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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 29, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the united states has carried out an air strike in the afghan capital, kabul. us officials say the missile targeted a suicide bomber in a vehicle who was aiming to carry out an attack on kabul airport. 20 years after being sent in, the last british troops have left afg ha nista n. the effort has been frankly truly humbling to see the hours worked, the exhaustion painted on people's faces, so we tried our best. the bodies of the 13 us military personnel killed in the kabul airport attack during the evacuation of civilians last thursday are returned home. forecasters warn a storm approaching louisiana could be more powerful
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than hurricane katrina which devastated new orleans 16 years ago. dilemma for doctors — a severe shortage of test tubes in the uk leaves gps with difficult choices about which patients get blood tests. great britain claims a historic first paralympic medal in wheelchair rugby, after storming to gold with a superb win over three—time champions the united states. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the united states have carried out an air strike in the afghan capital, kabul.
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a missile launched from a drone targeted a suicide bomber in a vehicle who was aiming to carry out an attack at kabul airport. these are the latest pictures we have from the afghan capital. speaking to the bbc�*s us partner network cbs news, a military official said "we are confident we hit the target we were aiming for." borisjohnson has vowed to use all the political, economic and diplomatic levers available to put pressure on the taliban to maintain women's rights and stop afghanistan becoming an incubator for global terror. he was speaking after the last british soldiers, diplomats and civil servants left kabul and arrived back in the uk. our political correspondent jessica parker reports. landing back in the uk, one of the last british planes to leave kabul. these troops widely praised. they helped evacuate more than 15,000 people. that as the taliban took over.
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borisjohnson says the government will engage alongside allies with the regime the uk helped topple 20 years ago, in a statement released by downing street this morning. if the new regime in kabul wants diplomatic recognition or to unlock the billions that are currently frozen, they will have to ensure safe passage for those who wish to leave the country, to respect the rights of women and girls, to prevent afghanistan from again becoming an incubator for global terror. thousands got out, british nationals and afghans who worked with the uk. but hundreds have been left behind, some say many more. i don't think there is a single person deployed forward, whether the thousand or so in kabul or the many hundreds of others drawn across from her majesty's government in the middle east or back here who could have given more in the last two and two and half weeks. the effort has been frankly truly humbling to see the hours worked,
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the exhaustion painted on people's faces. we tried our best. we have absolutely tried our best. government sources insist they are ramping up efforts to try and establish safe routes out via border countries such as pakistan. the journey ahead looks complicated. when i spoke to officials from the pakistani government in the last couple of days, there was an element of pessimism about how much pakistan is going to be able to do. they have 3 million afghan refugees already in the country. it was 2001 in the aftermath of 9/11 that british troops arrived as part of a us led mission. a57 uk personnel lost their lives. not in vain, says borisjohnson. 20 years on, a hasty withdrawal and claims that has damaged britain's standing in the world. because we got this so wrong, if when we go to another country to intervene,
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the people who work with us, the local civilians work with us, what confidence will they have that we will stand by them? 0ur words might seem quite empty now. that is a tragedy and we are going to have to work really hard in the world to restore our reputation so people will trust us and work with us in the future. disembarking at brize norton in 0xfordshire, the british ambassador to afghanistan. there is no embassy there any more. he will soon head up operations out of qatar. this is history, but not as many would have wanted it. jessica parker, bbc news. flights bringing british troops and officials out of afghanistan have been arriving back at raf brize norton today. 0ur correspondent simonjones is there and sent us this update. the british military operation in afghanistan that lasted just short of 20 years is now at an end. 0peration pitting, the operation over the last couple of weeks, a frantic operation to get british
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people and afghan allies out of the country, that too is at an end. it was seen very much here this morning at raf brize norton when a plane touched down just before 8:30am bringing back around 250 military personnel and diplomatic staff from the region. we are expecting more flights later on today from the region but it is very clear that the operation in afghanistan is at an end. it was seen pretty symbolically here on the airfield when the uk ambassador to afghanistan, sir laurie bristow, walked down the steps of the aircraft. he is in effect homeless now because the embassy in afghanistan has been shut. it is going to be relocated to qatar. he said on the tarmac that he hoped eventually the uk would be able to reopen an embassy in kabul but the timescale of that is not at all clear. he also said the past couple
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of weeks, getting people out of the country had been intense, it had been extraordinary, he paid tribute to staff from the foreign office, the border force and also the military who have been involved in that. but he also wanted to say that the people of afghanistan who have been left behind should not be forgotten. there are thought to be potentially around 1000 people who have been unable to get out who are eligible to come to the uk. 0pposition members have said they think the number could be far higher than that. so the uk says it will work in the coming weeks and months on a phase two of the operation to try and bring those who are eligible to the uk but there is a great deal of uncertainty about that. one thing that struck me seeing the the pictures from this morning is that there was no sense of celebration, there was no sense of ceremony at the end of this operation. i think the feeling here is rather sombre but although the troops are now out, ultimately there is still much work to do in the country,
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but work that will be difficult without a military presence there. tobias ellwood is a uk member of parliament and chair of the country's defence select committee. thank you very much forjoining us on a bbc news and bbc world news today. as simon was just reporting, a very sombre mood for all of those officials and soldiers returning from afghanistan, naturally, because they know there are people who have been left behind who are entitled to come. when borisjohnson talks about using the political, economic and diplomatic levers are available to the uk now, has he got many levers in reality? the uk now, has he got many levers in reali ? , , , the uk now, has he got many levers inreali ? _ , . , in reality? firstly, 'ust technology and echoed h in reality? firstly, 'ust technology and echoed the _ in reality? firstly, just technology and echoed the ambassador's - and echoed the ambassador's comments, this was an incredible uk tactical and military effort, thousands airlifted to safety in the most difficult and harrowing
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circumstances and the country can be very proud of what the armed forces have done but there is more work to be done. there is a priority to look after those who have come to this country, there needs to be a reasonable strategy which i'm still looking for one, for the at—risk afghans i wanted to depart afghanistan, longerterm afghans i wanted to depart afghanistan, longer term we need to work out how to help those people. it is imperative we get the big agencies, who, unicefand it is imperative we get the big agencies, who, unicef and world food programme into the country straightaway, because the humanitarian disaster that is likely to unfold will be massive. i humanitarian disaster that is likely to unfold will be massive.- humanitarian disaster that is likely to unfold will be massive. i spoke a little early to _ to unfold will be massive. i spoke a little early to the _ to unfold will be massive. i spoke a little early to the shadow _ to unfold will be massive. i spoke a little early to the shadow leader i to unfold will be massive. i spoke a little early to the shadow leader of| little early to the shadow leader of the house of commons he was speaking to me about, you will be aware of the criticism around those reports of thousands of e—mails sent to the foreign office for those eligible for evacuation that had been at left unread for days. she said that the contact from the foreign office had been minimal. what more do you want to see the foreign office du? do you
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accept those e—mails were sitting on unread as far as you're aware and what more does the government needed to do to use this information that has been sent to them? i will to do to use this information that has been sent to them? i will touch on some of— has been sent to them? i will touch on some of the _ has been sent to them? i will touch on some of the bigger _ has been sent to them? i will touch on some of the bigger picture - has been sent to them? i will touch| on some of the bigger picture issues which the committee needs to focus on but also there is a huge limelight on how the foreign office operated in connection with the mod. i'm afraid to say when the us steps back from the international stage, there has been an expectation that britain steps into the shoes and we were not able to do this. whitehall departments remain too silent nowadays and we no longer have the bandwidth to offer the strategic thinking and alternative solutions andindeed thinking and alternative solutions and indeed the leadership that was once a reputation. there are some very hard—working people in the cho, the department i used to work on, but they have been overwhelmed and as we reflect more widely in our place in the world, i hope we will nurture a greater appetite to step
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forward and lead coalitions with or without the us and that means looking at the whitehall constructs as to how we do business will stop you just said we no longer have the bandwidth, do you accept that work could have been done sooner to try to start getting people to leave afghanistan and that therefore more people ultimately may have been able to leave who want to? this people ultimately may have been able to leave who want to?— to leave who want to? this goes into it two macro — to leave who want to? this goes into it two macro issues, _ to leave who want to? this goes into it two macro issues, first, _ to leave who want to? this goes into it two macro issues, first, these - it two macro issues, first, these decisions were made unilaterally by the united states and have proven so operationally and strategically catastrophic with short and long—term consequences that are now unfolding. it is the absence of that special relationship, our ability to influence behind the scenes through back channels the united states that perhaps things could have been different. ., ., different. forgive me for interrupting, _ different. forgive me for interrupting, but - different. forgive me for interrupting, but the - different. forgive me for interrupting, but the uk| different. forgive me for . interrupting, but the uk has different. forgive me for _ interrupting, but the uk has known it for longer than a president and in making this a final decision that the date of the 31st of august would be the deadline for pulling out, the uk has known for longer, as has the
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rest of the world, that things were winding up, the western operation in afghanistan was winding up. what winding up, the western operation in afghanistan was winding up. what was not understood — afghanistan was winding up. what was not understood was _ afghanistan was winding up. what was not understood was the _ afghanistan was winding up. what was not understood was the speed - afghanistan was winding up. what was not understood was the speed in - not understood was the speed in which afghan soldiers themselves would recognise that they had been abandoned by the united states and indeed the international community, would rip off their uniforms, go back to the north, they did not have the top cover and that meant effectively the taliban were able to walk right across the country and thatis walk right across the country and that is exactly what has caught the international community of god. these timelines were put in place weeks, months ago. —— caught the international community off—guard. but operationally, as i suggested, the united states have big questions to answer, why they closed down baghdad airport and had to bring treats into a busy international effort to operate this evacuation operation. —— bring troops in. we operation. -- bring troops in. we are operation. —— bring troops in. we
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are broadcasting in afghanistan now, if there is anyone who helps you in the past he wanted to leave but could not, what would you say to them? i could not, what would you say to them? . , , , ., them? i am deeply sorry we have abounded that _ them? i am deeply sorry we have abounded that your _ them? i am deeply sorry we have abounded that your country - them? i am deeply sorry we have abounded that your country in - them? i am deeply sorry we have| abounded that your country in this way. we came into the country to try to make the country better and work with you and it is a very different place than what it was when the taliban was last therefore stop it was messy and difficult, the resume and government structure was perhaps inappropriate, but it was moving in the right direction and the international community has failed you. we now need to look at that regional strategy, you. we now need to look at that regionalstrategy, how you. we now need to look at that regional strategy, how can we work with the neighbouring states to develop refugee camps so that at—risk afghans can get out? and critically getting to un agencies to make sure we avoid the humanitarian disaster that is likely to unfold. you talk about government departments being overwhelmed, in the days and weeks ahead, will you
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be holding your own government to account to make sure that information that is coming in about people who wish to leave is processed in as timely a manner and is urgent a manner as possible? this will be is urgent a manner as possible? ti 3 will be something parliament will be looking out. it is not for my committee, the defence committee, to do this. it will be for my sister committee, the foreign affairs committee, and i'm sure the leader of that will be looking into this. my of that will be looking into this. my concern is not the rise of terrorist groups it will be able to occupy the vacant space that we said we pushed out. i encourage everybody to stop using this phrase that we have been there for 20 years and there has not been a terrorist attack from afghanistan during that time because that begs the argument why did we leave at all this time? —— after all this time. thank you for your thoughts today.
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0ur washington correspondent nomia iqbal has more details on that us strike which targeted a suspected suicide bomber. they say it was to eliminate the threat of isis—k. the threat was on the airport itself. i've got the statement here from the united states' central command. they describe it as a "self—defence, unmanned, over the horizon air strike," so a drone strike. and they say they're confident they successfully hit the target. they are checking to see if there were any civilian casualties. but they say that there's no indications of that at this time. we don't know if they eliminated the threat that they warned us of yesterday, where they said that isis—k could strike in the next 24—36 hours. the statement ends by saying that they are remaining vigilant for any future potential threats, which just underlines how seriously america is taking this. they have said that isis—k remains a very real threat as they wind up their evacuation mission.
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president biden and the first lady are at dover air force base in delaware attending the repatriation of the bodies of the 13 us military personnel killed in the kabul airport attack during the evacuation of civilians last thursday. president biden and the first lady, jill biden, met with the families of service members. they watched as flag—draped cases carrying 11 service members' remains were loaded into vans. the remains of two more service members will be transferred in an event not covered by media at the request of their families. the air force base houses a mortuary where virtually all troops killed overseas arrive back on american soil. more than a hundred afghan civilians were also killed in the attack in kabul.
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the headlines on bbc news: the united states has carried out an airstrike in the afghan capital, kabul. us officials say missile targeted a suicide bomber in a vehicle who was aiming to carry out an attack on kabul airport. the bodies of the 13 us military personnel killed in the kabul airport attack during the evacuation of civilians last thursday are returned home. hurricane ida has made landfall — forecasters warn it could be more powerful than hurricane katrina which devastated new orleans 16 years ago. that's continue with that story. tens of thousands of people are fleeing for safety from the us state of louisiana as a powerful hurricane has made landfall.
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the storm has been upgraded to a category four hurricane, one below the highest level, with sustained winds expected up to 150 mph. in the last few minutes it has made landfall at port fourchon just south of new orleans. forecasters are also warning against "life—threatening" storm surges as ida is likely to be stronger than hurricane katrina which caused devastation in new orleans exactly 16 years ago. i'm joined now by matthew cappucci who is a meteorologist at the washington post. a huge amount of fear surrounding the arrival of hurricane ida. tell us more about where it has made landfall. we are in the outer coast of louisiana and it is the eighth strongest storm to ever make landfall with sustained winds around 850, says per hour. we landfall with sustained winds around 850, says per hour.— 850, says per hour. we have seen a stron: 850, says per hour. we have seen a strong surge. _ 850, says per hour. we have seen a strong surge. but — 850, says per hour. we have seen a strong surge, but that _ 850, says per hour. we have seen a strong surge, but that could - 850, says per hour. we have seen a strong surge, but that could be - 850, says per hour. we have seen a strong surge, but that could be up | strong surge, but that could be up to four micro metres later on and plenty of rainfall up to 30 centimetres. it is moving north and
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west right now, it has had a significant impact in places around new orleans. that significant impact in places around new orleans-— significant impact in places around neworleans. ., ., ., ., ., new orleans. that two to four macro metres storm — new orleans. that two to four macro metres storm surge _ new orleans. that two to four macro metres storm surge combined - new orleans. that two to four macro metres storm surge combined with l metres storm surge combined with rainfall, the big question when you think back to hurricane katrina 16 years ago will be a canny strengthen things then turn protect the city? will they hold the brunt of this hurricane?— will they hold the brunt of this hurricane? , ., ., , ., ., hurricane? there is good news on two fronts, hurricane? there is good news on two fronts. first. — hurricane? there is good news on two fronts, first, there _ hurricane? there is good news on two fronts, first, there was _ hurricane? there is good news on two fronts, first, there was about - hurricane? there is good news on two fronts, first, there was about $16 - fronts, first, there was about $16 billion worth of spent on infrastructure as i'm optimistic they should hold. your piece of good news, this song has a lesser surge threat from katrina. wins are important, but size is very important, but size is very important of a storm for a storm surge because of that winter going over an area to post more towards the coast. katrina was a category five of 20 hours before it made landfall and was much bigger, so post more what it was the coast with
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a site up to about six and a half, almost seven metres, more than that, eight metres, this instalment not quite as bad in terms of size, it is a little bit more compact. the said risk a little lesser. this a little bit more compact. the said risk a little lesser.— risk a little lesser. this hurricane has been picking _ risk a little lesser. this hurricane has been picking up _ risk a little lesser. this hurricane has been picking up energy. -- i risk a little lesser. this hurricane i has been picking up energy. -- the has been picking up energy. —— the storm risk a little lesser. this is down to climate change, the fact we are seeing powerful hurricane is? partially climate change and tells of how powerful it was but how quickly it became powerful too. this rapidly intensified, but it tripled the rate of rapid intensification meaning rapid intense occasion occurs when a storm increases that five miles per hour or more injust 24 five miles per hour or more injust 2a hours or less. this thing tripled in 15 hours and warmer temperatures went through the roof as it moved over, wins in the upper atmosphere were weak, allowing it to really strengthen and organise. nothing was
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really holding it back and there was actually a study by meteorologist in the united states which says that once there is this rapid intensification, they become once a decade by the end of the century thanks to climate change. so really we are seeing the finished print of that time and time again in the united states, every hurricane seasonit united states, every hurricane season it seems now. you united states, every hurricane season it seems now. you have been focusin: season it seems now. you have been focusing on — season it seems now. you have been focusing on the _ season it seems now. you have been focusing on the impact _ season it seems now. you have been focusing on the impact on _ season it seems now. you have been focusing on the impact on new - focusing on the impact on new orleans for obvious reasons, but whereas, when we look where hurricane ida is heading, where else is likely to be affected?— is likely to be affected? gusting winds of 90 _ is likely to be affected? gusting winds of 90 mph _ is likely to be affected? gusting winds of 90 mph in _ is likely to be affected? gusting winds of 90 mph in other - is likely to be affected? gusting. winds of 90 mph in other places, is likely to be affected? gusting - winds of 90 mph in other places, my concern too as the heavy rainfall. we do not talk about that because the focus is on the on surge, but we are about 20, 30, a0 centimetres weather painful, even inside levees protecting of the storm surge which could be a big issue for residents.
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it is making sure people have a way to keep the water out of their homes, in an area that is already saturated under this contract all the way in and through parts of the tennessee valley and ohio valley and evenin tennessee valley and ohio valley and even in washington, dc where there was some powerful rainfall on wednesday. was some powerful rainfall on wednesday-— was some powerful rainfall on wednesda . ., ,, , was some powerful rainfall on wednesda . . ~' , . wednesday. ok, thank you very much for our wednesday. ok, thank you very much for your thoughts _ wednesday. ok, thank you very much for your thoughts on _ wednesday. ok, thank you very much for your thoughts on this. _ with me now is tanya gulliver garcia who lives in new orleans, she also works for the centre for disaster philanthropy. you are trying to ride out this storm, can i begin by asking you why you have chosen not to leave the area? ,, ,., ., you have chosen not to leave the area? ,, ., ., area? sure, so i thought about leavin: area? sure, so i thought about leaving and _ area? sure, so i thought about leaving and i'm _ area? sure, so i thought about leaving and i'm dealing - area? sure, so i thought about leaving and i'm dealing with i area? sure, so i thought about. leaving and i'm dealing with some chronic pain issues and as matthew said, the storm got big so quickly that by the time i decided i may be should get out, the traffic was so backed up there was no way i would have been able without being stuck
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in traffic. ., ., , ., , ., ., in traffic. how nervous are you now? know ou in traffic. how nervous are you now? know you are — in traffic. how nervous are you now? know you are not — in traffic. how nervous are you now? know you are not in _ in traffic. how nervous are you now? know you are not in new _ in traffic. how nervous are you now? know you are not in new orleans - in traffic. how nervous are you now? i know you are not in new orleans when hurricane katrina struck, but how worried are you about the hours ahead? . , ., ., ., ahead? valley worried, more than i thou~ht it ahead? valley worried, more than i thought it would _ ahead? valley worried, more than i thought it would be. _ ahead? valley worried, more than i thought it would be. i— ahead? valley worried, more than i thought it would be. i have - thought it would be. i have volunteered in disasters fur a number of years through other hurricanes but it is difficult when you are in your own home rather than a nice, sheltered place and i am watching a tree outside my house that i'm sure is coming down at some point tonight. that i'm sure is coming down at some point tonight-— point tonight. wow, that is obviously _ point tonight. wow, that is obviously a _ point tonight. wow, that is obviously a very _ point tonight. wow, that is obviously a very scary - point tonight. wow, that is - obviously a very scary situation and have you been able to take any measures to try and protect yourself, protect your property? as their anywhere that you can go to, obviously sometimes we see pictures of houses with basements and people go to the basement when there is a hurricane coming, i do not know if you have anything like that on your property? you have anything like that on your ro -e ? ., ,
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you have anything like that on your --roe ? ., , , you have anything like that on your ”roe ? ., , , property? no, they hurricanes you want to get — property? no, they hurricanes you want to get as _ property? no, they hurricanes you want to get as high _ property? no, they hurricanes you want to get as high as _ property? no, they hurricanes you want to get as high as possible. i want to get as high as possible. tornadoes that you want to go to the basement. the risk of flooding if you are in a basement means the water will go down, so for me, i live in a raised house, for a five feet above the ground, and even though it is one of the lowest points in the city, it was only a couple of feet of water during katrina, so the levees hold, might be trapped inside my house, i might lose my car but i should be ok inside the house without any flooding. inside the house without any floodinu. , ., ., ., inside the house without any floodinu. ., ., , ., , flooding. there is a lot of history around this _ flooding. there is a lot of history around this week _ flooding. there is a lot of history around this week and _ flooding. there is a lot of history. around this week and anniversary. what talk, you and your friends when you have been talking about this hurricane, what have you been hearing about the levees? 0bviously strengthened after katrina but are you confident they will do theirjob and protect the city at least to a much greater extent than they did 16 years ago? i much greater extent than they did 16 ears a . o? . much greater extent than they did 16 ears auo? ., ., , much greater extent than they did 16 ears ao? . ., , ., years ago? i have to believe that the walls, _
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years ago? i have to believe that the walls, that _ years ago? i have to believe that the walls, that is _ years ago? i have to believe that the walls, that is my _ years ago? i have to believe that the walls, that is my real- years ago? i have to believe that the walls, that is my real hope . years ago? i have to believe thatj the walls, that is my real hope in staying, that they will. a lot of my friends have left, including people who never leave or who have not left it since katrina, and part of that is the trauma of the day. having another storm, hurricane isaac in 2012, also came in in august the 29th come out hurricane harvey and texas was also this weekend, it is too much for people and you can feel that energy in the air over the last few days and in conversations. my landlord, who i share a house with, a duplex side by side unit, for her, it was too much to think about writing it out whilst she was here. she wanted it to just get her and her animals somewhere a bit safer and watch it from afar.— and watch it from afar. tanya, do stay safe. — and watch it from afar. tanya, do stay safe. we _ and watch it from afar. tanya, do stay safe, we wish _ and watch it from afar. tanya, do stay safe, we wish you _ and watch it from afar. tanya, do stay safe, we wish you well i and watch it from afar. tanya, do stay safe, we wish you well and l stay safe, we wish you well and thank you so much for talking to us about the situation there. tanya is
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staying put and says that she is convinced the tree outside her house is about to come down and of course we know that hurricane ida has now made landfall. you are watching bbc news. here in the uk, a shortage of test tubes means gps are having to make difficult choices about who gets blood tests, the british medical association has warned. the bma said shortages across hospitals and gp surgeries were "severe" and if the nhs did not reduce usage in the coming days, even the most clinically important tests may be at risk. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. more than 12 million blood tests are carried out in england each week but now nhs england has admitted there is a serious shortage of the test tubes used in the process. a shortage that is likely to get worse over the next month. it is down to a major supplier of the vials, becton dickinson, experiencing what it says are serious supply chain issues due to increased
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demand and transportation and border challenges. patients in england and wales have been receiving text messages like this from their gp surgeries, stating that new nhs advice means clinically urgent blood tests will continue but others could be rescheduled. the sort of testing put on hold is likely to be in areas like fertility, allergies and prediabetes. but some clinicians say the guidance is vague and it is not always easy to decide what's essential. they're calling for more information from government. there will be some patients who absolutely must have blood tests and i have got to make that decision and choice and seek understanding from patients who perhaps could wait a bit longer. but i'll tell you this much, the lack of clarity in terms of how long this might go on for, what volumes we are dealing with, what small numbers we are dealing with in terms of the tubes available, how quickly we are going to go short — all of that is unknown. the department of health and social care says it is working flat out with their supplier to make
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sure there is minimal impact on patient care. but the nhs has been warned, the issues could continue for a significant period of time. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news. let's take a look at the latest coronavirus figures across the uk. a further 33,196 people have tested positive for the virus, a further 61 people have died within 28 days of a positive test and a total 78.a% of the population have now received both doses of a coronavirus vaccine. the bbc has been told that the uk government is set to announce plans to gradually lift the official ban on standing in premier league and championship football grounds. it's thought a handful of clubs in england's top two divisions will be selected as "early adopters" of safe standing before the current season ends in may. 0ur political correspondent, peter saull reports. after a year—and—a—half away from the stands, it's hard
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to keep your emotions in check. but doing this, standing during a premier league football match, is still officially banned. by the end of the season in may, though, it's expected that, for some fans at least, it will be legally permitted. that is as long it's in designated safe standing areas, like here at celtic park. these rail seats, as they are known, are built into a waist—high barrier for the person behind to lean on. they are also allowed to be used in england's lower divisions. like here at league 1 shrewsbury town. now, several premier leagues have installed their own in anticipation of a change in legislation and for many fans, it can't come soon enough. it's fantastic news, i've got a bottle of champagne at home, i've been waiting for this moment for a long, long time. i'll not open it yet, because of course, for the moment it's an intention to do it but when it's actually officially done, then that bottle will be open, as i say it has been a very long campaign. it means fans that are being treated like the fans of any other sport.
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and given the choice. those that want to stand can stand and those that want to sit can sit and amongst like—minded fans who want to sit down as well and are not going to have their view blocked. so we are being treated equally with rugby fans, fans that go to cricket or horse racing, all other outdoor sports, big sports, who can have that choice and until now we haven't had that for the last 30 years. ministers are keen to proceed with caution. there will be no return to the packed terraces of yesteryear. but it is thought a handful of clubs will soon be chosen as early adopters and, if successful, the ban on standing in the top two divisions will be fully lifted within the next few years. a formal announcement from the government could come as soon as next month. former international olympic committee presidentjacques rogge has died at the age of 79, the organisation announced.
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