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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 18, 2021 3:00am-3:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news — i'm david eades. our top stories. the taliban take centre stage — their leader says the rights of women will be respected as long as they adhere to islamic laws. translation: there | will be nothing against women in our ruling. our people accept our women are muslims. they accept islamic rules. if they continue to live according to sharia, we will be happy. the uk government says up to 20,000 afghans will be resettled in britain in the long term. 5,000 in the coming year. half a million children in desperate need of shelter and drinking water in haiti after the earthquake which has left nearly 2000 dead. and we take a look at the devastating impact of rising temperatures
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on the world's oceans in our weekly series climate critical. thank you very much forjoining us. we begin in kabul in afghanistan, where taliban leaders have stepped into the public limelight to outline their intentions after sweeping through the country and taking control within a matter of days. they are leaders who have in fact never been seen in public before. and they were quick to send out messages of assurance to both aghan nationals and the international community. they said afghans who assisted international forces would come to no harm, that media freedoms would be protected, and that women would be allowed to study and work, albeit adding �*within islamic principles�*. with the story of how the taliban claims it will rule, here's our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet.
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the republic has fallen. its leaders fled. taliban rule is returning, day by day its fighters more visible on the streets of kabul. patrolling with us military vehicles left behind or lost by government forces. taking on tasks to show they're in charge now. and showing the new face of afghanistan to the world. today, the first press conference by a man who's long been a mystery. taliban spokesman zabihullah mujahid showing his face in public for the first time, making their message clear. translation: i reassure| all internationals, the un, all embassies, our neighbours, that we will not be allowing the soil of afghanistan to be used against anybody. we have given amnesty to everybody. there is no revenge. all those young people who have talent, who have got an education, we don't want them to leave.
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day by day, afghans come to terms with the taliban again. waiting, not for words, but for what will change in their lives. let's see what afghanistan brings. i want to stay here, i want to fight for my students. i want to fight for our vision of afghanistan. and i know things are never going to be the same any more. it'sjust i have to be here. and so far, some surprises. female presenters are still fronting popular news programs. a talib taking her questions. but many fear it's just a shiny new show for now. women are already taking to the streets. "we exist," they shout. "work, education, political participation, is our right." women make up half of afghan society. "don't upset us," they tell the taliban. "be our voice."
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today, the taliban also focused on that fear. translation: there | will be nothing against women in our ruling. our people accept our women are muslims, they accept islamic rules. if they continue to live according to sharia, we will be happy, they will be happy. they've said that so many times before. as an afghan woman, i wouldn't trust them because they don't have a very good track record of keeping their promises or something like that. if they were so keen on women's rights, they wouldn't stop girls from going to university. they wouldn't stop women working in banks. these are two different narratives. with fighting finished, time forfun, too — taliban style. not the usual image of austere islamists, but it may be but a brief pause before new rules come into force. look atjust one snapshot of how many people,
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afghans and foreigners, are fleeing as fast as possible. the evacuation from kabul airport proceeds ever more urgently, including britain's operations. the taliban are promising stability too, and a government that's different this time round. their words have changed, many wait to see what they really mean. lyse doucet, bbc news. well for more on the situation in afghanistan we can speak now to mariam mustafa, the founder of afgans of dc, a charity that's campaigning for the rights of women and children in afganistan. thank you forjoining us. we havejust seen in thank you forjoining us. we have just seen in that report a slave of what i presume are
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designed to be reassurances from the taliban? we have seen a female journalist interviewing a taliban official on tv. we have seen women protesting in the streets. does that give you any cause for confidence?— that give you any cause for confidence? ., ~ , ., . confidence? thank you so much for having _ confidence? thank you so much for having me — confidence? thank you so much for having me and _ confidence? thank you so much for having me and raising - for having me and raising awareness on the situation in afghanistan. it does not give me any hope. i am very concerned for the women and children and for their rights. the taliban has done this before. they are holding their words because the media is watching right now. the troops helped guide them before they had left. the taliban saying they will keep their promise under the guidance of islam, if the taliban were following the koran by letter and spirit, they wouldn't exist in the spirit. islam is a beautiful
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religion which values the lives of people. i religion which values the lives of maple-— religion which values the lives of --eole. ., �* ~' . of people. i don't think anyone would have _ of people. i don't think anyone would have any _ of people. i don't think anyone would have any queries - of people. i don't think anyone would have any queries aboutl would have any queries about your scepticism, would have any queries about yourscepticism, it would have any queries about your scepticism, it seems, it yourscepticism, it seems, it is natural and not at all surprising. but the question is, what on earth can you do about it?— is, what on earth can you do about it? ,., ., , .. ., about it? personally, we cannot do anything- — about it? personally, we cannot do anything. the _ about it? personally, we cannot do anything. the government i do anything. the government right now needs to take action, the world needs to take action. where are you guys? we need help right now, our humanity is in crisis right now. in virginia, we have created a campaign which is a message to our congress house, we are protesting every day at the white house. there is only so much we can do. i have contacted the state department, i have been given the runaround. no one is doing anything. it has been for years, my cousin is there right
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now. she worked for the government. we worked shoulder to shoulder with the us government and they left my people there to bleed.- government and they left my people there to bleed. what is she doing? — people there to bleed. what is she doing? i — people there to bleed. what is she doing? i don't _ people there to bleed. what is she doing? i don't know- people there to bleed. what is she doing? i don't know if- people there to bleed. what is she doing? i don't know if you | she doing? i don't know if you are able to communicate with her quite readily, but what is the state of your own relatives and friends out there? to the state of your own relatives and friends out there?- and friends out there? to be honest, and friends out there? to be honest. for _ and friends out there? to be honest, for their _ and friends out there? to be honest, for their protection, | honest, for their protection, they are hiding, they cannot voice their opinions. the taliban are controlling the media and i wouldn't be surprised if the internet gets cut off soon. in the story of niger, they were going and not door to door and if they knock 34 door to door and if they knock 3a times, they knocked it down. they need their women to cook for them. you don't see a woman on the street. a cnn reporter went in there, but she was an american woman. how come she wasn't able to report any of their faces. wasn't able to report any of theirfaces. they wasn't able to report any of their faces. they are wasn't able to report any of theirfaces. they are not allowing it. there are consequences if they speak. i
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have seen it, i am in contact with some people on the ground, i have found myself through different channels. i i have found myself through different channels.- i have found myself through different channels. i can feel our different channels. i can feel your anxiety _ different channels. i can feel your anxiety and _ different channels. i can feel your anxiety and the - different channels. i can feel your anxiety and the sense l different channels. i can feel| your anxiety and the sense of different channels. i can feel. your anxiety and the sense of a lack of power at the moment. i appreciate you talking to us. thank you very much. thank you for having me. the british government has announced further details of its own resettlement scheme for afghan refugees. 0ur political correspondent nick eardley explained what we know so far, about how it will work and the scale of the government's ambition. up to 20,000 afghan refugees to come to the uk and resettle over the next few years — 5000 in the first year, the rest expected to come after that. and ministers here say it will focus on what they're calling the most at risk, in particular, women and girls. it is different from the scheme which had already been announced, which was for afghans who worked with uk forces
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over the past 20 years and their families. we expect about 5000 people to settle in the uk under that scheme, but this is 20,000 people separate from that. we don't have details about how it's going to be funded just yet, but we do know that the government plans to work with local councils and devolved governments to figure out the best places for refugees to be housed over the next few years. but the message from government tonight is that they believe this scheme, which is modelled on the one which was used during the syrian war, and ultimately saw 20,000 people settle in the uk over around five years. ministers saying the new scheme for afghanistan will ultimately save lives, and we've seen those pictures over the last few days that show how desperate some people are to leave kabul and to leave the country as a whole. and the hope in the uk government is that this will be part of a wider humanitarian effort.
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yes, money for humanitarian aid, but also countries who have been involved in afghanistan over the last 20 years pledging to take significant numbers of refugees. a tropical storm has hampered efforts to help the survivors of saturday's powerful earthquake in haiti. almost 2000 people are known to have died. tens of thousands forced into temporary shelters are now having to deal with flooding, heavy winds and rain. unicef says half a million children have been left with limited or no access to shelter and safe water. 0ur correspondent, james clayton reports now from the town of les cayes, one of the worst affected areas. at times, it feels like haiti is being hit from all directions on multiple fronts. first the earthquake. then the storm. it hit just after dark. violent winds
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and horizontal rain. misery loaded on top of misery. all across this town people have been left with a stark choice. do they either sleep in unsafe structures or do they decide to sleep on the streets in the wet and the cold? this is the biggest camp in the area. people seeking refuge on a football field. they were told they'd be safe here, but as the rains poured, they were soaked, their tents ripped apart by the winds. the people here are desperate and angry. translation: we have problems here. - just look at the conditions. and where are the government? they're not here. there are injured people here, too. this woman's foot has a deep laceration, but she's had no medical attention. and another woman tells me she has not eaten since saturday. the other option here is to sleep in homes already badly damaged. joshua runs the local lottery shop. he and his family were lucky
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the house didn't totally collapse, but they've had to make a difficult decision. and did you sleep here last night? translation: yes, i slept here in this l broken house last night. there was wind and rain. but the other people in the tent city had to sleep outside on chairs. there are simply no good options in this situation. these are desperate times and the storm has meant that the help that is needed by air and road simply hasn't arrived. james clayton, bbc news, les cayes. we can now speak to coleen kelly who's ceo concern worldwide. thank you forjoining us. we are hearing from one of your colleagues he was also in les cayes and describes a grim depiction of the state of affairs there. how easy is it to get provisions in, let alone too did to them?—
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too did to them? absolutely, that is the — too did to them? absolutely, that is the big _ too did to them? absolutely, that is the big problem - that is the big problem everyone is having. —— distribute them. the road took about six hours, normally about half of that. they are trying to quickly clear the roads but up to quickly clear the roads but up until this point it is been by air and sea to get supplies and food in. we did have enough kits for about 10,000 people with non—food item kits. water, sanitation products, cooking supplies. we have gotten those in. we will be quickly be giving a cash transfer system in to try to get cash into the hands of the people on the ground. hands of the people on the round. .,, . ground. those are the urgent issues, ground. those are the urgent issues. i _ ground. those are the urgent issues, i almost _ ground. those are the urgent issues, i almost dare - ground. those are the urgent issues, i almost dare not - ground. those are the urgent issues, i almost dare not ask| issues, i almost dare not ask how long you think you might have to stay there in order to look after these people? it is auoin to look after these people? it is going to be _ look after these people? it is going to be a _ look after these people? it is going to be a while, - look afterthese people? it 3 going to be a while, as you can imagine. between the damage of
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the earthquake, it is a very rural area and it is quite away from port—au—prince. just fixing that many homes, 30,000 people are displaced, then the storm coming through isjust going to do exponential damage with landslides and whatever buildings were just partially damaged, the storm would have done a lot more damage with the wind and the water getting into cracks and into foundations. it is going to be a while until we get other people... this is going to be a while until we get other people. . ._ get other people... as far as ou are get other people... as far as you are aware, _ get other people... as far as you are aware, are _ get other people... as far as you are aware, are there - get other people... as far as l you are aware, are there areas which have not been accessed yet? which have not been accessed et? �* , 4' which have not been accessed yet? absolutely, i think today, esterda yet? absolutely, i think today, yesterday and _ yet? absolutely, i think today, yesterday and today _ yet? absolutely, i think today, yesterday and today are - yet? absolutely, i think today, yesterday and today are just i yesterday and today are just the first time people are getting in. there's not much communication. people don't know when or if help is coming, so we are trying to get there
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as quickly as possible and get to as many areas as possible. best of luck. thank you for joining us. best of luck. thank you for joining us-_ joining us. thank you very much. stay with us on bbc news, still to come. we take a look at the devastating impact of rising temperatures on the world's oceans in our series climate critical. the big crowds became bigger as the time of if the funeral approached. as the lines of fans became longer, the police prepared for a huge job of crowd control. idi amin, uganda's brutal former dictator, has died at the age of 80. he's been buried in saudi arabia, where he lived in exile since being overthrown in 1979.
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two billion people around the world have seen the last total eclipse of the sun take place in this millennium. it began itsjourney off the coast of canada, ending three hours later, when the sun set over the bay of bengal. this is bbc news, our main story this hour. taliban leaders vow to respect the rights of women — in their first public comments since re—taking control of afghanistan. every week at this time we're taking a look at climate change, and the implications for our planet's future in our series — climate critical.
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and today the focus is on the ocean. a disturbing report has shown that the warming seas in the pacific are driving tuna away from their traditional waters to colder climes. why does that matter so much? well the fish stocks are the main source of revenue for some pacific island nations — who could see their government revenues fall up to 17% as they lose the ability to charge for licences to fish in their waters. and if you lose that sort of income you lose the ability to provide for your own schools, hospitals and roads. it is a threat to the existence of states like the cook islands, solomon islands and marshall islands. as it is, no part of the planet is more at risk from climate change than the ocean. those warmer waters, rising sea levels, and ocean acidification pose a massive threat both to marine ecosystems and to people who live in coastal areas or depend on the seas for their livelihood. what's more, many of the impacts are irreversible
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in our lifetimes and look set to continue for generations to come. the ipcc�*s recent report warns a global ocean rise approaching two metres by the end of the century can't be ruled out. as many as 200 million people could live below sea level by 2100. with 160 million more affected by higher annual flooding. 0cean temperatures are rising too. more than 90% of the excess heat trapped by greenhouse gases is absorbed by the world's oceans, threatening fragile marine ecosystems — from coral and plankton to fish and whales. and c02 from burning fossil fuels dissolves in the oceans, making them more acidic, and posing further threats to marine life. 0ceans absorb nearly 30% of excess carbon dioxide and when absorbed by sea water, the co2 forms carbonic acid it points to huge challenges — and great uncertainty — for many of the ocean's ecosystems.
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all of which is a challenge for peter thompson, who serves as the un secretary general�*s special and the four the ocean. as a fijian, if we took on the tuna stocks returns, that is close to your country and your heart no doubt?— heart no doubt? thank you for that, david- — heart no doubt? thank you for that, david. the _ heart no doubt? thank you for that, david. the situation - heart no doubt? thank you for that, david. the situation is i that, david. the situation is very worrying. when you think about the fact that this is one of the world's best managed fisheries and it is going to take the tuna to move away from the exclusive and economic zones of these countries of the pacific and they will be moving to the high seas and they won't be the best managed fish stock any more. they will be outside those zones. change is coming
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and we have to adapt accordingly. i and we have to adapt accordingly.— and we have to adapt accordingly. and we have to adapt accordinul . ~ ., ., accordingly. i think one of the most disturbing _ accordingly. i think one of the most disturbing elements - accordingly. i think one of the most disturbing elements of. most disturbing elements of this, we can talk about reducing co2 emissions and trying to bring down the rising temperatures, but some of the temperatures, but some of the temperatures for the ocean, you cannotjust be change back again, they are irreversible? no, the tuna example is a good one, if we can bring down the rate of greenhouse gas emissions, that problem, it doesn't go away but it diminishes significantly. all of our efforts have to be towards bringing down the emissions.— towards bringing down the emissions. . ., emissions. that said, you have islands, kiribati _ emissions. that said, you have islands, kiribati is _ emissions. that said, you have islands, kiribati is the - emissions. that said, you have islands, kiribati is the one - islands, kiribati is the one thatis islands, kiribati is the one that is quoted, which is effectively sinking, the rising water levels. we can talk about tuna, but there are xt essential —— existential issues
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the islands have two arise to? yes, it is also because of the melting ice on the glasses and theice melting ice on the glasses and the ice sheet and so on. think of it as one bathtub, the ocean is one ocean and we are flowing off to greenland, it is going to cause rising levels whether it is kiribati ireland other coastline of florida. we have to look for— coastline of florida. we have to look for solutions, - coastline of florida. we have to look for solutions, you - coastline of florida. we have i to look for solutions, you have to look for solutions, you have to look for solutions, you have to look ahead, what can be done to look ahead, what can be done to improve the situation? realistically?— to improve the situation? realistically? that is why we have called _ realistically? that is why we have called the _ realistically? that is why we have called the glasgow - realistically? that is why we . have called the glasgow cop26, thatis have called the glasgow cop26, that is the last chance we have
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got. it is a great opportunity to lower our greenhouse gas emissions. that will be giving our grandchildren a chance. if we carry on the way vr at the minute, heading towards a three to 5 degrees morning, it is a world of chaos. hate to 5 degrees morning, it is a world of chaos.— to 5 degrees morning, it is a world of chaos. we often talk about the _ world of chaos. we often talk about the need _ world of chaos. we often talk about the need for _ world of chaos. we often talk. about the need for governments to make big decisions, policy decisions which are acted upon. is there a value still in talking to people as individuals to take on their own responsibility? each person is a mere drop in the ocean, does that help?— is a mere drop in the ocean, does that help? obviously, the government — does that help? obviously, the government are _ does that help? obviously, the government are more - does that help? obviously, the l government are more important and that is what glasgow is about. it is the coal burners who are the worst of all. they have to be held to account for those rising sea levels and the
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destruction of age old cultures in the south pacific. individuals can do a lot as well. i am individuals can do a lot as well. iam not individuals can do a lot as well. i am not going to preach, i don't eat beef, even though i like the. all the things you can do as an individual make a huge difference.— huge difference. there is a drive to develop _ huge difference. there is a drive to develop more - drive to develop more protective marine areas and zones, desperately difficult when you are talking about the ocean, isn't it? it's not as if you can look at hard borders and say, from here to here, we will protect that, so let's get an international agreement? true, the world is moving towards adopting a 30% of the world being protected, by 2030. which scientists are telling us we have got to have. as far as the ocean is concerned, you have to be smart where the 30%
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is because the ecosystem is changing in the ocean because of the acidifying and the oxygenation and the warming to which you refer.— which you refer. peter thompson. _ which you refer. peter thompson, thank - which you refer. peter thompson, thank you | which you refer. peter. thompson, thank you for which you refer. peter— thompson, thank you forjoining us. peter referring to acidification. if you don't know your c02 from your cfc then climate critical�*s jargon buster might help. we are diving deep into the issue of ocean acidification. so let's speu ocean acidification. so let's spell it out for you, around a quarter of the carbon dioxide we pump into the air gets absorbed by sea water, changing its chemistry and making it more acidic. it dissolves the shells of some sea animals, it stops corals and plankton growing properly. under drastic decline ripples up the food chain, it hits fish stocks and the diets and livelihoods of millions of people. we will be putting that out, i will put it
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out on my twitter handle as soon as this bulletin is over. more of this to come, you are watching bbc news, thanks for staying with us. hello there. sunshine was limited across the country on tuesday. but we did see some good spells of sunshine for central—southeastern scotland, where temperatures reached close to the mid—20s celsius. for the next few days, though, we hold onto the largely cloudy skies and it's going to feel pretty cool for the time of year. we maintain these west—northwest winds across the uk. moisture laden air rolling in off the atlantic will bring a lot of cloud, thickest of it across northern and western fringes, where we could see some light rain or drizzle. but, again, like tuesday, with some shelter to central eastern scotland, east of the pennines, southeast wales, southwest england, will see some good spells of sunshine. the winds quite brisk again particularly across northern and western coastal areas. and those temperatures pretty much where they've been the last few days, high teens for most, but in the sunnier spots, the low 20s once again.
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now, as we head through wednesday night, it stays rather benign, pretty cloudy for most. there will be the odd spot of light rain and drizzle across northern and western hills. the odd clear spell, too. temperatures no lower than 11—15 celsius, pretty much where they have been the last few nights. so, as we head on into thursday, again, it's a similar story, a lot of cloud around, the odd spit, spot of light rain here and there. a weather front will be pushing into wales and then spreading across parts of england through the day. that will bring some showery bursts of rain. but behind it, skies will tend to brighten for southwest england and wales, and again that could lift temperatures into the low 20s celsius, otherwise, again, it's the high teens. that weather front spreads across eastern england during the first part of friday. and then, we've got the new area of low pressure starting to work its way into western areas. that'll bring some cloudy, wet, breezy weather to northern ireland and maybe western fringes of britain. for most, i think it's another rather cloudy day, but i'm hopeful later in the day, we start to see some sunny spells
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increasing across the south. that will lift temperatures up into the low to mid 20s celsius, otherwise, again, the high teens for most. this new area of low pressure will slowly work its way in during the start of the weekend, but we start to pick up southerly winds, and that will tap into something much warmer across france into central, southern and eastern parts of england. so, we'll see a brief warm spell to start this weekend with some sunshine around, could see up to 26 celsius or so in the south. that weather front, though, will continue to push its way eastwards bringing some showers, some of which could be heavy and thundery. and many places will see that showers during the course of sunday.
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this is bbc news — the headlines... in his first news conference, the taliban spokesman — zabihullah mujahid — tried to reassure the rest of the world afghanistan won't be used as a base for foreign fighters to spread terrorism. he also insisted women would be able to work, study, and be actively involved in society. twenty—thousand afghans are to be welcomed to the uk in the coming years as part of government plans to resettle people at risk of persecution by the taliban. the prime minister has pledged up to 5,000 can seek refuge this year saying the country owed them a "debt of gratitude". the authorities in haiti now say nearly 2,000 people are known to have died in saturday's powerful earthquake — an increase of 500 on the previous figure. the united nations children's
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fund estimates that around 1.2—million people in haiti have been affected — including half a million children. now on bbc news, panorama. i'm on the trail of a new generation of criminals. they're fuelling a fraud epidemic. i was starting to panic because obviously my account hit zero. i just started crying. their targets are everywhere — big brands, the banks... and they could be coming for you. ifeel like, how stupid was i to believe this? they are openly using social media to run criminal networks. you could potentially earn anywhere from £2000 to £4,000. and promoting fraud as a lifestyle choice.
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i'm a london scammer, i see it, i want it, i click it.

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