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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 19, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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us and nato forces. still chaotic scenes at the hamid karzai airport. the pentagon it has 6000 people inside, processed and ready to go. but there are tens of thousands of others who won't make it. in remote, rural corners of haiti the damage left by last week's earthquake is only now emerging. five days on the injured are finally reaching the field hospitals. haitian authorities say they're in urgent need of outside help. covid—19 hospitalizations are surging across the us, with the rates for children and adults under 50, hitting their highest levels yet and the colorado river, one of the biggest sources of fresh water for millions of people in the american west is running perilously low. and climate change is to blame.
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hello. there was a protest in kabul today. 200 people came out near the presidential palace carrying afghan flags. it was quickly put down. the taliban have moved to crush any early opposition to their rule putting the entire city of khost in the south east of the country under indefinite curfew. but it is further evidence that while thousands are still trying to get out of the country, there are many left behind who will fight for a say in how its run. right now the focus remains on the airport. the pentagon says it has evacuated 7000 people since saturday and another 6000 are at the airport, processed and waiting for flights. but outside it is becoming harder for people to get through. and as people scramble to leave the country, the united nations refugee agency says the number of people displaced within afghanistan threatens to become a humanitarian crisis. from kabul our correspondent
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secunder kermani. this is crowd control, taliban style. 0utside this is crowd control, taliban style. outside the airport, thousands of people desperate to leave. this is the road anyone being evacuated has to travel along. the taliban repeatedly stopped us filming. they don't like the images of so many afghans are fleeing their rule. they have denied claims they are at times preventing some afghans with valid documents from entering the airport. but many of those here don't have a visa. they are hoping somehow to leave. i want to go anywhere else other than here, says this man. but the embassies and offices are closed. what can i do? then taliban fighters bring the interview to an end. the taliban are
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everywhere you go in kabul. they are heavily armed. but for the most part, in the city, they are friendly. today so more protests expressing defiance to their rule, rallying around the afghan flag. 0utside rallying around the afghan flag. outside the canadian embassy, more chaos. hundreds of people frantically scribbling their names on pieces of paper hoping it will somehow lead to a visa. the embassy has already been evacuated. these people have no real information about what they can do to leave afghanistan, but they are desperate. they are asking us, is it too, will the canadians give me a visa? the fact is, most of these people will never get one. this family haven't spoken to anyone at the embassy, but heard rumours that if they turn up, they will find help. there is war, misery. i cannot even buy bread for
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my children, says this man. new footage today of the even more chaotic scenes at the airport earlier this week. some parents so desperate, they hand their children over. new details of the horrifying story of those who lost their lives. 0ne story of those who lost their lives. one of the young men clinging to a plane, clinging to it even after take—off, a talented footballer who had played for the national youth team. a generation of afghans now facing an uncertain future. today the british foreign secretary dominic raab hosted a virtual meeting of the g7 foreign and development ministers. one of the urgent things they have to consider, in mind of that un warning, is if and how to engage with the new taliban regime. three quarters of the former governments budget came from international aid, the financial reserves of the country around 6.5 billion dollars are in the us and access has been denied by us authorities. the former governor of the central
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bank, ajmal ahmady told this programme on tuesday that an economic collapse who send refugee pouring to the border and towards the west. the issue is now that it is likely the us government will freeze international reserves we had on paper so the taliban government will not be able to utilise those. without those reserves, it is likely the currency will significantly decline which will cause a spike in inflation and increased poverty levels at the same time we have a humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. put them together and it is a challenging environment. alex zerden, is the founder of capitol peak strategies he is a former us treasury official and was the financial attache to the us embassy in kabul. welcome to the programme. there are seniorfigures in europe who welcome to the programme. there are senior figures in europe who think they're now needs to be a contractual relationship with the
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taliban, a carrot and stick approach. the collapse of the country benefits no one, least of all the taliban.— country benefits no one, least of all the taliban. thank you so much for havin: all the taliban. thank you so much for having me- _ all the taliban. thank you so much for having me. i— all the taliban. thank you so much for having me. i want _ all the taliban. thank you so much for having me. i want to _ all the taliban. thank you so much for having me. i want to speak- all the taliban. thank you so much l for having me. i want to speak from my experiences in kabul as the treasury department at 0'shea. the taliban is still subject to us, european and un sanctions. they were put on the sanctions list for their support of terrorism. there is a critical way to make sure the us, the international partners, our european allies can support the afghan people, provide humanitarian assistance while not engaging directly with the taliban or providing them with the resources they need to engage in activities. we have just heard from the former governor of the central bank, who says the reserves of frozen, the international aid is drying up and the germans cancelled or suspended their aid the other day. how do you get money to the people through the
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system you know well and ensure it doesn't go towards the taliban or to towards terrorism? i doesn't go towards the taliban or to towards terrorism?— doesn't go towards the taliban or to towards terrorism? i have the utmost resect for towards terrorism? i have the utmost respect for the _ towards terrorism? i have the utmost respect for the acting _ towards terrorism? i have the utmost respect for the acting governor, - towards terrorism? i have the utmost respect for the acting governor, i - respect for the acting governor, i had the chance to work with him when i was in afghanistan. i agree with his assessment. we are facing a major economic crisis in afghanistan and us government officials are working tirelessly now to resolve the question. how to help the afghan people while not enriching the taliban, untilthey people while not enriching the taliban, until they change their behaviour and they go with international norms and standards and support women, support minorities, support media and go after terrorist organisations and disembowelled their relationship with al-qaeda._ disembowelled their relationship with al-qaeda. ~ ., ., , with al-qaeda. would you say that is the only way? _ with al-qaeda. would you say that is the only way? obviously _ with al-qaeda. would you say that is the only way? obviously you - with al-qaeda. would you say that is the only way? obviously you know i with al-qaeda. would you say that is| the only way? obviously you know the treasury very well, are they talking to their international partners, to the imf, to the world bank to tell them to cut off the money? this i the imf, to the world bank to tell them to cut off the money? as i read
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about earlier — them to cut off the money? as i read about earlier this _ them to cut off the money? as i read about earlier this week _ them to cut off the money? as i read about earlier this week with - them to cut off the money? as i read about earlier this week with the - about earlier this week with the atlantic council, they have a number of options and they have the ability to engage with allies, with other partners around the world. both bilaterally and multilaterally, the secretary is an expert, a former deputy national security adviser and i have confidence they are engaging at all levels with appropriate counterparts.— at all levels with appropriate counterarts. u, . ., , counterparts. the concern in europe would be that _ counterparts. the concern in europe would be that if the _ counterparts. the concern in europe would be that if the americans - counterparts. the concern in europe would be that if the americans take | would be that if the americans take a hard—nosed approach, it is the europeans that will suffer more, drugs, the terrorism and the refugees will end up on europe's shows. when it comes to the drugs, if you cut off the money, the taliban just grows the opium, we have seen it before? the taliban just grows the opium, we have seen it before?— have seen it before? the taliban recently said _ have seen it before? the taliban recently said they _ have seen it before? the taliban recently said they will _ have seen it before? the taliban i recently said they will disembowel the opium trade, which is a major source of revenue for them. i don't understand how they are going to abide by their own commitment. they
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are putting a lot of farmers out of work, if that is what they choose to enforce. they have the ability to do it, but i don't trust the taliban, i don't trust the statements that they will not flood their neighbours in europe with drugs. this has been a shared sacrifice, notjust immigration with drugs that have entered afghanistan, but nato allies, a shared sacrifice with american soldiers and afghan partners. that should not be lost in this conversation either.— this conversation either. when the taliban make _ this conversation either. when the taliban make these _ this conversation either. when the taliban make these positive - this conversation either. when the taliban make these positive signs| taliban make these positive signs and they want to be more inclusive and they want to be more inclusive and they want people to come into government, from your experience, do you think it is possible? do they have the capability to run an economy the size of afghanistan's. it is a question of will. certain things we can verify, there was a 2021 public treasury assessment that identified an ongoing relationship between the taliban and al-qaeda, in
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2021. it is morally reprehensible, these people are responsible for the deaths of thousands of americans and many more abroad. to the idea afghanistan wants to be a responsible stakeholder led by the taliban, i have no evidence of that. they control the levers of government, but will they be willing to do it? it is within their control, if they have the military resources and they chose to break off peaceful, diplomatic engagement to engage in violence and the military takeover of the government. then they have the responsibility and obligation to take care of the afghan people. but this is their choice and they have the ability to abide by international norms and responsibilities and obligations. 0ne responsibilities and obligations. one would think there is some pragmatism in washington. after all, the peace agreement we were pointing to on this programme yesterday, the four page document that mike pompeo signed with the taliban, to say on
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page four they will support them economically. is that on the basis they are an inclusive government? i cannot speak to the economic aspects of it, but i understood that agreement was a component of the agreement was a component of the agreement that has been aggregated, it is no longer in force and not abide by the taliban when they took over the country by violence. 0n the other aspects, the taliban tried to, in that same agreement, ask for sanctions relief and extra international support. they haven't held up their end of the bargain, in my view. i held up their end of the bargain, in m view. ., ., , ., my view. i want to finish with one final point. _ my view. i want to finish with one final point, because _ my view. i want to finish with one final point, because i _ my view. i want to finish with one final point, because i don't - final point, because i don't understand, if there is a humanitarian argument for getting money into afghanistan, how do you do that? does it have to go via the ngos? do we know even if the ngos will be allowed to operate? i ngos? do we know even if the ngos will be allowed to operate?— will be allowed to operate? i think there are a —
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will be allowed to operate? i think there are a number _ will be allowed to operate? i think there are a number of _ will be allowed to operate? i think there are a number of ongoing, i will be allowed to operate? i think l there are a number of ongoing, very robust discussions, i would suspect in the us government and international capitals in europe about the question. this happens around the world every day, where the us government and allies in the uk, europe and elsewhere help people of certain countries without helping the government. when there are policy disagreements at that level, you can provide humanitarian assistance and that is in critical need here in afghanistan. there are ways to affect that and i believe the us government will be finding ways to strike that correct policy balance by holding the taliban accountable, whilst still not penalising or punishing the afghan people who are in dire need of assistance.— people who are in dire need of assistance. ., ,, , ., , . ., assistance. thank you very much for our assistance. thank you very much for your insight- — let's look at some of the day's other news. the number of covid deaths recorded in iran has passed 100,000, despite tighter restrictions nationwide to contain the spread of the virus. iranian health officials have acknowledged that official figures
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almost certainly understate the real number — but even they make iran the worst—hit middle eastern country. a man has been arrested after making a bomb threat near the congress building in washington dc. the suspect, identified as floyd ray roseberry, surrendered hours after the threat was made. his motives remain unknown. police are still searching the vehicle. nicole kidman has become the latest hollywood star to come under fire for circumventing strict quarantine rules for international travellers. the actress's arrival in hong kong has sparked widespread anger after she was reportedly spotted out and about two days after touching down. this is despite the region having some of the strictest rules in place, with up to 21 days quarantine required. it is not easy getting into more rural areas of haiti, where last weeks earthquake reaked the greatest damage. foreign aid is starting to trickle
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in now, but the bridges are damaged, the roads are poor, that getting it to the people that need it, is slow work. following a request from the haitian government the uk's royal navy announced today it is sending a ship to help that will act as a landing pad for american military helicopters, that are moving relief to the hardest hit regions. the death toll is now 2,189, thousands more were injured and are being treated in clincis and makeshift hospitals. i'm joined now by nadesha mijoba who is the country director for the haitian health foundation in jeremy, haiti. thank you for being with us. tell me about your day and tell me about what you can see right now from the clinic where you are working? i am in the heart _ clinic where you are working? i am in the heart of _ clinic where you are working? i am in the heart of the _ clinic where you are working? i am in the heart of the city _ clinic where you are working? i am in the heart of the city of - clinic where you are working? i —n in the heart of the city ofjeremy, which is the capital. looking down, there is a lot of destruction and there is a lot of destruction and the closer you get to the water, the more destruction there is. houses,
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churches, schools the banks. in fact, two of the banks cannot open because of the damage to the building, which creates quite a situation for the people in the community to access their money. but where i cannot see from my office is where i cannot see from my office is where there is also a lot of damage, it is in the rural areas of the grande arms. it is a very mountainous area and a lot of the people live in very hard to reach areas. that is where we are beginning to see devastation, the destruction of the homes, also the mudslides, all kinds of rocks coming down the damage it has created to the roads, houses, clinics. not only the roads, houses, clinics. not only the earthquake, the damage from the earthquake but the following storm
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and the amount of water it dropped causing the mudslides. it is quite a critical situation.— critical situation. given all that and the poor— critical situation. given all that and the poor state _ critical situation. given all that and the poor state of- critical situation. given all that and the poor state of the - and the poor state of the roads before the earthquake, you are now only, five days on, starting to see people appearing at the clinic? that is exactly what _ people appearing at the clinic? twat is exactly what we suspected because what happened following hurricane matthew. five to seven days after the event, is when people finally begin to arrive to the city of jeremy where the referral hospitals and where the services are. we are beginning to see a lot more patients with severely infected wounds, injuries to their heads, cuts, fevers, dehydration. yesterday,
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because now our teams are able to get to the hard to reach areas, many patients were evacuated. but there is still a lot of areas where we haven't been able to get to because of the destruction and the challenges associated with the rocks and the blockage. so there is still and the blockage. so there is still a lot we don't know five days following the earthquake and three days following the storm. the following the earthquake and three days following the storm.— days following the storm. we are startin: to days following the storm. we are starting to hear— days following the storm. we are starting to hear frustration - days following the storm. we are starting to hear frustration there | starting to hear frustration there is for the government, only weeks after the assassination of the haitian president. do you feel, where you are sitting, there is so —— some coordination of the relief
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effort? -- some coordination of the relief effort? , , , , effort? yes, but it is very difficult _ effort? yes, but it is very difficult to _ effort? yes, but it is very difficult to get _ effort? yes, but it is very difficult to get the - effort? yes, but it is very difficult to get the aid in. | effort? yes, but it is very - difficult to get the aid in. because the bridge that goes intojeremy is destroyed. you can only arrive to a certain point and then you have to unload everything. jeremy was crossed by very small vehicles to distribute the aid. we continue to see the us coast guard helicopter flying back and forth, evacuating patients and bringing some relief. but it is simply not enough. we are nowhere near what is needed. we are nowhere near what is needed. we are nowhere near what is needed. we are nowhere near getting close to the people that really need a lot of the help. the destruction is massive and
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yes, one of my teams was able to get in, and what we found was quite shocking. and then we are concerned about the public health disaster that could enfold if we really don't get help to the people soon. relative to nutrition and relative to infections, the sanitation situation is quite critical and it is our hope we don't have an outbreak of cholera. we are certainly going to start seeing diarrhoea. we had a couple of patients today with those problems. we are on the verge of a very poor public health disaster.— public health disaster. thank you for bringing _ public health disaster. thank you for bringing us — public health disaster. thank you for bringing us up _ public health disaster. thank you
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for bringing us up today - public health disaster. thank you for bringing us up today with - public health disaster. thank you for bringing us up today with the | for bringing us up today with the situation in haiti and the focus has been on afghanistan, but real problems in haiti. still to come... we will take a look at how coronavirus is taking its toll on the younger populations in the united states. gurkhas have called off the hunger strike after getting a meeting with the government. 0ne veteran says they are seeking fairness. aha, the government. one veteran says they are seeking fairness. a gurkha soldier would _ they are seeking fairness. a gurkha soldier would retire _ they are seeking fairness. a gurkha soldier would retire at _ they are seeking fairness. a gurkha soldier would retire at a _ they are seeking fairness. a gurkha soldier would retire at a 15 - they are seeking fairness. a gurkha soldier would retire at a 15 year - soldier would retire at a 15 year point and a british soldier would retire at 22 year point. we are asking for a pro wrought attention. that is, if a british soldier gets £22 after retiring after 22 years, a
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gurkha soldier should get £15 on his retirement at the 15 year point. because we serve under the same rules, we were the same uniform, we fight the same war. we are in the same danger and, you know, we face the same bullets. so why is this different? that is what we are asking for. covid—19 hospitalisations are surging across the us — clear evidence the highly contagious delta variant is spreading among the unvaccinated. look at this graph. in seven days to august 16th, an average of 7a thousand people were in hospital with covid — up from 59,000 the previous week. but the numbers are more alarming when you drill down into the younger age categories. in the 30 to 39 age group — infections have been on an upward trend since latejune — 30% higher than they were in january. and hospitalisations for under
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185 on a similar path. currently 2000 children in hospital. let's bring in dr krishna udayakumar,he's the director of the duke global health innovation center. a center. lot of parents are saying, we are not a lot of parents are saying, we are not going to get our children vaccinated because children recover well from covid—19, there is no need. well from covid-19, there is no need. �* ., well from covid-19, there is no need. �* . ., , need. but are we in a different lace need. but are we in a different place with _ need. but are we in a different place with this _ need. but are we in a different place with this delta _ need. but are we in a different place with this delta variant? i need. but are we in a different i place with this delta variant? we reall are place with this delta variant? - really are and the key message to take away is vaccinations can save lives. what we have seen, as he pointed out, is a rising rate of infections and a rising rate of hospitalisations among younger people because of the lower rate of vaccinations in those younger populations. especially when we are talking about younger kids, they are not eligible for vaccinations, so the rest of the family unit and the community needs to do everything we can to protect them. kids, on average, do better but we are still
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seeing really terrible outcomes for children and those can be avoided. israel, one of the world's most vaccinated countries has one of the highest infection rate at the moment. in fact, they are in their fourth wave, which raises questions about the vaccine's longevity. is that what is informing the cdc's decision there to have this booster programme starting in september? we programme starting in september? - are starting to see data coming in from israel, some from the us and more recently from the uk as well, that does seem to show that after about six months, a reduction in vaccine effectiveness against infections. but it is important to point out, there is still really strong protection, 80 to 90% effectiveness against hospitalisation and death. we are starting to see weakening of effectiveness, may be as low as 50 to 70% effectiveness against all
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infections, but the vaccines are still protecting as against the outcomes we want to avoid. the who senior figure — outcomes we want to avoid. the who senior figure in _ outcomes we want to avoid. the who senior figure in africa _ outcomes we want to avoid. the who senior figure in africa tonight - outcomes we want to avoid. the who senior figure in africa tonight has - senior figure in africa tonight has said it is disgraceful the united states is setting off on this path when there is such a gulf in vaccination rates around the world? that is absolutely true. to give you some perspective, we are reaching almost 5 billion doses of vaccine that had been administered and yet less than 1a million doses administered in all low income countries around the world. so it is veryjustifiable countries around the world. so it is very justifiable that countries around the world. so it is veryjustifiable that people feel outraged that many high income countries are starting to give third doses while vulnerable populations and health—care workers in low and middle income countries are still waiting. if we are going to roll out boost as it has to be done in the context of a much stronger leadership role in getting first and second shots out to everyone around the world. we have to commit to
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making sure that it can'tjust be boosters because the supply will mmp boosters because the supply will ramp up enough in the coming months so we should be able to do boosters and make sure we are vaccinating the whole world and that needs to be a primary concern. whole world and that needs to be a primary concern-— whole world and that needs to be a primary concern. which is essential because this _ primary concern. which is essential because this is _ primary concern. which is essential because this is a _ primary concern. which is essential because this is a global— primary concern. which is essential because this is a global pandemic. | because this is a global pandemic. is there a danger that if you offer third shots to people in a country where there is vaccine scepticism like the united states, you will put people off receiving a first dose, because they think it will not work? it may for some people, but the more we can do to layer vaccinations in addition to all of the public health measures that are necessary are going to be needed, as we see we are in a terrible wave in the us and we are starting to see that same trend line in other countries as well. we have to get the messaging and the communication is right that the vaccines are still highly effective and highly safe and whether it is boosters or not, we have to make sure that as many people around the
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entire world get vaccines as possible. entire world get vaccines as possible-— entire world get vaccines as ossible. , , , . possible. very quickly, plastic screens, there _ possible. very quickly, plastic screens, there is _ possible. very quickly, plastic screens, there is news - possible. very quickly, plasticj screens, there is news around possible. very quickly, plastic - screens, there is news around today that actually we should get rid of them, because we need circulation and ventilation in rooms?— and ventilation in rooms? that's riaht, as and ventilation in rooms? that's right. as kids — and ventilation in rooms? that's right, as kids go _ and ventilation in rooms? that's right, as kids go back to - and ventilation in rooms? that's right, as kids go back to school, j and ventilation in rooms? that's i right, as kids go back to school, we are seeing ventilation is incredibly important. it has to be one of the tools we layer on top of masking, testing and vaccines and ventilation is an important component of the public health response. it is always aood to public health response. it is always good to get — public health response. it is always good to get your — public health response. it is always good to get your perspective, i public health response. it is always| good to get your perspective, thank you very much forjoining us. plenty more coming up and we will be focusing on afghanistan and the un report that the taliban are hunting collaborators who worked with nato and us officials. stay with us. hello again. so far this month the
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weather has been average in terms of the amount of rainfall we have seen, average for temperatures, too. but it has been a cloudy month. we have had a lot of cloud in the sky is once again. a few breaks in the cloud every now and again, thickest cloud every now and again, thickest cloud across northern england where we had outbreaks of rain and talking of rain, to the west, we have got the weather fronts associated with this low pressure and that will be bringing bands of rain across the uk over the next few days. 0vernight, a dry picture for most but extensive cloud across the skies, maybe if you mist patches forming by dawn. temperature is about ten to 1a degrees. tomorrow, the first area of rain will make its presence felt in northern ireland with the rain turning heavy and steady here. the scotland and england and wales, a chance of seeing bigger brakes in the cloud and more in the way of sunshine. the may held onto that sunshine. the may held onto that sunshine in scotland on the far east of england but the cloud will
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thicken out west with rain gathering across western scotland, pushing into the north—west of both england and wales. top temperatures, 22 degrees. the weekend will start wet, low pressure in charge and is weather front slowly pushing eastwards. sunday will be the better of the two days. rain on the charts for saturday. because the rain is arriving quicker than had been forecast, there is less time for temperatures to rise particularly high across eastern areas. not as hot as you might have seen in the forecast over recent days, top temperature about 23 degrees. rain heavy at times as it works eastwards. showers following for ireland, wales and the south—west of england. we still have rain left on the chart across eastern england on sunday and that will clear out of the way. sunday is a day of sunshine and showers but it is these showers across the midlands, central and southern england and perhaps the
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south—east we need to keep a close eye on. they will be thundering and slow moving in nature. next week, high pressure builds on the weather will be a lot drier, more settled and more sunshine. temperatures into the low 20s. no heatwave on the cards.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. taliban squads are said to be hunting door to door for collaborators — as some at kabul airport hand over their children to us marines, to at least get them, on flights to freedom. there are reports that the taliban have seized us military biometrics devices— possibly aiding in the identification of afghans who assisted coalition forces. for the first time ever, the us government declares a water shortage on the colorado river —— a life source to millions in the southwest. plus — does the major pullout from afghanistan mark the end of the so—called american era? we'll discuss later in the show. a united nations report, which the bbc has seen, says the taliban in afghanistan are intensifying their hunt for all
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people who worked for and helped nato and american forces. the confidential intelligence paper says the taliban are arresting or threatening to kill family members of those they are targeting, unless they surrender. christian nellemann is executive director of the norwegian un intelligence support center — the group that has released this report. what we have seen the taliban, in advance of moving into all major cities in afghanistan, notjust kabul, they have more advanced intelligent systems, they have a list of individuals and even in the very first hours of moving into kabul, they began to search for former government employees, especially intelligence services and special forces units and this is not the action of random taliban groups seeking revenge. this involved written orders from the military
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commission of the taliban. it involves actual intelligence, photographs and so on of the individuals they are searching for. and tonight there are questions just how the insurgent group are identifying afghans who assisted coalition forces. earlier this week the the intercept reported that the taliban had seized us military biometric devices that could help with that process. ken klippenstein is a dc—based investigative reporter for the intercept and is with us. good to have you on the programme. what did they use, the us forces, what did they use this biometric data for? , , . , u, data for? they used devices called identity detection _ data for? they used devices called identity detection equipment i data for? they used devices called identity detection equipment and i data for? they used devices called | identity detection equipment and it scanned irises, fingerprints and provides biographical data about individuals in afghanistan. while this was first built as a means of tracking and searching potential
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terrorists, as i interviewed a former military official for the story, it became clear they used it on everyone. as one military contractor told me, at one point they were processing thousands of afghans with this equipment, scanning their irises. these are unique identifiers and among the information collected is potentially which us government they work for, whether they are translators orjust worked that an air force base. the taliban, they have acquired this equipment and they can access the data and they have unique identifiers associated with it locally but they can access a remote database which contains everything the us military has on official data. ~ ., ., ., ., data. who had control of it, when ou talk data. who had control of it, when you talk about — data. who had control of it, when you talk about the _ data. who had control of it, when you talk about the databases, i data. who had control of it, when you talk about the databases, did local gov�*t officials have the databases? you would anticipate
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withdrawing army would have some way to wreck the database, to get rid of it, burn it and do away with it. what did they do? this it, burn it and do away with it. what did they do?— it, burn it and do away with it. what did they do? this is one of the most astonishing _ what did they do? this is one of the most astonishing parts _ what did they do? this is one of the most astonishing parts of— what did they do? this is one of the most astonishing parts of the i what did they do? this is one of the most astonishing parts of the story. | most astonishing parts of the story. what was quickly made apparent to me, there will be a killswitch, a fail—safe and something like this happens. it wasn't appreciated in washington that the government could follow the taliban. and the answer given back to me was, i wouldn't assume they did. these are private contractors who might not have the same sets of goals in mind the government does. very often, they don't think about these things. the chief technology officer from human rights first, an ngo, said it seems as though there was no thought going into information security with respect to these devices. i was shocked at the lack of foresight that seems to have been taken into account, notjust by us military but
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by private contractors as well. ii'idta�*e by private contractors as well. have ou ut by private contractors as well. have you put this — by private contractors as well. have you put this to _ by private contractors as well. have you put this to the pentagon? yes, | you put this to the pentagon? yes, the didn't you put this to the pentagon? yes, they didn't deny — you put this to the pentagon? yes, they didn't deny it, _ you put this to the pentagon? yes, they didn't deny it, but _ you put this to the pentagon? yes they didn't deny it, but they referred me to the office for the secretary of defence but they declined to comment. [30 secretary of defence but they declined to comment.- secretary of defence but they declined to comment. do we know if the taliban knows _ declined to comment. do we know if the taliban knows how _ declined to comment. do we know if the taliban knows how this - declined to comment. do we know if the taliban knows how this stuff- the taliban knows how this stuff works, have used it before? there is a sense the — works, have used it before? there is a sense the taliban _ works, have used it before? there is a sense the taliban may _ works, have used it before? there is a sense the taliban may not - works, have used it before? there is a sense the taliban may not have i works, have used it before? there is| a sense the taliban may not have the technological knowledge to access some of the remote databases. for a moment i thought, potentially nothing can happen. but intelligence people have said they work very closely with the inner service intelligence agency, the spy agency, who do have sophisticated technology and understanding of how to use it. notjust and understanding of how to use it. not just them and understanding of how to use it. notjust them but and understanding of how to use it. not just them but the chinese government is a body that could help them better access and exploit this data. so there is a lot of concern they may help the taliban either reverse the technology they have or
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find some other way to retrieve data they cannot do indigenously. {lit they cannot do indigenously. of course, they will watch people going into government buildings and they know this technology is being used. if you have only had stone wool from the pentagon and defence department so far, do you think whether or not they do have this technology, we need some answers and we need them quickly? certainly. many us citizens still have not been evacuated and talking to individuals trying to get afghans who helped us out removed from the country, whether it be translators or whatever else, they are not getting answers. there is a huge backlog in terms of the immigration system being able to process these requests so a lot of people are not getting answers. requests so a lot of people are not getting answers-— getting answers. thank you very much. the western states of the us are experiencing
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their worst drought on record. it's led to the devastating wild fires seen in california and neighbouring states this year and now it has led to water rationing in those states that get their water from the colorado river. the colorado is one of the united state's biggest rivers and it enormous basin supplies water to most of the country's western states, but record drought — which is now in its 22nd year — is leading to serious water shortages particularly affecting the lower basin. at lake mead water levels are at their lowest since the reservoir was created by the hoover dam in the 1930s. it means that arizona, nevada and indeed mexico will face cuts on the amount of water they can use. the worst affected state is arizona which will now have to use 18% less water. for more let's speak to sharon megdal director of the university of arizona water resources research center. thank you for being with us. do you
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think this is down to climate change? think this is down to climate chan . e? , think this is down to climate chance? , ., ., , ., change? there is no doubt that climate change _ change? there is no doubt that climate change is _ change? there is no doubt that climate change is the _ change? there is no doubt that climate change is the major i climate change is the major influencer of what we are experiencing now, but there is something else at play here and that is that the river itself has been over allocated. is that the river itself has been overallocated. even is that the river itself has been over allocated. even before the last 20 years, if you looked at average flows and the allocations, particularly to the lower basin states, more was allocated toward those state deliveries each year than could be expected, so you couple the two together and we are in the situation we are in now. i spent a large part of my career in africa and asia, and i have seen what happens when there are water shortages, you get difficult conversations in the conflict between various groups. do you think we are approaching something like this in the western side of the united states? our states now going
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to start grappling upstream for the precious resources there are? there is both good — precious resources there are? there is both good news _ precious resources there are? there is both good news and _ precious resources there are? there is both good news and bad - precious resources there are? tues is both good news and bad news here and that is over the years, there have been many issues to deal with and the states along with the federal government of the united states and the republic of mexico have often engaged in difficult conversations in give and take, because we have known that shortage conditions could happen. what has happened is they have come sooner and deeper than we expected, so we have shown that we have a record of having some of these difficult conversations, often they may not seem like they will be fruitful but in the end, we can not afford to fail so they end up being successful and we in arizona show that back a few years ago we were figuring out how to try to mitigate the expected implications of cutbacks. these cutbacks are not a surprise in that
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they have come, it is the question of theirtiming and they have come, it is the question of their timing and how long they may last. of their timing and how long they ma last. ., ., , ., ., of their timing and how long they ma last. . ~ , ., ~ ., may last. the lakes we talked about, the were may last. the lakes we talked about, they were full — may last. the lakes we talked about, they were full 20 _ may last. the lakes we talked about, they were full 20 years _ may last. the lakes we talked about, they were full 20 years ago. - may last. the lakes we talked about, they were full 20 years ago. in i may last. the lakes we talked about, they were full 20 years ago. in fact i they were full 20 years ago. in fact lake mead was brimful, so is it wasteful water management as much as it is climate change? i wasteful water management as much as it is climate change?— it is climate change? i don't think --eole it is climate change? i don't think people would _ it is climate change? i don't think people would want _ it is climate change? i don't think people would want to _ it is climate change? i don't think people would want to say - it is climate change? i don't think people would want to say they i it is climate change? i don't think| people would want to say they are wasting water. the question is can we use our water more wisely? and there are opportunities in all of these sectors, the agricultural sector which is by far the biggest water using sector, in how our communities grow and use their water, a lot of our community water is used for outdoor landscaping water, so it is not waste but it is about the economics of water use, the technologies and people's awareness that things are changing. we have experienced rapid growth in our population and so some behaviours must change and water use
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practices will change. you behaviours must change and water use practices will change.— practices will change. you 'ust come to m final practices will change. you 'ust come to my final point and i practices will change. you 'ust come to my final point and that i practices will change. you just come to my final point and that is you i to my final point and that is you have a diminishing resource and yet those conurbations, the likes of phoenix and arizona, las vegas, these are growing populations, they are putting more demand on the resource. , , ., , ., resource. yes, indeed they are but a few thin . s resource. yes, indeed they are but a few things had _ resource. yes, indeed they are but a few things had to _ resource. yes, indeed they are but a few things had to be _ resource. yes, indeed they are but a few things had to be kept _ resource. yes, indeed they are but a few things had to be kept in - resource. yes, indeed they are but a few things had to be kept in mind i few things had to be kept in mind and that is for some of the community like phoenix and tucson, arizona, where i live, colorado river water is not the only source of water so it is a balancing of different supplies and looking at the demands, looking at wee use of highly treated waste water and how our newcomers use their water. so it is a big picture look. i do think we are going to have increased conversations about drought, about how people can use their water or should use their water in their home, but the fact of the matter is,
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yes, we do have more people but our water planners are walking very hard to make sure water supplies are secure. as i have said too many, we are not in a state of panic, we are concerned but the good news is that we have planned and we will continue planning on having these discussions and adapt. we will have to adapt but i believe we can.— 30 years ago, a coup was launched in the then soviet union by hardline communist leaders to take power away from soviet president michael gorbachev, who's reform programme was slowly opening russia up. it failed — largely due to massive civil resitance in the capital moscow. (tx vt) it was the day the world held its breath. there had been a coup in a nuclear superpower. tanks rolled into moscow right up to red square.
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communist hardliners has seized power in the soviet union. but the people were not having any of it. defiance on the streets. and outside parliament. from russia's president boris yeltsin. the coup collapsed. four months later, so did the country. the soviet union was consigned to history. dmitry had helped build the barricades outside parliament. he and his wife tatiana still remember their elation when the coup failed. i still remember their elation when the coup failed.— still remember their elation when the coup failed. i felt a great hope for a great — the coup failed. i felt a great hope for a great new— the coup failed. i felt a great hope for a great new russia, _ the coup failed. i felt a great hope | for a great new russia, democratic russia. where everyone has the right to influence all the things going on but now i feel that my hope failed.
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the country is deteriorating, human rights deteriorating. the soviet union is an autonomy. that rights deteriorating. the soviet union is an autonomy.- rights deteriorating. the soviet union is an autonomy. at the time the collapse _ union is an autonomy. at the time the collapse of _ union is an autonomy. at the time the collapse of the _ union is an autonomy. at the time the collapse of the coup _ union is an autonomy. at the time the collapse of the coup was i union is an autonomy. at the time | the collapse of the coup was hailed as a victory of people power but in the years that followed, democracy failed to root itself in russia. that is partly because life became so tough here that in the eyes of many russians, the very concept of democracy became discredited. but it is also because for those running russia today, authoritarian rule is backin russia today, authoritarian rule is back in fashion. this year the authorities cracked down hard on anti—government protests. and there have been police raids on government critics. so where does that leave democracy? for many here a distant memory. this monument honours the three men killed in the 1991 coup. there are few visitors. there seems
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to be little interest in moment in history when russians embraced freedom. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: we will talk about american foreign policy. where does this leave the united states after such a seismic week in afghanistan? one week on from the fatal shootings in plymouth... the inquests into deaths of the five victims — and the gunman — have opened. in a short hearing, the senior coroner heard details of the fatal injuries inflicted by the gunman, twenty—two year old jake davison, the coroner heard from the man, the senior investigating officer in this
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case, detective inspector stephen hamley, he told the court that shortly before maxine davidson had been shot there had been an argument between her and her son. jake davidson then went out into the street and shot dead three—year—old sophie martin, who was out walking the family dog with her dad, that jake davidson then went around the corner and shot stephen washington, who was out walking his dogs. we had this morning that he is a carerfor his wife and thenjake davidson went further along the road and shot at cape shepherd who died later in hospital. the coroner heard this morning that none of those victims knew jake davidson and that they had all died from shotgun wounds. the inquest into jake davidson's death has just been opened and adjourned. all those inquests will reopen in december this year but of course all this comes on the day that is a week
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on from when that mass shooting happened in plymouth. it is a community and city completely rocked and shaken to its core and it is clearfrom and shaken to its core and it is clear from the and shaken to its core and it is clearfrom the vigils and shaken to its core and it is clear from the vigils and the tributes and the services that have been held that it will take a long time for the community and the city to come to terms with what happened. 0n the runway of the airport stands the military might of the united states. 0utside on the perimeter a ragtag militia of taliban fighters who are triumphant. how did it come to this? humiliation for nato and
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afghan forces and deeper questions for the us and where it goes globally? could it ever build a western coalition as it did 20 years ago? is the war on terror down or is it entering a terrifying chapter. robin wright is a contributor to this programme. does the great retreat from afghanistan marked the end of the american era? welcome. does it? ~ ., ., ,, does it? what happened in afghanistan _ does it? what happened in afghanistan is _ does it? what happened in afghanistan is an _ does it? what happened in afghanistan is an epic i does it? what happened in i afghanistan is an epic defeat for the united states, its allies. this is the most powerful country in the world that could not hold off a ragtag militia. this is a staggering turn of events for a country and in stark contrast to what happened 80 years ago when it took on the nazi war machine and japanese empire.
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this is going to weaken america's position around the world and make it more difficult to organise the kind of coalition, international coalition that is necessary whether it is to take on al-qaeda and the taliban or saddam hussein in iraq. the trouble is it has been a repeating miscalculation. it is not just confined to afghanistan. you could go back to lebanon in the 19805, could go back to lebanon in the 1980s, iraq, syria, libya. there seems to be an inclination to get involved but no real idea on who to work with, how to exit and i think that perception that we have now of the united states, as i say would make it very difficult for allied countries to get on board, wouldn't it? ~ , , ., countries to get on board, wouldn't it? absolutely and i think you have ca tured it it? absolutely and i think you have captured it correctly. _ it? absolutely and i think you have captured it correctly. one - it? absolutely and i think you have i captured it correctly. one remembers captured it correctly. 0ne remembers the stark contrast of the images of the stark contrast of the images of the last helicopter pulling out of
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saigon in 1975, 76. contrast with the helicopters above the us embassy in kabul. the united states has for all its power, does not seem to know how to take on the ideology, hardline ideology that has a strong local following and it has been pushed back, whether it is by hezbolla in lebanon, thejihadi is in iraq, the vietcong in vietnam. this is a recurrent problem that i think proves that the united states is not a one—off catastrophe. the is not a one-off catastrophe. the reall bi is not a one—off catastrophe. the really big concern is that the war on terror isn't over stop president biden told us as much on monday. he said the threat has metastasise, it has spread to africa, asia, other parts of the world. and you fear
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that the jihadi �*s will want to book an the 20 years in afghanistan with another big strike. god forbid. but what happens if we get something like 911? i what happens if we get something like 911? 4' ., ., , like 911? i think the real danger is that afghanistan _ like 911? i think the real danger is that afghanistan once _ like 911? i think the real danger is that afghanistan once again i like 911? i think the real danger is i that afghanistan once again becomes the haven and sponsor of like—minded militants. with the demise of the islamic state in iraq and syria, jihadis will be looking for a place that can allow them to rebuild and afghanistan in the chaos and with the taliban in power could offer that kind of tell. but you're right, the jihadism that kind of tell. but you're right, thejihadism of that kind of tell. but you're right, the jihadism of 2001 that kind of tell. but you're right, thejihadism of 2001 has metastasise. just last month the us sanctioned a branch of isis in mozambique which is a former portuguese colony in southern africa which is 60% christian. that you now
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find jihadi elements in all six inhabited continents and that shows you how far we have gone and what the dangers are ahead. the afghanistan represents in a broader sense the triumph ofjihadism against democracy and i think that is the most ominous element of what has happened. is the most ominous element of what has happened-— has happened. there will be any ennui has happened. there will be any enquiry into _ has happened. there will be any enquiry into this. _ has happened. there will be any enquiry into this. given - has happened. there will be any enquiry into this. given what i has happened. there will be any| enquiry into this. given what you have just enquiry into this. given what you havejust said enquiry into this. given what you have just said about the geopolitical shift and the ongoing threat from terrorism you would expect the white house would be pulling its allies closer, underpinning nato and talking about the importance of nato and yet we see a white house pulling away. do you think there is a real concern about that within the us congress? i think there are both republicans and democrats now that who are deeply concerned about the rippling repercussions about what is happening in afghanistan. washington wants to draw closer to its allies. the danger is the allies will say
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the us is not reliable as a leader oras the us is not reliable as a leader or as a strategic planner as we had long calculated and we need to make our own provisions, whether it is the europeans, looking for their own means of forming rapid deployment force or taking care of its own strategic interests. that is the real danger that you see the kind of gap among the transatlantic alliance that has been so important in countering the threats to our common interests. ., , ~ countering the threats to our common interests. ., , . , ., interests. robin wright, it is a really good — interests. robin wright, it is a really good piece _ interests. robin wright, it is a really good piece in _ interests. robin wright, it is a really good piece in the i interests. robin wright, it is a really good piece in the new. interests. robin wright, it is a i really good piece in the new yorker. thank you for being with us. we will see you at the same time next week. thank you for watching.
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so far this august they weather has been pretty average in terms of the amount of rain we have seen and the temperatures being close to average, but it has been a cloudy month and on thursday we had a lot of cloud around again. just a few breaks here and there as you can see but looking to our west we have an area of low pressure. this has france to the south—west that will bring zones of cloud again across the uk so continuing that cloudy theme. they will be bringing some rain our way. the first sign of that rain will be for northern ireland with the rain turning heavy and study here. further east for scotland, england and wales there is a better chance of seeing some sunshine, even into the afternoon for north scotland and eastern england. but further west we will see the rain starting to spread into west scotland and the north—west of both england and wales. from there through friday night the rain will continue its progress northwards and eastwards. quite slowly. the heaviest rain
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probably across wales and the south—west and quite a mild night for some of us friday with temperatures falling no lower than 16 in liverpool. for the weekend as we have seen already there will be rain as these weather fronts push eastwards. sunday looks like being the better of the two days as most of the fronts clear out of the way. rain coming our way on saturday. because this is arriving more quickly than had been forecast over recent days it means temperatures don't go quite as high across eastern england as you might have seenin eastern england as you might have seen in forecasts over recent days. looking at highs of 22, 20 three degrees. as the rain clears from western areas for northern ireland, wales and the south—west, a mixture of sunshine and showers following through saturday afternoon. some of the rain is loitering on sunday across eastern areas but that will clear out and it will be followed by a day of sunshine and showers. the showers looked to be heavy, thundery and potentially quite slow moving,
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particularly across the midlands, central southern england and may be the south—east. we might have to watch for some heavy downpours to develop for these areas. looking at the jet stream pattern into next week we see a change in our weather fortunes as this big ridge built in right over the top of the uk and with a weather pattern like this, the air descends from the adverse of it and collect. we get high pressure forming, this one over scandinavia and with the winds coming around this high in a clockwise sense, you can see the air coming our way isn't that hard. the hottest air in europe gets steered and trapped in the south of europe, so no heatwave on the way but there will be an improvement. in that it will become drier and sunnier as well. he was the chance for monday. a lot of dry weather, sunshine, temperatures still, in the august sunshine, highs
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of 22 in glasgow, 2a belfast and 23 in glasgow. these temperatures will be kind of typicalfor much of in glasgow. these temperatures will be kind of typical for much of next week. high confidence in the forecast, a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine and for the most part, temperatures in the low 20s. it may turn cloudier towards the end of the week and into the following weekend. dry, sunny, not bad but no heatwave on the way. that is your latest weather. goodbye.
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tonight at ten, the desperate the crowds at kabul aiport, tonight at ten, the desperate scramble to escape afghanistan, scramble to escape afghanistan, and life, under taliban rule. and life, under taliban rule.
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the militants beat back the militants beat back the crowds at kabul aiport, as afghans beg western embassies, for travel papers. these people have no real information about what they can do to leave afghanistan but they are desperate. in fact, they are asking us, "is it true, will the canadians give me a visa?" the fact is, most of these people will never get one. the uk says it will continue to help people escape, as long as the us military controls the airport. we are the lucky ones, we made it. there are lots of people who really need help. the un is warning that the taliban is systematically hunting down anyone who worked with us and nato troops. we'll be live in kabul.

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