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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  August 13, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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police have confirmed that a "very young girl" was among the five victims of yesterday's shooting in plymouth. the gunman has been named by police as 22—year—old jake davison, who had a licence for a firearm. we can confirm that mr davison is a licensed firearms holder and we are unable to confirm whether that is the firearm that was used to stop sign when it comes to firearms licensing that is absolutely what the police oversee and clearly i will be asking questions. also this lunchtime... taliban militants have captured afghanistan's second biggest city, kandahar. here, the widow of a british soldier killed serving in afghanistan calls on the british government to help afghan civilians. my husband died to give them a better life.
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and by then not having a better life, it's taken away his life. i think this government need to stand up think this government need to stand up and be accounted for, same as the american government. in antarctica — the colossal iceberg almost as big as greater london being monitored carefully by scientists. and england make early break—throughs as india build a big first innings score at lord's on the second day of the second test and in the sport on the bbc news channel... a couple of early wickets on day two at lord's — but can england wrestle back the initiative in the second test against india?
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. police have been giving more details of the murders in plymouth last night during which a 22—year—old man killed five people, including a very young girl, before turning the gun on himself. officers say jake davison had a licence to hold firearms, and used what witnesses described as a pump action shot gun. detectives are studying his social media accounts but do not believe he had links to far—right groups or terror. the home secretary, priti patel, has praised the emergency services for their response to what she called a tragic�* incident. sarah ransome reports. very good morning, ladies and gentlemen. g very good morning, ladies and gentlemen-— very good morning, ladies and centlemen. �* , ., ., ., , ., gentlemen. a short while ago devon and cornwall— gentlemen. a short while ago devon and cornwall police _ gentlemen. a short while ago devon and cornwall police get _ gentlemen. a short while ago devon and cornwall police get more - gentlemen. a short while ago devon and cornwall police get more detailsi and cornwall police get more details of the mass shooting that has shaken this residential area of plymouth to its core. ., , ., , ., its core. therefore five people of pl mouth its core. therefore five people of plymouth who — its core. therefore five people of plymouth who have _
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its core. therefore five people of plymouth who have lost - its core. therefore five people of plymouth who have lost their - its core. therefore five people of. plymouth who have lost their lives overnight, and mr davison himself, including a particularly young child. we are not that this time naming the details of those people because not only are we working with the families, but each one of them has wide families throughout the united kingdom.— has wide families throughout the united kinudom. , , . , united kingdom. emergency services were called to _ united kingdom. emergency services were called to the _ united kingdom. emergency services were called to the scene _ united kingdom. emergency services were called to the scene at _ united kingdom. emergency services were called to the scene at last - were called to the scene at last night after reports of shootings. neighbours described hearing gunshots and a commotion at the house. police say a woman was killed at an address before the gunman went into the road and shot dead a young girl and her male relative. two others were then shot dead. another two people were also shot, but i've been treated in hospital. less than 24 been treated in hospital. less than 2a hours after the shooting began the police presence here is a still massive. forensic teams are here scouring the area, trying to piece together what happened. i’m scouring the area, trying to piece together what happened.- together what happened. i'm so beaten down — together what happened. i'm so beaten down as _ together what happened. i'm so beaten down as definitive. - together what happened. i'm so beaten down as definitive. the i together what happened. i'm so l beaten down as definitive. the six erson to beaten down as definitive. the six person to die _ beaten down as definitive. the six person to die has _
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beaten down as definitive. the six person to die has been _ beaten down as definitive. the six person to die has been confirmed| beaten down as definitive. the six i person to die has been confirmed as jake davison. police say he turned the gun on himself. the 22—year—old appears in a number of social media videos when he talks about his life. elsewhere he engages with what is known as incel subculture, known for its hostility and misogyny towards women. police say the shootings are not thought to be terror related but many questions of what happened and how inane. this many questions of what happened and how inane. , ., , , many questions of what happened and how inane. , . , , . many questions of what happened and how inane. , ., , , ., how inane. this really is a good -unch how inane. this really is a good punch for _ how inane. this really is a good punch for our — how inane. this really is a good punch for our community - how inane. this really is a good punch for our community and l how inane. this really is a good punch for our community and it i how inane. this really is a good - punch for our community and it will take time for us to be able to understand what has happened, why and how this has happened in a city like plymouth that is normally a safe and welcoming place for everyone. safe and welcoming place for everyone-— safe and welcoming place for everyone. local churches and community — everyone. local churches and community centres _ everyone. local churches and community centres are - everyone. local churches and community centres are open | everyone. local churches and - community centres are open today people together to try and make sense of the horror that unfolded on their doorstep. and we can speak to sarah now. what else have the police been saying this morning? the? what else have the police been saying this morning? they gave a ress saying this morning? they gave a press conference _ saying this morning? they gave a press conference earlier - saying this morning? they gave a press conference earlier this - press conference earlier this morning at which they confirmed as you are hearing the name and age of
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the gunman. they also told us of course a little bit more about the victims that died, but details are still very sketchy on that because, as you are hearing, they want to contact members of the family and widerfamily throughout contact members of the family and wider family throughout the uk before they release those sorts of details. i have to say, make no mistake, the shock waves of what happened here last night have rippled through this community. this is a very tight—knit community in the shadow of devonport dockyard. flowers are starting to be laid here. people when i speak to them are stunned at what happened, they can't quite believe that this tragic event happened here in devon. this sort of thing doesn't happen here. quotes time and time again that people were saying to me. is this community tries to get a handle on what happened you will not be surprised to hear that a number of fundraising groups have been set up to try to help families who are
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themselves trying to get to grips with what has happened and deal with it. but the scars of what happened last night here in the quiet streets of plymouth, they are going to take a long time to heal.— of plymouth, they are going to take a long time to heal. sarah ransome re-aortin. taliban fighters in afghanistan have seized the country's second biggest city, kandahar. its capture represents a major blow to the afghan government, a day after the militants overran herat and several other provincial capitals — including lashkar gah in helmand province. the taliban's rapid advance has provoked widespread criticism of the decision to withdraw western troops so quickly, with one former defence chief telling the bbc he feels ashamed. the widow of a british soldier who died in the conflict says she fears the achievements of uk forces will now be reversed. here's our diplomatic correspondent, paul adams. the war is closing in on kabul. this
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is a little way to the south. this morning and ambushed convoy pictures filmed by taliban fighters who date so doing says shows captured troops. and who is to say they are not unstoppable? two of the country's biggest cities, kandahar and the last 2a hours. the covenant seem seem incapable of stemming the tide. kabul is now swamped with displaced people. there is no shelter, they are living out in the open and questioning the capital, how soon before the taliban come here? american officials say the government could fall in as little as 30 days. the western withdrawal is almost over. after weeks of seems like there's thousands of british and american troops are being sent in to finish the job. leaving afghanistan to fend for itself. it
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is the country that is led by warlords and led by different provinces and tribes and you end up, if you are not very careful, in a civil war and i think we are heading towards a civil war. initially shown ljy towards a civil war. initially shown by taliban with momentum. more than 450 british soldiers _ by taliban with momentum. more than 450 british soldiers died _ by taliban with momentum. more than 450 british soldiers died in _ 450 british soldiers died in afghanistan, each loss and those of their comrades in iraq, commemorated in wootton bassett. was their sacrifice with it? sergeant peter rayner was killed in 2010, hit by an improvised explosive device while on patrol in helmand province. husband died give a better life, and patrol in helmand province. husband died give a better life,— died give a better life, and by then not havin: died give a better life, and by then not having better _ died give a better life, and by then not having better lives _ died give a better life, and by then not having better lives it _ died give a better life, and by then not having better lives it has - died give a better life, and by then not having better lives it has taken away. so i think this government need to stand up and be accounted for, aim at the american government, because they went in, they had plenty to say when we went in. now what are they saying now, what is
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going on? what are they saying now, what is auoin on? ~ , , what are they saying now, what is anoinon? , , :: going on? western trip 20 afghanistan _ going on? western trip 20 afghanistan to _ going on? western trip 20 afghanistan to defeat - going on? western trip 20 - afghanistan to defeat al-qaeda and stayed for 20 years. after such a long time and so much blood and treasure, some of those who played essential roles feel remorse. i had ho ed essential roles feel remorse. i had hoped that — essential roles feel remorse. i had hoped that we _ essential roles feel remorse. i had hoped that we would _ essential roles feel remorse. i had hoped that we would hear - essential roles feel remorse. i i—f. hoped that we would hear from the government an explanation for why we are in this position and then an explanation of how they are going to avert this disaster. and all we have heard is an admission of failure and a desire to pull people out. that seems to me... you know, i am almost ashamed that we are in this position. ashamed that we are in this osition. ashamed that we are in this position-— ashamed that we are in this osition. l , ., ., , ashamed that we are in this osition. l , ., ., position. the west had hoped to leave afghanistan _ position. the west had hoped to leave afghanistan with - position. the west had hoped to leave afghanistan with a - position. the west had hoped to leave afghanistan with a stable l leave afghanistan with a stable government and an army able to stand on its own two feet. with the end now in sight, what will this long legacy really be? paul adams, bbc news. 0ur correspondent yogita limaye is in kabul. are people there bracing themselves for the taliban to capture the capital? the taliban continue to make rapid
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advances in this country. now they have taken a province which is very close to the city of kabul and there are real fears about the future of the capital of afghanistan. everything has changed herejust at the span of a week and it has taken people by disbelief. the second largest city, kandahar, now controlled by the taliban. it is a traditional stronghold of the group, so for them, it is a major victory. herat in the west, close to the border with iran, an important trading centre, that too now controlled by the taliban. these are major losses for the afghan government. it leaves them in a very vulnerable position and people here really are waiting to hear from the leadership of this country, from the president of the country about how things are going to unfold in the days to come. 0ur defence correspondent jonathan beale is here. having withdrawn troops, hundreds of british and us troops are going back into get their nationals out. yes. into get their nationals out. yes, this is essentially _ into get their nationals out. yes, this is essentially the _ into get their nationals out. ieis this is essentially the endgame. so there are going to be more than 3000
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us marines and troops going in to evacuate some of their embassy staff and also american citizens. britain is doing the same, 600 troops britain is sending. this is a temporary surge to extract those nationals from their own countries and to reduce the embassy presence essentially. it is a sign they are worried about the security situation. ben wallace says this is normal, this was planned, but people in afghanistan, people in the government, the army will see this more as evidence of a sense of abandonment, of being left behind and the west rushing to the exit. ben wallace says that, you know, they have achieved over the last 20 years what they went in for, which was to prevent afghanistan becoming in the bit base from which terrorist attacks are planned. that said, they also tried to create a stable government, create a security force
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that could look after the country, and they haven't done that. that's clear from what we see, and that is why, i think, clear from what we see, and that is why, ithink, you clear from what we see, and that is why, i think, you that anger, that sense of frustration from some of the 457 british troops who lost their lives in that country, and from those who served, like general richard. ., ~ , ., nick eardley is our political correspondent at westminster. the pm hasn't said anything yet, but what's his defence secretary said about the deteriorating situation? give us more detail stock of the picture painted by the government here is a pretty bleak one. picture painted by the government here is a pretty bleai_ here is a pretty bleak one. ben wallace whati _ here is a pretty bleak one. ben wallace whati afghanistan - here is a pretty bleak one. ben l wallace whati afghanistan might here is a pretty bleak one. ben - wallace whati afghanistan might fall into civil war. ministers think the repercussions of that could be significant, notjust a rise in poverty in the country, but potentially the re—emergence of al-qaeda in afghanistan. and remember that back in 2001, the removal of al-qaeda from afghanistan was one of the key reasons given to justify the invasion. now, the speed with which this has all happened has
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surprised many around here, but there were warnings and mr wallace said this morning he had tried to persuade some nato allies to leave a military presence in afghanistan. ultimately he was unsuccessful in that because of the lack of us infrastructure and the lack of willpower in nato capitals. but i suppose the question that many are going to ask is, what comes next? many conservative mps are increasingly voicing their frustration at the government's policy, calling for some sort of rethink. labourare policy, calling for some sort of rethink. labour are calling for more support to be given the afghan army with intelligence, support and some other forms of back—up to allow them to try and stop the search of the taliban around kabul but i think there will be real questions asked of the governors in the next few days. notjust about how of the governors in the next few days. not just about how to of the governors in the next few days. notjust about how to get uk nationals out of the country but what happens in the medium term, as
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well. ., ~' , ., , what happens in the medium term, as well. ., ~ ,, , . what happens in the medium term, as well. ., ~' ,, , . x' well. rank you very much, nick eardley at _ well. rank you very much, nick eardley at westminster. - a study of the way covid spread in uk hospitals has shown how doctors struggled to contain the disease in the early stages of the pandemic. 0verall, more than a tenth of people in hospital with coronavirus caught the virus while they were there. researchers analysed data from more than 300 hospitals. scientists say levels of hospital—acquired infections are now much lower. here's naomi grimley. falling ill with covid while in hospital with something else was one of the most worrying features of the first wave of the pandemic. howard crozier was 81, and admitted to hospital in sunderland in march last year with regular pneumonia. he was moved around the hospital and put onto an elderly care ward. his daughter is sure that's where he caught covid and later died. the hospital told me they had admitted a patient with suspected covid on to the elderly care ward.
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0n the 25th of march, when i was told i needed to be there because dad was on end of life, i was told he tested positive for covid. there was nowhere else he could have caught that. researchers from several uk universities have examined patient records and found that at least one in ten hospital patients with covid were infected after admission. at the peak, this rose to more like one in five. 0verall, research suggests 11,800 people may have been infected this way and possibly more because early data is unclear. crucially, there were big variations between similar types of hospital and that is down to different preventative measures. even at the peak of the outbreak, we saw some busy hospitals still managed to maintain good, effective prevention control. hospitals still managed
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to maintain good infection prevention control. that meant there was good handwashing, good testing of patients so the right patients were tested and kept separately from non—infected patients. better regulation on some of the wards would have helped and access to a plentiful supply of ppe. researchers say the levels of hospital—acquired infections for covid are now much lower, thanks to the vaccination programme and a better understanding of how the virus spreads. naomi grimley, bbc news. the time is 1.16pm. our top story this lunchtime. police say jake davison — the gunman who killed five people in plymouth last night — had a licence to hold firearms. officers say a young girl was among the victims. and how local councils' claims to be fighting global warming mightjust be hot air. coming up in the sport on on the bbc news channel... tonight's the night. premier league football returns
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with league new—boys brentford hosting arsenal. and there's a capacity crowd expected for their first game back in the top flight since 1947. much of the mediterranean is sweltering under some of the hottest temperatures ever recorded in europe, with sicily this week reaching nearly 49 degrees celsius. hundreds of wildfires are still raging across italy, as the country moves into its peak holiday period. as our correspondent, mark lowen, reports, the hot weather has been caused by an anticyclone moving up from africa. well, we're coming into the peak holiday weekend of the year here in italy. 0n the slopes of mount etna here in sicily it's particularly busy at the moment, partly because it's actually significantly cooler as you go up the slopes of the mountain and down at sea level. sicily, and much of italy have been sweltering over the past week with sicily recording a temperature this week of 48.8 degrees, believed to be the highest
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temperature ever recorded in europe. it has been prompted by an anticyclone, that's an area of high atmospheric pressure that's currently sitting across north africa and much of southern europe. it's push temperatures to the mid to high 40s here and also getting towards spain and portugal as well. it has contributed to a bout of wildfires as well. there has been about 500 wildfires in italy over the last couple of days and four people have died from the flames. the only solution for those going mountains for the moment are, bottles of water, italian ice cream, and to get to the top, where it is significantly cooler. the united states is facing some of the worst forest fires in its history, with some of the blazes visible from space. but the haze of smoke hanging over parts of the country mean it's hard to spot exactly where the fires are burning on the ground. now aerial teams are using infra—red technology which allows them
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to pinpoint where forests have caught alight, and pass the information to firefighters. james clayton has joined one team flying over washington state. this is the dixie fire in northern california. it has been blazing since the middle ofjuly and has continued to grow. it is now the second—largest wildfire in state history. it has already consumed an entire town, yet it is just one of the many fires americans have faced this year. the weather outlook is bad too, with drought and heat waves across many western states. some experts worry that this could go on for months. this aerial scanning team has been making intense night—time reconnaissance trips over forest fires for two months now. mike murphy's mission is to get as close to the fires as possible to scan them and then send detailed maps to firefighters on the ground. these are intense flights between eight and ten hours long, and i have been allowed tojoin them. tonight's flight is over
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the state of washington. after 15 minutes, the clouds become thicker until we see a huge plume of smoke, the first fire of the day. it is only really when you are up in the air that you get a sense of the scale ofjust how big these forest fires are. they almost look like mushroom clouds from a nuclear bomb. they carpet the state with this thick haze. it is really difficult to know what is going on on the ground, which is why firefighters want the scans of the fire. mike uses infrared cameras to see through the smoke. this is a live map and it is building right now. this is all the front of the fire. all the red is areas of intense heat. from this height, everywhere you look, you can see fires, big and small. the sun is just setting now. we have been over five fires. you can see how far the haze goes, all the way into the distance. afterfour hours, we refuel and mike takes the chance to send scans
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to the forestry service. when we find these fires, we try to pass this information off to the forestry service as fast as fast as we can, so they can respond to it as fast as they can. then, it is back up again, surveying the burning terrain well into the night. this is what we can see from the plane, and this is what mike can see as he scans the fires. this technology isn't going to prevent forest fires, but it's a crucial tool in battling against them. and with more scorching summer days ahead, firefighters need all the help they can get. james clayton, bbc news, washington state. more than a third of english councils that have declared a �*climate change emergency�* support policies that threaten to increase carbon emissions. environmentalists say plans for more road building and airport expansion are examples of how local authorities are not taking a consistent approach to global warming. council leaders insist they are taking action
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but need more funding. roger harrabin reports. the residue of our consumerist lives. truckload after truckload of stuff we wanted once but want no more. 0ur waste generates lots of planet—eating greenhouse gases, but in leeds, they�*re turning it into something useful. heat. burning waste is controversial, but this giant plant, with its searing temperatures, generates electricity, and provides hot water to warm people�*s homes through a network of pipes. so we will extract over 100,000 megawatt hours of electricity a year and export that to the local area network. over 25,000 megawatt hours of heat energy, which feeds over 2000 homes and tens of businesses. even the lorries that collect the waste are going electric. leeds has a reputation as one
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of the uk�*s greenest cities. but what about this? green leeds wants to expand its airport, even though flying damages the climate. it's extremely difficult to get that balance right, and there are always going to be competing factors. if we don't expand, the fear is that somebody else will and that economic growth will go elsewhere. similar economic arguments are made about roads. councils backing road schemes include those in wiltshire, in shropshire, and also in london, even though councillors declared a climate emergency. we need to see changes in government policy and government planning policy so it�*s actually a legal obligation for every development to be in line with the climate change targets. in leeds, the airport expansion is widely opposed. i don't like it in a certain way because it means that more planes have got to come in. you know, and it's making more pollution. really important, it's the future
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of everything, isn't it? - if we're not green, - if we're not sustainable, then everything is going to fall apart i guess in the future. - i mean, there's so much fuel used with the aeroplanes, _ there's so much... so many resources i required for an airport for everybody to fly around. it has to be as green as possible. i don�*t really think about it that much but my grandma goes on about it a lot. what kind of world will we live in in 20 years�* time? all these things are happening already, what kind of world will be left for our children and our grandchildren? politicians on the doorstep and round the world are making decisions that will help to determine the future. roger harrabin, bbc news. britney spears�* dad has agreed to step down as the singer�*s conservator, which gave him control over her estate. jamie spears took charge of his daughter�*s affairs in 2008, following concerns over her mental health. he�*s promised an "orderly transition" to a new legal arrangement but hasn�*t indicated when he�*ll relinquish the role.
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the singer�*s lawyer called it �*another step toward justice.�* a 14—year—old boy has been charged with the murder of a man in chingford in essex. james markham, who was 45, was stabbed outside his home on monday evening after police say he confronted a group of youths causing a disturbance. two other teenagers are being questioned. a man, who tricked an elderly woman out of £140 by pretending to give her a coronavirus vaccine, has been sentenced to three and a half years in prison. david chambers, who was 33 and from southwest london, posed as an nhs employee when he knocked on 93—year—old kathleen martin�*s door in surbiton in december. thejudge called his actions "despicable."
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researchers say they have during research into burning calories. the rate remained steady for the next 40 years. this suggests weight gain in middle age has more to do with the amount of calories we and how quickly they are banned. british climate scientists working in antarctica are carefully monitoring a colossal iceberg floating near their base. it�*s almost as big as greater london, and hasjust brushed past the iceshelf where the researchers carry out their work. the uncertainty around the way the ice is drifting means the halley research station has been mothballed, as jonathan amos explains. it was the briefest and gentlest of icy kisses. a colossal iceberg, a74, weighing billions of tonnes, scrapes past a region of the antarctic, known as the brunt ice shelf. it was the moment the british antarctic survey had been anticipating for months. the expectation was the berg
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would knock into and dislodge another vast and unstable piece of ice that�*s sitting in front of the survey�*s halley research station. the fact that nothing was dislodged this time will be a frustration for the british antarctic survey. until the unstable ice in front of halley comes away, the base must close every winter on safety grounds, and this impacts the world—leading science that can be done at this important location. it�*s at halley, for example, that they discovered and continue to monitor the hole in the ozone layer. icebergs the size of a74 are impressive, but they are not necessarily an indicator of climate change. the antarctic balances the amount of snow falling on the interior of the continent by routinely discharging blocks of ice at its margins. we don�*t have that long of a record of carving from satellite imagery in antarctica, so it is quite hard to tell if the frequency of carving
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events is increasing. we do know that ice fronts in parts of the antarctic peninsula are further back than some of their historical locations. the survey will continue to track a74 and the behaviour of the brunt ice shelf. it is entirely possible the big berg�*s gentle embrace delivered some unseen damage. if that�*s the case, the expected breakaway of unstable ice could yet happen in the days ahead. jonathan amos, bbc news. england�*s bowlers have taken four wickets so far on the second day of the second test at lord�*s. india reached lunch at 346 for seven. joe wilson has been watching. (tx) lord�*s on friday was about a man, or rather a cause. andrew strauss wore red for his late wife ruth and her foundation, which supports
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in particular bereaved families. and the two teams and the ground and the strauss boys joined in. 0pening batsman, that was dad�*sjob. kl rahul�*s too. he batted all of thursday, one minute of friday. commentator: oh, my word! can you believe that? no, don�*t think he could. remember you did score 129. five minutes later, england had another. ajinkya rahane gone. delight onjames anderson�*s face, surprise too. hang on... weren�*t we being outplayed? suddenly, it was tense for india. here comes rishabh pant. that�*s basically his approach, whatever the occasion. yeah. now just a faint touch from pant�*s bat meant he was out for 37. measure england�*s reaction. relief. a lot! i think england will be pretty pleased with the morning. india is still in a strong position at 346—7.
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my still in a strong position at 346—7. my view here encompasses a lot of spectators wearing red shirts. there is a great deal of admiration around the ground for the work andrew strauss is doing now. there might be a few england fans attempted to allure him out of retirement because at some point england today will have to bat and the batting has looked a little shaky so far this summer, to say the least. it is unique being at a lunch interval at lord�*s. at the boundary edge i have found a stray champagne cork stop i will return that and try to find a cup of t. i will return that and try to find a cu of t. ., , will return that and try to find a cuoft. .,, will return that and try to find a cu oft. ., , ., ., cup of t. i do believe you. now for a look at the _ cup of t. i do believe you. now for a look at the weather. _ the weekend is upon us and the weather is looking a little mixed with some rain and sunshine in the

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