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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 9, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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the un has sounded a dire warning that climate change is unfolding more quickly than feared and humanity is almost entirely to blame. it says ongoing emissions could also see a key temperature limit broken injust over a decade. it comes as people are forced leave their homes in parts it comes as people are forced to leave their homes in parts of greece and in california, where wildfires are continuing to burn out of control. the president of belarus has told the bbc that britain can "choke" on the economic sanctions it has imposed on his country in response to human rights abuses. he was speaking at a lengthy press conference one year since the disputed presidential election. the taliban have seized six provincial capitals in afghanistan, including the strategic town of kunduz. they have dismissed international calls for a ceasefire and warned the us against any further intervention.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are lucy beresford and alsojoe twyman. welcome to both of you. let's take a look at the front pages. the metro leads on the un climate report, which it calls "the starkest alert yet over the threat of human—led climate change" and a "code red" for humanity. the financial times also leads on the report, which warns the world is likely to be 1.5 degrees warmer than pre—industrial levels injust 20 years if drastic action is not taken. the i quotes the climate change expert lord stern, who tells the prime minister and chancellor to "ramp up british efforts" and be more active in affecting change. the guardian quotes some of the scientists involved in the report, who say the global
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climate crisis is "inevitable, unprecedented and irreversible". the daily mail also features the story and uses the same picture featured on a number of front pages of a victim of the greek wildfires. it also covers another story — on the cost of covid pcr tests required for travel abroad and how they've cost up to five times as much as some flights. the telegraph looks forward to tomorrow's a—level results that thousands of teenagers will be receiving. experts predict the number of a or a—stars handed out could be higher than last year. the times reports on the news reported by bbc panorama about the former prime minister david cameron, who made around £7 million from the failed finance company greensill. and the sun features the tokyo olympics' golden couple, jason and laura kenny, who returned to the uk today with the rest of team gb after both winning record—breaking cycling golds.
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so let's begin, let's start with the guardian, which has got a photo that is featured on so many of the front pages, and extraordinary greek tragedy photo, isn't it, taken of a woman in distress? as the wildfire nears her home in greece, and lucy, the last time we spoke, i think you are making the point we have this extremely stark disturbing report about climate change at the same time as so many people around the world are not really directly feeling the effects of climate change. feeling the effects of climate chan . e. , feeling the effects of climate chance. , . .,, ., ~ change. yes, and i was also thinking about the fact _ change. yes, and i was also thinking about the fact that _ change. yes, and i was also thinking about the fact that it _ change. yes, and i was also thinking about the fact that it feels _ change. yes, and i was also thinking about the fact that it feels so - change. yes, and i was also thinking about the fact that it feels so much l about the fact that it feels so much closer to home. three and a half million brits went to greece in 2019 on holiday, so it is a country that many people in this country are familiar with, whereas in the past, when we have heard stories about
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some random a toll in the middle of the pacifica which may or may not be submerged by sea water in 20 years time, it all feels so abstract, whereas i think these photos are really bringing home the actual stark report that has been put out there today, which is really talking about how inevitable it is that the climate is going to get worse, that climate is going to get worse, that climate change is here to stay, unless we actually do something about it, and therein lies the problem, because we can all do little individual things and we have the cop26 conference happening in november of that which we are hosting in glasgow, where we are hoping to corral all of the people attending to really put policies in place so that climate change does not escalate, but we've still got countries around the world who are churning out way more carbon
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emissions than, say, a country like the uk, which is responsible for 1% of carbon emissions. you've got a country like china which is response will for about 27%, so even though this climate crisis is global and even though the un report is trying to marshal the resources of every country on the planet, there is a very big danger that this will be one more report and nothing... jae. one more report and nothing... joe, what do you — one more report and nothing... joe, what do you think _ one more report and nothing... joe, what do you think about that? do you think that there is room to ignore such a stark warning? i think that there is room to ignore such a stark warning?— think that there is room to ignore such a stark warning? i think some --eole such a stark warning? i think some people will— such a stark warning? i think some people will always _ such a stark warning? i think some people will always ignore - such a stark warning? i think some people will always ignore such - people will always ignore such warnings, and have indeed consistently ignored warnings. we vecino— consistently ignored warnings. we vecino till— consistently ignored warnings. we vecino till protocols, we have had paris _ vecino till protocols, we have had paris climate agreements, we are having _ paris climate agreements, we are having cop26 and consistently around about seven out of ten people in this country believe that global warming — this country believe that global warming and climate change are real
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and that_ warming and climate change are real and that they are caused in the majority— and that they are caused in the majority by human activity, and yet consistently around about 16%, 15-16% of — consistently around about 16%, 15—16% of people, do not that. they believe that climate change — that. they believe that climate change is — that. they believe that climate change is not happening and/or that it is not— change is not happening and/or that it is not a _ change is not happening and/or that it is not a result of human activity. _ it is not a result of human activity, and the science is very ciear— activity, and the science is very clear on— activity, and the science is very clear on this. georgia 34 scientists contributed — clear on this. georgia 34 scientists contributed to the latest report posted — contributed to the latest report posted the signs very clear and lots of things _ posted the signs very clear and lots of things. most recently on vaccinations. and indeed various things— vaccinations. and indeed various things to — vaccinations. and indeed various things to do with covid. and yet there _ things to do with covid. and yet there are — things to do with covid. and yet there are still people who will vehemently, sometimes violently, deny that— vehemently, sometimes violently, deny that this is the case, and this is a struggle for government, as indeed _ is a struggle for government, as indeed is — is a struggle for government, as indeed is the need to balance all the requirements that are needed in order— the requirements that are needed in order to _ the requirements that are needed in order to bring about, prevent the worst— order to bring about, prevent the worst cases and effects of climate change. _ worst cases and effects of climate change, and report says the worst effects _ change, and report says the worst effects can — change, and report says the worst effects can be prevented, but it will take —
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effects can be prevented, but it will take notjust individuals in this countries, it will take companies and organisations and indeed _ companies and organisations and indeed other countries to be onhoard _ indeed other countries to be onboard. this will be a global effort — onboard. this will be a global effort for— onboard. this will be a global effort for global issue. and onboard. this will be a global effort for global issue.- onboard. this will be a global effort for global issue. and it will have to be _ effort for global issue. and it will have to be governments - effort for global issue. and it will have to be governments that - effort for global issue. and it will| have to be governments that lead effort for global issue. and it will - have to be governments that lead the way for some of the really major decisions, and ifi way for some of the really major decisions, and if i canjust go to the front page of the daily telegraph, which as exec of the same photo at the top, but it is talking about the uk government and what it might do. lucy, what's the detail in the story? might do. lucy, what's the detail in the sto ? ., , ., might do. lucy, what's the detail in the sto ? . , ., ., , might do. lucy, what's the detail in the sto ? . , . ., , ., the story? calls are really growing, i think, now _ the story? calls are really growing, i think, now for _ the story? calls are really growing, i think, now for ministers - the story? calls are really growing, i think, now for ministers in - i think, now for ministers in the government to spell out how they're xha going to achieve any goals of being zero. and it is all very well for governments to save this is what they want to do, but what they have to be very transparent about is what we are going to have to do in order to bring about that reduction in emissions, and some of the things that are talking about, having been talked about in the past, change your boiler or changing your car to maybe an electric car or a hydrogen
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car, and all of that incurs a cost, so all —— the government is examining proposals to extend some cash amounts they might give to households, for example, £4000 to go to help people replace the boiler, and it is going to cost a lot more than £4000 to change your boiler, so some of this money that is being offered is obviously welcome to some extent but it is not going to meet all the needs of all the people. and it is interesting, because this blueprint for cutting carbon from the treasury has actually been delayed and it is widely felt that if the delay is down to the fact that it if the delay is down to the fact thatitis if the delay is down to the fact that it is going to reveal a lot of these costs are going to hit the poorest the hardest. jae. these costs are going to hit the poorest the hardest.— these costs are going to hit the poorest the hardest. joe, you were sa in: poorest the hardest. joe, you were saying earlier _ poorest the hardest. joe, you were saying earlier that, _ poorest the hardest. joe, you were saying earlier that, in _ poorest the hardest. joe, you were saying earlier that, in fact, - poorest the hardest. joe, you were saying earlier that, in fact, you - saying earlier that, in fact, you would die on the route of looking to
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replace your gas boiler. has there been polling done? has there been pulling you have done about public attitudes to changing their behaviour and making the switch away from gas and away from fossil fuels and away from petrol and diesel cars? ., , . and away from petrol and diesel cars? ., , cars? people are supportive in --rincile cars? people are supportive in principle to — cars? people are supportive in principle to a _ cars? people are supportive in principle to a lot _ cars? people are supportive in principle to a lot of _ cars? people are supportive in principle to a lot of these - principle to a lot of these measures, they are less supportive, for instance. — measures, they are less supportive, for instance, when it comes to eating — for instance, when it comes to eating less meat, but certainly when it comes _ eating less meat, but certainly when it comes to— eating less meat, but certainly when it comes to eat changing your boiler, — it comes to eat changing your boiler, people are supportive, but not if— boiler, people are supportive, but not if it— boiler, people are supportive, but not if it cost them money for some people _ not if it cost them money for some people are — not if it cost them money for some people are not against the parcel at all, people are not against the parcel at all. they— people are not against the parcel at all, they are against having to shell— all, they are against having to shell out— all, they are against having to shell out money for it, and i say this as _ shell out money for it, and i say this as someone who's on the car is a fully— this as someone who's on the car is a fully electric car, and i think it is great, — a fully electric car, and i think it is great, but it is clearly not for everyone — is great, but it is clearly not for everyone will sub infrastructure that is — everyone will sub infrastructure that is in— everyone will sub infrastructure that is in place in this country at the moment is really not where he needs— the moment is really not where he needs to _ the moment is really not where he needs to be, and local authorities who should be leading on this tend to he _ who should be leading on this tend to he the _ who should be leading on this tend to be the worst providers of the sorts— to be the worst providers of the sorts of— to be the worst providers of the sorts of things, not least my own.
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and if— sorts of things, not least my own. and if that — sorts of things, not least my own. and if that is the kind of thing that— and if that is the kind of thing that is— and if that is the kind of thing that is going to be required, it is take _ that is going to be required, it is take a _ that is going to be required, it is take a lot — that is going to be required, it is take a lot more to convince people, because _ take a lot more to convince people, because at— take a lot more to convince people, because at the moment, they support the idea _ because at the moment, they support the idea but— because at the moment, they support the idea but even he cannot see themselves taking it, and that's indeed — themselves taking it, and that's indeed trooper alok sharma himself. no reflection on their on alok sharma, it is partly human nature. let's move on. front page of the times, big day tomorrow for many teenagers, a—level results come out, eddie times says that a grade will be awarded in almost half of the exams —— and the time says a grades. lucy. lucy, can you hear me? yes. lucy. lucy, can you hear me? yes, this is with — lucy. lucy, can you hear me? yes, this is with the — lucy. lucy, can you hear me? yes, this is with the times _ lucy. lucy, can you hear me? yes, this is with the times is _ lucy. lucy, can you hear me? yes, this is with the times is saying, - this is with the times is saying, couple of the other papers are saying perhaps... but almost half of
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the results of a level tomorrow are expected to be a a or a+. quite interesting details in this, because there have been highlighting about how schools have done in terms of the great allocation by the teachers, given by private schools, and as a result, some people are going to criticise this as, again, the private schools that will receive, improve the most, but i think another interesting dimension of this is the comment... he is saying that if you've got a situation where your teacher is giving you the grade, they know you best, and this particularly is for borderline pupils, perhaps there is a more positive spin that can be put on these peoples performances which almost sounds like someone is
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saying, going forward, maybe we should scrap the whole exam system. and of course last year we had a ridiculous algorithm situation which then got completely dismantled, so this is the second year of teachers assessing pupils, buti this is the second year of teachers assessing pupils, but i do wonder what the legacy might be going forward that if this proves to be at least an effective form of grading and marking pupils, might we be seeing the end of exams? interesting. joe, i suppose last year's exam season was deemed a fiasco, because of the algorithm, and so we have this system this year of teacher assessment, but the fear is expressed in the times by a former director general for the deferment of education that there is not a mean of ensuring consistency —— department for education. that perhaps is across schools and
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between this your�*s results in previous years results. the between this your's results in previous years results. the last two ears previous years results. the last two years have — previous years results. the last two years have been — previous years results. the last two years have been a _ previous years results. the last two years have been a disaster, - previous years results. the last two years have been a disaster, and - previous years results. the last two years have been a disaster, and it l years have been a disaster, and it really— years have been a disaster, and it really do — years have been a disaster, and it really do feel for the students receiving the results tomorrow, and there _ receiving the results tomorrow, and there are _ receiving the results tomorrow, and there are various problems with the process— there are various problems with the process the — there are various problems with the process the students have gone through— process the students have gone through and there are various problems— through and there are various problems with the exam system as it stands _ problems with the exam system as it stands if, _ problems with the exam system as it stands if, if— problems with the exam system as it stands if, if you like, in normal times — stands if, if you like, in normal times but _ stands if, if you like, in normal times but i _ stands if, if you like, in normal times. but i think the particular issue _ times. but i think the particular issue we — times. but i think the particular issue we have with the system is if it results _ issue we have with the system is if it results in— issue we have with the system is if it results in half of all pupils getting. _ it results in half of all pupils getting, roughly all half of pupils, getting _ getting, roughly all half of pupils, getting a or a—star grades, there is no granulation to decide who are the best students and who are not as strong, _ best students and who are not as strong, and so if moving forward there _ strong, and so if moving forward there is— strong, and so if moving forward there is going to be something that looks— there is going to be something that looks at— there is going to be something that looks at things in different ways, whether— looks at things in different ways, whether does teacher assessment or perhaps— whether does teacher assessment or perhaps universities launching their own examinations, there needs to be a way— own examinations, there needs to be a way to— own examinations, there needs to be a way to differentiate between these pupils. _ a way to differentiate between these pupils, because as a university or
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as an _ pupils, because as a university or as an employer, and i say this is someone — as an employer, and i say this is someone who employs graduates, it is very difficult to differentiate between students if everyone, or half of _ between students if everyone, or half of those writing to you, have a or a a—star. and that is no criticism of any student— a—star. and that is no criticism of any student getting results this year. _ any student getting results this year. but — any student getting results this year, but it is not fit for purpose and something needs to be done moving _ and something needs to be done moving forward. gk, and something needs to be done moving forward.— and something needs to be done moving forward. 0k, we shall see in a few hours' — moving forward. 0k, we shall see in a few hours' time _ moving forward. 0k, we shall see in a few hours' time what _ moving forward. 0k, we shall see in a few hours' time what sort - moving forward. 0k, we shall see in a few hours' time what sort of - a few hours' time what sort of grades are given out. lucy, can i take you to the front page of the daily mirror? and it is not a story reported by bbc panorama. karen's read. tell us more by the details about this. == read. tell us more by the details about this-— read. tell us more by the details about this. -- cameron's read, it sa s. about this. -- cameron's read, it says- david _ about this. -- cameron's read, it says. david cameron _ about this. -- cameron's read, it says. david cameron was - about this. -- cameron's read, it. says. david cameron was reported about this. -- cameron's read, it- says. david cameron was reported lee paid or received £7 million from greensill capital before it rather spectacularly went bust. this is as
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a result of paper shown to bbc panorama — there has been a programme about that. half of the money came from the share of shares which david cameron made for the company collapsed, and it does rather highlight how he was expect to sing for his son. we know that he bombarded ministers with requests to be seen —— singh for his son. and that left a rather sour taste in the mouth, but obviously this is what greensill capital were expecting him to do, this is what it paid him so much money, this is why they gave him so many share options, and hejust they gave him so many share options, and he just exercise those options at a veryjudicious time. i and he just exercise those options at a veryjudicious time.— at a very 'udicious time. i should sa that at a veryjudicious time. i should say that mr _ at a veryjudicious time. i should say that mr cameron's _ at a veryjudicious time. i should i say that mr cameron's spokesman at a veryjudicious time. i should - say that mr cameron's spokesman has issued a statement, saying that
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david cameron did not receive anything like the figures quoted by panorama. panorama was quoting, as you were saying, £7.2 million, but mr cameron's spokesperson does not give a figure as to exactly what he did receive. joe, ijust want to want director you may or may not have done work on this, producers like this cut through to the general public? document but to stories like this? it public? document but to stories like this? , , ., , ., ., this? it depends what you mean. if ou mean this? it depends what you mean. if you mean do _ this? it depends what you mean. if you mean do the _ this? it depends what you mean. if you mean do the stories _ this? it depends what you mean. if you mean do the stories get - this? it depends what you mean. if you mean do the stories get to - this? it depends what you mean. if you mean do the stories get to the| you mean do the stories get to the general— you mean do the stories get to the general public, they do, but do they have a _ general public, they do, but do they have a long—lasting effect on voting intention— have a long—lasting effect on voting intention or who some of it for, no, but the _ intention or who some of it for, no, but the human went to the effect of these _ but the human went to the effect of these stories, all of these stories, can be _ these stories, all of these stories, can be damaging, and will be interesting to see whether anything sticks— interesting to see whether anything sticks on— interesting to see whether anything sticks on this —— cue much of effective _ sticks on this -- cue much of effective-— sticks on this -- cue much of effective. ., ,, , ., g ., effective. 0k, thank you. joe, let me ask you _ effective. 0k, thank you. joe, let me ask you about _ effective. 0k, thank you. joe, let me ask you about the _ effective. 0k, thank you. joe, let me ask you about the front - effective. 0k, thank you. joe, let me ask you about the front page | effective. 0k, thank you. joe, let i me ask you about the front page of the daily mail, covid tests five—time the cost of flights.
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the daily mail, covid tests five-time the cost of flights. yeah, i think it five-time the cost of flights. yeah, i think it is — five-time the cost of flights. yeah, i think it is more _ five-time the cost of flights. yeah, i think it is more reflecting - five-time the cost of flights. yeah, i think it is more reflecting the - i think it is more reflecting the flights— i think it is more reflecting the flights costs are than the covid tests! — flights costs are than the covid tests! the covid test are listed as £93. _ tests! the covid test are listed as £93, which — tests! the covid test are listed as £93, which if you are applying for a family— £93, which if you are applying for a family of— £93, which if you are applying for a family of four, adds up, but the flights— family of four, adds up, but the flights quoted at £18, below the picture — flights quoted at £18, below the picture of a house on fire because of climate — picture of a house on fire because of climate change i think we really need to— of climate change i think we really need to have a serious conversation not about _ need to have a serious conversation not about the price of covid test but _ not about the price of covid test but, moving forward, the price of flights— but, moving forward, the price of flights instead.— but, moving forward, the price of flights instead. that is such a good oint, flights instead. that is such a good point. lucy- _ flights instead. that is such a good point. lucy. do _ flights instead. that is such a good point. lucy- do you _ flights instead. that is such a good point, lucy. do you echo _ flights instead. that is such a good point, lucy. do you echo that? - flights instead. that is such a good point, lucy. do you echo that? i. point, lucy. do you echo that? i would love to have been the person who said, somebody has to find me the cheapest flight that is currently on sale, this flight probably goes at three in the morning or something, but i think the point is well made that, actually, flights do contribute to climate change in the could not be a more stark contrast on that front page between the discussion about pcr tests, which are in effect in
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luxury, and nobody is forcing you to go away on holiday, and the stoeva setting foot of the lady in greece, holiday destination on the island, whose home is completely destroyed —— the striking photo of. we need to acknowledge those two things are linked. ., . ., acknowledge those two things are linked. ., .. _, linked. 0k, iwould ifi can cover another couple _ linked. 0k, iwould ifi can cover another couple of _ linked. 0k, iwould ifi can cover another couple of stories - linked. 0k, iwould ifi can cover another couple of stories very i another couple of stories very quickly will the front page of the yorkshire post, gps have suffered a rising toll of abuse, says paul. joe? rising toll of abuse, says paul. joe? ., rising toll of abuse, says paul. joe? . ., . ~' joe? yeah, i would take the poll findints joe? yeah, i would take the poll findings with _ joe? yeah, i would take the poll findings with a _ joe? yeah, i would take the poll findings with a pinch _ joe? yeah, i would take the poll findings with a pinch of- joe? yeah, i would take the poll findings with a pinch of salt, - findings with a pinch of salt, because _ findings with a pinch of salt, because the survey is not a representative survey of doctors, but clearly — representative survey of doctors, but clearly there is a concern quite rightly _ but clearly there is a concern quite rightly but — but clearly there is a concern quite rightly but the abuse doctors are suffering — rightly but the abuse doctors are suffering as a result of the covid crisis _ suffering as a result of the covid crisis and — suffering as a result of the covid crisis and dealing with that, in what — crisis and dealing with that, in what was _ crisis and dealing with that, in what was obviously hugely stressful circumstances, made worse by patients — circumstances, made worse by patient's behaviour, very disappointing.—
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patient's behaviour, very disa ”ointin. ., patient's behaviour, very disa ”ointin. . _ disappointing. 0k, and ending, lucy, with the front — disappointing. 0k, and ending, lucy, with the front page _ disappointing. ok, and ending, lucy, with the front page of— disappointing. 0k, and ending, lucy, with the front page of the _ disappointing. 0k, and ending, lucy, with the front page of the daily - with the front page of the daily star, the headline, we will shoot geronimo. , star, the headline, we will shoot geronimo-— geronimo. this is a devastating headline! i— geronimo. this is a devastating headline! i am _ geronimo. this is a devastating headline! i am very _ geronimo. this is a devastating headline! i am very passionate| geronimo. this is a devastating - headline! i am very passionate about mamas and alpacas, and having spent a lot of time in peru, but over there, they did not really sentimental eyes their attachments to these beautiful animals —— llamas. ifeel very to these beautiful animals —— llamas. i feel very torn. to these beautiful animals —— llamas. ifeel very torn. i would never like to think of a creature being put down or shot needlessly, but the fact is that the tests that have currently been carried out on geronimo, an alpaca, do suggest that this animal has tv, and that is something that needs to be taken very seriously. we had george eustis writing yesterday in the newspapers. he comes from a family of farmers,
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many generations, so he has lived through how painful it is for farmers to lose some of their herd or the flock. in this particular case i worry that we have allowed ourselves to become too attached to an animal that does after all look incredibly endearing, alpacas and llamas are beautiful creatures, but the bottom line is if it is unwelcome it probably does need to be put down. i unwelcome it probably does need to be put down-— be put down. i should think that his head, not be put down. i should think that his head. rrot our— be put down. i should think that his head, not our hearts. _ be put down. i should think that his head, not our hearts. thank- be put down. i should think that his head, not our hearts. thank you . be put down. i should think that his. head, not our hearts. thank you very much to both of you, lucy beresford and joe twyman. thank you so much. and that is it for the papers. my thanks to our guests, lucy and joe. sport is next, followed by our latest headlines at midnight. bye for now. hello. i'm marc edwards with your sport. thanks forjoining us. jack grealish has been
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officially introduced as a manchester city player. hejoined the premier league champions last week from aston villa, in a deal worth £100 million. that makes him the most expensive british player in history and the sixth—biggest fee of all time. he came on as a substitute in city's community shield defeat to leicester on saturday but was presented to fans outside the etihad this evening. grealish is expected to make his premier league debut at tottenham on sunday. i felt like it was time for me to move on. obviously, i always said how much i wanted to play champions league football and i couldn't do that at villa this year. and i have a football club here that has got so much potential. i think they're the most successful english side in the last ten years. and, yeah, they showed so much faith in me, and ifelt like it was the right time. chelsea, meanwhile, are closing in on the signing
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of striker romelu lukaku. the inter milan forward has had a medical in italy today, ahead of a £97.5 million move to stamford bridge. lukaku's already played for chelsea, of course, leaving the club in 2014 after just 15 appearances in three years. but since then, he's gone on to become one of the most prolific strikers in europe, with 24 goals for inter last season, helping them to their first italian title in 11 years. and the speculation around where lionel messi will play next season continues. the record six—time ballon d'or winner said that french side paris saint germain is just one possibility, after ending his 21—year association with barcelona, who couldn't afford to keep him. well, fans in paris think they have their man. hundreds of them, as you can see, waiting outside an airport in paris yesterday, hoping messi would arrive. there was no sign of him yet, but plenty think he's on his way. the queen has congratulated team gb as the final 0lympians arrived back to heathrow, after the tokyo games came to a close yesterday. team gb enjoyed one of their most successful games, with 22 golds and 65 medals in total,
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matching the achievement of london 2012. laura kenny, who won a gold and a silver and also carried the flag in the closing ceremony, led the team off the plane with her husband, jason, now britain's most decorated 0lympian after his gold in the men's keirin. well, inside the terminal, one of the biggest receptions was afforded to boxer galal yafai, who won gold in the flyweight division. and as you heard, his friends and family were in fine voice. meanwhile, his fellow boxer lauren price won britain's 22nd and final gold of the games yesterday morning. she's already looking ahead to paris in three years' time. looking at the likes of obviously nicola adams and katie taylor, they inspired a lot of people after london 2012, when women's boxing was introduced, and from there, i think it has come on leaps and bounds, so itjust keeps getting bigger and bigger all the time. and hopefully, myself and a lot of the others have inspired
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the next generation, and, yeah, forfemale boxing, it keeps getting bigger and i'm looking forward for the next three years in paris. hopefully they'll introduce more weights as well. joe choong created history by becoming the first british man to win a modern pentathlon gold. after a long time away from his family, with various covid restrictions over the last few months, he was looking forward to the simple things. oh, it feels absolutely amazing. i haven't seen my family in nearly four months now, so i'm just really looking forward to getting home, getting my mum to cook something and just sitting in front of the tv and relaxing. i didn't expect there to be such a huge reception. obviously, i was looking forward to seeing my family, but i don't think i understood how much it would mean to me seeing them again after so long. so, ijust don't think i could be happier right now. following on from his success in tokyo, tom pidcock has been selected to race at the vuelta a espana for ineos grenadiers. the 22—year—old won gold in the men's cross—country
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mountain bike at the olympics, but the all—terrain rider will now switch his focus to the road and feature in the the first switch his focus to the road and feature in the first grand tour of his career, which starts on saturday. the youngest and oldest player in the men's hundred combined to sensational effect as birmingham phoenix went top of the table courtesy of an emphatic 93—run victory over welsh fire at edgbaston. moeen ali made a blistering 28—ball 59, which included three successive sixes. but even the captain was outshone by the baby of the competition. will smeed is tearing up the hundred atjust 19 years of age, and he smoked an unbeaten 65 off 38 balls as phoenix smashed their way to the highest score in the tournament, 184. so, from the youngest to the eldest statesman in the hundred — imran tahir, ageing like the finest of wines at 42, took the tournament's first hat—trick to finish with figures of 5—25, with the fire skittled forjust 91 runs.
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i think he's still running about edgbaston! in the women's fixture, it was another brilliant performance from india's teenage superstar shafali verma, who scored 76 as birmingham phoenix stormed to a 10—wicket win over welsh fire in the women's hundred. welsh fire collapsed from 75—1to127—9, including losing their last six wickets for 23 runs in a 21—ball spell. chasing 128 to win, verma smashed an unbeaten 76 off 42 balls, after bringing her up her 50 withjust 22 balls, the 17—year—old hitting nine fours and two sixes. and andy murray has been added to the main draw for the us open after former champion stan wawrinka withdrew. murray pulled out of the men's singles at the tokyo 0lympics last month with a thigh strain, but was able to play in the doubles alongsidejoe salisbury, where they reached the quarterfinals. murray won the us open back in 2012. and that's all your sport for now. from me, marc edwards, and the rest of the team, bye—bye.
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well, many of us have had to endure days of torrential showers, the grass has sodded. what has happened to august, we wonder? i've got some good news — tuesday is looking sunnier and warmer than of late across most of the uk, not absolutely everywhere. we still have a few showers in the forecast in the short term. here's the unsettled weather recently. you can see the clouds spiralling across the uk, but we've got a gap in the weather. it's called a ridge of high pressure. there's a low which is heading our way, as well, but this ridge is going to settle things down on tuesday. so, what's tuesday, 6 in the morning looking like? a lot of fine, bright, if not already sunny weather across the uk. 13 degrees in london, 10 degrees in glasgow, just the stray shower here and there. how about the rest of the morning into the afternoon? so, lots of sunshine, especially across england and wales.
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in scotland, we are anticipating downpours and thunderstorms to form over the highlands, and they'll probably drift towards the east coast, and there's a chance of a few scattered showers just close to the north sea coasts and maybe one or two other areas. but other than that, it is going to be a predominantly sunny day with scattered fairweather clouds, light winds, and very pleasant temperatures. i suspect they will probably hit around 24 celsius in one or two spots on tuesday. now, here's a look at wednesday's weather map. a low is approaching with its weather front — here's the low out there. the weather front is approaching western areas of the uk, so the weather will go downhill. 0ut towards the west on wednesday, you can see the rain sweeping in — this is the morning in northern ireland, western parts of scotland, and other western extremities also getting the cloud and rain, and a bit of a breeze, too. but eastern areas in the southeast should, at the very least, stay bright and actually quite warm in norwich, up to 24 — that's because, ahead of weather fronts, we quite often have a southerly wind that's strengthening the breeze — not strong, just a light summer breeze keeping those temperatures high enough.
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now, the weather front moves through the uk on thursday, but notice there's hardly any rain on the weather front, it's literallyjust a line of cloud. that will introduce just slightly fresher conditions to western areas here, but staying warm in the southeast, up to around 24—25 degrees. but in the northwest, closer to the centre of the low pressure, it will stay wet and, at times, windy.
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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... a code red for humanity — the un headlines that humanity is changing the climate in unprecedented and sometimes irreversible ways. the unprecedented and sometimes irreversible ways.— irreversible ways. the world listen to but _ irreversible ways. the world listen to but didn't - irreversible ways. the world listen to but didn't hear. - irreversible ways. the world | listen to but didn't hear. the world listened but it did not act strongly enough. and as a result, climate change is a problem that is here now. nobody is safe and it's getting worse faster.— worse faster. raging wildfires in greece. — worse faster. raging wildfires in greece, one _ worse faster. raging wildfires in greece, one of— worse faster. raging wildfires in greece, one of many - in greece, one of many countries already feeling the impact. the impacts fanned by strong winds and rising
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temperatures. and the world's

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