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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 10, 2021 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are maya goodfellow, political writer and academic, and broadcaster david davies. thank you both for being with us. after results day today, the telegraph claims traditional a—level grades face being scrapped under government plans, amid fears record numbers of top marks are making them meaningless. a gradual tightening of grades over several years is being planned to prevent employers losing confidence in the exams — that's according to the i. as well as leading on the calls for change, the times reports that gavin williamson is said to be in danger of being replaced as education secretary after a series of missteps. the ft says the record—setting results have put pressure on universities to find places for an excess of top—rated students.
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the guardian reports on the gap between private and state school a—level grades, which is now at its widest in the modern era. state school pupils are falling behind, writes the daily mail. 70% of private school results were top grades, compared to 39% at comprehensives. the mail also covers the lawsuit that's been filed against prince andrew on its front page, as does the metro. the woman who's filed the lawsuit has accused prince andrew of sexually abusing her when she was 17 — allegations he has previously denied. and "messi makes his move" — the independent shows the footballer waving to fans as he arrived in the french capital today after agreeing a two—year deal with paris saint—germain. so we must start with a—levels, so many waiting with baited breath to find out what they got. lots of heavy faces on the front page of the
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times," call for urgent a—levels overhaul as grades sort," it's all very speculative at the moment, it's all fresh and raw?— all fresh and raw? while we talked about the impact _ all fresh and raw? while we talked about the impact of _ all fresh and raw? while we talked about the impact of the _ all fresh and raw? while we talkedl about the impact of the inequalities within today's results. half an hour ago, we talked about regional variations, we talked about the differences and widening gap between, on the one hand, private and top—end schools desktop state schools, and on the other hand, most state schools. we didn't talk about the difference between boys and girls. girls have done rather better, again, then the boys in these results as a whole, before you get to certain other differences as well. in this times story, there is an influential contribution, as usual, from robert houston, chairman of the education select committee whose supporting the scrapping of
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a—levels altogether and going over to the international baccalaureate, which i didn't realise it is now being covered by 150 countries worldwide. then there's another not very happy story for gavin williams, who is looking to be replaced — his replacement is said to be a rising star of the tory party, not always a helpful tag in days gone by, must be said. but the big question is, where is education policy heading now? that remains to be seen. this is education policy heading now? that remains to be seen.- is education policy heading now? that remains to be seen. this all is set against — that remains to be seen. this all is set against a _ that remains to be seen. this all is set against a backdrop _ that remains to be seen. this all is set against a backdrop of _ that remains to be seen. this all is set against a backdrop of two - set against a backdrop of two years that have been immensely disrupted, pupils have had to cope with the disruption and teachers have had to make it up as they go along as rules have changed. it's been very difficult. ~ , ., ., difficult. absolutely, and all those ounu difficult. absolutely, and all those young peeple _ difficult. absolutely, and all those young peeple out _ difficult. absolutely, and all those young people out there _ difficult. absolutely, and all those young people out there last - difficult. absolutely, and all those young people out there last year | difficult. absolutely, and all those i young people out there last year and this year— young people out there last year and this year have worked incredibly
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hard _ this year have worked incredibly hard regardless of the outcome, and they've _ hard regardless of the outcome, and they've really been through it. i really _ they've really been through it. i really feel for them, they've really been through it. i really feelforthem, it's they've really been through it. i really feel for them, it's been an incredibly— really feel for them, it's been an incredibly disruptive year and i imagine — incredibly disruptive year and i imagine incredibly difficult for a lot imagine incredibly difficult fora lot of— imagine incredibly difficult for a lot of people in particular those who've — lot of people in particular those who've necessarily not had access to the online _ who've necessarily not had access to the online learning, may be don't have _ the online learning, may be don't have the — the online learning, may be don't have the internet connectivity or access _ have the internet connectivity or access to — have the internet connectivity or access to their own devices. there's no tots _ access to their own devices. there's no lots of— access to their own devices. there's no lots of speculation, as the times and telegraph is saying, around changes— and telegraph is saying, around changes that might happen to the a-ievei_ changes that might happen to the a—level system because of this increased — a—level system because of this increased proportion of a's over the past few_ increased proportion of a's over the past few years. you do have these slight _ past few years. you do have these slight moral panics sometimes around the so—called grade inflation, and i think— the so—called grade inflation, and i think we _ the so—called grade inflation, and i think we don't want to ignore how hard students work. i would also say that any— hard students work. i would also say that any sort — hard students work. i would also say that any sort of change the government pursues really needs to be measured and think about the problems— be measured and think about the problems of the traditional examination system, actually looking at a system of examines democrat exams _ at a system of examines democrat exams mixed with continual
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assessment. but it seems at the moment— assessment. but it seems at the moment that young people like robert hoiston, _ moment that young people like robert holston, chairman of the education select— holston, chairman of the education select committee, aiming for the scrapping — select committee, aiming for the scrapping of a—levels and excepting the international baccalaureate, but you also— the international baccalaureate, but you also have these rumours over whether— you also have these rumours over whether the government are considering shifting away from the way the _ considering shifting away from the way the a—levels are greeted in a style _ way the a—levels are greeted in a style akin— way the a—levels are greeted in a style akin to what they do with gcses — style akin to what they do with gcses i— style akin to what they do with gcses. i would worry more on the focus _ gcses. i would worry more on the focus of— gcses. i would worry more on the focus of examinations, which is something the government has been doin- something the government has been doing the _ something the government has been doing the past few years, and looking — doing the past few years, and looking at how that impacts different students. i don't think it's a _ different students. i don't think it's a particularly positive move, and we — it's a particularly positive move, and we have to make sure all students _ and we have to make sure all students are getting the best of their education system, not only focusing — their education system, not only focusing on these important moments like a—levels, but maybe the amount of emphasis — like a—levels, but maybe the amount of emphasis we put on that isn't always— of emphasis we put on that isn't always helpful.— of emphasis we put on that isn't always helpful. something else to address, always helpful. something else to address. in _ always helpful. something else to address, in the _ always helpful. something else to address, in the guardian, - always helpful. something else to address, in the guardian, the - always helpful. something else to address, in the guardian, the gap widening between the private and
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state schools is the widest it's beenin state schools is the widest it's been in the modern era. this is exercising quite a lot of people in education. , ., , �* exercising quite a lot of people in education. , ., ,�* , , education. this doesn't sit very well with boris _ education. this doesn't sit very well with boris johnson's - education. this doesn't sit very l well with boris johnson's leveling well with borisjohnson's leveling up well with borisjohnson's leveling up campaign and efforts in that direction. education is one of those subjects, along with health, of course, that governments feel very vulnerable about when they've been in power for vulnerable about when they've been in powerfor several vulnerable about when they've been in power for several years. and in powerfor several years. and even though it would've been very difficult for any government over the past two years, there's no doubt about that, you do wonder how their u—turns in this area have seemed rather even more damaging than their u—turns elsewhere. let’s rather even more damaging than their u-turns elsewhere.— u-turns elsewhere. let's look at the yorkshire post. _ u-turns elsewhere. let's look at the
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yorkshire post. "herd _ u-turns elsewhere. let's look at the yorkshire post. "herd immunity- u-turns elsewhere. let's look at the | yorkshire post. "herd immunity hope now a mythical dream after variant." this is professor sir andrew pollard, saying yes, carry on getting vaccinated but it won't mean the end of coronavirus. he getting vaccinated but it won't mean the end of coronavirus.— the end of coronavirus. he was aaivin the end of coronavirus. he was giving evidence _ the end of coronavirus. he was giving evidence to _ the end of coronavirus. he was giving evidence to mps - the end of coronavirus. he was giving evidence to mps today, | the end of coronavirus. he was i giving evidence to mps today, and giving evidence to mp5 today, and essentially what this is rooted in is herd _ essentially what this is rooted in is herd immunity is mythical, which is herd immunity is mythical, which is the _ is herd immunity is mythical, which is the term — is herd immunity is mythical, which is the term he used, because what we know— is the term he used, because what we know suggests that people who are fully vaccinated can contract coronavirus, you are at much less risk of— coronavirus, you are at much less risk of contracting it and much less likely to _ risk of contracting it and much less likely to he — risk of contracting it and much less likely to be seriously ill if you contract _ likely to be seriously ill if you contract it, but it doesn't guarantee you won't contract it. so the idea — guarantee you won't contract it. so the idea that the virus is stopped purely— the idea that the virus is stopped purely through vaccination is not a
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possibilitx — purely through vaccination is not a possibility. there's a discussion about— possibility. there's a discussion about what to do next, and one thing that saiid _ about what to do next, and one thing that sajid javid has been talking about— that sajid javid has been talking about is— that sajid javid has been talking about is this idea of boosterjabs for those — about is this idea of boosterjabs for those who are vulnerable, those who are _ for those who are vulnerable, those who are older with previous conditions. there's pushback from scientists— conditions. there's pushback from scientists saying we need to wait and see — scientists saying we need to wait and see in— scientists saying we need to wait and see in relation to how people contract — and see in relation to how people contract the virus. we need to be concerned — contract the virus. we need to be concerned around those vulnerable groups. _ concerned around those vulnerable groups, notjust assuming concerned around those vulnerable groups, not just assuming that everyone — groups, not just assuming that everyone can magically return to normal, — everyone can magically return to normal, and particular people with underlying — normal, and particular people with underlying health conditions. but as i underlying health conditions. but as i said _ underlying health conditions. but as i said earlier, one of the really important _ i said earlier, one of the really important things here is, especially when _ important things here is, especially when talking about boosters in the country _ when talking about boosters in the country like the uk where so many people _ country like the uk where so many people are — country like the uk where so many people are vaccinated, we really need _ people are vaccinated, we really need to — people are vaccinated, we really need to be putting at the forefront of the _ need to be putting at the forefront of the conversation global vaccinations. they are still many, many— vaccinations. they are still many, many people around the world who do not have _ many people around the world who do not have access to the vaccine because — not have access to the vaccine because of this vaccine apartheid, where _ because of this vaccine apartheid, where you — because of this vaccine apartheid, where you have estates like the us and canada buying up huge amounts of the vaccine, _ and canada buying up huge amounts of the vaccine, meaning other countries cannot— the vaccine, meaning other countries cannot vaccinate even older people.
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we are _ cannot vaccinate even older people. we are not safe until everyone is vaccinated. — we are not safe until everyone is vaccinated, but we need to be thinking — vaccinated, but we need to be thinking about those who are unsafe because _ thinking about those who are unsafe because they aren't able to access the vaccination, really looking at that global inequality is really important. that global inequality is really important-— that global inequality is really im ortant. ,., ., important. even in some of the wealthier countries, _ important. even in some of the wealthier countries, people - important. even in some of the wealthier countries, people are turning on the vaccine. i was talking to an emergency doctor in texas earlier tonight, who was saying that everyone they are treating are all unvaccinated and very poorly — underlining the need to have the jab because it will hopefully mean your symptoms are not so severe. tram hopefully mean your symptoms are not so severe. ., , ., ., so severe. two things about that - one, so severe. two things about that - one. those — so severe. two things about that - one, those who _ so severe. two things about that - one, those who spoke _ so severe. two things about that - one, those who spoke out - so severe. two things about that - one, those who spoke out againstl so severe. two things about that - i one, those who spoke out against the astrazeneca jab in the early days has created so many scare stories around it. they have something to answer for, around it. they have something to answerfor, there's no doubt around it. they have something to answer for, there's no doubt about that, and particularly in the countries that she's been talking about. the second point i would meet is let some good news here — the
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opposition to the covid jab in our own country from younger people seems to be diminishing significantly.— seems to be diminishing significantly. seems to be diminishing sianificantl. , ., ., significantly. 7596 of adults are fully vaccinated _ significantly. 7596 of adults are fully vaccinated in _ significantly. 7596 of adults are fully vaccinated in this - significantly. 7596 of adults are fully vaccinated in this country| fully vaccinated in this country now. let's look at the daily express, david, "superscans give hope and dementia battle." a very promising piece of research here particularly when you think that we are an ageing population and the number of people suffering from dementia is likely to rise. it’s dementia is likely to rise. it's like the good _ dementia is likely to rise. it�*s like the good old days in the press preview, when whatever the rest of the press was doing, the daily express, their health editor would get a front splash, and here it is. and it appears — and you yourselves have been running the story through today — the express talks about a fantastic development in treating dementia thanks to ai and the fact
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that one scan at the right time and early on can make a huge difference. if the story is to be believed, and it is i think, your own health editor was very... it's a terrific story. editor was very... it's a terrific sto . . . editor was very... it's a terrific sto . , . .,. editor was very... it's a terrific sto . , . ., editor was very... it's a terrific sto. ,. ., �*, story. yes, and the fact that it's so cuick story. yes, and the fact that it's so quick to _ story. yes, and the fact that it's so quick to diagnose, _ story. yes, and the fact that it's so quick to diagnose, just - story. yes, and the fact that it's i so quick to diagnose, just briefly, we know with dementia, early intervention can make such a difference to patients's life expectancy. difference to patients's life expectancy-_ difference to patients's life exectan . , , ., expectancy. absolutely, these move forward with — expectancy. absolutely, these move forward with identifying _ expectancy. absolutely, these move forward with identifying these - forward with identifying these changes in the brain, which is what the story— changes in the brain, which is what the story is— changes in the brain, which is what the story is saying, a single scan catching — the story is saying, a single scan catching small changes in the brain which _ catching small changes in the brain which are _ catching small changes in the brain which are hard to detect, and that can he _ which are hard to detect, and that can be really important in treatment and knowing just how horrendous dementia — and knowing just how horrendous dementia is. it seems to be a
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positive step in the right direction, so we welcome this kind of investment, or advancement in medicine — of investment, or advancement in medicine h— of investment, or advancement in medicine. �* . of investment, or advancement in medicine. ~ , ., , medicine. a couple of back pages, first, the sports _ medicine. a couple of back pages, first, the sports page _ medicine. a couple of back pages, first, the sports page of _ medicine. a couple of back pages, first, the sports page of the - first, the sports page of the mirror, "some of the earth." the uk was by far the main origin of abhorrent racism to make a racist abuse after euro loss —— the uk lost the 2021 euros final. so many people said that when they saw those three players missed the penalties, they knew there were going to be in for an appalling time, and here we have the evidence of it. thea;r an appalling time, and here we have the evidence of it.— the evidence of it. they did, and my auestion the evidence of it. they did, and my question would _ the evidence of it. they did, and my question would be, _ the evidence of it. they did, and my question would be, if— the evidence of it. they did, and my question would be, if twitter. .. - question would be, if twitter... what are social media companies going to do about this? my question for them, as well as others and the football authorities, is can they put their hands on their heart tonight, tomorrow, and say that they
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are doing absolutely everything — not later in the year, not next year, not after legislation, now — to prevent significantly this from going on into the new season? because i believe that there are, in existence, ways of bringing this ghastly problem, which is an absolute disgrace for our country, to bring it down significantly. in the question is, when will that happen with white twitter say they've removed 622 tweets in the last 2a hours —— in 2a hours after the game. 499% of the suspended accounts, their owners were identified. —— accounts, their owners were identified. --_ accounts, their owners were identified. -- 9996. is removing tweets sufficient? _ identified. -- 9996. is removing tweets sufficient? you - identified. -- 9996. is removing tweets sufficient? you wonder. tweets sufficient? you wonder whether there is some sort algorithm
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that could stop them being published in the first place? i don't know enough about how these work, but like david said, it needs to be more proactive like that, not reactive. absolutely, i think particularly for those _ absolutely, i think particularly for those football fans who look up to these _ those football fans who look up to these wonderful football players as real rote _ these wonderful football players as real role models, and still do, and them _ real role models, and still do, and them having to witness that kind of abuse _ them having to witness that kind of abuse is _ them having to witness that kind of abuse is absently disgusting. and unfortunately when the game went as it did and _ unfortunately when the game went as it did and it— unfortunately when the game went as it did and it was all too unfortunate for people in the uk — part of— unfortunate for people in the uk — part of it _ unfortunate for people in the uk — part of it the story is about is that— part of it the story is about is that it — part of it the story is about is that it was _ part of it the story is about is that it was an instant reaction from some _ that it was an instant reaction from some people, certain commentators — these _ some people, certain commentators — these accounts were all in the uk —— outside the — these accounts were all in the uk —— outside the uk trying to whip up racism _ outside the uk trying to whip up racism in — outside the uk trying to whip up racism in the uk. racism in the uk evidently— racism in the uk. racism in the uk evidently goes beyond these explicit and overt forms of racism. this really— and overt forms of racism. this really does _ and overt forms of racism. this really does show us how deep racism
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runsi _ really does show us how deep racism runs. that _ really does show us how deep racism runs. that it— really does show us how deep racism runs, that it is a problem in the uk and we— runs, that it is a problem in the uk and we need — runs, that it is a problem in the uk and we need to get serious about tackling _ and we need to get serious about tackling and addressing it, and not having _ tackling and addressing it, and not having these ridiculous supports to make _ having these ridiculous supports to make a _ having these ridiculous supports to make a report saying institutional racism _ make a report saying institutional racism is — make a report saying institutional racism is not a problem. this is the tip of— racism is not a problem. this is the tip of the _ racism is not a problem. this is the tip of the iceberg, so yes, we need action— tip of the iceberg, so yes, we need action from — tip of the iceberg, so yes, we need action from organisations like twitter. — action from organisations like twitter, but we also need action throughout society to really address systemic _ throughout society to really address systemic racism in britain which is a serious — systemic racism in britain which is a serious problem.— systemic racism in britain which is a serious problem. quick comment from ou a serious problem. quick comment from you about _ a serious problem. quick comment from you about the _ a serious problem. quick comment from you about the guardian's - from you about the guardian's support page. lionel messi signed a two—year deal, earning about £1 million a week. two-year deal, earning about £1 million a week.— million a week. this is all over iuite a million a week. this is all over quite a few— million a week. this is all over quite a few papers, _ million a week. this is all over quite a few papers, this - million a week. this is all over quite a few papers, this is an i quite a few papers, this is an historic— quite a few papers, this is an historic move given lionel messi's career— historic move given lionel messi's career at — historic move given lionel messi's career at barcelona. to me it's very difficult _ career at barcelona. to me it's very difficult to — career at barcelona. to me it's very difficult to get around the large amounts — difficult to get around the large amounts of money involved in this, when _ amounts of money involved in this, when you _ amounts of money involved in this, when you also see people priced out of the _ when you also see people priced out of the game, there's a major problem in terms _ of the game, there's a major problem in terms of— of the game, there's a major problem in terms of how these things are structured _ in terms of how these things are structured. he
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in terms of how these things are structured-— structured. he had to leave barcelona _ structured. he had to leave barcelona because - structured. he had to leave barcelona because they - structured. he had to leave - barcelona because they couldn't afford him any more.— barcelona because they couldn't afford him any more. that's true, but i afford him any more. that's true, but i have — afford him any more. that's true, but i have to _ afford him any more. that's true, but i have to say _ afford him any more. that's true, but i have to say that _ afford him any more. that's true, but i have to say that my - afford him any more. that's true, but i have to say that my wife - but i have to say that my wife said, an hour ago, i overstated his wages by saying he would get a million quid a week or something. then i read in the guardian that perhaps she was right — £29.6 million a year. she was right - £29.6 million a ear. . �* . she was right - £29.6 million a ear. ., �*, ., ., ~' she was right - £29.6 million a ear. . �* . . . .. but year. that's after-tax, ithink. but what about— year. that's after-tax, ithink. but what about bonuses? _ year. that's after-tax, ithink. but what about bonuses? that's - year. that's after-tax, ithink. but what about bonuses? that's whatl year. that's after-tax, i think. but. what about bonuses? that's what i've been told about. but anyway, i haven't changed my view, i don't think i ever will change my view. it is obscene, it is indefensible, and it is the world we are living in for these people who i compare to the showbiz stars of hollywood in the 19305. �* , ., ., ~ , showbiz stars of hollywood in the 19305. , ., ., ~, , 19305. i'm 'ust glad that mrs davies is -a in: 19305. i'm just glad that mrs davies is paying so — 19305. i'm just glad that mrs davies is paying so much — 19305. i'm just glad that mrs davies is paying so much attention - 19305. i'm just glad that mrs davies is paying so much attention to - 19305. i'm just glad that mrs davies is paying so much attention to what| is paying so much attention to what we're doing. i'm grateful to her. thank you. we're doing. i'm gratefulto her. thank yon-—
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thank you. let's 'ust give her a iuick thank you. let's 'ust give her a quick wave. _ thank you. let'sjust give her a quick wave, where _ thank you. let'sjust give her a quick wave, where are - thank you. let'sjust give her a quick wave, where are you? i thank you. let'sjust give her a . quick wave, where are you? thank you, mrs davies. let's finish with the daily telegraph. "claimants are deczki drives aid diesel." and so to a lot of people. —— bell wasn't overly harsh when i spoke about him referring to stupid politics? about him referring to stupid olitics? , . about him referring to stupid olitics? , , ., , , about him referring to stupid olitics? , , , ., politics? only his advisers would know how likely _ politics? only his advisers would know how likely he _ politics? only his advisers would know how likely he was - politics? only his advisers would know how likely he was to - politics? only his advisers would know how likely he was to be - politics? only his advisers would i know how likely he was to be asked that question. but there we have it. he's tried to help himself by saying his next car will be electric — of course it will, but we shall see. i agree very much that this is the sort of story that runs around, i don't think it changes the world. we were all being encouraged, and it's entirely true, a few years ago to
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drive diesel cars. i think i had one once, i don't have it at the moment, but i'm still very dubious — it's but i'm still very dubious — its extraordinary, this paperfollows us a story about the environment and global warming, and all the rest of it. and today we can barely find it on the front page. i’m it. and today we can barely find it on the front page.— it. and today we can barely find it on the front page. i'm sure we will in the run-pp _ on the front page. i'm sure we will in the run-up to _ on the front page. i'm sure we will in the run-up to 26, _ on the front page. i'm sure we will in the run-up to 26, which - on the front page. i'm sure we will in the run-up to 26, which is - on the front page. i'm sure we will in the run-up to 26, which is what | in the run—up to 26, which is what sir alex sharma is president of, this all—important climate change conversation. he does say that he uses public transport a lot, but he's also made a lot of flights as well. ~ . he's also made a lot of flights as well. . . ., , he's also made a lot of flights as well. ~ . . , ., well. what we really need from the government _ well. what we really need from the government is _ well. what we really need from the government is to _ well. what we really need from the government is to make _ well. what we really need from the government is to make public- government is to make public transport _ government is to make public transport cheaper across the country. _ transport cheaper across the country, and from newcastle, it's so much _ country, and from newcastle, it's so much cheaper for me to get a bus in london _ much cheaper for me to get a bus in london than — much cheaper for me to get a bus in london than newcastle. so we can get caught— london than newcastle. so we can get caught up— london than newcastle. so we can get caught up in_ london than newcastle. so we can get caught up in the stories about individual politicians in the decisions they make, and that matters — decisions they make, and that matters to a degree. but i think the bigger— matters to a degree. but i think the bigger issue is that we need more
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concrete — bigger issue is that we need more concrete plans from the government about _ concrete plans from the government about the _ concrete plans from the government about the immediate steps they'll take to _ about the immediate steps they'll take to get us to reduce emissions. because _ take to get us to reduce emissions. because of— take to get us to reduce emissions. because of the moment, the planes they have _ because of the moment, the planes they have are really not up to scratch. — they have are really not up to scratch, almost nonexistent as they pursue _ scratch, almost nonexistent as they pursue other things like airport runways— pursue other things like airport runways and major road—building ventures — runways and major road—building ventures which fly in the face of their— ventures which fly in the face of their pledges on the climate. all too far their pledges on the climate. too far into their pledges on the climate. fill too far into the future for many. do buy a paper in the morning, won't you? gives us something to talk about every night. have a very good night, see you soon. hello, thanks forjoining us. i'm marc edwards with all your sport. it's one of the biggest football transfers in history, because lionel messi — one of the greatest players of all time — has been announced as a paris saint—germain player. the french club have confirmed that the six—time ballon d'or winner
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has signed a two—year contract with the option of a further year. the argentina star said on tuesday that he is impatient to start a new chapter of his career in paris, and that the club and its vision are in perfect harmony with his owns ambitions. he added that he was looking forward to stepping out onto the pitch at the parc des princes, and was determined to help build something special for the club and the fans. katie gornall takes us through us the events on a momentous day in the french capital. chanting. he was dressed a bit like a tourist. but this was no ordinary day—tripper. lionel messi, one of the game's greatest players, had arrived at a french airport ready to sign for paris saint—germain. fans, some of whom had been waiting for days, could barely contain themselves. i watched him play in barcelona, and how he acted, how he's playing with his team—mates, how he's finding ways to play the ball, it'sjust amazing. and his goals, his free kicks, everything is just amazing. he's the best player.
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translation: today is an historic day. - the biggest player on the planet is here in the capital. i'm not going to stay in my neighbourhood, i have to be here. for argentina and for his club, messi has always been a class apart. from his days in argentina, messi has always been in a state apart. brilliant from lionel messi. that's what you expect of him! at barcelona, he scored a staggering 672 goals and secured ten league titles — and there could have been more. applause. in a tearful farewell press conference on sunday, messi said he never wanted to leave the club he joined when he was 13, but due to la liga salary cap rules, they could no longer afford to keep him. barcelona kept spending, spending, spending. you know what happens if at home you spend more that you have? you cannot afford certain things. so, right now, if you look at what happened last season with a87 million euros in debt, just from last season,
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plus the wages of the players, it's110% of what comes in. so technically, barcelona are bankrupt. and paris saint—germain was perhaps always the most likely destination, a club backed by qatari money and already littered with stars, including kylian mbappe and his former barca team—mate, neymar. barcelona are now moving on without their biggest star. for messi, a new story is beginning. katie gornall, bbc news. there'll be no champions league for rangers this season, after they were beaten 2—1 on the night at ibrox and li—2 on aggregate by malmo in the third qualifying round. 2—1 down from the sweden leg, rangers began well and made the tie all square through alfredo morelos. and then, despite having a man sent off, malmo began to regain control, and antonio cholak restored their overall lead. five minutes later, the croatian was allowed through the rangers' defence to add another. so, rather than messi's psg
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in the champions league, it's kairat almaty or alashkert for steven gerrard's side in the europa league playoff next. to cricket now, and london spirit won their first match at the men's hundred. they beat manchester originals by six runs. without a doubt, player of the day, though, goes to matt parkinson with this incredible catch to send adam rossington back to the stand. that spirit's victory was sealed as heinrich klaasen dismissed himself, knocking the wickets with his back foot. in the women's match, london spirit were also victorious, despite the win, spare remain bottom of the table. in the women's match, london spirit were also victorious, but they didn't get off to the best start. tammy beaumont out to just the second ball of the innings, but they pulled it back with an impressive comeback to effectively elimate the originals. spirit are now fifth in the table. staying with cricket, and england could be without stuart broad for their second test against india, with the bowler picking up a calf
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injury in today's warm—up. broad was unable to train this afternoon, and will have a scan tomorrow to determine the extent of the injury. england and india drew the series opener at trent bridge last week. the second test starts on thursday at lord's. meanwhile, the international cricket council will bid for the sport's inclusion in the olympic games. the icc say cricket has more than one billion fans a worldwide, and they see the games as part of its long—term future. they've set up a working group to lead the bid, which is focused on making the 2028 olympics in los angeles. it would end a 128—year wait for the sport to be included, its only previous appearance coming in the 1900 games in paris. to tennis, and british number onejohana konta is through to the second round of the wta event in montreal, as she returned to the court having missed out on the tokyo olympics after catching covid. konta lost the first set 6—4 to shuai zhang from china. she then led 5—2 in the second set before zhang retired with a leg injury. but a tough match next, she'll face world number five elina svitolina.
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harriet dart is also through, who will play bianca andrescu. but bad news for cameron norrie — he was beaten two sets to one by world number 28 karen khachanov in the first round of the canadian open in toronto. and that's all the sport for now. from me, marc edwards, and the rest of the team, bye—bye. hello. tuesday brought us our first 25 celsius day in the uk in over two weeks. and, whilst some of that warmth will still be felt on wednesday across the south and east of the country with some sunny spells, clouding over into the afternoon, it's the cloudier conditions in the north and west which will bring different conditions compared to what we've seen. much more in the way of rain and breeze, all courtesy of these weather fronts pushing in off the atlantic. heaviest of the rain into the start of the day across parts of northern ireland and the very far west of scotland, but quite a mild and humid start here, 11i—15 celsius.
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fresher in the east, where there will be a few mist and fog patches, but the best of the morning sunshine. now, the sunshine, as i said, will be best in the morning, clouding over from the west, so there's still some sunny spells to the south and the east. northern ireland should cheer up into the afternoon with some sunshine, and into late afternoon, we'll see that sunshine develop across western scotland, too. but after the morning sunshine across the far north, into orkney and eastern parts of scotland, a rather damp afternoon, rain coming and going. rain at times in northwest england, though areas around the merseyside, cheshire area mayjust about stay dry. patchy rain across wales and southwest england through the afternoon, but much of the midlands, east anglia and the southeast dry, with temperatures around 2li—25 celsius yet again, and a fine day in the channel islands, too. now, that weather front bringing the rain actuallyjust fizzles as it pushes its way eastwards as we go into wednesday night and thursday morning. not much in it as it reaches parts of southern england, the midlands, and east anglia. clearer skies to the north of it means a cooler night to take us into thursday,
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particularly across scotland and northern ireland. temperatures more widely into single figures. but for thursday, we're between two weather fronts — one which is stalling across the south of the country, and this next one across the deepening area of low pressure out to the west of the uk. does mean most will start off dry with some sunshine, a few showers around. a lot more cloud, though, southern counties of england, east anglia, with some patchy rain and drizzle which will move its way a bit further northwards through the day. but to the north and west, the breeze will pick up, gales across western parts of scotland, parts of northern ireland, too, and some heavy bursts of rain later. in the sunshine, though, for many, temperatures still where we should be for the time of year, 20—2li celsius. friday sees yet more in the way of heavy, thundery showers across parts of western scotland. winds remain strong. blustery day for all. still some cloud lingering across the south, but sunshine elsewhere. bye for now.
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welcome to newsday. welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines: the headlines: the governor of new york the governor of new york resigns in the face of growing pressure over sexual harrassment cases. andrew cuomo said he would leave his post spectacle — beijing prepares for the greater good. resigns in the face i work for you. and doing the right thing is and doing the right thing is doing the right thing for you. doing the right thing for you. fleeing for safety fleeing for safety in afghanistan. in afghanistan. as taliban militants take over as taliban militants take over an eighth provincial capital, an eighth provincial capital, tens of thousands of civilians seek shelter from the fighting. the us senate passes a $1 trillion dollar the us senate passes a $1 trillion infrastructure bill, with 19 republicans voting for the package. it's a major win for
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president biden's agenda. and building a new olympic

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