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sport for now- — sport for now. thank you, mark. let's return to our top story and the withdrawal from afghanistan. peter spiegel is us managing editor of the financial times — he reported on afghanistan as defence correspondent from 1999 to 2006. he's found the unfolding events tragic and disappointing to watch. the last 72 hours have been hard to watch. the attack on us forces, the suicide bombing on thursday killing 11 marines and special forces operative and that was a huge incident. it has been visiting to watch the last a8 hours with the ability of the us to pinpoint specific isis members in kabul with these aerial attacks and what it tells me is that there actually is, perhaps from their experience on the ground over the last 18 months, they have pretty good intelligence on what is going on within isis—k, not only being able to award the public
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12 or 2a hours in advance of both the thirsty attack and then this most recent incident, but they overseen all the individuals involved and able to target then withdrawn strikes, so what has been interesting to watch pull tragedy on the thursday is the ability to do whatjoe biden has been saying they want to do in the future which is this over the horizon capability to strike at terrorists. they seem to have either serious intelligence where they contract the radio signals and the chatter among the terrorists or human intelligence which they may have actual had afghan operatives infiltrating some of the isis—k operatives. it will be interesting to watch where out they are getting this intelligence from thatis are getting this intelligence from that is actionable in real—time. what do you make of how the airport is going to be controlled. tuesday? i know president a was posed the question of whether turkey would take over that responsibility because they have kept their embassy in kabul. how key is that airport? very key. notjust for the logistics
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of evacuation which has been going on now, but the interesting thing to watch is the taliban have been trying to trade themselves as an organisation that can govern afghanistan in a way it really did not into thousand one. it was very much an islamist movement and still is, but it did not care about the outside world and the afghan economy, did not care about what is needed to do to govern a country what we're seeing now, least from, for lack of a better word, the political wing of the taliban, they have been trying to portray themselves as responsible stakeholders, governing afghanistan, and as a result, they know they cannot run the airport. in controllers and engineers they need to run the airport, they have reached out for the turks to stick around and run the airport. they were running the airport before the collapse of kabul.— collapse of kabul. peter spiegel there of the _ collapse of kabul. peter spiegel there of the financial— collapse of kabul. peter spiegel there of the financial times. . let's have a look at some of the other stories making headlines in the uk. a man has been charged with murder and a further arrest has been made in connection with the death of a1—year—old helen anderson
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whose body was found near the a3 in guildford on monday. police say 52—year—old dane messam has been remanded in custody let's have a look at some of the other stories making the number of new coronavirus cases reported in scotland has hit another record high of more than 7000 in the last 2a hours. the latest record comes as the scottish health secretary warned the nhs was facing a "perfect storm" of pressure. a man who turned down the coronavirus vaccine has died in hospital after contracting covid—19. a0—year—old father—to—be marcus birks from staffordshire, died on friday leaving his family "shattered", his wife said. he was admitted to an intensive care unit earlier this month, and before his death urged people to get vaccinated. the influential reggae producer and performer lee "scratch" perry, has died injamaica at the age of 85. known for his work with musicians as varied as bob marley, the clash and the beastie boys, he was a pioneer of remixing and dub music, reportedly producing more than a thousand recordings over 60 years.
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here watching bbc news. the bbc has been told that the uk government is set to announce plans to gradually lift the official ban on standing in premier league and championship football grounds. it's thought a handful of clubs in england's top two divisions will be selected as "early adopters" of safe standing before the current season ends in may. our political correspondent, peter saull reports. after a year—and—a—half away from the stands, it's hard to keep your emotions in check. but doing this, standing during a premier league football match, is still officially banned. by the end of the season in may, though, it's expected that, for some fans at least, it will be legally permitted. that is as long it's in designated safe standing areas, like here at celtic park.
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these rail seats, as they are known, are built into a waist—high barrier for the person behind to lean on. they are also allowed to be used in england's lower divisions. like here at league 1 shrewsbury town. now, several premier leagues have installed their own in anticipation of a change in legislation and for many fans, it can't come soon enough. it's fantastic news, i've got a bottle of champagne at home, i've been waiting for this moment for a long, long time. i'll not open it yet, because of course, for the moment it's an intention to do it but when it's actually officially done, then that bottle will be open, as i say it has been a very long campaign. it means fans that are being treated like the fans of any other sport. and given the choice. those that want to stand can stand and those that want to sit can sit and amongst like—minded fans who want to sit down as well and are not going to have their view blocked. so we are being treated equally with rugby fans, fans that go to cricket or horse racing, all other outdoor sports, big sports, who can have that choice and until now we haven't had that
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for the last 30 years. ministers are keen to proceed with caution. there will be no return to the packed terraces of yesteryear. but it is thought a handful of clubs will soon be chosen as early adopters and, if successful, the ban on standing in the top two divisions will be fully lifted within the next few years. a formal announcement from the government could come as soon as next month. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. hello there. not sure how much sunshine we're going to see over the next coming days, but it will be dry. there will be a lot of cloud around, though, so it's going to be shades of grey as we chase the cloud across the country, and because there's a little more cloud, those temperatures perhaps down to around average for the time of year. you can see from the word go on monday, that northeasterly breeze filtering in quite a lot of cloud off the north sea, thick enough for some drizzle as well on those exposed east coasts where we'll see the coolest of the weather. in sheltered western
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areas, again, some brighter spells and highs of 20 degrees. we keep the cloud coming as we go through the night. that's going to prevent those temperatures from falling very far at all. it'll be a mild start to tuesday morning, but once again, it is going to be a rather cloudy one. always closer along that east coast, where it could stay damp and drizzly. hopefully the cloud should break a little out to the west, but not as much as we've seen in recent days, and as a result, temperatures are going to be a little more subdued.
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hello, this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak with the headlines. with the us withdrawal due to conclude on tuesday, time is running out for afghans still desperate to leave. the flights are almost over? what are you going to do now? what about us? we are working with them, we support them. the last planes carrying uk troops home from afghanistan have been landing at raf brize norton. their arrival marks the end of britain's 20—year military campaign in the country. more explosions as the us carries out another air strike, this time in kabul. officials say an "imminent isis—k threat" has been stopped.
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hurricane ida makes landfall on the louisiana coast with wind

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