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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 23, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines at eight: the race to get people out of afghanistan intensifies as the uk government asks president biden to delay the date of the final withdrawal of american troops. most of these people do not have permission to leave. some of them do and still cannot get through. everyone is desperate to get out. the deadline for us and other troops to leave is the end of the month but the taliban says it does not want an extension. if they extend it beyond the 31st, thatis if they extend it beyond the 31st, that is a clear violation. here, the government warns covid test providers about misleading prices for holiday makers in a clampdown on "cowboy behaviour". queuing to reach snowdon�*s summit —
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walkers are urged to "respect the mountain" as the number of visitors soars. and britain's paralympians prepare for the start of competition tomorrow, hoping to beat their medal haul from rio five years ago. welcome to bbc news. the defence secretary has warned there are hours, not weeks, left to airlift people out of afghanistan. diplomatic pressure is building to try to extend the august the 31st deadline forforeign troops to leave. but the taliban, now in charge of course in kabul, appear to be ruling out any delay to the withdrawal. the ministry of defence says british forces have already airlifted out more than 6,000 people. the focus now, it says, is on a further 1,800 uk nationals and more than 2,200 afghans.
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the government conceded again today that some who are eligible to come to the uk will be left behind. 0urfirst report comes from our afghanistan correspondent secunder kermani who is in kabul. it's crowded, filthy and baking hot. but desperate afghans keep coming to kabul airport. so many children in such a terrible place. this woman worked alongside german forces. she has documents proving it. but no permission to travel. "i've been here with my kids for the past five days waiting for the soldiers to look at my papers," she says. "they can't even take two steps in this crowd." everywhere we go, people beg us for help, beg us for information. we're being surrounded by dozens and dozens of people who are desperate to leave, showing us their documents. this chap worked with
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the afghan security forces. a foreign airfield. someone else who worked with foreign forces, someone else has got other documents. most of these people don't have permission to leave. some of them do and still can't get through. everyone is desperate to get out, everyone is totally confused as to what to do. you've got an e—mail saying that you should go? yes. you should come here. are you able to get through? no, no. with the deadline for international forces rapidly approaching, many are panicking, fearing this is their last chance to get out. taliban officials say foreign forces must leave by the end of the month. if they extend beyond the 315t, that is a clear violation, one thing.
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secondly, about consequences, it is up to our leadership what...how to proceed and what kind of decision they take. that decision will be implemented. elsewhere in kabul, there's an uneasy sense of calm. shops and some government offices are open, but the streets are still quieter than usual, whilst banks remain closed. the taliban forces have been gathering here in panjshir, the one province yet to be captured, the fighters calling themselves the resistance. for now, though, the focus is on the crisis around the airport, some are managing to make it out. my family, my newborn baby... last week, we filmed this former british army interpreter and his newborn baby. today, they arrived in the uk. many others won't be able to leave. secunder kermani, bbc news, kabul.
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we have some new lines in from the british prime minister and the us presidentjoe biden who have agreed to date to work together to ensure that all of those who are eligible to leave afghanistan are going to be able to, even including after the initial evacuation phase has ended, thatis initial evacuation phase has ended, that is according to borisjohnson�*s offers. the downing street spokesman said they have spoken on the phone and discussed the ongoing efforts by the uk and us to coordinate the rapid and safe evacuation of nationals and those who previously worked for our governments from kabul international airport. the leaders agreed to continue working together to ensure those who are eligible to leave are able to commit including after that initial phase of evacuation. this does not necessarily mean that borisjohnson is going to get the extension of the
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troop withdrawal he is seeking. that is likely to be very much on the agenda tomorrow. the prime minister will be leading a summit of other g7 leaders tomorrow, including the us president, to discuss the crisis in afghanistan. but it's far from clear if the us, or the taliban, will agree and what other options, if any, the uk might have to get people out. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth has more. packed up and prepared to go, these troops are poised to head to kabul if needed, to help the evacuation effort. with them this morning, the defence secretary said it is a race against time. it is fraught, we have a timetable, we don't know how long the united states are going to stay. he said the government would urge the us to stay in afghanistan beyond the end of this month to get people out. but he admitted without them, the uk could not go it alone. i don't think there is any likelihood on staying on after the united states if their timetable extends. even by a day or two it
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will give us a day or two more to evacuate people, because we are really down to hours now, not weeks and it is important to exploit every minute to get people out. outside the home office today, a reminder of what is at stake. afghans in the uk urging the government not to abandon their friends and family who helped foreign forces and fear reprisals from the taliban. their lives are at risk at the moment. they can get killed any time, so before that moment we are here to fight for our families. when world leaders last met in cornwall it was all smiles. that might not be the case at a virtual summit tomorrow. convened by the prime minister, he will ask the president to stay longer in afghanistan, but his chance of success seems slim if the taliban do not consent. staying without that, some warn, would mean evacuation efforts could become violent. we would have to be prepared to leave the airport and fight the taliban to get these people
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and i don't see that as a credible proposition. secondly, if the taliban don't want our aeroplanes to use the airport, one missile, one burst of machine—gun fire and the evacuation is over. after the scramble to respond to events in afghanistan, ministers say the evacuation effort has stepped up, with more than 6500 people brought out in the past ten days. but by its own admission, the uk is dependent on the us to keep that going, so beyond borisjohnson�*s diplomatic push, the options are limited and people will be left behind. labour says it didn't need to come to this. there is no evidence that our government tried to influence the withdrawal plan, despite knowing it was happening for 18 months. it is important now the g7 display the international leadership which has been missing in recent months. the government says even if this operation has to stop soon, there will be other routes for refugees through neighbouring
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countries, but the detail is scant and the difficulty obvious in a complex crisis that many simply didn't see coming. alex forsyth, bbc news. well, for more on this story, we can now speak to sir mark lyall grant, who's a former uk ambassador to the un, and former uk national security adviser. sir markjoins us now from south london. welcome, thank you forjoining us. how great is the reputational damage to the west? i how great is the reputational damage to the west? ~ how great is the reputational damage to the west?— to the west? i think there is some reputational _ to the west? i think there is some reputational damage, _ to the west? i think there is some reputational damage, particularlyl to the west? i think there is some i reputational damage, particularly to the united states, no question of that. this is not so much a military setback as a political setback for the biden administration. because he has pursued a policy that was started by donald trump, he did so without much consultation with closest allies and the implementation of the evacuation, the withdrawal, has been a flawed.
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we understand though from boris johnson's office that president biden has agreed with downing street that they will keep working to get everyone out who is eligible to be out, even if it means it is beyond the current evacuation phase. how difficult would that be if the troops have withdrawn? they have not talked yet about extending that withdrawal date. it talked yet about extending that withdrawal date.— withdrawal date. it will be impossible. _ withdrawal date. it will be impossible. with - withdrawal date. it will be impossible. with the - withdrawal date. it will be i impossible. with the troops withdrawal, let's be 100% clear about that was not there is no serious prospect of evacuation once armed troops have left, but there are two stages. first, persuading president biden that he has gained a push and push hard for an extension to the 31st august deadline and secondly, persuading the taliban to agree to that extension, because without the taliban's agreement, there is no realistic prospect of any extension. i think both those things are possible, i think that the g7 summit tomorrow most of the other g7 countries will argue in favour of staying as long as it
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takes to evacuate the most vulnerable and foreign nationals from kabul and i think that it is possible to persuade the taliban to allow the evacuation to continue beyond the 31st of august. not us arguing, or indeed the americans, but using those who do have some influence with the taliban regime, which means pakistan, china, turkey operating at the airport. these countries do have some influence with the taliban and if they can be persuaded to argue for an extension, i think there is a realistic possibility that the taliban will agree. possibility that the taliban will a . ree. possibility that the taliban will a i ree, ., , ., possibility that the taliban will airee, ., ., possibility that the taliban will auree. . ., possibility that the taliban will aaree, ., ., ., agree. the taliban are saying though that it would — agree. the taliban are saying though that it would be _ agree. the taliban are saying though that it would be a _ agree. the taliban are saying though that it would be a violation _ agree. the taliban are saying though that it would be a violation to - that it would be a violation to have an extension of any sort. why are they so keen on the 31st? that an extension of any sort. why are they so keen on the 31st?- they so keen on the 31st? at the 31st of august — they so keen on the 31st? at the 31st of august was _ they so keen on the 31st? at the 31st of august was set _ they so keen on the 31st? at the 31st of august was set by - they so keen on the 31st? at the 31st of august was set by joe - they so keen on the 31st? at the - 31st of august was set by joe biden, 31st of august was set byjoe biden, not the taliban. the taliban it deadline that was agreed with donald trump was actually may, so there has
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already been a violation if you like of that agreement. president biden originally set the target of the 11th of september as the deadline. so he can still meet that deadline if we go beyond the 31st of august. but i think the british government can probably evacuate most of the short term evacuees within that timetable at. after all, they have already evacuated over 6000 and there are only about another four or 5000 in this initial wave of evacuation is. so it should be possible to do that within eight days. possible to do that within eight da s. ~ ., ., ~ possible to do that within eight da s. ~ . ., ~ ., possible to do that within eight da s. ~ . ., days. what will it take, do you think, for— days. what will it take, do you think, for the _ days. what will it take, do you think, for the taliban - days. what will it take, do you think, for the taliban to - days. what will it take, do you think, for the taliban to get i think, for the taliban to get recognition by the international community as the legitimate rather than a de facto authority? i community as the legitimate rather than a de facto authority?— than a de facto authority? i think we have to _ than a de facto authority? i think we have to be — than a de facto authority? i think we have to be honest _ than a de facto authority? i think we have to be honest and - than a de facto authority? i think we have to be honest and say - than a de facto authority? i think i we have to be honest and say they have made a pretty good start. they have made a pretty good start. they have maintained a degree of security in a kabul, they have allowed this evacuation process which was not at all guaranteed and actually, it has
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been very encouraging and rather surprising how few alleged incidents of brutality that have actually been at since the taliban took over. all this is very different from 1996 when that they were immediately in a brutal mode, killing people left right and centre. this is not happening this time. they're talking with some of the senior political figures in afghanistan, including the previous president, about creating the government. if they do create a government that includes one or two of these other political leaders, then i think they will have made a good start on persuading the international community that taliban international community that taliban in 2021 is very different from the taliban in 1996. inevitably there will be more recognitions anyway in the five years they were in power in the five years they were in power in the 1990s, only three countries actually recognise the taliban government, pakistan, saudi arabia and the uae. this time there will be
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well over 50, and the uae. this time there will be well over50, because and the uae. this time there will be well over 50, because all the neighbours, china, russia, will certainly deal with the taliban, so will the organisation of islamic countries. so i think although the west may be a little bit reticent to start with and will wait several months before seeing what the taliban actually do when foreign eyes or forces have disappeared or gone, nonetheless i would expect many more recognitions than we thought before. == many more recognitions than we thought before.— thought before. -- than we saw before. thank _ thought before. -- than we saw before. thank you _ thought before. -- than we saw before. thank you for _ thought before. -- than we saw before. thank you for your - thought before. -- than we saw| before. thank you for your time. charlotte is an american citizen who has lived in kabul for more than a decade, and has founded kabul small animal rescue, a women—led veterinary clinic and animal rescue. she has the right to leave the country but says that she will not go until she knows the staff and animals can leave. thank you very much forjoining us, we appreciate you taking time out and do what is,
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i know, from a facebook video you have posted, a stressful time for is that the taliban have been to see you, what did they say? we that the taliban have been to see you, what did they say?— that the taliban have been to see you, what did they say? we have been in contact with — you, what did they say? we have been in contact with them _ you, what did they say? we have been in contact with them since _ you, what did they say? we have been in contact with them since monday - in contact with them since monday morning. approach them on monday morning. approach them on monday morning and asked for safe passage to continue our operations throughout the city and how we could evacuate. that has mostly been successful, we have worked with a couple of other members of their i think intelligence services. it was fairly cordial until today when 15 showed up at my house apparently with the chief of foreign embassies and foreign organisations and tried to order me to leave and then tried to order me to leave and then tried to order me to leave and then tried to order me to have guards inside my house and then tried to say i should go to a safe location with them. it is quite stressful and made worse by the situation at the airport and the
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new regulations today that look like only us citizens, green hold hard —— green card holders can go through the airport which would mean our entire staff would be left behind. assuming we could get the animals out. , ., ., , i. assuming we could get the animals out. , ., ., , ., , out. there is no doubt you are very dedicated to _ out. there is no doubt you are very dedicated to supporting _ out. there is no doubt you are very dedicated to supporting these - dedicated to supporting these animals, but many people will wonder why you and your staff are not taking the opportunity to leave, evenif taking the opportunity to leave, even if it means leaving the dogs behind. can you explain why you are so determined? say again, sorry? they are on the view that list but have not been invited to the airport yet. —— on the visa list. they have not missed an opportunity, they simply have not had it yet. we were hoping to get all our staff out on flights on wednesday, thursday or friday and they have not materialised yet, so no one has missed a chance, itjust has not
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been given to us yet. if missed a chance, itjust has not been given to us yet.— been given to us yet. if that chance arrives and — been given to us yet. if that chance arrives and you _ been given to us yet. if that chance arrives and you have _ been given to us yet. if that chance arrives and you have not _ been given to us yet. if that chance arrives and you have not got - been given to us yet. if that chance arrives and you have not got the i arrives and you have not got the landing permit for the animals you want to take with you, what will you do? i want to take with you, what will you do? , , ., , ., ., do? i will send the staff out and i will fiiure do? i will send the staff out and i will figure out _ do? i will send the staff out and i will figure out how _ do? i will send the staff out and i will figure out how to _ do? i will send the staff out and i will figure out how to move - do? i will send the staff out and i will figure out how to move the i will figure out how to move the animals. ., ., will figure out how to move the animals-— notl will figure out how to move the - animals._ not until animals. you will not go? not until it is absolutely _ animals. you will not go? not until it is absolutely necessary _ animals. you will not go? not until it is absolutely necessary and - animals. you will not go? not until it is absolutely necessary and i - it is absolutely necessary and i believe, i think as your former guest said, there is a little bit of legitimacy to this government and i do not think they would automatically hold me out and kill me, so i have a decent chance of staying safe long enough to do this. it will surprise people to hear how determined you are, why are you prepared to go to those lengths? because i am determined. but it feels like you're _ because i am determined. but it feels like you're putting - because i am determined. but it feels like you're putting animals| feels like you're putting animals before your safety. i feels like you're putting animals before your safety.— feels like you're putting animals
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before your safety. i am putting the lives of 250 — before your safety. i am putting the lives of 250 creatures _ before your safety. i am putting the lives of 250 creatures that - before your safety. i am putting the lives of 250 creatures that i - before your safety. i am putting the lives of 250 creatures that i think i lives of 250 creatures that i think matter and i am giving them priority. i am matter and i am giving them priority. iam not matter and i am giving them priority. i am not on a suicide mission here, i value my life, but i also think that i can do this. what also think that i can do this. what is it iioin also think that i can do this. what is it going to _ also think that i can do this. what is it going to take _ also think that i can do this. what is it going to take for _ also think that i can do this. what is it going to take for you - also think that i can do this. what is it going to take for you to i also think that i can do this. what is it going to take for you to do this? you have put out a lot of appeals for help, what sort of help you need? 50. appeals for help, what sort of help ou need? , , ., ., ., you need? so, yes, our social media team, you need? so, yes, our social media team. almost _ you need? so, yes, our social media team, almost all— you need? so, yes, our social media team, almost all volunteers - you need? so, yes, our social media team, almost all volunteers and i you need? so, yes, our social media| team, almost all volunteers and very recent has made the call, we need landing permits and right now we need permission for our staff to get on and leave. we really hope for everyone's sake that this new policy of american citizens only is it revoked. there is enough chaos at the airport, have an hour, change the airport, have an hour, change the rule again, let us give it a shot. i think it might be up to
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90,000 people who are not green card holders but very much us allies, it is pretty unconscionable.— holders but very much us allies, it is pretty unconscionable. thank you for talkini is pretty unconscionable. thank you for talking to _ is pretty unconscionable. thank you for talking to us, _ is pretty unconscionable. thank you for talking to us, we _ is pretty unconscionable. thank you for talking to us, we wish _ is pretty unconscionable. thank you for talking to us, we wish you i is pretty unconscionable. thank you for talking to us, we wish you the l for talking to us, we wish you the best of luck. for talking to us, we wish you the best of luck-— time they look at the sport. good evening. a moment for swimmer ellie simmonds to remember. she's a flagbearer for great britain at tomorrow's paralympic opening ceremony in tokyo, alongside the oldest member of the team, archer john stubbs, who's 56. both athletes are competing in their fourth games. chef de mission penny briscoe's selections mean simmonds will be the first woman to carry the flag for gb at a summer games since fellow swimmer maggie mceleny 21 years ago. there are literally no words to describe it. i mean, this is my fourth paralympics and i've never actually been to an opening ceremony! so to go to an opening ceremony,
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but also have the privilege of carrying the flag withjohn, it's going to be so exciting. when penny said that i was called for a meeting with her, i thought it was a general meeting. when she announced that me and john were both flag—bearers, i think we were both in awe and didn't really know how to respond! 0ne match in the english premier league to tell you about. west ham united are in action against leicester city. they have been playing for 20 minutes and it is still currently 0-0. liverpool have said they won't release mo salah for international duty for egypt in their match against angola next week due to quarantine restrictions the striker would face on his return to the uk. along with other top european sides, liverpool are seeking exemptions from the rules for players returning from red list countries, but with no agreement between the premier league and the government, salah will face
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a ten—day isolation period after playing in egypt. the third test at headingley starts on wednesday. england are one down in the series after losing against india at lord's last week. fast bowler mark wood is going to miss the match with an injury, something captainjoe root has described as a hammerblow. here's our sports correspondentjoe wilson. england prepared at headingley knowing they must bat with greater resolve and aware there is another bowling problem to solve. mark woods out, having injured his shoulder at lord's, making a desperate diving stop — fully committed or ill considered? his captain today said it was just a freak occurrence. it's frustration for him more than anything else. he was bowling at great pace. he seemed to be managing his body a lot better, and it was nothing more than a freak incident that he found himself missing this test match. so a bit of a hammer blow in that respect, but he'll come back. headingley isjoe root�*s home
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ground, where the county is still to publish the full report into the treatment of hasnain rafik. he accused the county of downplaying racism after yorkshire said he was the victim of what they called inappropriate behaviour. root cannot speculate on the contents of the full report, but says it's difficult to see rafik hurting. if anything, it just shows from a game that we need to keep finding ways of making our game as diverse as we can and improving it, trying to make sure this is the last time that we have the conversation. meanwhile the ecb released more figures today designed to highlight the success of the hundred tournament — watched at some point by over 16 million people on tv. and over half of those who bought tickets for the games were new to cricket. the hundred is there to generate new interest, but with intense discussions set to happen, the ecb maintained that test cricket is the sport's pinnacle.
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joe wilson, bbc news. the team for europe's solheim cup has been announced and there are three english players selected for their defence of the title against the united states next month. georgia hall and charley hull made the team automatically, while mel reid is one of six picks from captain catriona matthew. georgia hall makes the team after finishing second in the women's open, and will be making her third appearance in the competition. charley hull meanwhile will be playing the event for the fifth time. mel reid has been picked for the first time after missing out on selection in 2019. that's all the sport for now. back to you. thank you very much. there's to be a clampdown on the "cowboy behaviour" of some covid test providers who've been accused of taking advantage of holiday—makers travelling abroad. more than 80 companies listed on the government's website are to be warned over misleading prices. a further 57 firms will be removed from the website today because they either no longer exist or don't actually provide the relevant tests. 0ur transport correspondent caroline davies has the details.
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if you travel, you test. and you pay for those tests. the government's own website has a list of providers, but booking through them isn't to guarantee things will go smoothly, as barbara lowe found out coming from her holiday in portugal in june. we didn't get any test results at all. you couldn't get through to them on the phone, you couldn't contact them via the website. well, to be honest, i think it's quite farcical. i'm annoyed, i'm upset that i've lost my money and i haven't got what i paid for, basically. the government lists companies with the cheapest at the top, but some firms have advertised tests at lower prices, only to charge more at checkout, or the tests aren't available at all. today, the government has said that 82 test providers will be given a warning about misleading pricing and could be removed altogether. 57 have already been removed from the list because they no longer exist or don't provide relevant testing services. some testing companies hope this
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will help the industry's reputation. over the last weeks, companies in the space of the industry has received a bad reputation, not because of everybody, just from a select few, so now that those select few are removed, we think that, you know, the industry can now show its capability, focusing on quality of service as well as obviously trying to reduce the price at the same time. this provider has done over a million tests, and it's pleased to say it hasn't been getting a warning. this is where the pcr tests are first processed when they arrived. testing for holidays has been going on for months, but complaints about some operators have been going on for almost the same amount of time. it's meant that there have been some questions about why the government is only taking action now. we are really talking about the most basic of checks, we are talking about does the company exist? does the price it says it's going to sell the test at, does that exist? there are lots of other problems behind us, so good news that the government is taking action, but my goodness, it really has taken a long time. the government has said it will do
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regular spot checks to ensure that prices are accurate and providers are legitimate. but the summer season has nearly come to an end, and for some, testing has already left a nasty aftertaste. caroline davies, bbc news. the latest government coronavirus figures show there were 31,914 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means on average there were 32,981 new cases per day, in the last week. the most recent figures show there were almost 6,500 people in hospital with the virus on thursday. a0 deaths were recorded in the past 2a hours, with an average of 100 deaths a day in the past week. 0n vaccinations, 87.7% of adults in the uk have now had theirfirstjab, and 76.9% have had two. the government says it's met its target of offering all 16 and 17—year—olds in england a single dose of the covid jab. more than a million young people became eligible earlier this month
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and the latest figures suggest around 360,000 have taken up the offer. a new nhs video has been launched highlighting the effects of long covid in a bid to drive up vaccination rates amongst teenagers. here's our medical editor fergus walsh. hiya, are you ready for vaccination? yeah. every jab counts. these 16 and 17—year—olds were getting their vaccine today at tipton in the west midlands. almost 90 million doses have now been administered in the uk. yeah, it was quick and easy, keeping everyone safe. i want to keep my family safe and me safe, more importantly, so, yeah. as an a&e doctor, i've seen a lot during this pandemic. but nothing has shocked me more than seeing younger people being admitted to our hospitals with covid—19. and as well as their age, many of them have one other thing in common — they were unvaccinated. the nhs video urges young adults to get vaccinated and shares stories of several who were laid low by the virus.
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my lungs, out of nowhere, just kind of stopped. i struggled to breathe sitting, lying down, obviously sitting upright. i was then, sort of, attached to a ventilator machine. the younger you are, the lower your overall risk from covid, but people aged 18—34 now make up more than a fifth of those admitted to hospital with the virus. and there is the threat of long covid. normally you would be able to go to bed, go to sleep and wake up kind of feeling ready to face the day, i could sleep for a week and still feel tired. if we look at vaccine uptake in adults in england, whereas over 90% of all of those aged 60 and over have had at least one dose, it falls to 63% for those aged 18—29. for 16 and 17—year—olds, is estimated around 36% have had a jab in the three weeks since they became eligible. the sse arena in belfast
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marked its final day as a vaccination centre on sunday, having administered more than 360,000 doses overfive months. the last recipient — this 17—year—old. with covid cases and hospital admissions rising, the immunisation campaign remains as important as ever to ensure as many people as possible are protected. fergus walsh, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. most of us have had a fine day with some sunshine and the weather this week is not looking bad at all the. this high pressure has parked itself over the uk and is here to stay for the whole of the week. this is the weather it brings, so areas of a cloud but also big breaks in that cloud but also big breaks in that cloud cover, so there will be some sunshine around as well. this is the satellite picture from monday. let's look at the forecast for the evening
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hours and plenty of clear skies, but eastern and central parts of the country tending to cloud a vet through the night and that is because there is a wind blowing off the north sea dragging on some cloud. these are the attempt is at six o'clock on tuesday, single figures in some spots but for most ten to 13 degrees. centre of the hypertext right over scotland during the course of tuesday and this is where we are setting the best of the weather, perhaps up to 25 in glasgow. the most, perhaps not quite so warm but there were certainly be a good deal of nice weather.
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hello, this is bbc news — the headlines. the race against time to get people out of afghanistan safely — the british government asks president biden to delay the date of the final withdrawal of american troops. a clamp down on cowboy firms offering pcr travel tests — nearly 60 companies are removed from the official list. walkers on snowdon are being urged to respect the mountain after concerns over the impact of a spike in visitors. flash floods in the american state of tennessee have claimed more than 20 lives with dozens of people still missing — more than 15 inches of rain has fallen. pressure is growing of the us to delay its final withdrawal from afghanistan to allow more people to leave safely. afghanistan to allow more people to leave safely. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kabul and says the situation at kabul airport is getting more desperate by the day. well, what is injoe biden�*s head now?
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the president and commander—in—chief of the united states is under constant pressure now, constant criticism and yet every time he comes on air, every time he takes questions he sticks by his decisions. this is a man when he was senator when he was by president and now as president he believes afghanistan is a quagmire, he believes that american troops should come home long ago. but how can he ignore? with the reporting in this programme that the british, french, germans, italians, so many countries are begging the united states just give us more time. we saw at the airport the crush of people, the evacuation is going more smoothly, more quickly but there are so many more people to board. i'm just one person on my mobile phone, on my computer, hour by hour and sometimes minute by minute. i'm getting sos messages. "please, my life is in danger, please can you give me on a flight, please, i can't get to the airport.
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can you get me inside?" these are desperate calls for help. they know the window is closing and they know that if they don't get past those gates now they may never have a chance to do so. doctor leslie vinjamuri is the director of the us and americas programme at chatham house which is an international affairs think tank. good to see you thank you very much forjoining us. we've got this extraordinary g—7 meeting. what needs to happen there? there is going to be a lot of pressure onjoe biden to extend this deadline. absolutely. and it is critical of course at the g—7 come together after a period when there's been a lot of fracturing over this decision to exit and the humanitarian catastrophe that is unfolding. it's absolutely critical to work together to agree how to evacuate people that are trying to get out. and also of course to agree a strategy for
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talking with the taliban. because of course we know that the taliban have also said to accept the deadline of august. it's very critical situation, requires talking to all parties to get as many people out of the country as is possible. of course we know the g—7 also has a broader agenda which is stabilising a humanitarian situation that threatens to spiral out of control, agreeing a plan for assistance with agreeing a plan for assistance with a also moving this conversation very quickly to the security council to the un to a broader group of actors, it's absolutely vital that russia and china are part of these conversations if they are to be successful. i think in the short term as you suggested the number one priority is to work together to get people out of the country. and if that means extending that august 31 deadline that will certainly be top of the agenda on tuesday. hour of the agenda on tuesday. how important _ of the agenda on tuesday. how important are _ of the agenda on tuesday. how important are the _ of the agenda on tuesday. how important are the countries that neighbour afghanistan go to be? if
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people can't get out via the airport there is the option of getting across the land border, i suppose if they can do that. i across the land border, i suppose if they can do that.— they can do that. i think this is much more — they can do that. i think this is much more difficult. _ they can do that. i think this is much more difficult. in - they can do that. i think this is much more difficult. in the i they can do that. i think this is i much more difficult. in the current environment it's certainly something that's being discussed. but i think right now the focus is very much on line people back. in the us case not directly to the us, president biden was very clear on this that people would be taken to other places, and then having the question of visas and refugee status at that very carefully. in the case of the us before people are brought in. the other thing with the g—7 is there needs to be a very serious conversation about who will be taking what numbers of refugees and as it as we've seen some numbers, from canada and others we are still waiting to see what the us will say on this. those conversations are absolutely key. again, it's hard to stress how difficult the
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circumstances are for cooperation. at the same time they are absolutely vital at the state.— vital at the state. because joe biden has _ vital at the state. because joe biden has many _ vital at the state. because joe biden has many domestic i vital at the state. because joe i biden has many domestic concerns that are competing for his attention. he that are competing for his attention-— that are competing for his attention. ., , , ., , .,, that are competing for his attention. ., , , ., , , attention. he absolutely does was up as we know. — attention. he absolutely does was up as we know, covid, _ attention. he absolutely does was up as we know, covid, the _ attention. he absolutely does was up as we know, covid, the rate - attention. he absolutely does was up as we know, covid, the rate of- as we know, covid, the rate of infection and hospitalisation has begun to really climb, it's a very serious situation in the us largely because of the people who are not getting vaccinated. the fda approval is come through, i think that might mean that at the beginning of opening a conversation about vaccines being mandatory. but that domestic crisis certainly impacting the president. there's a movement right now in congress to consider the budget plan to consider the infrastructure. so many things in the heat of august that of course, pressing down on the president. at the front of his mind, rememberjoe biden has taken foreign policy very seriously. he's thinking about afghanistan since 9/11 in a very
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serious and deliberative way. this will be absolutely at the forefront of his mind and his efforts. doctor leshe of his mind and his efforts. doctor leslie vinjamuri, _ of his mind and his efforts. doctor leslie vinjamuri, thank— of his mind and his efforts. doctor leslie vinjamuri, thank you i of his mind and his efforts. doctor leslie vinjamuri, thank you very i leslie vinjamuri, thank you very much. a man who tricked the taliban to get his family on a british government plane out of kabul is now safely back in the uk. mohammad taher first arrived in this country as a refugee in 2001. he became a taxi driver and brought up a family in lincoln. thinking afghanistan was safe to return to live, he travelled there just as the taliban were fighting there way back in to power again. tonight he's back in britain after escaping the nightmare scenes in the afghan capital. jake zuckerman has his story. a country in chaos and a taxi driver from lincoln trapped into middle with his young family. a british citizen had been hoping to make a permanent return to the land of his birth.
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he was visiting kabul where his wife and children who were born in lincoln had set up home. but the return of the taliban sent them fleeing for their lives. at that time we all left our houses. we escape to our friends houses which nobody knows who we are. and we are hiding over there. how did it feel for you and your wife and kids hiding in a friend's house not knowing what can happen? very scary. very, very scary, terrible stuff. the family had to talk their way past taliban guards to reach the safety of the airport. they were so many people and shooting was all over. taliban was shooting so many people and surrounding the airport. the second thing we were there, we don't want to reveal our identity to the taliban in case they found out we are from uk, the british passports they must kill us immediately. you know? but once inside mohammed became
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separated from his wife and children, they were flown to the uk where finally yesterday he was able to rejoin them. hugging each other, crying from joyce and emotional to see each ——joy other after long time from that kind of horror to just get out of afghanistan and come to here and find peace. nine two now 20 years after he arrived in the uk mohammed is a refugee for the second time. his family have only the clothes on their backs but are thankful to be safe. they must stay in quarantine for the next ten days but he is keen to return to lincoln, the city he loves. yes, that's my second home, actually. ever since i was young, 17 years old thing in lincoln. now i still love all the uk and i loved lincoln as well
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for that i want to come back to the uk, yes. another story of an escape from kabul. a woman from nottingham who's been desperately trying to leave afghanistan. she says she is also believed to be back in the uk. the 24—year—old was in the country with her mother and two young siblings visiting sick relatives when the taliban took control. the family whose name we are not using for safety air two landed in the airport this morning. good to see her. lovely to see you you look so handsome. lovely to see you you look so handsome-— lovely to see you you look so handsome._ the . lovely to see you you look so i handsome._ the sound lovely to see you you look so - handsome._ the sound of handsome. thank you. the sound of 'o and handsome. thank you. the sound of joy and relief- _ handsome. thank you. the sound of joy and relief. he _ handsome. thank you. the sound of joy and relief. he has— handsome. thank you. the sound of joy and relief. he has spent - handsome. thank you. the sound of joy and relief. he has spent the i joy and relief. he has spent the past week worrying about his wife, aduu past week worrying about his wife, adult daughter and two small children who have been trying desperately to leave afghanistan. they travelled there last month from their home in nottingham to visit sick elderly grandparents and never expected to be caught up in the taliban takeover. these images were filmed by his 24—year—old daughter last week as they tried to get through to the airport in kabul. he
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a taxi driver says he feared for their lives. but today they finally returned to the uk. home their lives. but today they finally returned to the uk.— returned to the uk. how are you feelin: returned to the uk. how are you feeling today? — returned to the uk. how are you feeling today? i _ returned to the uk. how are you feeling today? i am _ returned to the uk. how are you feeling today? i am very - returned to the uk. how are you feeling today? i am very happy, | returned to the uk. how are you i feeling today? i am very happy, very happy. they're so happy. they were so tired at the moment. very overjoyed _ so tired at the moment. very overjoyed because _ so tired at the moment. very overjoyed because i - so tired at the moment. very overjoyed because i didn't i so tired at the moment. very overjoyed because i didn't even know that. overjoyed because i didn't even know that in_ overjoyed because i didn't even know that in the _ overjoyed because i didn't even know that. in the morning i felt so angry but that. in the morning i felt so angry hut then— that. in the morning i felt so angry but then when i heard when they are here my— but then when i heard when they are here my wishes immediately changed. he spoke _ here my wishes immediately changed. he spoke to me from inside the airport. he spoke to me from inside the airort. ~ . . he spoke to me from inside the airort. . ., . ., he spoke to me from inside the airort. ~ ., . ., ., airport. watching caliban on tv was 'ust like a airport. watching caliban on tv was just like a horror _ airport. watching caliban on tv was just like a horror movie _ airport. watching caliban on tv was just like a horror movie for - airport. watching caliban on tv was just like a horror movie for me. i airport. watching caliban on tv was just like a horror movie for me. -- l just like a horror movie for me. —— caliban _ just like a horror movie for me. —— caliban but— just like a horror movie for me. —— caliban. but seeing _ just like a horror movie for me. —— caliban. but seeing face—to—face l just like a horror movie for me. ——j caliban. but seeing face—to—face it was something _ caliban. but seeing face—to—face it was something like _ caliban. but seeing face—to—face it was something like i— caliban. but seeing face—to—face it was something like i can't- caliban. but seeing face—to—face iti was something like i can't describe. it has _ was something like i can't describe. it has been — was something like i can't describe. it has been really— was something like i can't describe. it has been really even _ was something like i can't describe. it has been really even because i it has been really even because everywhere _
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it has been really even because everywhere you _ it has been really even because everywhere you go _ it has been really even because everywhere you go you - it has been really even because everywhere you go you see i it has been really even becausei everywhere you go you see them it has been really even because - everywhere you go you see them with a gun _ everywhere you go you see them with a gun and _ everywhere you go you see them with a gun and you — everywhere you go you see them with a gun and you are _ everywhere you go you see them with a gun. and you are really, _ everywhere you go you see them with a gun. and you are really, there i everywhere you go you see them with a gun. and you are really, there is i a gun. and you are really, there is no respectful— a gun. and you are really, there is no respectful woman. _ a gun. and you are really, there is no respectful woman. most- a gun. and you are really, there is i no respectful woman. most relieved to see _ no respectful woman. most relieved to see nty— no respectful woman. most relieved to see my siblings _ no respectful woman. most relieved to see my siblings here, _ no respectful woman. most relieved to see my siblings here, really- to see my siblings here, really happy. — to see my siblings here, really happy. we're _ to see my siblings here, really happy. we're heading - to see my siblings here, really happy. we're heading back, i happy. we're heading back, we're going _ happy. we're heading back, we're going to _ happy. we're heading back, we're going to see — happy. we're heading back, we're going to see dad _ happy. we're heading back, we're going to see dad was— happy. we're heading back, we're going to see dad was up- happy. we're heading back, we're going to see dad was up they- going to see dad was up they are reatiy— going to see dad was up they are really happy, _ going to see dad was up they are really happy, seeing _ going to see dad was up they are really happy, seeing them - going to see dad was up they arei really happy, seeing them happy, going to see dad was up they are i really happy, seeing them happy, i'm happy— really happy, seeing them happy, i'm happy it's— really happy, seeing them happy, i'm happy it's just — really happy, seeing them happy, i'm happy it's just everything _ really happy, seeing them happy, i'm happy it's just everything to - really happy, seeing them happy, i'm happy it'sjust everything to me. i happy it'sjust everything to me. i'm happy it'sjust everything to me. i'm just — happy it'sjust everything to me. i'm just waiting _ happy it'sjust everything to me. i'm just waiting to _ happy it'sjust everything to me. i'm just waiting to see _ happy it'sjust everything to me. i'm just waiting to see my- happy it'sjust everything to me. i'm just waiting to see my dad i happy it'sjust everything to me. l i'm just waiting to see my dad and my brothers — i'm just waiting to see my dad and my brothers he _ i'm just waiting to see my dad and my brothers-— my brothers. he and her family members _ my brothers. he and her family members who _ my brothers. he and her family members who have _ my brothers. he and her family members who have returned i my brothers. he and her family i members who have returned from afghanistan will have to complete a ten day hotel quarantine before they can be reunited with the rest of the family in nottingham. although they are so worried about their relatives that remain in the country this family are looking forward to putting the last few days behind them. as the crisis in afghanistan continues to unfold our concerns that minority groups in afghanistan will subject to persecution under taliban rule and that the tele— bands interpretation of islamic law
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homosexuality is strictly prohibited and punishable by death. an american activist campaigning for pdq rights in afghanistan and also an author who joins author whojoins us from author who joins us from san author whojoins us from san diego. thank you for joining us. tell us what life was like for you in afghanistan. you have known what it's like to be persecuted. have known what it's like to be persecuted-— have known what it's like to be persecuted. absolutely. i faced tremendous — persecuted. absolutely. i faced tremendous amounts _ persecuted. absolutely. i faced tremendous amounts of- persecuted. absolutely. i faced i tremendous amounts of oppression when i returned to my home and at the 32 years in exile. in 2012 i became a professor of global science at the university of x canister. from the day i arrived i received blowback from people —— afghanistan. paris and believe in the fundamentalist interpretation of islam was basically said there is zero tolerance for them. people persecuted me not only because i was a homosexual but also a lapsed muslim. so people under sharia law
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which taliban are very strict about enforcing they believe that lgbtq people of the worst creatures because they have three cardinal sins. they are enemy combatants. they are homosexual, the apostates are not practising religion property doing a properly and also sodomize there is no discussion about it. �* , . sodomize there is no discussion aboutit. ., ., ., . ., about it. it's an automatic death enal . about it. it's an automatic death penalty- even — about it. it's an automatic death penalty. even for— about it. it's an automatic death penalty. even for the _ about it. it's an automatic death penalty. even for the last i about it. it's an automatic death penalty. even for the last 20 i penalty. even for the last 20 years in afghanistan it was considered illegal and even the lgbtq community really good and i barely had some breathing room. now it's like they are living in a prisonjust breathing room. now it's like they are living in a prison just as everyone else's. this are living in a prison 'ust as everyone else's._ are living in a prison 'ust as eve one else's. a ., ., ., ., everyone else's. as an international community — everyone else's. as an international community is _ everyone else's. as an international community is pretty _ everyone else's. as an international community is pretty much - everyone else's. as an international community is pretty much be i everyone else's. as an international community is pretty much be trying | community is pretty much be trying the afghans. the community is pretty much be trying the afghans-— the afghans. the taliban have at least offered _ the afghans. the taliban have at least offered to _ the afghans. the taliban have at least offered to make _ the afghans. the taliban have at. least offered to make concessions for women's rights, education of girls and some freedom of that media. we obviously have to wait and see whether they to that. to what
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extent were lg btq see whether they to that. to what extent were lgbtq plus people included in those negotiations? there were never included in that negotiation. not only were they not included in negotiations, it's like lgbt people, they never existed when the us didn't offer what should we do about them, they basically, they basically give them permission to do whatever they want. not allowing that. also the international community did nothing in 2002 when they caliban were first toppled. when afghans from all society, all ethnic and religious groups, all the different geographic look patients met, all gender of men and women they met to discuss the future of afghanistan to create eight inclusive creek accuracy and that will be safe for all the people and power will be divided. lgbtq people were not giving a say. they still come to me to say that lgbtq people
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have no status, decriminalise and it's illegal. they gave permission for families to commit honour violence against them. i gave permission for police officers to go ahead and apprehend and find lg eq people and break them and nobody can do anything about it. also mobs and militias will go ahead and terrorise them there is also instances that i heard of lgbtq people are victims of wiretapping by the security force of resources is supposed to be spent that this is the corruption again, the afghan government, there was post be spent towards finding terrorists whatever it may be, al-qaeda, delavan, they were used to wiretap on dating apps on social media groups to find and lure these 93)’ media groups to find and lure these gay and bisexual men into traps to break the lgbtq networks. iliiui’itli gay and bisexual men into traps to break the lgbtq networks. with all that in mind, _ break the lgbtq networks. with all that in mind, what _ break the lgbtq networks. with all that in mind, what then _ break the lgbtq networks. with all that in mind, what then should i break the lgbtq networks. with all that in mind, what then should the |
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that in mind, what then should the foreign government who are offering a safe haven to people trying to get out of afghanistan to be doing to support the lgbt community and afghanistan?— support the lgbt community and afghanistan? what they should be doini is afghanistan? what they should be doing is lowering _ afghanistan? what they should be doing is lowering the _ afghanistan? what they should be doing is lowering the barriers. i afghanistan? what they should be doing is lowering the barriers. we | doing is lowering the barriers. we know that the united states, the uk government, the european union have not been doing that. there was an article four years ago that was published in the guardian that basically the uk was telling people you know what, we are going to use deport these lgbtq afghans because they're not coming from iran or saudi arabia, they're coming from afghanistan. it was democratic, it was liberated by nato. well we saw what that was last week when how easily it was taken over by taliban. but also they were telling the lgbtq to pretend to be straight and you should be five. well, that's not good enough. that's not a normal life of decency. what we have in the situation right now, i have 200 plus cases right now that are pending with the us state department and i'm telling them, lower the barriers.
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some of these people are like transgender people who don't have a passport. how are they going to go to the caliban and say please give me paperwork so i can fly out? they see a male name but they say a woman who's gone through the process of changing her gender, how a secular work was that there will be automatic death sentences for these people. i'm saying look, help these people. i'm saying look, help these people get to joe harr people. i'm saying look, help these people get tojoe harr or qatar or wherever they need to go outside of afghanistan and then we can figure out the paperwork, bureaucratic things we can figure these things out later. the time is of the essence was up this morning i received a frantic call by someone who is basically persecuted, their father was killed taliban, the brother was killed by the taliban, the boy from was killed by the taliban last week, be added. now he's looking for him and he's basically got sad for the taliban stabbed him in the dark of the basement where he is hiding. i do not know where he is right now.
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these stories are immensely distressing. hopefully the western governments at least will bear what you say and mind. thank you very much indeed. officials in the us state of tennessee say — that at least two young children, are among the more than 20 people known to have died, in flash flooding over the weekend. dozens are still missing. record rainfall of more than a0 centimetres in 2a hours — in some areas — led to roads and bridges being washed away. daniela relph reports. those living here described a wall of water coming in hard and fast. flash floods overwhelming parts of tennessee. the rain and wind tore through communities with a ferocity few had predicted. it was a terrifying experience as residents tried to save their homes and theirfamilies. i'm trying to get them out of the door but the water is so high
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and it's pushing against the door that i'm having a hard time pushing to open the door to get them out, i'm holding two babies. the aftermath is a landscape strewn with floodwaters, wrecked vehicles and severely damaged homes. in many counties, there is bewilderment at how quickly the storm took hold and this remains both a recovery and a search and rescue operation with many still missing, including children. tremendous loss of life, a number of missing people on the ground, homes washed off their foundations, cars strewn around the community, it is a devastating picture of loss and heartache. the worst hit area was humphreys county, west of nashville. here, the floodwaters rose so quickly many people just couldn't escape their homes. the plight of those living here recognised in last night's presidential address. i want to begin by expressing my deepest condolences for the sudden and tragic loss of life due
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to this flash flood. i know we have reached out to the community, we stand ready to offer them support. i asked the administrator to speak to governor lee of tennessee right away and we will offer any assistance they need for this terrible moment. tens of thousands of people are still without power. roads and bridges remain impassible in some places, hampering rescue efforts. there were hurricane warnings in the north—east of the united states over the weekend but it was here, further south in tennessee, where the extreme weather really hit and took lives. daniela relph, bbc news. it struck in long queues to try reese's summit.
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amid concerns that increasing numbers of visitors are damaging footpaths and leaving litter. and far from getting away from it all, some walkers are finding themselves stuck in long queues to try to reach the summit. 0ur wales correspondent tomos morgan reports from the snowdonia national park. earlier this month in poor visibility in treacherous conditions, rafts of people chose to climb snowdon, the uk's third highest and busiest mountain. rescue services say they're in holiday madness, dealing with three incidents within three hours on saturday alone. today, however, with the rugged landscape glistening in far brighter weather, yr wyddfa, as it's known in welsh, is no less of a draw at a time when going abroad is still too much of a trek for most. it feels busier than last time, because we came right at the peak of covid last time when we were allowed to travel. it feels so much better this year. it's busy, but i thought it was going to be packed—packed and it's just nice. i picked up cans and bottles. dog fouling is still happening. it's such a shame, because it's a beautiful area if everyone i justjust did their bit. we've got water over there. this is where plastic will end up if it is not picked up. _ the mountain railway only goes
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to halfway this year and the cafe at 3500 feet is closed. covid and uncertainty earlier in the summer over social distancing measures forcing the hands of those in charge. nevertheless, this morning, just like on so many others during the holidays, we were told there was an hour—long queue for a selfie on the summit. as a consequence of covid, more of us are staycationing, enjoying the great british outdoors this year. and the snowdonia society estimate that there has been an increase of a third in people travelling up the mountain. but with that increase also comes certain problems. the snowdonia society has had to put over two thirds of our capacity, staff, volunteers, money, just into managing visitor pressures, and the other organisations involved are in the same boat. the mountain rescue teams of course are very stretched. at the base in llanberis as the last train heads up, the car parks are still full and the ice cream is still being served.
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economically, the tourists are needed. environmentally, could more be done? tomos morgan, bbc news, snowdonia. tomorrow the paralympics get under way in tokyo. the flag bears name for gp and the opening ceremony the team hope to build on a 147 medals won in rio five years ago. our sports correspondent eddie swiss is in tokyo. raising the barfor a paralympics port from powerlifting to fencing, from athletics to archery, the british team in tokyo has success in its site. but for the games themselves in the midst of a pandemic simply getting to the start has been a struggle. the traditional torch relay for example is had to be scaled back. the athletes can hardly wait, including ellie simmonsjust
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13 when she made her name in beijing. now 13 years later a flag bearer at tomorrow's opening ceremony. to bearer at tomorrow's opening ceremony-— bearer at tomorrow's opening ceremon. ., , �*, ~ ceremony. to be honest it's like literally no _ ceremony. to be honest it's like literally no words _ ceremony. to be honest it's like literally no words to _ ceremony. to be honest it's like literally no words to describe i ceremony. to be honest it's like literally no words to describe it. j literally no words to describe it. to me this is my fourth paralympics. i'm not actually been to an opening ceremony. yet i think i'm just so excited. it's going to be really good. many here don't share _ it's going to be really good. many here don't share that _ it's going to be really good. many here don't share that excitement. once again there will be no fans in the venues since the olympics covid cases in japan faced a the venues since the olympics covid cases injapan faced a new high. but the head of the paralympics told me these games won't spread the virus. of course one here the other after their_ of course one here the other after their they— of course one here the other after their they will face a situation where — their they will face a situation where the test is get a return positive — where the test is get a return positive and this is devastating. but then— positive and this is devastating. but then how we identified with, we isolate _ but then how we identified with, we isolate them is the key to guaranteed safe games. 30 isolate them is the key to guaranteed safe games. so you are confident that _ guaranteed safe games. so you are confident that will _ guaranteed safe games. so you are confident that will be _ guaranteed safe games. so you are confident that will be a _ guaranteed safe games. so you are confident that will be a safe - guaranteed safe games. so you are confident that will be a safe games| confident that will be a safe games because i am confident it will be a safe games was up at safe games doesn't mean zero cases. but the state of emergency still in place across tokyo these games will begin
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amid a subdued atmosphere. but the atmosphere here will be hoping they can change that. and for the british team as ever there are high hopes. paralympicsgb have flourished in recent games with a 120 metals in london, 147 in rio for the peer they've been a range of 100 to 140 because of this uncertainty covid is cause. one applet has a chance at history for the swimmer turned cyclists could become britain's most decorated paralympic and after winning metals in the last seven games. i winning metals in the last seven names. ., �* ~' ., winning metals in the last seven iames. ., �* 4' ., , winning metals in the last seven names. ., �* ~ ., , ., ., games. i don't know but not 'oin the swimmin: games. i don't know but not 'oin the swimming club * games. i don't know but not 'oin the swimming club as h games. i don't know but not 'oin the swimming club as a h games. i don't know but not join the swimming club as a ten-year-old. i | swimming club as a ten—year—old. i was told i was trick training too late to be coded anything. it almost feels like you're constantly trying to prove someone wrong.- feels like you're constantly trying to prove someone wrong. britain and of course is — to prove someone wrong. britain and of course is already _ to prove someone wrong. britain and of course is already enjoy _ to prove someone wrong. britain and of course is already enjoy plenty - to prove someone wrong. britain and of course is already enjoy plenty of l of course is already enjoy plenty of metals the summer after soaring to olympic success. but the paralympics could be even more glittering despite the shadow of the pandemic it's now their chance to shine.
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we will have more on afghanistan at the top of the hour and we will see how it's covered in tomorrow's front pages and have had ten and half past 11 this evening in the papers was up arejustjoining us tonight 11 this evening in the papers was up are justjoining us tonightjason are just joining us tonight jason beatty from are justjoining us tonightjason beatty from the daily mirror and sean griffith from the sunday times. time for a look at the weather forecast now most of us have had a fine day with some sunshine and the weather isn't looking bad at all. this has parked itself over the uk and is here tuesday for the whole of the week. this is the weather it brings so areas of cloud and also big breaks in that cloud cover. they will be some sunshine around as well. this is a satellite picture from monday. let's have a look at the forecast for the evening hours and you can see plenty of clear skies. but eastern and central parts of the country tending to cloud over through the night. that's because there is a wind blowing off the north sea dragging in some of that car. these are the temperatures at
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six o'clock on tuesday, single figures in some spots but for most of us is around ten to 13 degrees. at the centre of the high—pressure right right over scotland during the course of tuesday. this is where we are expecting the best of the weather perhaps up to 25 degrees in glasgow. for most of us not so warm but certainly a good deal of bright weather around.
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this is bbc news with me, christian fraser. 16,000 people have been evacuated from afghanistan in just 24 hours, but time is running out for those afghans who are eligible to leave. borisjohnson and joe biden have spoken ahead of tomorrow g7 virtual summit. tomorrow's g7 virtual summit. the british side wants an extension to next week's deadline. the taliban says there would be consequences. search and rescue efforts continue in tennessee where at least 22 people have died in flash flooding. a third of the state's annual rainfall fell in just 24 hours. henri is now a tropical depression dumping heavy rain over new york state. this the moment the lightning struck the world trade center in downtown manhattan.

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