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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 10, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines at 8pm: record numbers of top grades for a—level students in england, wales and northern ireland after exams were cancelled for a second year in a row because of the pandemic. i think we've experienced things that others years haven't, we've had a lot of uncertainty. and at the end of the day, our results came from tests that were done under exam conditions. in scotland, a record number have achieved a grades in highers and advanced highers, though the overall pass rate has dropped slightly. prince andrew declines to comment after an american woman files a civil case in new york claiming he sexually assaulted her when she was 17. new york governor andrew cuomo
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resigns after an inquiry found he sexually harassed multiple women. in my mind, i've never crossed the line with anyone, but i didn't realise the extent to which the line has been redrawn. what a welcome for lionel messi — one of the world's greatest footballers — as he flies into france to agree a deal with paris st—germain. hi, i'm max. and coming up, we meet an 11—year—old boy from devon preparing to spend his 500th night camping outside for charity. good evening and welcome to bbc news.
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the number of a—level students receiving an a or a—star has risen to a record high after exams were cancelled for the second year in a row due to the pandemic. the education secretary, gavin williamson, has praised students for dealing with unprecedented levels of disruption over the past year. students were assessed by teachers in england, wales and northern ireland — 45% were awarded top grades, compared to 25% in 2019 before the pandemic. the gap between private and state school students achieving top grades has also widened. 0ur education editor branwen jeffreys reports from the north east of england, where the number students achieving top grades has risen but not as much as everywhere else. after a tough year for students, the moment of truth. fewer surprises in this year's envelope — they know what work and tests teachers have used. fewertears, too, in a bumper yearfor top grades. and, afterall, proud of what they've achieved
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despite the disruption. that's kind of the priority for us, is just to keep going and try and get into the uni and try and get to where you want to go, because if you can work through the pandemic and do all your online learning and get your a—levels like you wanted, what's stopping you going off to uni and doing what you need to do? i think the standard has still definitely been there. it's definitely not we've just walked in and they've handed us the grades. we've worked for these grades. regardless of what you've got, - you should still be incredibly proud of what you've done. i know my family are going to be l incredibly proud of what i've done and all the work that i've put in. here, a—star grades were slightly down. the principal says they marked students over several months. they've had to learn from home, and learning behind a screen is vastly different to being in a college environment. i think the rigour of those grades has been extremely high, in terms of the amount of work that the students have had to produce. dylan got a distinction merit in his btec despite cancer treatment.
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sorry! yeah, just everything that he's gone through in the past four years with his leukaemia, he deserves it. really happy that i'm getting to go to scarborough. cos it's the one that i've been focused on getting to. while top grades in some vocational qualifications are slightly up, the big leap has been in a—levels. what matters to students getting results today is what they do next in life — going into work, an apprenticeship or getting a place at university. the system this year has been designed to give them grades that will make sure they can go on to those next steps, but the price of that, it seems, is a boom in top grades. a—level grades this year across the uk are based on teacher assessments, from lurgan in northern ireland
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to wales, where students got provisional grades injune. but there was no attempt to hold back rising grades with an algorithm. there were some courses in clearing at newcastle today, but universities are having to choose carefully between top grade students. a—level grades are not the only thing that determines this. the students' own interests matter a lot, what they say in their personal statement, and in some programmes, how they come across at interview and what is our assessment of why they're interested in a programme. their place at newcastle confirmed, these friends will be celebrating, while others rethink their plans in clearing. branwen jeffreys, bbc news, newcastle.
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in scotland, a record number of students have achieved a grades in highers and advanced highers. but overall, the pass rate has dropped slightly since last year, though it's still significantly higher than before the pandemic. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordon reports. at this youth theatre group in paisley, they're rehearsing a show about heading to university. the pandemic meant no final exams for school students this year. but for those here, that didn't mean less work. in a normal year, i maybe would have sat five or six exams. that year, i sat i9. i really feel like the year has been so incredibly difficult, this year and last year as well. nothing was a fluke. results were based on teacher assessment — a fairer system, say these students, who, like many others across scotland, have been awarded as. normally, all the pressure�*sjust on one day, and some people might have an off day. the higher grades is kind of proof that this is a better way for students to get the grades that they deserve. people say grade inflation,
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but i actually think it's more accurate than the previous years, because it wasn't like teachers just picked a letter and said, "this is what this person got." we sat countless class tests under the exam conditions. pass rates this year are down on 2020 but up in previous years, pass rates this year are down on 2020 but up on previous years, while the percentage of pupils achieving a grades reached a record high. in 2019, less than a third of higher candidates were awarded an a grade. there was a huge leap last year, while this year almost half of higher candidates received the top grade. this pattern was repeated in other qualifications. this is a credible set of results. young people should feel proud of what they've achieved, so i think young people and the wider system will have confidence in the results that they received today. today's results were always going to be heavily scrutinised — the chaos of the algorithm—based results last year, followed by the scrapping of exams part way through this year. and opposition parties have today raised concerns about the widening attainment gap between the most
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and least deprived students, which the scottish government has vowed to close. there's been a slight increase in the attainment gap from last year, but when you look at the historical trend, it's still a very, very good picture. so when you compare it to 2019 and the years before that, we've seen a very, very big improvement in the attainment gap. but we're determined, of course, to go further. a record number of scottish students have been accepted to universities here — their hard work paying off after an exceptional year of challenges in education. lorna gordon, bbc news, paisley. let's speak to sam butters, who is the chief executive of the fair education alliance. welcome. what have the exam results this year exposed in terms of disparity in attainment? i this year exposed in terms of disparity in attainment? i think the first thing to _ disparity in attainment? i think the first thing to say _ disparity in attainment? i think the first thing to say is _ disparity in attainment? i think the first thing to say is that _ disparity in attainment? i think the first thing to say is that the - disparity in attainment? i think the first thing to say is that the most l first thing to say is that the most important message here is to celebrate the achievements of young people in these challenging times and also gratitude for all the
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amazing teachers and workforce staff who have supported young people in this roller coaster 18 months, and no chat about disparities or education quality should take away from that. and then the other thing is as if you people of mentioned this comparison of year on year and grade inflation is pointless, because actually it is comparing apples and pears, and with teacher assessed grades this year, different years having exams, the main helen is, sadly, not covered as much today, and that is probably because it is not a surprise, that like every year, there's still this huge gap between children from certain backgrounds, wealthier backgrounds, and children from poor backgrounds in terms of how well they do in their exams, and we cannot really
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compare like for like, but we know that differences in results for black students, children eligible for free school meals, those with higher levels of deprivation and their comparatives with other groups are still very severe in terms of those differences, and it has worsened slightly overall since last year. and that's the big headline we really need to be focused on, but sadly is not a surprise but is not a new story from other years either. how much of this this year is down to the pandemic? because kids over the struggle to get into school for the struggle to get into school for the last 18 months or so. the really borin: the last 18 months or so. the really boring thing — the last 18 months or so. the really boring thing is _ the last 18 months or so. the really boring thing is that _ the last 18 months or so. the really boring thing is that the _ the last 18 months or so. the really boring thing is that the teacher - boring thing is that the teacher assessed grades have probably masked the true story here —— the really worrying thing for some the real disadvantage is probably not written accurately by how the grades pan out. we know that learning has been lost right across the board, we know that it has been particular for
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younger children, maybe not as relevant to the a—level grades today, but we also know that it is affecting young people from disadvantaged backgrounds much more greatly, so actually moving aside from the grades, which still have that gap, actually, we might be seeing that that difference in actual learning has been different because of different circumstances that young people from different background have been in, but the key is really that the pandemic has only exacerbated these inequalities that were there already and what we want to use these moments for each year is to really call on the government to tackle once and for all these long—standing inequalities that are morally unfair but also unsustainable for wider society and lead to inequalities, lack of skills in the workforce, problems further down the line, and we really need to tackle this. we got the auto budget coming up and this is an opportunity for the government to really think
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about this long—standing problem that's been exacerbated by the pandemic stop at its enormous question. i pandemic stop at its enormous cuestion. ., ., ,~' , ., question. i need to ask you to insert as _ question. i need to ask you to insert as consistently - question. i need to ask you to insert as consistently as - question. i need to ask you to insert as consistently as you l question. i need to ask you to - insert as consistently as you cancel to what else needs to change other than money to level things out in education? it than money to level things out in education?— than money to level things out in education? , ., , ~ , education? it is money, i think put money for— education? it is money, i think put money for the _ education? it is money, i think put money for the mouth _ education? it is money, i think put money for the mouth is _ education? it is money, i think put money for the mouth is and act - education? it is money, i think put money for the mouth is and act on | money for the mouth is and act on that, but it is also how we act on education and making sure it is inclusive to young people from all backgrounds and notjust those the education system is curtly sub to serve. providing equal opportunity to extracurricular activities and enrichment activities, to young people who could not otherwise afford it, engaging parents and communities from more disadvantaged communities from more disadvantaged communities in education, who would not usually be able to perhaps because lenglet or resources or digital access be able to engage in their children's learning, and also supporting teachers and leaders who are serving disadvantaged
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communities financially but also with that support and incentives to do their job with that support and incentives to do theirjob the best they can stop what sam butters, ceo of the fair education alliance, thank you for much for your time ——. education alliance, thank you for much for your time —-. sam education alliance, thank you for much for your time --. sam butters, ofthe much for your time --. sam butters, of the fair— much for your time --. sam butters, of the fair education _ much for your time --. sam butters, of the fair education alliance. - an american woman has filed a civil lawsuit in new york, accusing prince andrew of sexual abuse. in a statement, virginia giuffre claims she was trafficked to the prince by the convicted paedophilejeffrey epstein when she was 17. the duke of york has consistently denied the allegations. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. which of the people in this photograph is telling the truth? the man, prince andrew, who categorically denies any impropriety? or the woman, virginia giuffre, who alleges she was sexually assaulted by him on three occasions? ms giuffre has made these allegations before. she's now followed up with a civil claim filed at a district court in new york. the claim states that when she was 17, she was the victim of sex trafficking.
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the document states... it goes on to refer to prince andrew's criminal acts and states in conclusion... prince andrew has offered no reaction to the filing of the court claim. his position remains as it was in his interview with newsnight�*s emily maitlis in november 2019, when he denied any improper behaviour with ms giuffre — or virginia roberts, as she was then. you can say categorically that you don't recall meeting virginia roberts, dining with her, dancing with her at tramp or going on to have sex
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with her in a bedroom in a house in belgravia? i can absolutely, categorically tell you it never happened. do you recall any kind of sexual contact with virginia roberts, then or at any other time? none whatsoever. so what are the chances that this civil claim will lead to a trial? it is by no means certain. there's a lot of steps from filing a lawsuit until you get to trial. the first and major hurdle is that they are going to have to serve prince andrew with process. in the united states and new york, you have to personally serve someone with the lawsuit for it to get going. that's going to be difficult considering that he's in the united kingdom. buckingham palace is doing its best to keep everything to do with prince andrew at arms length. but whatever the truth of these claims, the very fact that a member of the royal family finds himself facing them is clearly damaging. prince andrew has withdrawn from public life with the royal family. for all his denials, these latest developments suggest
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there can be little immediate prospect of him restoring his public reputation. nicholas witchell, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: record numbers of top grades for a—level students in england, wales and northern ireland after exams were cancelled for a second year in a row because of the pandemic. in scotland, a record number have achieved a grades in highers and advanced highers, though the overall pass rate has dropped slightly. prince andrew declines to comment after an american woman files a civil case in new york claiming he sexually assaulted her when she was 17. let's get all of the latest sport from the bbc sport centre with marc edwards. 0ver over to you. thank you very much, martine.
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it's one of the biggest football transfers in history, because lionel messi — one of the greatest players of all time — is in paris ahead of a move to paris saint germain. messi is set to undergo a medical with psg after agreeing a two—year deal. he's spent the last 21 years with barcelona — and he admitted he didnt want to leave — but the club's finances are in such a bad way that they couldn't afford to keep him. katie gornall reports. he was dressed a bit like a tourist, but this was no ordinary day—trippers. 0ne but this was no ordinary day—trippers. one of the game's greatest players had arrived at a french airport ready to sign for paris st germain. the fans, some of them had waiting for days, could barely contain themselves. i watched him -la in barely contain themselves. i watched him play in barcelona _ barely contain themselves. i watched him play in barcelona and _ barely contain themselves. i watched him play in barcelona and how- barely contain themselves. i watched him play in barcelona and how he - him play in barcelona and how he acted, how he is playing with his team—mates, how he is finding ways to play the pulp, it'sjust amazing, and his goals, his free kicks, everything isjust and his goals, his free kicks, everything is just amazing. and his goals, his free kicks, everything isjust amazing. he is the best player stop translation: todayis the best player stop translation: today is a historic day, the biggest
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player— today is a historic day, the biggest player on— today is a historic day, the biggest player on the planet is here in the capitah _ capital. i- capital. i am not come to capital. — i am not come to stay in my neighbourhood. i have to be here. but argentina and for his club, messi is always been a class of heart. �* ., ., ., ~ , , heart. brilliant from lionel messi! that's heart. brilliant from lionel messi! thats what _ heart. brilliant from lionel messi! that's what you _ heart. brilliant from lionel messi! that's what you expect _ heart. brilliant from lionel messi! that's what you expect him! - heart. brilliant from lionel messi! that's what you expect him! at. that's what you expect him! at barcelona, he scored a staggering... and secured ten league titles. in the could have been more. in a tearful farewell press comforts on sunday, messi said he never wanted to leave the club he joined when he was 13, but due to league salary cap rules, they could only grow to keep him. 2, . ., . rules, they could only grow to keep him. . ., ., ~ , rules, they could only grow to keep him. ., ., ~ , ,, him. barcelona kept spending, spending. _ him. barcelona kept spending, spending. you _ him. barcelona kept spending, spending, you know— him. barcelona kept spending, spending, you know what - him. barcelona kept spending, - spending, you know what happens if you spend more than you have? you cannot afford certain things. so right now, look at what happened last season, with a87 million euros in debtjust from last season, plus the wages of the players, it is 110% of what comes in, so technically barcelona bankrupt.—
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of what comes in, so technically barcelona bankrupt. paris sentiment was perhaps — barcelona bankrupt. paris sentiment was perhaps always _ barcelona bankrupt. paris sentiment was perhaps always most _ barcelona bankrupt. paris sentiment was perhaps always most likely - was perhaps always most likely destination, a club backed by qatari money and already littered with stars, including killing mbappe and his former passer team—mate neymar. barcelona are now moving on with their biggest star. —— without. for messi, a new store is beginning. katie gornall, bbc news. scottish champions rangers are in action this evening. they're at ibrox for the second leg of their champions league qualifying match against swedish side malmo. rangers have lost two in a row now and were beaten in their opening leg. but it is better news. rangers have just scored the past couple of minutes, alfredo morelos making ero— zero on the night, 252 on aggregate. no way goals any more, so after... it is rangers 1—0.
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england could be without stuart broad for their second test against india, with the bowler picking up a calf injury in today's warm—up at lords. broad was unable to train this afternoon and will have a scan tomorrow to dertermine the extent of the injury. england and india drew the series opener at trent bridge last week. the second test starts on thursday at lord's. staying with cricket, there are more matches in the hundred today — manchester originals taking on birmingham phoenix. in the women's fixture, the originals won the toss and chose to bat first. they made 127—5 from their hundred balls, thanks to some big hitting late on from sophie ecclestone. spirit, though, getting off to the worst possible start with their reply, tammy beamont out to just the second ball of the innings. but that didn't stop them going on to win in the final set and move up to fifth in the table. and in the men's fixture, manchester originals will draw level with the birmingham phoenix at the top of the men's table later player of the day enjoyed, as you can see there, by matt parkinson, that incredible catch. that one still going.
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but that's all your support for now, back to you, martine. marc, thank you very much indeed. the governor of new york state, andrew cuomo, has announced his resignation in the face of a sexual harassment scandal. he'd been under mounting pressure to quit from fellow democrats, including president biden, after an investigation published last week found that he had harassed 11 women. mr cuomo said he didn't want to be a distraction and would step down for the good of the state. i take full responsibility for my actions. i have been too familiar with people. my sense of humour can be insensitive and off—putting. i do hug and kiss people casually, women and men. i have done it all my life. it's who i've been since i can remember. in my mind, i've never crossed the line with anyone,
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but i didn't realise the extent to which the line has been redrawn. there are generational and cultural shifts that ijust didn't fully appreciate, and i should have. no excuses. andrew cuomo. let's go to our correspondent in washington, gary o'donoghue. quite a reversal of fortune for this man, gary, who had been hailed as a bit of a saviour during the covid pandemic. mt; bit of a saviour during the covid pandemic— pandemic. my goodness, it has been cuite a pandemic. my goodness, it has been quite a fall. — pandemic. my goodness, it has been quite a fall, when _ pandemic. my goodness, it has been quite a fall, when you _ pandemic. my goodness, it has been quite a fall, when you think- pandemic. my goodness, it has been quite a fall, when you think back - pandemic. my goodness, it has been quite a fall, when you think back a i quite a fall, when you think back a year, this time last year, the winter months of last year, andrew cuomo really a leader, a national leader, any battle against the coronavirus, those daily new york state briefings that he gave, that
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kind of leadership people thought they were looking for at that time when there was a little coming out of the white house. at here we are a year or so later, and his fall from grace has been completed today with his resignation, facing a number of allegations from women about sexual harassment, facing other investigations into his time as governor for aspects of dealing with that coronavirus in particular, with nursing homes, so it has been quite a change. it isjust a reminder i think that political careers can come crashing down, can't they come injust a matter of come crashing down, can't they come in just a matter of days and weeks, really? in just a matter of days and weeks, reall ? �* , ., . really? but he is facing criminal charues, really? but he is facing criminal charges. but — really? but he is facing criminal charges, but he _ really? but he is facing criminal charges, but he is _ really? but he is facing criminal charges, but he is claiming - really? but he is facing criminal charges, but he is claiming this| really? but he is facing criminal. charges, but he is claiming this is politically motivated. does he explain what that means? well, he thinks that the — explain what that means? well, he thinks that the investigation - explain what that means? well, he thinks that the investigation by - explain what that means? well, he thinks that the investigation by the | thinks that the investigation by the state attorney general was skewed, he thinks there are political motivations behind that, he thinks
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connector his lawyer, indeed, has accused some of those women of motives that are beyond and above what they say they are, that's why you heard very robust defence of his position by his lawyer before he actually announced his resignation today, and you are right. there is a committal investigation and one i think they are particular worried about is in albany, this to capital, were the district attorney there is looking at potential committal charges. there are other civil actions will stub so he is not out of the was by any means through this resignation, and of course we are still not sure what is going to happen with this impeachment process that was hanging over him in the state legislature, but his career really is over. there's barely little ways to see how we can come back from any of this. when he was actually looking to try and run for actually looking to try and run for a fourth term as governor next year, and certainly from last year, people were talking about potential presidential run ifjoe biden were not to run again in 202a. and all
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that, i'm afraid, has gone. but not to run again in 2024. and all that, i'm afraid, has gone. but new york state gets _ that, i'm afraid, has gone. but new york state gets its _ that, i'm afraid, has gone. but new york state gets its first _ that, i'm afraid, has gone. but new york state gets its first female - york state gets its first female governor. york state gets its first female tovernor. . ., , , governor. yeah, kathy hochul is the lieutenant governor, _ governor. yeah, kathy hochul is the lieutenant governor, effectively - governor. yeah, kathy hochul is the lieutenant governor, effectively the | lieutenant governor, effectively the deputy governor in new york. she steps up and takes over, first woman to hold that post in the state's 230 odd year history. she will hold that post until the election next year, the end of next year, and we will see whether or not the democrats have a primary to see who can actually run for election at that point for some she would be a serious contender. and she is facing a lot of challenges, notjust the delta variant of covid but also significant rising crime rates in new york state over the past year or so, some big challenges facing her. and i think she will have to sort of
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get up to speed pretty quickly, although there does seem to be this two week, strange to be canned over period that andrew cuomo appears to have arranged, were he does actually step down for 1a days. have arranged, were he does actually step down for 14 days.— step down for 14 days. gary, for the moment, step down for 14 days. gary, for the moment. think _ step down for 14 days. gary, for the moment, think you _ step down for 14 days. gary, for the moment, think you very _ step down for 14 days. gary, for the moment, think you very much. - step down for 14 days. gary, for the j moment, think you very much. gary o'donoghue in washington. —— thank you very much. more than 75% of uk adults have now been fully vaccinated against coronavirus. the prime minister has described the milestone as a huge national achievement. meanwhile, the health secretary has warned that the impact of the pandemic means that more than 13 million people could be waiting for routine operations and hospital treatment in england within the next couple years. here's our health editor, hugh pym, the two new leaders of the health system in england here at milton keynes university hospital. and the health secretary and the head of nhs england are having to face up to a growing waiting list for nonurgent operations. the patient would know in advance of the surgery... they heard about new initiatives,
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including robotic surgery, but sajid javid acknowledged the waiting list could more than double. no—one knows what the final number will be. i've said it could go as high as 13 million, but ijust want to do is make sure if it does grow, it grows at the lowest possible rate, that we are seeing as many people as possible as quickly as possible, and that will require notjust new investment but also new ways of doing things. the blue area shows the total number waiting for routine operations in england from march 2020. during the pandemic, it soared, with 5.3 million now on the list. the orange area shows the number waiting more than 18 weeks, with a sharp increase during the pandemic. labour said a rescue plan was urgently needed. behind every number is a patient�*s story, like hillary's. she's been waiting more than a year and half for hip replacement. obviously heavily reliant on painkillers. the pain can be anything from just
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a constant ache to a stabbing pain. it can disturb my sleep, even with painkillers. my frustration, i think, is over not knowing how much longer i'm going to have to wait. there are many unknowns for the nhs. although covid pressures on hospitals are less than feared at one stage, what might happen in the months ahead and what could happen if there's a severe winter flu season? those challenges will come on top of the drive to reduce the backlog of routine operations. another task for the nhs will be the continued roll—out of the vaccination programme, now extended to 16 and 17—year—olds. at the moment, that will be through a combination of gps contacting people, inviting them forjabs, and a number of places that are already offering walk—in vaccination opportunities. we'll see many more of those open up this week. and then boosterjabs for those
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who have already had two doses. the health secretary wants these to start in england early next month, but there have been warnings from one experts that would not look good when people in many other parts of the world haven't had a first dose. hugh pym, bbc news. the latest government coronavirus figures show there were more than 23,500 new infections recorded in the latest 2a—hour period, which means on average there were 28,007 new cases per day in the last week. almost 6,000 people are in hospital with coronavirus. 1a6 deaths were recorded in the last 2a hours — that's the highest daily death toll since the 12th of march, meaning an average of 89 deaths a day in the last week. 89% of adults in the uk have now had theirfirstjab. and more than 39.5 million have had both jabs — that's 75% of adults. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. he though there. there has been dry
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weather and summer sunshine across more of the uk today. we have seen some showers in northeast england and particularly in the northeast of scotland, but those are going to be pushing away later this evening and it should be turning dry overnight. instead, we look to the west to see increasing cloud, thickening cloud and some rain pushing towards northern ireland, southwest scotland by the end of the night, apertures 11-13 by the end of the night, apertures 11—13 for some we start off fairly bright for eastern areas, some sunshine. it will cloud over at this band of cloud pushing eastwards also we rain pushing across northern ireland with sunken following in the afternoon for terrain pushes eastwards across scotland we get some rain writing across wales and western parts of england. some sunshine after the rain, yes, but thatis sunshine after the rain, yes, but that is ugly healthy temptress too much, high sceptres and head of the rain pours a singly and the southeast. could make to 5 degrees for the first time this month. during the evening, what is left of that rain moves into the midlands, largely petering out, and it turns dry and scotland.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: record numbers of top grades for a level students in england, wales and northern ireland after exams were cancelled for a second year in a row because of the pandemic. in scotland, a record number have achieved a grades in highers and advanced highers — though the overall pass rate has dropped slightly. prince andrew declines to comment after an american woman files a civil case in new york claiming he sexually assaulted her when she was 17. new york governor andrew cuomo resigns after an inquiry found he sexually harassed multiple women. and what a welcome for lionel messi — one of the world's greatest footballers — as he flies into france to agree a deal with paris st germain. hi, i'm max. coming up, we meet the 11-year-old — hi, i'm max. coming up, we meet the 11-year-old boy _ hi, i'm max. coming up, we meet the 11-year-old boy preparing _
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hi, i'm max. coming up, we meet the 11-year-old boy preparing to - hi, i'm max. coming up, we meet the 11-year-old boy preparing to expand l 11—year—old boy preparing to expand his five—time draught night camping outside the charity. let's return to the a—level results, the education secretary, gavin williamson, has praised students for dealing with unprecedented levels of disruption over the past year following another record breaking set of a—level results in england, wales and northern ireland. almost a5 per cent of entries were awarded the top marks of a or a—star up from 38.5 per cent last year and almost double the proportion in 2019, when exams were last held. students' work was assessed and graded by their teachers in place of exams because of the pandemic. i'm nowjoined by larissa kennedy who is the president of the national union of students. thank you forjoining us. these are extraordinary results but at the same. what is your assessment of why? it same. what is your assessment of wh ? , . , ., same. what is your assessment of wh ? , . , . same. what is your assessment of wh? ,. , ., why? it is incredible that so many students have _ why? it is incredible that so many students have done _ why? it is incredible that so many students have done so _ why? it is incredible that so many students have done so well- why? it is incredible that so many students have done so well and l why? it is incredible that so many i students have done so well and are getting into their first choice
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university in record numbers which is of course really positive news. but unfortunately we are seeing a widening in the gap between at the mints between students comprehensive schools and private schools in the air seeing a widening gaps with marginalised students such as working—class students and those gaps are remaining stable which of course is not positive. we want to be closing those gaps and we knew this was going to be a year like no other but i don't think it's good enough that we are seeing this lack of progress when it comes to educational justice of progress when it comes to educationaljustice and i think this pandemic has given us an impetus to rethink assessment and how we examine and assess and think differently about that. certainly, the problems — differently about that. certainly, the problems of— differently about that. certainly, the problems of accessing - differently about that. certainly, i the problems of accessing learning digitally became very apparent. but
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according to base there is a record number of disadvantaged students getting into university. how do you account for that? there are of eating an amazing number as i was saying a record number of students getting into their first choice university which is incredible but i think seeing base builds on previous year is that makes us want to go first up five —— faster and further. and hearing the department saying things like we will be going back to normal soon and thinking they're going back to normal and i don't think that's what we should be doing. i don't think we should go backwards. i think we should be looking forward to to how we reduce the barriers to getting rid of educationaljustice and how we start to use this as a sign that exams aren't marking as they should end the grades that we have seen this year are a signal to us that if
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exams at the end of the year aren't the way to go, we shouldn't be going back to that way of assessment so we have seen more students getting into those first choice universities and specifically more students from marginalised communities but i do think there is a way to go in terms of how we envisage education and how you sex and examine. heat of how we envisage education and how you sex and examine.— you sex and examine. next up i had to be academic _ you sex and examine. next up i had to be academic year. _ you sex and examine. next up i had to be academic year. first _ you sex and examine. next up i had to be academic year. first of- you sex and examine. next up i had to be academic year. first of all, - to be academic year. first of all, medical students. we know some of those medicals goals are and people are being offered £10,000 to switch to a less populous school and some are being asked to defer. we need more doctors but is this the right way to handle medical school applicants? i way to handle medical school applicants?— way to handle medical school a- licants? ~ , , applicants? i think medical students have been put _ applicants? i think medical students have been put in _ applicants? i think medical students have been put in an _ applicants? i think medical students have been put in an incredibly - have been put in an incredibly difficult position and of course from a union perspective we want to be seeing students offered places of uncertainty about where they are going and what they're doing and
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that's where the difficulty is in this process through these changes in subscription and the way that changes are visible so of course difficult for students for whom this day has had a lot of uncertainty. but i think what we need to do is make sure that there is the right investment in fully funded education such that all the medical places that students would like to take on and making sure we are not leaving students in the lurch when it comes to these offerings and over subscriptions that are made. in terms of what going to university will look like this coming academic year, how much of it is going to be in person?— in person? how much stair island? post institutions _ in person? how much stair island? post institutions at _ in person? how much stair island? post institutions at the _ in person? how much stair island? post institutions at the moment i l post institutions at the moment i talking about pending learning which means a blended learning —— version of online which means over the past year it's really important to look
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back and take the ones that have been positive and so far up of the things when it comes to digital learning or online learning where disabled students and disabled students representatives have been waiting for years for this kind of provision and constantly told it's impossible and almost overnight it became possible which is incredible so it's important that we don't throw the baby out with the bath water and we retain access to provision but of course try to safely access in person as much as possible but i think this also requires an investment in the digital infrastructure needed to make this blended approach truly accessible and open government needs to up and make sure that gaps that we are seeing between disabled students and non—disabled students are not continuing on between students with access to the types of technology and other digital infrastructure and those who don't have that and those who come from
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less affluent backgrounds are not continuing to be hit by this pandemic when it comes to education. we have not even started talking about that. that is a massive issue for everyone considering going to university. thank you very much for talking to us. let's get more now on the news that the football superstar, lionel messi, is in france ahead of his move to paris saint—germain. the argentinian signed a two—year deal with them after he confirmed his exit from barcelona in a tearful farewell on sunday after 21 years with the spanish club. at barcelona — messi reportedly earned £125m pounds a year at barcelona — which barcelona could no longer afford to pay. he's agreed to a 50% pay cut in his move to psg. but what does that money get you. in a 16 year career at barcelona, he scored 672 for the club — making him the clubs record goalscorer, he won ten la liga titles — four champions leagues, and the copa del rey seven times, and picked up the ballon d'or — widely regarded as the most prestitigious individual award in football —
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on a record occasions. well, we can speak now to the football finance expert, kieran maguire from the university of liverpool. let's see them i am now absolutely nothing about football for a moment. i know a little bit more than nothing but not a lot. why is this a significant story? why should people be paying attention?— be paying attention? lionel messi is robabl be paying attention? lionel messi is probably the — be paying attention? lionel messi is probably the best _ be paying attention? lionel messi is probably the best player _ be paying attention? lionel messi is probably the best player on - be paying attention? lionel messi is probably the best player on their - probably the best player on their panicked and present if not he has been fighting with cristiano ronaldo, he signed or fc barcelona as a young lad and he stayed there all his career to date but due to the mismanagement of the club's finances and also the imposition of financial control, the club faced a financial control, the club faced a financial squeeze and to a certain extent he's being forced out by the account into than anything to do with football. ii
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account into than anything to do with football.— account into than anything to do with football. if he is taking a pay cut to to with football. if he is taking a pay out to go to _ with football. if he is taking a pay cut to go to paris _ with football. if he is taking a pay cut to go to paris st. _ with football. if he is taking a pay cut to go to paris st. germain, i with football. if he is taking a pay i cut to go to paris st. germain, why couldn't he have done that at barcelona?— couldn't he have done that at barcelona? ~ .. barcelona? well, he did in fact offered to _ barcelona? well, he did in fact offered to take _ barcelona? well, he did in fact offered to take a _ barcelona? well, he did in fact offered to take a pay _ barcelona? well, he did in fact offered to take a pay cut - barcelona? well, he did in fact offered to take a pay cut to - barcelona? well, he did in fact offered to take a pay cut to at l offered to take a pay cut to at barcelona but the problem is it appears that barcelona has lost more than £a00 million in the last calendar year and even with his offer activities his offer for wages by half but then he offered to have been spread over five years to allow the club an opportunity to catch up in terms of the cash payment. that would still exceed the salary cut that spanish football. hahn would still exceed the salary cut that spanish football.— would still exceed the salary cut that spanish football. how can psg afford him? _ that spanish football. how can psg afford him? do _ that spanish football. how can psg afford him? do we _ that spanish football. how can psg afford him? do we have _ that spanish football. how can psg afford him? do we have an - that spanish football. how can psg afford him? do we have an idea - that spanish football. how can psg afford him? do we have an idea of| afford him? do we have an idea of what they're going to pay? it looks as if they would _ what they're going to pay? it looks as if they would pay _ what they're going to pay? it looks as if they would pay him _ what they're going to pay? it looks as if they would pay him around i what they're going to pay? it looks as if they would pay him around 25| as if they would pay him around 25 million per year net will realistically a0 to a5 million gross. psg is extremely well—funded. it's onerous are qatari —based and they will be able to go to their commercial partners and say do you want your products set aside
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alongside lionel messi or one of their regular players? i'm defeats him that you want to be will charge you an extra 500,000 euros for the privilege as you get the chance to have your products and aligned with the worlds best football there. there will be opportunities to leverage off in terms of commercial deals and merchandise and also if he helps to deliver the champions league then you get an additional prize money forforming league then you get an additional prize money for forming that tournament from ua for itself. hagar tournament from ua for itself. how much of this _ tournament from ua for itself. how much of this is _ tournament from ua for itself. how much of this is about _ tournament from ua for itself. how much of this is about the silverware that psg will think we have got him on our side we are a shoo—in for things like the champions league? there is nothing guaranteed in football. psg already have name are and in by pay and other players who are international standard but they one thing that that is missing from their roster of trophies is the champions league trophy and the owners are very keen to achieve that
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sell as far as they're concerned, if you cannot do it with the existing squad you do it with the existing squad you do it with the existing squad plus lionel messi and a little gift and the greatest chance in the history to achieve that objective. to what extent does space revive the idea of a european super league? something that was short—lived recently. could that be brought back to life? n... recently. could that be brought back to life? ~ . . ., ., recently. could that be brought back tolife? ., . ., ., to life? according to barcelona, around the _ to life? according to barcelona, around the jet, _ to life? according to barcelona, around the jet, and _ to life? according to barcelona, around the jet, and give - to life? according to barcelona, around the jet, and give them l to life? according to barcelona, i around the jet, and give them test, extent still alive, it's still not dead. this is clearly linked to the failure of super league because have super league gone ahead and i can't buy set an outlet have managed to keep hold of lionel messi and they were very confident that there is franchise project would have been successful. it is notable that psg where one of the clubs that were not involved in super league. so there's still a lot of debate within europe. remember, the 29th while they
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described it as super league, it consisted of three countries and seven 50s which is not a particularly widespread of the geographic of the continent. thank ou for geographic of the continent. thank you for taking _ geographic of the continent. thank you for taking the _ geographic of the continent. thank you for taking the time _ geographic of the continent. thank you for taking the time to - geographic of the continent. thank you for taking the time to talk- geographic of the continent. thank you for taking the time to talk to i you for taking the time to talk to us. just two days after winning olympic boxing gold in tokyo, lauren price struggled to hold back the tears — as she was re—united with her nan. hundreds turned out in ystrad mynach to greet her, which came as bit of a surprise to lauren, who said, she hadn't expected such a welcome. our reporter nelli bird was there too. a hug from herfamily, home as an olympic champion and there was no way that her nan, linda, wasn't going to be first in the queue. i was waiting for her to come in because i could hear the cheering and i thought i have to be the first person to get her from the car and ijust ran across and i think i could have actually run the 100 metres like in the olympics! they were all saying,
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look at her go! hundreds turned out to see the 27—year—old today. it wasn't a planned homecoming event but word spread on social media and the crowds came. a chance to see the local girl who achieved the ultimate sporting dream. it's mad how we have someone who lives local that has won the olympics. it's just amazing. we play a bit of rugby and it was an inspiration to carry on and try and get into the olympics and work harder. just over the moon for her, she's worked so hard so it's amazing. it's brilliant for the kids, they are inspired. it'sjust fab, really, really good. she's done the village proud. put us on the map! everybody is coming | out to recognise her. i didn't expect this many people, it's insane. even when i was away, it has been amazing and i can't thank everyone enough, especially the welsh people
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and we are very proud to be welsh as well. i'm always representing wales and the support ofjust being... i didn't expect to come home to this and thank you for coming to see me, it means the world. she was clearly overwhelmed, but she stayed and had a picture with everyone who wanted one. afterwards, i caught up with lauren and linda to talk about what the last few weeks have been like, not that linda can ever bring herself to watch a granddaughter compete. i watch her coming into the ring and i look at the size of her opponents and i think, now it's time to go. i don't watch the end, i don't watch anything, i wait for my daughter to ring me with the result and then i go back in and watch. that's whether she wins or loses. it's a privilege to be her nan because she so humble and she's always been that way from day one. she's always been grounded. like i said, i know i'm
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blowing her trumpet a little bit too much but she isjust the perfect child. the perfect granddaughter. she truly is. i don't know anybody else quite like her. and again, it's a privilege to be her nan and i'm so proud. it was an incredible end to a crazy few weeks for lauren price. a story to inspire the next generation to dream big. the headlines on bbc news: record numbers of top grades for a level students in england, wales and northern ireland after exams were cancelled for a second year in a row because of the pandemic. in scotland, a record number have achieved a grades in highers and advanced highers — though the overall pass rate has dropped slightly. prince andrew declines to comment after an american woman files a civil case in new york claiming he sexually assaulted her when she was 17.
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over the next 20 years it is thought the number of people with dementia with a double to 1.6 million. researchers at the institute say an early diagnosis can greatly improve patient outcomes. our science correspondent reports. penelope clark noticed that her 75—year—old husband began to forget things last year. they are concerned he is developing some form of dementia. the couple from hertfordshire are taking part in trials of a new system that would be able to tell him not on the weathered denny's has some form of dementia but how quickly it's likely to develop. have you got any questions about it? i think it is fantastic. it
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you got any questions about it? i think it is fantastic. if you - you got any questions about it? i think it is fantastic. if you had i you got any questions about it? i think it is fantastic. if you had a l think it is fantastic. if you had a diatnosis think it is fantastic. if you had a diagnosis that _ think it is fantastic. if you had a diagnosis that gave _ think it is fantastic. if you had a diagnosis that gave you - think it is fantastic. if you had a diagnosis that gave you some l diagnosis that gave you some indication of progression, would that be of help? we indication of progression, would that be of help?— that be of help? we could plan financially _ that be of help? we could plan financially as _ that be of help? we could plan financially as well _ that be of help? we could plan financially as well as _ that be of help? we could plan financially as well as a - that be of help? we could plan financially as well as a couple l that be of help? we could plan. financially as well as a couple to be able — financially as well as a couple to be able to — financially as well as a couple to be able to have holidays before things — be able to have holidays before things got bad and i could not take dennis _ things got bad and i could not take dennis on — things got bad and i could not take dennis on holidays. it things got bad and i could not take dennis on holidays.— things got bad and i could not take dennis on holidays. it makes me more comfortable — dennis on holidays. it makes me more comfortable because _ dennis on holidays. it makes me more comfortable because if _ dennis on holidays. it makes me more comfortable because if you _ dennis on holidays. it makes me more comfortable because if you get - dennis on holidays. it makes me more comfortable because if you get a i comfortable because if you get a diagnosis then you're not waiting months and months until someone comes and says we know what it is now. , l , , ., comes and says we know what it is now. , , now. dennis's brain scan will be anal sed now. dennis's brain scan will be analysed by _ now. dennis's brain scan will be analysed by artificial— now. dennis's brain scan will be| analysed by artificial intelligence computer programme. it compares his stand with those of thousands of dementia patients. in preclinical tests it's been able to diagnose dementia years before symptoms develop. dementia years before symptoms develo -. ., . dementia years before symptoms develo. ., . ., ., dementia years before symptoms develo. ., ., ., ., , ., develop. you have a diagnosis of dementia- _ develop. you have a diagnosis of dementia. it _ develop. you have a diagnosis of dementia. it is _ develop. you have a diagnosis of dementia. it is a _ develop. you have a diagnosis of dementia. it is a big _ develop. you have a diagnosis of dementia. it is a big thing - develop. you have a diagnosis of dementia. it is a big thing to i develop. you have a diagnosis of| dementia. it is a big thing to take on board. so, when i am delivering this diagnosis, anything which i tended to be more confident about that and to give people more information and help them plan their
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lives is a great thing to be able to do. �* , ., . .., do. and then your technique can give results much — do. and then your technique can give results much faster. _ do. and then your technique can give results much faster. currently - do. and then your technique can give results much faster. currently it i results much faster. currently it can take several scans and many other tasks to find out whether someone has dementia. then the artificial intelligence system can potentially pick it up with just one scan. and it can pick it up much earlier in the progression of the disease. the researcher who led the development of the assistant believes that early and accurate diagnosis of dementia will meet treatment much more effective. the treatment much more effective. the treatment can _ treatment much more effective. iie: treatment can take treatment much more effective. "iie: treatment can take in treatment much more effective. i““ie: treatment can take in early and slow down the progression and at the same time avoid my damage coming into the brain and its like these systems —— symptoms that might occur later in life or they may never occur. this s stem life or they may never occur. this system is — life or they may never occur. this system is currently _ life or they may never occur. this system is currently being tested to see if it works just as leading clinics as it has in the lab. if so, it would make a big difference to dennis and millions like him.
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the inquest into the death of a 20 year old man, who attacked two people with a knife in south london last year, has been shown footage of the moment he was shot dead by undercover police officers. sudesh amman had been released from prison 10 days earlier after serving time for terrorism offences. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, reports. knife in hand, this was the moment when sudesh amman turned on two surveillance officers, who immediately shot him dead. he was outside boots on streatham high road in south london and had just stabbed two members of the public. just over half an hour earlier, he'd left his probation hospital. a convicted terrorist who'd been released from prison just ten days previously, intelligence suggested he was still an extremist who wanted to carry out an attack, so he was being followed by a nine—man armed surveillance team, on foot, on cars and on a motorbike. ajd sports bag across his stomach concealed a poorly
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made hoax suicide belt. on streatham high road, he went into a hardware shop. a surveillance officer tried to catch up to see what he was doing, but he suddenly emerged with a stolen knife and stabbed a woman and a man as he ran. both survived. by this time, two surveillance officers were pursuing him, with their guns drawn. and outside boots, amman turned to confront them before being shot. this ain't real. a bus passenger filmed the aftermath as more of the surveillance team arrived. it was clear from the cctv that nobody gave sudesh amman any first aid for more than an hour and 20 minutes after he was shot. the jury's been told that this was because of concerns about the possible suicide belt that he was wearing. firearms officers who arrived within minutes were also taking no chances. the belt was fake, made from iron brew bottles and aluminium foil, but by the time it was made clear, sudesh amman was dead. daniel sandford, bbc news,
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at the royal courts ofjustice. the campaign to free the daughter of the ruler of the pie was disbanded after she was discovered with her cousin in iceland. she was forcibly returned after making a bid for escape in 2018. tonight is a big milestone for an 11—year—old boy. it'll be the 500th consecutive night max woosey has slept in a tent to raise money for the north devon hospice. andrea ormsby has been to meet him. he set out with an ambition of raising £100 for the north devon hospice. so far he has raised more than £6a0,000. it is incredible. let's have a look at some of the highlights of the a99 days so far.
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hi, i'm max! iam hi, i'm max! i am freezing cold. hey, max, well done for all you're doing _ hey, max, well done for all you're doint. ~ ., ., hey, max, well done for all you're doint . . ., ., . , doing. what an incredible achievement. _ doing. what an incredible achievement. hi - doing. what an incredible achievement. hi max, i doing. what an incredible j achievement. hi max, it's doing. what an incredible - achievement. hi max, it's johnny achievement. hi max, it'sjohnny wilkinson— achievement. hi max, it'sjohnny wilkinson and _ achievement. hi max, it'sjohnny wilkinson and i— achievement. hi max, it'sjohnny wilkinson and i want _ achievement. hi max, it'sjohnny wilkinson and i want to - achievement. hi max, it'sjohnny wilkinson and i want to send i achievement. hi max, it'sjohnny wilkinson and i want to send you| achievement. hi max, it'sjohnny. wilkinson and i want to send you a message _ wilkinson and i want to send you a message to — wilkinson and i want to send you a message to wish _ wilkinson and i want to send you a message to wish you _ wilkinson and i want to send you a message to wish you well. - wilkinson and i want to send you a message to wish you well. the i wilkinson and i want to send you a message to wish you well. the wind is -tickin message to wish you well. the wind is picking up- _
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that night sweetie, love you. in the morning. i that night sweetie, love you. in the mornint. ., a, that night sweetie, love you. in the mornint. ., ., ., morning. i am here with max. thank ou for morning. i am here with max. thank you for letting _ morning. i am here with max. thank you for letting us — morning. i am here with max. thank you for letting us be _ morning. i am here with max. thank you for letting us be a _ morning. i am here with max. thank you for letting us be a part - morning. i am here with max. thank you for letting us be a part of - morning. i am here with max. thank you for letting us be a part of this i you for letting us be a part of this adventure to celebrate your 500 nights. explain what you are building. nights. explain what you are buildint. ~ ., , ., building. me and my friend here for our 500 nights _ building. me and my friend here for our 500 nights we _ building. me and my friend here for our 500 nights we are _ building. me and my friend here for our 500 nights we are building i building. me and my friend here for our 500 nights we are building a i our 500 nights we are building a standard set of sleeping in the attempt tonight. so far, i've been a bit distracted. we have found other cool things to do and we have been playing around a bit. not what —— not 100% focusing. it will take us a while to make it. find not 100% focusing. it will take us a while to make it.— not 10096 focusing. it will take us a while to make it. and we be your two heroes, while to make it. and we be your two heroes. you — while to make it. and we be your two heroes, you would _ while to make it. and we be your two heroes, you would like _ while to make it. and we be your two heroes, you would like to _ while to make it. and we be your two heroes, you would like to be - while to make it. and we be your two heroes, you would like to be a - heroes, you would like to be a mixture of the two of them and he got quite a lot of adventure keeps on you, tell me about it. this got quite a lot of adventure keeps on you, tell me about it.- on you, tell me about it. this is a com ass on you, tell me about it. this is a compass that _ on you, tell me about it. this is a compass that rick _ on you, tell me about it. this is a compass that rick gave _ on you, tell me about it. this is a compass that rick gave me i on you, tell me about it. this is a compass that rick gave me who i j compass that rick gave me who i started this far and every time i wear this it brings back a memory of him and be adventure. my grandfather
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gave me this knife. it's not 100% child friendly but probably not even added to the child friendly. it's a big blade. i do take good care of it. it's got compasses, fishing ropes, match is, that's all they need. ., . . . ropes, match is, that's all they need. ., ., ., ., y need. you are an adventurer, let's talk about — need. you are an adventurer, let's talk about the _ need. you are an adventurer, let's talk about the money. _ need. you are an adventurer, let's talk about the money. more i need. you are an adventurer, let's talk about the money. more than i talk about the money. more than £6a0,000, it's incredible, what's your reaction to that? it’s your reaction to that? it's unbelievable _ your reaction to that? it's unbelievable to _ your reaction to that? it�*s unbelievable to raise that amount of money. starting from £100 now going over to 600,000. to make all this money go to a good cause is 100% worth it. all the hard mornings i have gone through.— have gone through. now, the million-dollar— have gone through. now, the million-dollar question, i have gone through. now, the i million-dollar question, tonight is million—dollar question, tonight is night 500. are you going to call it a day? night 500. are you going to call it a da ? ., a day? never. i love it. i left the tent. a day? never. i love it. i left the tent- the — a day? never. i love it. i left the tent. the outdoors _ a day? never. i love it. i left the tent. the outdoors is _ a day? never. i love it. i left the tent. the outdoors is incredible. | a day? never. i love it. i left the| tent. the outdoors is incredible. i never want to go back inside. itutihtztt never want to go back inside. what do our never want to go back inside. what do your parents — never want to go back inside. what do your parents make _ never want to go back inside. what
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do your parents make of _ never want to go back inside. what do your parents make of that decision?— do your parents make of that decision? , . ' :: :: , ., decision? they are 10096 got ted exce -t decision? they are 10096 got ted except my _ decision? they are 10096 got ted except my dad. _ decision? they are 10096 got ted except my dad, he _ decision? they are 10096 got ted except my dad, he is _ decision? they are 10096 got ted except my dad, he is relieved, . decision? they are 10096 got ted | except my dad, he is relieved, he asked me outside the house. itriti’eiiii asked me outside the house. well done. a asked me outside the house. well done- a huge _ asked me outside the house. well done. a huge achievement to raise that much money. good luck in your camp. it looks like we will be back in the next 500 nights. well done, oliver. here is to many more. for every 60 years, the singer has been wowing audiences with her powerhouse vocals and she is back with a new tour, a series of internet gigs which come to london's powerhouse in camden tomorrow night. you can see the full interview here but here is a sneak preview as she talks about her return to the states. this a sneak preview as she talks about her return to the states.— her return to the states. this is like my life _ her return to the states. this is like my life blood. _ her return to the states. this is like my life blood. ever - her return to the states. this is like my life blood. ever since . her return to the states. this is like my life blood. ever since i | her return to the states. this is i like my life blood. ever since i was 15 of course i have worked. i am a bit of a workhorse and a workaholic and i love myjob and what i cannot do myjob without an audience. you
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can record and write stuff which i do, but that i live thing is how i started when i was just a teenager so it was fabulous and you know i was living it and the band were loving it and we were all moaning at home for the past year and the audience, the people, you need the audience, the people, you need the audience because it doesn't work without them. they were just as hungry as we were. so it was fabulous. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello there. there has been dry weather and summer sunshine across the uk. we have seen some rain in northeast england. have seen some rain in northeast encland. �* ., .,, ., england. and in the northeast of scotland. they _ england. and in the northeast of scotland. they will _ england. and in the northeast of scotland. they will be _ england. and in the northeast of scotland. they will be pushing . england. and in the northeast of i scotland. they will be pushing away later this evening i need to be turning dry overnight. we would look to the west to see crowd and rain
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pushing towards the northern ireland and southwest in scotland by the end of the night. temperature is nights, 11 to 13 degrees. some sunshine and it will be cloudy as the cloudiness pushes east. the rain moving across northern ireland that sunshine following in the afternoon. the rain pushing east. we will get some rain writing across wales and western parts of england. sunshine after the rain but it will not help the temperature is too much. highest temperatures will be ahead of the rain towards east anglia. could make 25 degrees for the first time this month. into the evening what is left of the rain will move into the midlands. it will peter out and turning dry in scotland.
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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. our top stories: the governor of new york, andrew cuomo, has resigned. there were growing calls for him to step down after an inquiry found he sexually harassed multiple women. mr cuomo said he would leave his post for the greater good. i work for you, and doing the right thing is doing the right thing for you. the us senate passes a $1 trillion infrastructure bill, with 19 republicans voting for the package. it's a major win for president biden's agenda. prince andrew declines to comment after an american woman files a civil case in new york claiming he sexually assaulted her when she was 17. and she's the icon with the iconic voice.
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superstar lulu joins us to talk about returning to the stage.

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