Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 24, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

9:00 pm
this is bbc news — i'm christian fraser, our top stories: the taliban says afghans are not allowed to go to the airport in kabul. with thousands still trying to leave the country — a spokesman for the group also repeated their demand for all foreign forces to be out of afghanistan by next tuesday. western leaders have been meeting to discuss the august 31st deadline — president biden says he is sticking to it. we're expecting to hear from him in the next 30 minutes. there are kinks in the global supply chain that are starting to bite. in the uk, mcdonald's hasjust run out of milkshakes. just one example. we'll be looking at the bigger picture.
9:01 pm
and one of the rock and roll greats, the rolling stones drummer charlie watts dies at the age of 80. we'll look back at an extraordinary life. hello and welcome to the programme. this time next week the airlift from agfhanistan will be over. joe biden says he is sticking to his deadline, after consulting with national security officials, despite nato allies and many fellow democrats urging him today to stay and complete the mission. the upside for the president is that the evacuation is running at some pace. about a thousand people an hour are being flown out, 21,600 have left in the last 2a hours, and afghans with special immigration visas are again being admitted. but the taleban said today afghans should not be going to the airport
9:02 pm
and foreign countries should stop "encouraging" them to leave. all of which suggests that many thousands will be left behind. from kabul our chief international correspondent lyse doucet reports and a warning her report does contains some distressing images. "stay calm," orders this taliban guard. there is no calm here. not in a crowd too big to count, too big to control. but the days are numbered now before the us pulls its soldiers from this airfield, before their last evacuation flight lifts off. panic is rising. most afghans have waited here for days including four—year—old twins usna and usnia. their father was a guard for the us military. they've got documents to prove it. it's been such a bad experience, their mother says. so bad. my children have been so scared. we are meant to leave. you can feel the fear.
9:03 pm
it's notjust the kids. wahida faizi, an afghanjournalist, believes she is not safe under taliban rule. they know i'm a journalist. if they know, i know they will kill me. one day you will come back to afghanistan? never. it's not my country. after this, it's not my country. these are the last moments for afghans who feel not only are they leaving their country, they are losing it. leaving everything behind. this is a journey like no other. the most importantjourney they are probably going to make in their lives. and it is a journey so fraught with risk and fear. wahida faizi, in her red headscarf, keeps pushing forward.
9:04 pm
on this side american soldiers glance at papers. british soldiers standing guard. doing whatever they can to contain the chaos. translation: these americans are inexperienced. _ they asked the people to come in a very short time. they made this rush of people. this is the mismanagement of the americans, and nothing else. and at a news conference today and even starker message. my message to the americans is they should evacuate all the citizens by the deadline of august to 31st. they have the resources, they have the planes and the airport and they should evacuate all the forces and contractors and those belonging to them. we will no longer allow them to evacuate afghans. in the heart of kabul behind another gate, another place of hardship and heartache. families displaced by fighting.
9:05 pm
they are also on the move, now the taliban have taken control they're boarding buses to take them back to the north. this man was injured there in a gunfight. translation: i want to go back home, lwe do not have stood here and i have. not been able to get treatment for my arm. a nation ruled by war, people pushed from their homes. afghanistan's long war turns another corner but no one knows yet where it will lead. the g7 �*virtual summit�* lasted 2 hours today. together, france, germany and the uk were pressing the us to delay the withdrawal, beyond 31 august. u nusccessfully. one of the main reasons joe biden is resisting, is down to the security sitation on the ground, which is becoming increasingly perilous. but during the discussions the 7
9:06 pm
leaders did agree to some future engagement with the taliban. it's our "moral duty" said the german chancellor to continue helping the afghan people, and so they have set out a roadmap for dealing with the group, which will establish some basic principles. first and most importantly said the british prime minister, the taliban must guarantee �*safe passage' for everyone who wants to leave the country beyond the 31st. but the number one condition we are setting as g7 is that they've got to guarantee right the way through through august the 31st and beyond a safe passage, safe passage for those who want to come out. the united states of course, has the largest presence at the hamid karzai airport, they are manning the perimeter, with just short of 6,000 troops on the ground. there are also american jets patrolling the skies, as well as the attack helicopters that escort the planes in during their final approach. the uk has more than 1,000
9:07 pm
troops at the airport, including the army's 16 air assault brigade. and there are smaller contingents from nato members including france, germany and turkey. nato says it has about 800 civilian contractors still on the ground — most of them at the airport. so at what point do you start pulling them all out. let's bring in retired army brigadier general mark kimmitt. i'm army brigadier general mark kimmitt. starting tot commander i'm starting to think of this us commander on the ground who has to somehow over the next few days continue this remarkable pace that they've set for bringing people out while at the same time shrinking its perimeter and getting the 6000 troops out of the country safely. i think the main thing that the commander is first focused on is getting as many as idus in out as safely as possible. everything else can wait for that is at once he has been given by the national command
9:08 pm
authority the opportunity to leave and shut the gates then he'll do a tactical withdrawal. but this really to a great extent is dependent upon the taliban, is that withdrawal is going to go safely. that's one of the reasons i suspect that william burns was in talking to the taliban this week is the director of the cia. ., . ~ , this week is the director of the cm. ., 4 y. ., this week is the director of the cm. ., ., ., ., cia. how quickly, you are a general, ou know cia. how quickly, you are a general, you know how— cia. how quickly, you are a general, you know how these _ cia. how quickly, you are a general, you know how these things - cia. how quickly, you are a general, you know how these things work, i you know how these things work, tactical withdrawal, how long do you need to do that and when will they start beginning the process? be start beginning the process? ea planning is start beginning the process? ej: planning is going on right now but there's no doubt about it. in terms of how quickly it takes obviously that sort of tactics techniques and procedures that i don't want to get into. but it would certainly be the case that there is not a lot to leave behind in the way of equipment. what you are really talking about is large numbers of troops and getting on aeroplanes and the aeroplanes that we have in the
9:09 pm
british army have are quite large. i think you could do the maths on that but i don't think it's going to be the diplomatic equivalent of helicopters flying to the top of the embassy. i've seen these done before, they are methodical, they should be methodical, they should be done well. and it should be done without incident. but with everything else we've seen in kabul after this point i don't think anything is a guarantee. but clearly it will be the _ anything is a guarantee. but clearly it will be the americans _ anything is a guarantee. but clearly it will be the americans last - anything is a guarantee. but clearly it will be the americans last out. i it will be the americans last out. so the other nato countries must bake their preparations. the french said today that they would start withdrawing thursday. so in 48 hours' time. there is a sort of knock on effect thatjoe biden has made today. knock on effect that joe biden has made today-— knock on effect that joe biden has made toda . , ., ., made today. yes. the one thing that i am still questioning _ made today. yes. the one thing that i am still questioning is _ made today. yes. the one thing that i am still questioning is whether - i am still questioning is whether the turkish military who has alleged tuesday if their government tells them to, if they will have a contribution to this withdrawal perhaps by taking over control of the airport and conducting the defence of it while others are
9:10 pm
moving out. defence of it while others are moving out-— defence of it while others are moving out. talking about the americans _ moving out. talking about the americans that _ moving out. talking about the americans that are _ moving out. talking about the americans that are there, - moving out. talking about the | americans that are there, that moving out. talking about the i americans that are there, that is clearly, he's asked the pentagon for some contingency planning. he's obviously got one eye on americans that might still be in the country. i don't think there's any real accounting of how many out there. how much does that complicate the process for the pentagon? fix, process for the pentagon? complicated tremendously. the fact remains that if you are almost complete with the evacuation and you start getting phone calls from american citizens who have finally had cell phone contact restored, that's going make quite difficult and they are going to have take extraordinary means, probably not with this general evacuation operation that's going on. more likely with the special operations insurgents and pick up but i don't think that we will, unless there's a significant number of american
9:11 pm
citizens that we discover still in the country who still want to leave, i would suspect that this withdrawal is going to go along with the presidents timeline with this operation that's going on now. in the greatest fear of things, the discussions that are going on today the president has taken a lot of incoming from the conservative media you've got fox news saying they've been bullied by the taliban, you've got the chair of the font relation committee saying that the cohesiveness of nato has been called into question by all this. do you think it begs the question of the alliance that the united states will need to rebuild the other side of this? , ., ., �* ~ ., this? first all i don't think that united states _ this? first all i don't think that united states will— this? first all i don't think that united states will lose - this? first all i don't think that united states will lose much i this? first all i don't think that i united states will lose much with this nato allies. it may no longer be the case that america is the indispensable nation throughout the world but it is certainly the case that america is the indispensable nation within nato. that is not
9:12 pm
going to change. even as we look at this operation which could hardly be called a textbook or noncompetitive evacuation operation.— evacuation operation. always . rateful evacuation operation. always grateful for _ evacuation operation. always grateful for your _ evacuation operation. always grateful for your thoughts. i evacuation operation. always - grateful for your thoughts. thank you very much. is the taliban capable of change. the un high commissionerfor human rights warned today that she has credible reports of "summary executions" and restrictions imposed on women, in areas of afghanistan now under taliban control. michelle bachelet called on the human rights council to take "bold and vigorous action". we have also received credible reports of serious violations of international and human rights abuses. taking place in many areas under effective taliban control. they include among others execution of civilians and all the combat members of the afghan national security forces.
9:13 pm
restrictions on the rights of women including the right to move around freely and girls rights to attend school. recruitment of child soldiers and repression of peaceful protest and expression of dissent. many people now fear reprisals by the taliban against those working with the government or international community. but where is the oversight? the eu has been critical there is no commitment from the human rights council to an independent fact—finding mission. the eu's compromise proposal for the council to establish a special rapporteur for afghanistan was also rejected, and the final resolution makes no mention of the taliban. lets speak tojean marie guehenno, formerly with the french foreign ministry, and the un's under secretary generalfor peacekeeping operations. thank you for being with us this evening. we will come back to the road map and how the g7 retain some leverage over the taliban. first all if i could with what reaction has beenin if i could with what reaction has been in france tonight to that deadline and what that means you
9:14 pm
french troops put in the country? fits french troops put in the country? is you french troops put in the country? s—zs you said french troops put in the country? sis you said i think the french troops won't be able to stay for long. it's remarkable that they have been able to support the evacuation of the number of afghan people in the few friends that were there. these efforts had started early because french intelligence had a very pessimistic assessment at the time france was criticised for being too early. but the french are not going to be able to stay be on a few more days, i would think. find to be able to stay be on a few more days, i would think.— to be able to stay be on a few more days, i would think. and the afghans that are coming _ days, i would think. and the afghans that are coming into _ days, i would think. and the afghans that are coming into france - days, i would think. and the afghans that are coming into france at - that are coming into france at the moment, where are they going, how are they being house?— are they being house? france will acce -t a are they being house? france will accept a number _ are they being house? france will accept a number of _ are they being house? france will accept a number of refugees. - are they being house? france will accept a number of refugees. my| accept a number of refugees. my own personal views that they should except many refugees. i remember a time when the vietnam war ended and france accepted some 20,000
9:15 pm
refugees. many were francophones that's not the case of afghans. i think we ought to be generous and bring as many as possible into france. but they need to be trained, to find jobs and that's going to be a major effort. yes to find jobs and that's going to be a major effort-— a major effort. yes as it will be across europe. _ a major effort. yes as it will be across europe. the _ a major effort. yes as it will be across europe. the resolution l a major effort. yes as it will be i across europe. the resolution for the human rights council made no mention of the taliban. that's because countries like china, pakistan, saudi arabia, russia, human rights, women's rights isn't as important for them. and that's why it's so important, crucial in fact for the g7 and nato countries to stay united. do you think the decision that we've had today creates some space for that unity? i think so. i think it's very important that there is a sense of moral obligation for the afghan people. i think that moral obligation is both humanitarian in afghanistan and we will have to see
9:16 pm
how that humanitarian helps coordinator. probably the united nations and then a sense of solidarity to accept afghans in various countries. i think that's essential if we're going to keep some self—respect in moral terms. the british prime minister wejust heard once assurance from the taliban that those who want to leave have an assurance that they can leave beyond the 31st of august. how does that work and do your monitors on the ground, are we talking about them walking across land borders, how would you imagine that would work? i how would you imagine that would work? 4, how would you imagine that would work? ~j ., , , work? i think it would be very difficult to — work? i think it would be very difficult to enforce, _ work? i think it would be very difficult to enforce, to - work? i think it would be very difficult to enforce, to be - work? i think it would be very - difficult to enforce, to be honest. i think the cherubim are already on the record saying that they want the people who are qualified of education to stay in the countries was think they will make every effort to prevent movement out of the country. although they officially say they won't. but the afghan borders are porous. so i
9:17 pm
would expect a number of afghans to cross into neighbouring countries. they've set out this road map today but there are enormous questions left as to how they engage with the taliban. if they're putting humanitarian aid in is the un get to go in with that aid? do that humanitarian aid workers stay in the country, do you need to put monitors on the ground? all sorts of questions are left unanswered. i would expect that the un will do its utmost to stay in the country. it stayed in the country most of the time throughout the tragic history over the last 40 years in afghanistan. this is not the time to cut and run. i think the un must be there. i think engagement with the taliban will be necessary also with respect to international terrorism. you said that the taliban have, may not of change, i think you have changed one—way. they don't want to
9:18 pm
be at war with the world. they want to impose a harsh and awful rule in their own country but they saw that hosting bin laden lost them power. they don't want that, they don't want to repeat that. in some ways they will be the alliance of the western trying to fight isis. the question is whether they will have the capability to do so. the taliban are divided, the taliban of kandahar would not necessarily agree with the taliban network. their chain of command is far from taliban network. their chain of command is farfrom perfect. whether they will be able to control the country is unsure. but what is clear is that i think all of p5, all the permanent members of council, they don't want afghanistan to become a failed country. in some ways there is incentive beyond the humanitarian incentive, there's an incentive to keep relation, working relations at
9:19 pm
least with the taliban. so that they can fight international terrorism in afghanistan itself.— afghanistan itself. enormous challenges- _ afghanistan itself. enormous challenges. thank _ afghanistan itself. enormous challenges. thank you - afghanistan itself. enormous challenges. thank you ray i afghanistan itself. enormous- challenges. thank you ray much indeed for your thoughts this evening. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: the rolling stones drummer charlie watts has died. we will be taking a look back at his extraordinary life. the number of people dying with coronavirus in the uk is at its highest level since the end of march. according to the office for national statistics, 652 deaths were registered in the week to the 13th of august. mps have been warned that the nhs is facing a "perfect storm" this winter, as staff absences increase, and some consider leaving the health service. our health correspondent, nick triggle, has been looking over the latest figures that were released today. we look at the number of people dying as you mentioned the numbers
9:20 pm
today, reported today are high, 174 deaths but the delays in reporting over the weekend mean tuesdays we will tend to see a higherfigure. if you look at the average number of deaths over the past week we are now averaging more than 100 deaths per day. that was a figure that the government scientists said we were likely to reach by this stage. so we are very much where we expected to be, question now is where we go next. every day we hear about the shortages. today in the uk it was macdonalds who ran out of milkshakes, last week it was nando's who'd run out of chicken. there are supply—chain disruptions everywhere — the only people doing well it seems are the shipping companies. 40 foot
9:21 pm
container being sent from shanghai to rotterdam at the moment because almost 13,000, $213,700 that is a year on year rise of 659%. and do you know who is paying for it. us — the consumer. so how long will it persist? let's bring in phil levy, chief economist at flexport, we are constantly told this is a global pandemic. despite all the bullish headlines we are reading in the united states about the recovery there is no real recovery unless the container ports are up and running which perhaps sells is why we need to get everyone vaccinated. i’m to get everyone vaccinated. i'm certainly in _ to get everyone vaccinated. i�*jn certainly in favour of vaccination. i think you're right. one of the challenges we've had is with the economy is doing relatively well people are chosen to spend their incomes on buying goods. and it's a system is under a lot of stress right now. system is under a lot of stress right nova— right now. where do you see the bi est right now. where do you see the biggest kings — right now. where do you see the biggest kings in _ right now. where do you see the biggest kings in that supply - right now. where do you see the l
9:22 pm
biggest kings in that supply chain? the thing to remember initially is in its extremely taut supply chain. it's a system that is set up to handle key doing my peak capacity but were already exceeding it on a regular basis. so some of the kinks are ports and what they can do. some are ports and what they can do. some are things that grabbed headlines of your new show with things like the ever given in the suez canal. the door where we had key ports in china shut down for a stretch. that is the equivalent of an accident at rush hour on the freeway. i’m equivalent of an accident at rush hour on the freeway.— equivalent of an accident at rush hour on the freeway. i'm no great economist — hour on the freeway. i'm no great economist but _ hour on the freeway. i'm no great economist but i _ hour on the freeway. i'm no great economist but i do _ hour on the freeway. i'm no great economist but i do know- hour on the freeway. i'm no great economist but i do know that - hour on the freeway. i'm no great. economist but i do know that when supply falls, prices invariably rise. of these disruption in the supply chain, is that what is principally driving the inflation and pressure that we are seeing? whether driving inflation pressure well is certainly driving the prices that you describe where people are paying a substantial amount more than they were to transport goods from asia to europe. then the
9:23 pm
question is, what do they do it that goes back to they swallow it, pass it along? sooner or later these things do have to get passed along. that's the real concern about this stoking inflation.— stoking inflation. over the top of that we've _ stoking inflation. over the top of that we've got — stoking inflation. over the top of that we've got our _ stoking inflation. over the top of that we've got our own _ stoking inflation. over the top of that we've got our own local - that we've got our own local idiosyncrasies, here we are brexit, we've got a chronic lorry driver shortage, we have a chronic lorry driver shortage in spain. in the united states only thousands of people are disappeared from the job market. how long does it take for this to work through the system? you're absolutely right. one of the challenges, i hesitate when you asked me whether kinks out there a whole sequence of and challenges like this. one can try to address say port capacity but lorry drivers, what do you do with that? i think what do you do with that? i think what we need to work to solve out is you either drive a dramatic
9:24 pm
expansion of capacity and that takes a wealth of the things were talking about where you need a pause where we backed off and tried to move below capacity and we can clear the backlog. unfortunately, there is no sign of a pause like that any time certainly be for the end of the year. is. certainly be for the end of the ear. j ., ., certainly be for the end of the ear. j ., ._ ., ., thank you. some sad news from the world of entertainment today. the rolling stones drummer charlie watts has died at the age of eighty. the musician had been a member of the rolling stones since 1963. earlier this month he pulled out of the bands forthcoming tour of the us. david silitto looks back at his life. well i play the drums for keith and mick, i don't play for me. charlie watts — cool, calm, and distinctly dapper. the steady backbeat of the rolling stones. he was always a reluctant rock star, but he loved the drums.
9:25 pm
i can't play the drums at home, so i walk around and to play the drums i have to go on the road. i get a terribly vicious circle. it's always been my life. a graphic designer by trade, he was not expecting his evening sideline with a little blues band called the rolling stones to make him famous. would like to play a bo diddly number. rather than drugs and groupies, he liked antique silver and classic cars, even though he did not drive. but his real passion was jazz. in between touring, he could afford to set up his own big band. but even the "sensible stone" had his moments. he knew he had a drug problem, and high priest of debauchery keith richards took him aside one day and give him a talking—to. married for more than 50 years,
9:26 pm
he was always happiest at home with his dogs and horses, but his place in music history is onstage, keeping it together with the world's greatest rock and roll band. hello. the weather is expected to remain settled for the foreseeable future, at least the next 7—10 days. and certainly for the rest of this week, it's a case of sunny spells, but for some of us, cloudy at times, as well. now this is a blocking area of high pressure — it stops the weather fronts, the rain fronts from making any progress eastwards, so hence it'll keep things dry for us. but it's not gin clear within this high pressure — you can see areas of cloud earlier on, but many areas of the country seeing some sunshine. so through the course of this evening and overnight, it's a case of clear skies
9:27 pm
across many western and southern areas. closer to the north sea coasts and also inland, it once again will turn cloudy as that north sea cloud drifts in — or persists, if you have it already. that means that wednesday morning will start off grey in a number of areas. but, just like today, that cloud will give way to some sunshine eventually. so you can see through the morning, the cloudier skies, and into lunch time, the cloudier skies there into the east, the southeast as well, breaking up here, but sunshine along the coast and beautiful weather along the coasts of wales, the irish sea. there's some fantastic weather in the southwest of scotland, and in glasgow, up to 26 celsius with light winds and sunshine. now a subtle difference on thursday — a little cool front is expected to ride on the eastern edge of this high pressure here and bring some cool winds from the north. so here's that cooler wind blowing out of the north sea, bringing some cloud here. so i think on the coast itself, it could actually feel relatively chilly, temperatures could be around 15—16 celsius. out towards the west where the winds are lighter and there's more sunshine, temperatures will be in the low 20s.
9:28 pm
and little change expected into friday, the high pressure's with us centred across scotland and the norwegian sea — so this is where the best of the weather will be once again. always a bit more of a breeze closer to east anglia and, say, the lincolnshire coast there. and the temperature's around 18 celsius in norwich, we'll probably get into the low 20s just across some western parts of the uk. so a quiet week ahead, and the quiet weather's expected to last into the weekend and probably into the we'll probably get into the low 20s just across some western parts of the uk. so a quiet week ahead, and the quiet weather's expected to last into the weekend and probably into the bank holiday weekend. and it looks as though that high pressure is in no hurry to budge. bye— bye.
9:29 pm
9:30 pm
this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. any minute now president biden is due to deliver remarks on the pullout of us forces from afghanistan following today's meeting with western leaders. we'll take you there live as soon as that starts. there are reports of a secret meeting in kabul between the head of the cia and the leader of the taliban. we will hear from a former agency officer. at the moment the control room of the notorious iranian president realises they've been hacked. a hacker shared shocking images of prisoner abuse. how year's that the floods this summer i due to climate change, new report has said they were nine times more likely.
9:31 pm
there are reports in the us media today that the director of the cia met secretly which the leader of the taliban in kabul on monday. neither the taliban nor the agency would confirm that reported meeting between bill burns and the defacto leader of the group mullah baradar. if confirmed though it would be the highest—level contact between the us and the taliban since the militants took kabul on 15th august so what were they meeting to discuss. bob grenier is a career cia officer who served as the agency's top counter—terrorism official from 2004 to 2006. it is great to have you on the programme. i hope we have a long time to talk, because the president is due to appear soon. let's talk about this meeting in kabul. i can think of a long list of things he might want to discuss, but
9:32 pm
presumably, initially, he wanted to get a feel about whether a delay was possible. i get a feel about whether a delay was ossible. , , , . get a feel about whether a delay was ossible. , ,, . ., �*, possible. i suspect that's true. i think everybody _ possible. i suspect that's true. i think everybody is focused - possible. i suspect that's true. i think everybody is focused very | possible. i suspect that's true. i - think everybody is focused very much on a tactical situation right now, whether the taliban will extend its cooperation beyond the 31st of august in order to get americans and other areas out of kabul, so i suspect that was the real focus of their discussions, whether they got into other more long—term issues or not, of course, we don't know. i suspect they may have touched on them, but the focus right now is on them, but the focus right now is on the 31st august.— the 31st august. it's quite an event, because _ the 31st august. it's quite an event, because he _ the 31st august. it's quite an event, because he was - the 31st august. it's quite an l event, because he was tracked the 31st august. it's quite an - event, because he was tracked by the cia for many years. in fact, he was put in a pakistani prison for eight years, and there you have him speaking to the head of the cia in kabul, which really does speak to their reversal in the power dynamic at the moment.— their reversal in the power dynamic at the moment. yeah. it's one of the many ironies. by _ at the moment. yeah. it's one of the many ironies, by the _ at the moment. yeah. it's one of the
9:33 pm
many ironies, by the way, _ at the moment. yeah. it's one of the many ironies, by the way, they - at the moment. yeah. it's one of the many ironies, by the way, they sent | many ironies, by the way, they sent an emissary to speak with me back in 2001 when he was considering what he was going to deal, things are really bad with the taliban at that time. it was a joint operation which put him in a pakistani prison for quite a few years, and things have turned quite a bit since then. tell a few years, and things have turned quite a bit since then.— quite a bit since then. tell us about that — quite a bit since then. tell us about that interaction - quite a bit since then. tell us about that interaction you - quite a bit since then. tell us l about that interaction you have quite a bit since then. tell us - about that interaction you have with them at that time. did they think at that period, i guess you are talking prior to 2000 four, did they think that it was the end for the group? and how did they come back so strongly? he and how did they come back so stron al ? . , and how did they come back so stronal ? .,, .. ., and how did they come back so stron.l ? ., ., strongly? he was reaching out to me before the taliban _ strongly? he was reaching out to me before the taliban and _ strongly? he was reaching out to me before the taliban and fell, - strongly? he was reaching out to me before the taliban and fell, just - before the taliban and fell, just before the taliban and fell, just before the taliban and fell, just before the taliban and thalamus of this would've been a november december of 2001, and they were trying to see what sort of deal they could make them of their ongoing discussions at the time with who is now president of afghanistan, trying to negotiate with taliban leadership. but i think at that time, they were thinking that they
9:34 pm
might be a ball to come to some sort of agreements and work out some and mow it new afghan government, and across the us government and others refuse to deal with them at that time. , , refuse to deal with them at that time. , ., ., ~ ., time. they say if you want to know it happened _ time. they say if you want to know it happened in the _ time. they say if you want to know it happened in the future - time. they say if you want to know it happened in the future you - time. they say if you want to know it happened in the future you have | it happened in the future you have to look at what happened in the past. do you think he and the people around him are capable of the change they are promising? ida. around him are capable of the change they are promising?— they are promising? no, i think that their mindset _ they are promising? no, i think that their mindset is _ they are promising? no, i think that their mindset is still _ they are promising? no, i think that their mindset is still very _ they are promising? no, i think that their mindset is still very much - they are promising? no, i think that their mindset is still very much the l their mindset is still very much the same. there are more and more sophisticated people around the taliban leadership, but their main motivations i don't think you have changed at all. this is a religiously oriented organisation. they have certain core beliefs that they are not about to violate, certainly not now when they are flushed with victory. so i think that the new taliban in most respects will be very much like the old. one hopes that will not be true. one does not want to see
9:35 pm
taliban lead afghanistan once again become a pariah state, but if i had to bet can i think it's probably where we are going to end up. iiruilieii where we are going to end up. when ou are in where we are going to end up. when you are in charge _ where we are going to end up. when you are in charge of— you are in charge of counterterrorism, you had troops on the ground there, you had that formidable oversight of the us embassy, which was an intelligence hub. he had oversight from the planes that were flying over the top, the drones, an awful lot that has been stripped away now. do you think the agency has the capability to keep and off a lot of that has been stripped away now. do you think the agency has the capability to keep a night on the terrorist threat that will grow there?— that will grow there? well, i think there is both _ that will grow there? well, i think there is both human _ that will grow there? well, i think there is both human intelligence | that will grow there? well, i think i there is both human intelligence and technical intelligence. technical intelligence is still possible, but it is much more difficult when you don't have a base either in the country, inside afghanistan, or on the immediate periphery, i suspect there are efforts under way to try to get that, but as of right now, it doesn't appear that us intelligence has that. there's also the issue of human intelligence, and as you know,
9:36 pm
the cia, other western intelligence operatives have been in the area for a long time. afghanistan is a famously chaotic place. there are a great many people with whom one can deal, particularly if one has a platform in the region and. so i don't think that us intelligence said —— it is entirely blind, but the situation is much more difficult. it the situation is much more difficult. , w' the situation is much more difficult. , w ., difficult. it struck me when i read this report _ difficult. it struck me when i read this report today _ difficult. it struck me when i read this report today that _ difficult. it struck me when i read this report today that may - difficult. it struck me when i read this report today that may be - difficult. it struck me when i read i this report today that may be there are some areas in which the agency can work with the taliban because there clearly is no love lost between the taliban and isis, which is that they concern in the country. what the agency consider getting the taliban a heads up on the sort of threats they face?— threats they face? well, i think that if the _ threats they face? well, i think that if the us _ threats they face? well, i think that if the us and _ threats they face? well, i think that if the us and the - threats they face? well, i think that if the us and the taliban i threats they face? well, i think - that if the us and the taliban could get into some sort of what we would regard as a constructive dialogue with regard to terrorist elements, then, yes, obviously, isis k is a
9:37 pm
common enemy of the tail, but the situation is far more complicated than that. isis k isjust one situation is far more complicated than that. isis k is just one of the whole alphabet soup of radical extremist groups that have a presence inside afghanistan in the immediate vicinity, and i don't think that the taliban is going to take effective action against any of those other groups other than isis k anytime soon. so, unfortunately, i think the prospect for any sort of construction engagements on the terrace in france between the us and western intelligence friends is a very remote possibility. one hopes that i'm entirely wrong, but i would not bet that you are going to have that kind of cooperation in the near future. ibiiiii that kind of cooperation in the near future. �* �* , future. bill burns facing quite the challenue. future. bill burns facing quite the challenge. bob, _ future. bill burns facing quite the challenge. bob, lovely— future. bill burns facing quite the challenge. bob, lovely to - future. bill burns facing quite the challenge. bob, lovely to talk - future. bill burns facing quite the challenge. bob, lovely to talk to l challenge. bob, lovely to talk to you. thank you. the head of iran's prison service has apologised today after hackers leaked videos showing the abuse of detainees at the tehran's
9:38 pm
notorious evin prison. the hackers released security footage showing guards beating prisoners and dragging one along a floor. many political prisoners and dual and foreign nationals are held at evin, including the british dual national nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. i've been speaking to bbc persian's jiyar gol. but i must warn you some of the pictures you will see in this interview are disturbing. obviously, the video, it seems a group activists. they introduce himself, it could be intelligence of a country be behind it but they have managed to break into the notorious prison in toronto. prison in tehran. and one of the clip you could see the head of the prison in shock looking at the video in this message appears on all the monitors in the control room. it says "this will be
9:39 pm
a stain on the grey bird for absusing prisoners and also calling prison to eight people to rise up against the regime". and what we have seen in that video the evidence offers its unique. we haven't seen that before. but we have heard many tales of prisoners who have been tortured in many different ways and even one of the political prisoners today i was talking to said what we have seen in the past two days is nothing compared to what is happening inside interrogation room in other prisons across the country. so in this video we see a prisoner and i should warn people, it is shocking to watch. a prisoner collapsed in an outside exercise area, he is then dragged upstairs and through corridors and then left slumped in a sort of waiting area of the prison. no one comes to help him, no one comes to revive him. in fact we even see a cleric
9:40 pm
step over the top of him without reeling taking much interest in him. what it says, it seems to me when i was watching that clip, it's very shocking and disturbing. it shows it is a common scene inside the prison. you see the cleric walking, step over the poor guy laying on the floor. and without even looking at him or paying attention to him and just walk away. this is a kind of scene we have seen. in one video i see prisoners being beaten up by numbers of prison guards or prisoners are fighting with each other. we have heard from political prisoners that prison authorities are turning criminal conduct inside prison against political prisoners to attack them, to abuse them, simply make an example for those people who dare to challenge the system. just a final one, from a uk perspective we know of this prision because nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is inside the women's political wing of the prison. we've had concerns
9:41 pm
about her for some time and the condition she's kept in. this won't reassure anyone. i don't think so. those prisoners who are dual national they might be in a better position because they have obviously the international community behind them. they have a voice, they would be heard. the british government or the american government or french or german, we have numbers of dual national from the uk not are also dual national prisoners who are accused of spying or being held for political reason. and normally they are being kept in security ward within prison. and we have heard mistreatment of them but i think what is happening to iranian political prisoners is far worse than those dual nationals. plenty more on that report on the bbc website. we are keeping an eye across events at the white house. we are expecting joe biden to appear shortly. stay with us on bbc
9:42 pm
news, still to come: mission improbable. how one family is flying high after helping out tom cruise. they make police investigating the disappearance of claudia lawrence went missing in york more than 12 years ago have revealed they are carrying out new search is just outside the city. at 35—year—old chef failed to arrive to work on the 18th of march 2009. police believe she was murdered despite her body never been found. here is danny savage. claudia lawrence, a 35—year—old chef who vanished in york 12—and—a—half years ago. police believe she was murdered despite her body never being found. today, in arguably the most significant development since she disappeared, police started searching gravel pits in countryside, six and a half miles from where she was last seen alive. while i'm unable to disclose what brought us to this location, i would like to stress
9:43 pm
that the searches you will see in the coming days are just one of several active lines of inquiry being investigated and the north yorkshire police investigation team in our efforts to establish what happened to claudia and to identify any person responsible for causing her harm. claudia disappeared from her home in the area of york in march 2009. she talked to her mother on the phone in the night before she failed to arrive for work in the kitchens at york university. high—profile appeals were made at the time by the police and her father, who reported her missing. this is not a job she went on, she did not take money, he did not take a debit card or passport. as far as i'm aware she did not take spare clothes. nine people are being questioned about the disappearance but no charges had ever been brought. every year, her father made an appeal for information but earlier this year,
9:44 pm
peter lawrence died. now at last, there may be a breakthrough in the case of his daughter's disappearance although police are playing down the possibility of an imminent answer. welcome back. lets return to the sad news today that rolling stones drummer charlie watts has died. he was 80. his agent said he passed away in a london hospital with his family around him. let's speak to mike edison, author of the book "sympathy for the drummer: why charlie watts matters" and former editor of high times magazine. he joins us from new york. really get to happy with us on such a sad day. why don't you answer that question that your book poses is. how did charlie white changing our understanding of rock and roll, and how important was he to the history of the rolling stones? iie
9:45 pm
how important was he to the history of the rolling stones?— of the rolling stones? he was the rolling stones, _ of the rolling stones? he was the rolling stones, and _ of the rolling stones? he was the rolling stones, and if _ of the rolling stones? he was the rolling stones, and if you - of the rolling stones? he was the rolling stones, and if you asked i rolling stones, and if you asked nick or keith, they would say the same thing. now charlie, no stone, i guess we are going to see how that plays out, maybe they should be reconsidering their retirement. i don't know, they're going to take it on the road soon with a guy sitting in for him, but what a shock it was today. i have been in touch with some people who worked for rolling stones. they said he's not going to do i to her, but he's going to be up and he will come back to the 16th anniversary show coming up in spring or early of next year, so this was just completely unexpected. i think this just a tremendous sense of loss across the entire rock and roll world today. you have to think that if the rolling stones or average is the greatest rock and roll band in the greatest rock and roll band in the welcome at least for the moment, charlie watts was the greatest rock and roll drummer in the world. i think proof that a band is only as good as the drummer. we have seen that in other bands, they have lots drummer is who, and they could never possibly replace keith moon,
9:46 pm
zeppelin, when they lostjohn bynum, charlie watts was one—of—a—kind, he was very deceptively simple but very stylistic, that's why i wrote this book. this book is right heart for my mentor him or myself. asked me how long did it take to write this book? i usually say 45 years. i’m book? i usually say 45 years. i'm 'ust book? i usually say 45 years. i'm just looking _ book? i usually say 45 years. i'm just looking at these pictures, as you say, he was the ultimate drummer and always so stylish, wasn't he? he always looked stylish when he was on stage. but unlike jagger and richards, he avoided the limelight, didn't he? he didn't get that many interviews. he didn't he? he didn't get that many interviews. . , didn't he? he didn't get that many interviews. ., , ., ., . . s, interviews. he was an accidental rock star- _ interviews. he was an accidental rock star. and _ interviews. he was an accidental rock star. and when _ interviews. he was an accidental rock star. and when he - interviews. he was an accidental rock star. and when he joined i interviews. he was an accidental. rock star. and when he joined the rolling stones in 1962 and they were a blues band, he was kind of slumming it, he wanted to be in a jazz band. he was always the best dressed cameo is classed up the joint, that's another reason why he matters. he was there for the music and not for the rock and roll lifestyle such as it is, yahweh said he didn't like touring, too much hurry up and wait and mostly wait,
9:47 pm
but he was there for the music, and i think that's really it, not for the party. i think that's really it, not for the party-— i think that's really it, not for the party. i think that's really it, not for thea .~ ., ., the party. what people might not know about _ the party. what people might not know about them _ the party. what people might not know about them is _ the party. what people might not know about them is that - the party. what people might not know about them is that he - the party. what people might not know about them is that he was l know about them is that he was trained also as a graphic designer. he was quite a good artist, so he would do a lot of the set designs when they went on tour. iie would do a lot of the set designs when they went on tour. he was the kind of guy — when they went on tour. he was the kind of guy who _ when they went on tour. he was the kind of guy who would've _ kind of guy who would've been successful no matter what happened. had he not found himself in the world's biggest rock and roll band, he would have found success doing anything. he might have found success being a jazz drummer, his first true love them and that's the great thing, he was stilljazz, he had as little jazz bands and he was doing that as a side project. it's very funny that being in the world's greatest rock and roll band couldn't stop him from living his dream of being a jazz musician. you stop him from living his dream of being a jazz musician.— being a “azz musician. you talked about being a jazz musician. you talked about the influence _ being a jazz musician. you talked about the influence of _ being a jazz musician. you talked about the influence of jazz - being a jazz musician. you talked about the influence of jazz on - being a jazz musician. you talked about the influence of jazz on his| about the influence ofjazz on his drumming. did he have an influence on you? i can see the drum get there on the background study i think anybody who's ever played the rand date neck the drums are played rock and roll, he has had that influence
9:48 pm
on. he is the ability went up push a sign, went to pilate, he knows how to swing, he really knows how to move people. he's that rock and roll formula, the role as the most important part of the equation, that's the swing. they're called the rolling stones, not the rocking stones. that was a fitting tribute. thank you very much for being with us. mi; thank you very much for being with us. ~ , , ., , thank you very much for being with us-_ charlie _ thank you very much for being with us._ charlie watts - thank you very much for being with us._ charlie watts who us. my pleasure. charlie watts who has died at — us. my pleasure. charlie watts who has died at the _ us. my pleasure. charlie watts who has died at the age _ us. my pleasure. charlie watts who has died at the age of _ us. my pleasure. charlie watts who has died at the age of 80 _ has died at the age of 80 committee ultimate drummer. the heavy rainfall behind deadly flooding in europe this summer was made more likely by climate change, scientists say. the floods in germany, belgium and other areas killed at least 220 people in july as towns and villages were swamped. researchers say global heating made rainfall events in western europe up to nine times more likely. i've been speaking to the bbc�*s chief environment correspondent justin rowlett who told me how the scientists had come to their conclusion they get these huge super computers we've got darted around the world,
9:49 pm
they model what the climate would have been like without all the greenhouse gases we pumped into the atmosphere since the industrial revolution. they look at all the iterations of the models to see how often these kind of events would happen and they use that as a basis of comparison. so they say what with the world have been like? let's use all the models, they average the models out and then look at how likely it would be. and they say significantly more likely. they are saying between 1.2 times to nine times more likely. that huge variation is because the different models say different things about how the world might be. also these flooding events are actually really complicated to model because it's notjust about how much rain there is, it's about how wet the soil was, what the shape of the grounders. obviously a kind of steep valley is likely to more water more rapidly and push it into the river more quickly than a plains. so it depends where the rain falls as well. what they actually did is said let's just look at the rainfall. because it's so complicated to look at the other factors.
9:50 pm
so this is just about rainfall. they say, yeah, up to nine times more likely as a result of the gases that we put into the atmosphere. so very significant increase. very significant increase. do they conclude as well that the intensity of these freaky events is increasing? and how bad does it get? they say, i mean, the climate models say we should expect events like this to happen more often and there is likely to be more water and moisture in the atmosphere and therefore more rainfall in total. so warmer air, can hold more water hence more rainfall. quite simple physics, if you'd like. how far can it go? well that is the question, how warm is it going to get? the warmer it gets the more dramatic the changes in our weather are likely to be. that means notjust heavy rainfall but more extreme heat waves and droughts as well. you've got a more extreme environment. we see both of those in europe. incredible, amazing wildfires and then simultaneously almost we saw these huge floods. the point is it's becoming undeniable, it is undeniable.
9:51 pm
and so the challenge is to be surely when they get to cup 26 at the end ——and so the challenge is to be surely when they get to cop26 at the end of this year and pressing on governments look, the cost of rebuilding after something like germany and belgium is much greater then it would be to put the green alternatives in place that mightjust help. absolutely. in the long term i think it's the case was up in this year it makes it much more easier to argue. because we've seen these kind of events across the world. literally, huge floods in china, massive fire, there's a fire in siberia burning at the moment that is 5800 square miles. it's the size of greece, it's the area of most southern england. these are huge, huge events happening all around the world. really global phenomena and yeah, you say look, these are the cost. yes there are costs to changing but it's notjust that will have extreme weather, our agricultural systems may have to change. it may be that some cities in some parts of the world become unlivable, they become too hot for people to survive in summer.
9:52 pm
or you need huge expense on air conditioning just to keep people basically alive. so, yeah, these huge changes are part of one hopes to share in any year they will be able to say to the countries of the will year —— of the world look, it's happening to you this year. look about it can be. on a much more smaller scale, in the uk the woodland trust has today announced that it can stop using these plastic protectors for trees. i'm ashamed to say i actually got two in the garden that protect my fruit trees. they are very small fruit trees. but i use them largely because we have a rabbit. but out there they are hugely effective. they are very effective. these plastic sheets you see covering the trunks of the trees and the idea is that grazing animals, deer and rabbits and that kind of thing can't get at the trees. they can be incredibly disruptive. so left to their own devices rabbits and deer would probably eat all the trees in a forest. there needs to be some kind of protection but what they're
9:53 pm
saying is the woodland trust is saying that the balance of cost in terms of carbon emission of having these plastic sheets is greater then losing a few saplings. they're saying let's look at alternatives like having wool wrappers around them or cardboard or things that biodegrade and that would offer some protection, not as good protection but some protection and we will save us using the plastic. just to give you an idea, this is extraordinary, the woodland trust alone is talking about planting 10 million trees eight year between now and 2025. ——a year between now and 2025. if you look at what the uk climate advisers and saying, they say we need to increase 13% to 19%. woodland trust says this is one point 5 billion trees. this is a lot of plastic they are using. the problem is people rarely go back into the forest and pick up their waste once the trees have grown and are strong enough to survive. my my rabbit gets to anything, it is a force field we need. air b&b said it
9:54 pm
well and temporarily has 20,000 afghan refugees to help them resettle across the world. the company's boss has been speaking to the bbc. ., ., , company's boss has been speaking to the sac. ., ., , .., the bbc. how long they can stay, that is really up _ the bbc. how long they can stay, that is really up to _ the bbc. how long they can stay, that is really up to how— the bbc. how long they can stay, that is really up to how long - the bbc. how long they can stay, that is really up to how long our i that is really up to how long our hosts can house them, and also the need. most of these people are not looking for long—term housing, they are looking for temporary housing before they decide where they want to live. there is a pretty extensive protocol to work with resettlement agencies to figure out where they actually want to start their lives. so we look at what they need is, but i want to make sure we can go as big as possible for these people. iirui’eiiii as possible for these people. well done to air — as possible for these people. well done to air b&b, _ as possible for these people. well done to air b8b, before we go, a done to air b&b, before we go, a family in warwickshire have had the surprise of their lives, given a mission impossible, when coventry airports closed. after time cribs film was forced to land his helicopter in her garden in a little village nearby. the family had only been told in a vip needed some way to land, tom cruise posed for pictures of them and ingratitude, they gave them a free helicopter
9:55 pm
ride to her children and her partner's children. goodness me, mission impossible. we will see you tomorrow. hello, thanks forjoining me. it's time to have a look at the weather for the week ahead. and we have entered a spell of some very settled weather, brought by something called a blocking high, and it's likely to be here for the next seven to ten days, bringing settled weather conditions. one of the reasons why it's called a blocking high is because it blocks these weather fronts, it prevents them from coming through out of the west, so it stays dry. and the particular block that we have right now is called an omega block, so two areas of low pressure, and then one big area of high pressure in the middle, and this is the jet stream pattern as well. when we get this sort of set—up in the atmosphere, the high pressure neatly locks itself in, anchors itself across the uk,
9:56 pm
and the weather doesn't change. it's just physics and mathematics and we certainly haven't got time to get into that! but broadly speaking, for the next ten days, misty mornings, variable cloud cover, and there will be some warm sunshine around as well. so let's have a look at the forecast, then, and we'll start with the satellite picture. this is from the last day or so. and you can see variable amounts of cloud, sunshine in the north—west of the uk, thick cloud there across parts of yorkshire, lincolnshire, the midlands, northern wales too. and this is what it looks like early on wednesday morning. so, some of us will be waking up to sunshine across many western and southern areas, but further towards the east, it is going to be a little on the cloudy side. so there will be some variation for sure in the feel of things, you've got the cool, cloudy conditions in the east and you've got the warmer, sunnier weather out towards the west. and it is all to do with where the wind is coming from within this area of high pressure, and it's sort of blowing around clockwise, like so. where the winds are light and the skies are clear
9:57 pm
is where the highest temperatures will be — 26 in glasgow, whereas on that north sea coast over the coming days, it is going to be quite a bit fresher than that. now, if anything, we are going to see freshening winds and a weak cold front moving across these eastern parts of the country during the course of wednesday and into thursday. this is how we start thursday morning, so quite a lot of cloud around. the clouds will be breaking up, but there will be plenty of it because of this cold front here. and look at the winds blowing out of the north, that means that anywhere from the north—east of england all the way down to east anglia and the south—east, it is going to feel fresh. temperatures here will be only in the teens during the afternoon, whereas towards the west, closer to the centre of the high pressure, it's going to be a little bit warmer, there will be more sunshine around, the winds will be lighter, so it'll feel a lot more pleasant. so that's thursday's weather forecast. very little change expected into friday. the high pressure is still with us. and remember that omega block i mentioned — low pressure, low pressure, the high pressure in the middle. so, this is where the high pressure is on friday. variable amounts of cloud,
9:58 pm
still a bit more of a breeze in the south—east here. so filling a little on the cool side, maybe 17, 18 degrees. out towards the west, the temperatures are going to be a little bit higher than that. so, that's the end of the week, how about saturday, the bank holiday weekend? again, lots of fine weather, the high pressure is still with us, so very little change. and into the outlook — so this is sunday and into monday, bank holiday monday. notice the weather remains the same. now, these symbols are likely to change from sunny to cloudy to sunny again. it's actually difficult to forecast sunshine amounts, but it is going to be settled for the foreseeable future.
9:59 pm
10:00 pm

35 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on