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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 9, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. our top stories... a code red for humanity. a major new report warns human activity is changing the climate in unprecedented and irreversible ways. the study says we'll see more frequent, extreme weather events across the globe — like these raging wildfires in greece — that have driven thousands from their homes. an assistant to new york governor andrew cuomo speaks out, calling for accountability over his alleged sexual harassment. and it may not be mars, but it's the next best thing. we talk to the nasa scientist who's in charge of an out of this world mission, that will never leave planet earth.
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hello, and welcome to the programme. global warming is accelerating, and human influence is unequivically to blame — that's the warning from a damning new report from the un and its secretary general. antonio guteres says the evidence can not be denied: greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel burning and deforestation are choking the planet and putting billions of people at immediate risk. it's the most comprehensive climate change study ever and is produced by hundreds of the world's top scientists from 66 countries. the report warns that the global average temprature rise could reach or exceed 1.5 degrees celcius in the next 20 years — 10 years sooner than expected. it said rising temperatures will cause more frequent, extreme weather events across the globe. and warned that irreversible changes are already ongoing in melting ice sheets, rising sea levels and increasing acidification. but the report also stated that climate change could be slowed down — with rapid and sustained emission reductions. our science editor david shukman has this report.
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as the world gets hotter, it's becoming more threatening. the terrifying scenes of mass escape from greek islands, burning amid heatwaves, just as devastating fires also hit california. and the new report from the un climate panel says there will be much more of this to come. with every additional amount of global warning... this major study concludes that temperatures are rising and that it's beyond doubt that human activity is driving them up. and all the warnings so far have been ignored.
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the world listened, but didn't hear. the world listened, but it didn't act strongly enough. and as a result, climate change is a problem that is here now. nobody's safe, and it's getting worse faster. people in every region of the world are now feeling the impacts of more violent weather, fuelled by the gases that we release into the atmosphere. | it is an absolute fact that human| influence is warming the climate, and that's a very stark reminder that it is our activities _ which are changing the climate and affecting these _ extreme weather events. and as the planet continues to warm, these consequencesjust get worse. l the scientists are more certain of all this because they've got satellites spotting in minute detail how the planet is changing. and teams of researchers out in the toughest conditions, gathering data to help work out what's likely to come next. the big question is how much more the planet will heat up
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in the coming decades, so scientists explore different scenarios. in two of them, there are rapid and deep cuts in carbon emissions, and although the temperature does rise to potentially damaging levels, it's just about within the limits set by the international community. but in two other scenarios, which are actually much closer to where we're heading right now, the increases are much more dangerous. and in the most extreme, where emissionsjust keep growing, things become, well, catastrophic. but the message is that there is still time to act. in one sentence, this report shows that human action has got us to where we are, but human action can also crucially decide how the future will look like. we are not doomed. there is a lot we can all do, like this project in cambridge to fit shades to keep the sun
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off the windows. this problem's only going to get worse with climate change. we're going to have, i fear, more and more heatwaves and they're going to be worse and worse, so that's why i think it makes sense to shade your windows now, start learning how to adapt. but some changes will be far tougher to deal with. the oceans will keep rising, we just don't know how much. the scientists are warning that there's going to be some rise in sea level really whatever we do. maybe half a metre by the end of the century if emissions are brought under control, or a metre if they aren't. and that would be really devastating for millions of people on coastlines around the world. but they can't rule out a far bigger rise approaching two metres if the polar ice sheets collapse. the great ice sheets
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are already adding to the level of the sea, but this process may suddenly accelerate. scientists aren't sure, but the implications would be disastrous. india is now in the grip of flooding. higher seas would make it worse. the science has never been so clear that we can head off the worst of climate change, but not all of it, so we urgently need to get ready. david shukman, bbc news. let's speak to professor jonathan bamber — professor of glaciology at the university of bristol & a contributing author to the report. can you quantify can you quantify for can you quantify for us can you quantify for us to can you quantify for us to level can you quantify for us to level extreme events you are seeing in terms of water levels, sea levels, melting ice?—
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terms of water levels, sea levels, melting ice? well, i will come onto civil riahts melting ice? well, i will come onto civil rights in _ melting ice? well, i will come onto civil rights in just _ melting ice? well, i will come onto civil rights in just the _ melting ice? well, i will come onto civil rights in just the second - melting ice? well, i will come onto civil rights in just the second but i civil rights in just the second but i am working that sea level rises in a second but i've been working in climate science for that long and every year, over this for decades, they have just been more and more sign of climate breakdown and every part of the climate system we try, you can see signs to that happening, and that is what is in this report and that is what is in this report and it covers the permafrost that was and how those ice sheets contain as much ice in them and if you melted them, they would lase global sea levels of five metres, that's how much ice is in them. no one is suggesting that could happen but even a small change in the volume of thoseice even a small change in the volume of those ice sheet will have a dramatic
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effect on sea—level rises and just in the last 15 long—term average over the last century. there is some sea—level rises that people always see, no matter what we do. but if they continue rise of the next century, thatis continue rise of the next century, that is because... they take a very long time to adjust to the rest of the climate system but there are still for and one of the things that i try and always say to colleagues is what happens to the climate system, is not a binary thing, it's not every take action now, things will be fine and if we don't, they will be fine and if we don't, they will be fine and if we don't, they will be catastrophic. we don't know
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how bad it's going to be and that is the case with sea—level rise. we are looking at probably something like half a metre of sea level rising for the next century but it could be a lot worse. . �* , the next century but it could be a lot worse. . �*, ., the next century but it could be a lot worse-— lot worse. that's a very nuanced argument _ lot worse. that's a very nuanced argument you're _ lot worse. that's a very nuanced argument you're putting - lot worse. that's a very nuanced j argument you're putting forward because some people will listen to you saying something degree of sea—level rise is baked into the system and your complete despair. what can you say to them about what can be done to limit the damage? i hope the point i was making is that it's not about despair because there will be some damage, we are already seeing it and seeing record high temperatures, heatwaves in canada this year, record heat in siberia last year with temperatures reaching 40 last year with temperatures reaching a0 celsius in one of the coldest races on earth, so we are already seeing some consequent but there is
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everything to play for in terms of not allowing those consequences to get significantly worse, so i think... i don't see it as a negative thing and i don't like it's absolutely not the case that we are doomed whatever happens it will be catastrophic, that is not the case. there will be consequences no question, there already are but if we take action now and i mean really deep and profound action in terms of our mission a mission pathways —— e mission pathways, we can mitigate against the changes. if you read the report, some of the things in there about what has happened over the instrumental record of the satellite record, those are a bit grim, particularly if you work on polar research as i do. if you look at
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what's in the arctic, it's not great but... quite like this though action we can take. all right, we have to leave it there, thank you so much. for the seventh day — fires are continuing to burn on greece's second largest island of evia. more than 600 firefighters — some of them from the uk — are battling to control blazing forests which have destroyed homes and businesses and sent thousands fleeing. more than two thousand residents have been evacuated from evia — from where our europe correspondent bethany bell reports. fires rage on evia. it has been a week and they're still not under control here. greece is experiencing its worst heatwave in decades. the searing temperatures and scorching winds mean these forests are like a tinderbox. the flames leave behind a ghostly landscape, white with ash. the fire swept through these hills, killing the trees, and this is what has been left behind — wreckage and destruction. the ashes are still smouldering, the ground beneath my feet is hot from the blaze. this man has come to check up
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on his family's farm. it belongs to his son—in—law who is off fighting the fires. their flock of 2000 sheep and goats used to graze on this hillside. now all lost in this disaster. he says he has never experienced a fire like this before. translation: climate change in my opinion l is hurting the entire planet, and especially this forest. the authorities certainly have not handled this very well, but the fire was our destiny. no one could have put it out. dozens of wildfires have broken out across greece in recent days. the prime minister says climate change is to blame. translation: we have an obligation to save the country _
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from climate change. i am not looking for excuses, we have made important strides in organising the country, but that is not enough when we are faced with a phenomenon of such magnitude. in some areas, the fires only stopped when they reached the sea. many locals on evia say they have been abandoned. they say the authorities have not done enough to protect the forests and their homes. and with temperatures rising, there are fears of more wildfires like this in the years to come. a top aide to the governor of new york, andrew cuomo, has resigned amid a sexual harassment scandal involving her boss. melissa derosa — who was mr cuomo's secretary — has released a statement describing the last two years as �*mentally and emotionally trying.�* governor cuomo faces possible impeachment and removal from office by state lawmakers, having been accused by eleven women
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of sexual harassment.the state attorney general�*s report linked melissa derosa to an alleged cover—up within his office. mr cuomo has denied the allegations and resisted mounting calls for his resignation. brittany commisso is a former aide to andrew cuomo and is one of several women to have accused the governor of sexual harassment. she discussed her claims on cbs this morning. why did you file that criminal complaint with the sheriff office? it was the right thing to do, the governor has held accountable. being held accountable _ governor has held accountable. being held accountable do _ governor has held accountable. being held accountable do you _ governor has held accountable. being held accountable do you mean seeing the governor charged with a crime. what he did to me was a crime. he: broke the law. let's bring in amanda renteria, former national political director for hillary clinton 2016's campaign, now the chief executive
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of code for america. what difference will that make to what is going on?— what difference will that make to what is going on? you've heard over the last several— what is going on? you've heard over the last several days _ what is going on? you've heard over the last several days that _ what is going on? you've heard over the last several days that the - the last several days that the democrats, including the president of the united date, have the governor stepped down. the question is now really are what other levels does the democratic party and have, and seeing this morning, the adviser stepping down, this is the increasing drumbeat that will push him to step down but it's really also pushing the political party in the apparat is to say what more can we do to encourage the rights to
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peer? the increasing drumbeat will have an effect you peer? the increasing drumbeat will have an effect— have an effect you put out a statement _ have an effect you put out a statement saying _ have an effect you put out a statement saying he - have an effect you put out a statement saying he is - have an effect you put out a - statement saying he is somebody and it's part of his political persona, but how has that gone down? imilli it but how has that gone down? will it increase so — but how has that gone down? will it increase so much _ but how has that gone down? will it increase so much that _ but how has that gone down? will it increase so much that it _ but how has that gone down? will it increase so much that it makes - but how has that gone down? ll it increase so much that it makes it very difficult for him to manage what is going on in new york. you can keep doing the role that you are in, and he said i'll wait foran investigation which now has called out his actions as inappropriate and more will be coming. should he stay
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in office like is right now. the? in office like is right now. they are trying _ in office like is right now. they are trying to — in office like is right now. they are trying to get _ in office like is right now. they are trying to get through - in office like is right now. they are trying to get through their infrastructure. that cannot very helpful for infrastructure. that cannot very helful fo ., infrastructure. that cannot very helfulfo ., ., infrastructure. that cannot very helpful fo— helpful for none of these conversations _ helpful for none of these conversations help - helpful for none of these conversations help but i helpful for none of these | conversations help but on helpful for none of these - conversations help but on the helpful for none of these _ conversations help but on the other hand, people have been governing in a pandemic so everyone is trying to flexible and have multiple cameras at the same time. they are both talking about the infrastructure bill and the process of reconciliation.- bill and the process of reconciliation. . ., ., reconciliation. thanks for having me. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: nasa's new project that part reality tv show, part scientific experiment. we'll have the details next. almost all scotland's remaining coronavirus restrictions have been lifted. it means an end to social distancing — although the wearing of masks is still compulsory
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in some public spaces. a warning, lorna gordon's report does contain flashing images. life in scotland will feel more normal than at any time during march last year —— make since march last year but they are not going to the day, they say it's far too early to save your new virus. life in scotland will feel more normal than at any time since march last year but the scottish government isn't calling it freedom day, they say it is far too early to say we are free from the virus. so some restrictions will remain. masks are still mandatory here on public transport and in shops and office workers in scotland are being told where possible they should still work from home. we know lifting restrictions gives the virus more opportunity to spread, so there is a degree of nervousness but i know we can't keep legal
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restrictions on people's lives forever, so we have to try to do these things at the right moments and as carefully as possible. at a minute past midnight, clubbers celebrated as their favourite nightclubs re—opened after more than a year being closed. it had to spend my 20th in st andrew's at home. it is a bit irresponsible that everything is opening this soon, but i'm not going to ignore the chance to come and have a good time. the government here is warning that some of the few remaining restrictions could continue through the winter, in the hope that any increase in cases can be controlled, and for further lockdowns can be avoided. documents obtained by bbc panorama suggest david cameron made around seven million pounds — that's nearly 10 million dollars — from greensill capital before the controversial finance company collapsed. it was at the centre of controversy when it emerged the former british prime minister had lobbied the government on behalf of the company during the pandemic. he has repeatedly refused to tell mps what he was paid by greensill. the company went into administration in march this year and investors are facing billions of pounds of losses. a spokesman for mr cameron said his remuneration was a private matter. andrew verity reports. lex greensill was the banker at the heart of david cameron's government. he had his own office at number ten. lex greensill, lex, where are you?
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give us a wave. two years after david cameron left downing street, he went to work for his friends firm. greensill. changing finance to change the world. mr cameron travelled the world promoting greensill capital. with david cameron onboard, it sold more than $ia billion of investments. having an ex prime minister is a great way to open doors. he played a really crucial role in getting greensill in front of the right sort of people, which meant they could get access to more money, more funding, big investors. when greensill capital went bust in march, those investors were left facing billions in losses. but the man who set it up isn't short of cash. lex greensill took at least $a0 million out of his company based at these offices in the west end of london, and his family trust took millions more. our former prime minister also had a bumper payday. panorama has obtained a letter from greensill to mr cameron. it suggests david cameron pocketed $a.5 million, after cashing in greensill shares in 2019. before tax, including his salary and bonus, it looks like he made round $10 million, for two—and—a—half years part—time work.
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it was all about making money, and i think the danger is that cameron looks like he just saw the dollar signs. lobbying for green sill to be considered for the lending schemes. mr cameron's spokesman said he acted in good faith at all times, and there was no wrongdoing in any of the actions he took. lex greensill says the investments are covered by insurance that should cover 100% of any shortfall. investors could face huge losses while david cameron and his friend made a fortune. andy verity, bbc news.
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a spokesperson for david cameron has responded the panorama programme saying he did not receive anything like the figures quoted in india, researchers says child malnutrition is on the rise as government meal provisions have reduced during the pandemic. our correspondent devina gupta travelled to a village in the northern state of haryana to find out just how severe the situation is. fighting for a chance at a health life. access to nutritious food is hard to come by. now after his first birthday, it is less than two months old, saying she feels help was. she's so weak. her legs are so thin.
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how will she survive another summer? in normal times, families like this would given a helping hand. children use to get hot meals from the day care centre here but covid has put that to a grinding halt and children with malnutrition or her hardest. the centre is still but the staff yoursay the centre is still but the staff your say it is no longer the when they get packets of wheat and rice, we make food. that can provide the nutrition they need. they have been... schools under the current programme but without it, she began to show signs of malnutrition.
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thanks to distributed ration crates, she has made some progress. translation: we she has made some progress. translation:— she has made some progress. translation: we can see she is steadily gaining _ translation: we can see she is steadily gaining weight _ translation: we can see she is steadily gaining weight and - translation: we can see she is steadily gaining weight and is - steadily gaining weight and is coming out of yellow zone, it is a big win for us. what can march, the government said there was less than 1 million severely malnourished children in india but they are planning on outreach programmes to help them. however, experts estimate over 120 million children affected. the rely on meals to support the nutrition in their absence will impact your cognitive development. that might be rely on schools. the? that might be rely on schools. they can have learning _ that might be rely on schools. they can have learning difficulties, will do less— can have learning difficulties, will do less well in schools. for millions — do less well in schools. for millions of _ do less well in schools. for millions of parents, - do less well in schools. he“ millions of parents, this is a grim prospect. they are seeing the cry for help.
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let's look at some of the day's other news... a compensation fund set up for the sexual abuse victims of american financier, jeffrey epstein, says it has paid 138 people. 121 millions dollars were payed out, with administrators saying more than twice the number of claims expected were received. the announcement comes more than two years after epstein's suicide in a new york prison, while awaiting trial. the un says at least 27 children have been killed in afghanistan in three days amid fierce fighting between the taliban and government forces. the un children's agency unicef said it was shocked by the "rapid escalation of grave violations against children". the taliban have been making major advances across the country as foreign troops withdraw, taking at least six regional capitals since friday. people in france must now show a health pass before entering bars, cafes, restaurants, and intercity trains. an estimated quarter
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of a million people rallied against the new rule over the weekend. the so—called covid—19 pass is part of president macron's effort to contain its fourth wave of infections and encourage vaccinations. hello there. it looks like the weather is going to calm down a bit for tomorrow with drier, sunnier weather on the way for more of the country. there's been quite a number of heavy, thundery donwpours today, and a lot of thunderstorms actually across central areas of scotland through much of the day. we didn't do too bad, though, across the north of england and into parts of yorkshire, as well, with some sunshine. but there are still some heavy showers around at the moment. they'll continue through the evening, gradually tending to fade away overnight, but we could still keep some showers going overnight, even into parts of northern england for example. some clear spells developing, temperatures remaining in double figures overnight, typically 12—13 degrees in towns and cities. any overnight showers first thing will tend to move away. we could see one or two showers breaking out in wales and again across some eastern parts of england, but most of the showers will be in scotland.
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but this time, further north, so it should be a drier day in central and southern scotland. we may see more cloud coming into northern ireland, but otherwise more in the way of sunshine, the winds will be light on tuesday and it will be warmer. temperatures getting up to 22—23 degrees, a bit more like it for this time of the year. now, we briefly get this drier weather, i think, in many places on tuesday with slightly higher pressure, but if we look out in the atlantic, this is what's coming our way. we've got a weather front coming in from the west. that will bring cloud and rain into northern ireland, into scotland, particularly western scotla nd. ahead of that, though, we could see a few showers breaking out to wales and western parts of england. midlands, eastern england probably dry with some sunshine, and with a southerly breeze, it'll be a bit warmer still, 2a—25 degrees. for scotland and northern ireland, though, cooler with that wetter weather around.
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the rain does clear away from these areas during the night, and that weather front just pushes its way into england and wales for thursday. but there won't be much rain on it at all. in fact, we've probably got a band of cloud, a bit of patchy rain stuck from the south west of england through wales, towards lincolnshire, parts of yorkshire. north of that, it's cooler air, some sunshine, the winds picking up in scotland and northern ireland with some showers in the north west later on. so, temperatures a bit lower for these areas, but ahead of what's left of any rain on that weather front in east anglia and the south east of england, we're still in the warm air, so temperatures could reach 26 degrees, the peak of the heat this week. so, it's a bit warmer this week, and with low pressure not sitting right over the uk, it won't be as wet as it has been.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. our top stories: a damning new un report says global warming is accelerating, and human influence is unequivocally to blame. we'll speak live to the white house chief medical adviser, dr anthony fauci, as covid cases in the united states rise to their highest levels since february. the leader of belarus calls britain �*america's lapdog' and denies his government used torture and violence to silence dissent. plus, as canada reopens its border to fully vaccinated americans, we hear from the woman itching to get back to her house who made the crossing last night.
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millions of americans are still hesitant to get a coronavirus vaccine, despite a series of public health campaigns and incentive programmes aimed at increasing uptake, and so case numbers across the country are rising once again. for the first time since february, the us is averaging more than 100,000 cases a day. the resurgence is happening especially in states, where vaccination numbers are low, leaving many experts to say that this has now become a pandemic among the unvaccinated. the number of younger patients in hospital is also increasing. the surge is largely tied to the highly contagious delta variant. all the while, the us military today announced it will mandate covid—19 vaccines for troops by september. let's speak to dr anthony fauci, the director of the national institute of allergy &
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infectious diseases in the us. very good to have you on the programme, doctor fauci. i wonder if i could start by asking you whether you agree with that idea that this is becoming in the us a pandemic of the unvaccinated.— the unvaccinated. there's no question _ the unvaccinated. there's no question about _ the unvaccinated. there's no question about that. - the unvaccinated. there's no question about that. what i the unvaccinated. there's no| question about that. what we the unvaccinated. there's no - question about that. what we have in the united states is about 93 million people who are eligible to be vaccinated who have not been vaccinated yet. as you mentioned correctly, they are very much concentrated in areas of the country, the southern states particular the, where the highest levels of infections are —— particularly. when you see them numbers which are extremely disturbing, over100,000 new infections a day, that's really almost invariably very highly concentrated in those areas that are
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under vaccinated. that's what we mean when we say it's an outbreak of the unvaccinated. we know that vaccines are not 100% protective, so for the most part, not always, those infections are generally of minimal symptomatology. some of them go to the hospital, but generally, minimal symptomatology. the people really getting sick are the ones that have not been vaccinated. 50. getting sick are the ones that have not been vaccinated.— not been vaccinated. so, some sectors, not been vaccinated. so, some sectors. public _ not been vaccinated. so, some sectors, public and _ not been vaccinated. so, some sectors, public and private - not been vaccinated. so, some - sectors, public and private sectors, are talking about perhaps mandating vaccination once the vaccines have full approval. vaccination once the vaccines have fullapproval. can vaccination once the vaccines have full approval. can you explain that? why can't they mandate been sedation right now? == why can't they mandate been sedation riaht now? . ., why can't they mandate been sedation riaht now? . . ., .. ., ., right now? -- mandate vaccination. we have and _ right now? -- mandate vaccination. we have and authorisation - right now? -- mandate vaccination. we have and authorisation by - right now? -- mandate vaccination. we have and authorisation by which| we have and authorisation by which the vaccine is being distributed. unlike other authorisations, where you generally have a modest amount of data that you want to get
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something out quickly, we have an overwhelming amount of data, not only in the us, but throughout the world. not only is about the efficacy and the real—world effectiveness of these vaccines, but the safety of them. yet there is this idea that until you get full official approval, that the cover that you can get, the legal challenges that there would be to mandating what is an unapproved vaccine would be problematic. what you're going to see in the united states, i believe, is that once the vaccines get the full approval, that some people who were reluctant to get vaccinated but were waiting for that will get vaccinated, but something i think we'll have an even greater impact is that we'll be starting to see institutions, big organisations that employ a lot of people, the military, we would feel
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much more comfortable that the local level of mandating if you want to participate with this particular enterprise. you'll have to get vaccinated. we won't see a central mandate from the federal government, but you will see a lot of local mandates vaccines in the united states. d0 mandates vaccines in the united states. , ., mandates vaccines in the united states. , , mandates vaccines in the united states. , ., : , states. do you support that? because mandatin: states. do you support that? because mandating is _ states. do you support that? because mandating is controversial. _ states. do you support that? because mandating is controversial. yes, - states. do you support that? because mandating is controversial. yes, it. mandating is controversial. yes, it is controversial. _ mandating is controversial. yes, it is controversial. no _ mandating is controversial. yes, it is controversial. no one, - mandating is controversial. yes, it is controversial. no one, at - mandating is controversial. yes, it is controversial. no one, at least l is controversial. no one, at least in the free spirits of the united states, which i'm sure you have in the uk, i want to be told they have to do something. but when you're dealing with a pandemic that has already killed over 615,000 americans in over a million people worldwide, that is a situation that is unusual. when you have an unusual situation, to say the least, that's putting it mildly, sometimes you
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have to resort to things that are unusual. sure, it's unusualto have to resort to things that are unusual. sure, it's unusual to do this mandating, but that's something that i believe we need if we're going to get this outbreak under control. ,, ., , ., going to get this outbreak under control. , ., , control. so, there is a rise in cases, control. so, there is a rise in cases. and — control. so, there is a rise in cases, and also _ control. so, there is a rise in cases, and also arise - control. so, there is a rise in cases, and also arise in - control. so, there is a rise in - cases, and also arise in cases among children. that must be a real cause for concern. children. that must be a real cause for concern-— for concern. that's a great cause for concern. that's a great cause for concern- _ for concern. that's a great cause for concern. there _ for concern. that's a great cause for concern. there are _ for concern. that's a great cause for concern. there are a - for concern. that's a great cause for concern. there are a number| for concern. that's a great cause i for concern. there are a number of reasons why we're seeing that in the united states, and i believe similar to the uk, early on only got the vaccination programme going, we did very well in getting elderly individuals vaccinated. we have now more than 85% of the elderly individuals vaccinated with at least one dose and close to fully vaccinated. when you get a delta variant which is very different from the original alpha variant in its ability to spread from human—to—human is extremely
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efficient, you're going to get more people infected and among them will be children who may not have gotten infected with the early variance, the alpha variant. so what we're seeing in our paediatric hospitals, our younger individuals who are not only quantitatively more likely to get an effective, but more of them having severe to be —— severe disease a. having severe to be -- severe disease a— having severe to be -- severe disease a. : , ., , ., disease a. are they teenagers or oun . er? disease a. are they teenagers or younger? well. _ disease a. are they teenagers or younger? well, they're - disease a. are they teenagers or younger? well, they're mostly l younger? well, they're mostly teenagers- _ younger? well, they're mostly teenagers. you're _ younger? well, they're mostly teenagers. you're seeing - younger? well, they're mostly| teenagers. you're seeing some younger children still getting infected. obviously not nearly as many as you see among the elderly from months is much ago, but you're seeing right now children who you would not have seen before who are requiring intensive care. we're also starting to see long covid in young people who recover from covid—19 and
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have prolongation of sometimes rather incapacitating symptoms, even though they so called recovered. there are so many things about all of this that are troublesome, and we can put it all behind us if we got the overwhelming proportion of our population vaccinated. that's why it's so frustrating from a public health standpoint to see segments of our population which are very heavily weighted towards the red states, or republican states, and it becomes almost a political issue which there's no place for that when you're dealing with a common enemy of a virus. yet we unfortunately are seeing that in the united states. so, countries across the world are coming to terms with the fact that we're going to have to learn to live with coronavirus. people in rich western countries are being vaccinated at different rates, but there is a question of whether
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vaccinated adults will need booster shots sometime in the near future. where do you stand on that? well. where do you stand on that? well, the one thing _ where do you stand on that? well, the one thing we're _ where do you stand on that? well, the one thing we're learning - where do you stand on that? -ii the one thing we're learning is that people who are immune compromised, people who are immune compromised, people who are immune compromised, people who have cancer chemotherapy, people who have cancer chemotherapy, people who have transplants, who are on a immunosuppressive therapy, they very likely did not get an adequate response to begin with, so when you talk about boosters, you want to make sure you separate a booster for the durability of the response — how long your good response lasts — versus the fact that some people may not have had a good response to begin with. for that reason, in the united states, we're very, very close to looking at the possibility of giving an additional shot to people who are immune compromised. whether or not we're going to need it, particularly for the elderly, we're looking at that very carefully and examining the durability of
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protection. i know that we're seeing in situations in israel where the durability has gone down significantly. pfizer is reporting that in their following up on month ljy that in their following up on month by month basis, they're seeing a diminution in protection. we're following that very carefully. to see if in fact, it will be necessary to give a booster shot. ok. see if in fact, it will be necessary to give a booster shot.— to give a booster shot. ok, very aood to to give a booster shot. ok, very good to talk _ to give a booster shot. ok, very good to talk to _ to give a booster shot. ok, very good to talk to you. _ to give a booster shot. ok, very good to talk to you. that's - to give a booster shot. ok, very. good to talk to you. that's doctor anthony fauci. thank you so much. thank you for having me, good to be with you. today marks a moment of reckoning for the planet. a sober assessment of our planet's future has been delivered by the un's intergovernmental panel on climate change. global warming is unfolding more quickly than feared, and human activity is almost entirely to blame. authors say temperatures will climb 1.5 degrees celsius by 2030, a full decade earlier
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than previously forecast. they've also forecasted that sea levels will continue rising i'm joined now by kim cobb, professor of earth and atmospheric sciences at georgia institute of technology. good to have you on the programme, doctor cobb. just a reaction first of all to this report. was there anything that surprised you? well, we've been — anything that surprised you? well, we've been working _ anything that surprised you? well, we've been working on _ anything that surprised you? -ii we've been working on support for three years as a team. hundreds of scientists working, thousands of studies to make this assessment about the scope and scale of our influence. ~ �* : about the scope and scale of our influence-— about the scope and scale of our influence. ~ �* ., ,., , , ., influence. we've had reports before. what is it about _ influence. we've had reports before. what is it about this _ influence. we've had reports before. what is it about this one _ influence. we've had reports before. what is it about this one that - what is it about this one that distinguishes it?— what is it about this one that distinguishes it? certainly, it's no news that humans _ distinguishes it? certainly, it's no news that humans are _ distinguishes it? certainly, it's no news that humans are causing - distinguishes it? certainly, it's no| news that humans are causing the planet to warm. but that's not new. what is new is we now have strong lines of evidence that link that
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ongoing warming to any number of different climate and weather extremes, including extreme rainfall, drought, ocean heat waves and heat waves over land. that's the bad news, but it's also apparent from this report that with each additional increment of warming, we should expect those impacts to increase noticeably. the good news is that we can still turn this around. science is very clear that you can work to limit additional warming from today to about half a degree celsius and in doing so, avoid the worst outcomes of climate change. avoid the worst outcomes of climate chan . e. , ., ., avoid the worst outcomes of climate chance. ,., ., ., avoid the worst outcomes of climate chance. ., ., , change. government have to act, they have to act with _ change. government have to act, they have to act with speed. _ change. government have to act, they have to act with speed. yes, they - have to act with speed. yes, they do. the have to act with speed. yes, they do- the most _ have to act with speed. yes, they do. the most ambitious - have to act with speed. yes, they l do. the most ambitious trajectories were that were considered are roughly consistent with reaching carbon neutral admissions by about mid century. that's quite a bold
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enterprise that will require deep and sustained reductions in emissions to achieve that lowest possible level of warming. this re ort possible level of warming. this report comes _ possible level of warming. this report comes out _ possible level of warming. this report comes out at _ possible level of warming. this report comes out at a - possible level of warming. this report comes out at a time where we really are seeing the effects of climate change across the globe with wildfires and floods. it's been quite alarming.— wildfires and floods. it's been quite alarming. wildfires and floods. it's been uuite alarmina. , . �*, , quite alarming. yes, that's 'ust it. i think we can i quite alarming. yes, that's 'ust it. i think we can hear * quite alarming. yes, that's 'ust it. i think we can hear beyond _ quite alarming. yes, that'sjust it. i think we can hear beyond the . i think we can hear beyond the headlines with this report and understand that the science around ongoing drought and higher weather in the western united states is very clear, and that's exactly where we've seen this drumbeat of headlines year on year. unfortunately, the mediterranean called in the report for drought conditions and fire prone weather. it is just really a shocking coincidence this summer, but of course, we see headlines like this in previous years and unfortunately, we will continue to see them going
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forward. ~., , we will continue to see them going forward. n, , ., we will continue to see them going forward. , ., ., forward. many thanks, professor kim cobb from the _ forward. many thanks, professor kim cobb from the georgia _ forward. many thanks, professor kim cobb from the georgia institute - forward. many thanks, professor kim cobb from the georgia institute of. cobb from the georgia institute of technology. the president of belarus has told the bbc that britain can "choke" on the economic sanctions it has imposed on his country in response to alleged ongoing human rights abuses. speaking at a press conference — one year since securing a sixth term in a presidential election that many view as fraudulent — alexander lukashenko called britain "america's lapdog" , alexander lukashenko called britain "america's lapdog", and denied his authoritarian government had used torture and violence to silence dissent. they include potash and petroleum products — key sources of income for mr lukashenko's regime — as well as financial services and transport. he and his top aides are already under western sanctions. it is the out of this world mission that will never leave planet earth. as nasa continue to explore the possibility of sending astronauts to mars, they've started taking applications for four people to live for a year inside a martian
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habitat that recreates the atmospher recreates the atmosphere and life astronauts could live on the red planet, whilst never leaving the earth's atmosphere. the succesful participants will live in mars dune alpha, a 1,700—square—foot martian habitat, created by a 3d—printer, and inside a building atjohnson space center in houston. so, what does nasa hope to discover, and what how can hopeful candidates make their application stand out? dr grace douglas is the lead scientist for nasa's advanced food technology research unit and joins us now. doctor douglas, this will either be a terrifying prospect for an individual or a wonderfully exciting one. what qualities would an applicant need to bring to this? 50. applicant need to bring to this? so, we look for — applicant need to bring to this? srr, we look for similar applicant need to bring to this? 5p, we look for similar qualities applicant need to bring to this? 5;r13, we look for similar qualities to astronauts and there are quite a few qualifications, and they're all
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listed on our website@nasa.gov, which is the analogue websites. we have a lot of specifics there, but i would encourage anyone who is interested to go there and take a look because that will give them the best information on the qualifications.— best information on the qualifications. best information on the aualifications. ~ . , ., best information on the aualifications. . , ., qualifications. what is it that you ho -e to qualifications. what is it that you hope to learn _ qualifications. what is it that you hope to learn from _ qualifications. what is it that you hope to learn from this - qualifications. what is it that you hope to learn from this project? | qualifications. what is it that you i hope to learn from this project? so, hope to learn from this pro'ect? so, when we hope to learn from this project? 5&3, when we look at a mission to mars, it's going to be a lot more restricted in resources as far as what we can provide for the humans on those missions. so, resources like food, resources like the fact that there could be... there will be a time delay on those missions, are going to be more limited than they are on the international space station. these are much longer missions. we want to make sure that as we plan these missions and our
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capabilities, we can support performance and meet the mission objectives throughout those long durations and confinement. so, we want to be able to look at these while we're still on a low risk situation to validate the capabilities in place will support performance and realistic simulations. where we're looking at planetary exploration, where they're going to be exercising a lot, this type of situation, are we able to support them weather resources? i suppose as much as being a scientific project, it's actually a sociological one as well. for people in this environment for a long period of time.— in this environment for a long period of time. so, that's part of the requirements _ period of time. so, that's part of the requirements for _ period of time. so, that's part of the requirements for selection . the requirements for selection because it is a long time. we do look for certain qualifications to
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make sure that we're selecting participants that are the right participants that are the right participants for this kind of mission. , ., ., ., participants for this kind of mission. , ., ., ,, ., mission. ok, very good to talk to ou. mission. ok, very good to talk to you- doctor— mission. ok, very good to talk to you. doctor grace _ mission. ok, very good to talk to you. doctor grace douglas - mission. ok, very good to talk to you. doctor grace douglas from i mission. ok, very good to talk to - you. doctor grace douglas from nasa. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: families reunite after canada re—opens its border with the us. campaigners fighting to save an alpaca from being put down have marched on downing street this afternoon to lobby for a reprieve. the government says geronimo must be culled because he's twice tested positive for bovine tb, which is a risk to cattle. andrew plant reports. she's been fighting to keep her alpaca alive for four years. now geronimo's story has started making headlines after the courts ruled he could be put down any time in the next four weeks. how are you feeling about all the support you've had? oh, just immense. it's keeping me going. you know, this is an animal injustice.
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what are you going to do if people turn up at your gates? i'm not going to break the law, but i won't be making it easy. i'm not going to be helping them to kill an animal that doesn't need to be killed. bovine tb is a common issue for uk farmers. around a0,000 cows are killed after positive tests each year. helen thinks geronimo's tests were flawed and is calling on the government to take another look. the environment secretary, george eustice, has said geronimo's tests were reliable. downing street also expressed its sympathy, but said everything possible needed to be done to fight bovine tb. no test is absolutely perfect. no test is absolutely 100% sensitive or 100% specific. so, defra have to work on the big numbers, and they make policy based on the big numbers, and decisions based on those big numbers, whereas, for the individual, of course, you're always hoping that your animal is one of the 1—2%,
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maybe a little bit more, where there's a false positive result. a petition to spare geronimo has received around 100,000 signatures. a warrant from the courts means officials still have four weeks to put geronimo down. helen and a team of volunteers say they'll do everything they can to stop that from happening. andrew plant, bbc news. for more than a year and a half, canada has closed its borders to most non—essential foreign travellers due to coronavirus restrictions. this ban included barring visitors from its closest neighbour and largest trading partner, the united states. but as of today, fully vaccinated americans are now allowed to enter canada free of quarantine, which prompted massive queues at the border overnight. but for anyone who has travelled during the pandemic, you might recall that travel is not
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as straightforward as it once was. the fenmimore family from delaware have documented these difficulties for us, as they have not been able to visit their house in ontario, canada for two years. first, they had to confirm all the required documents needed for travel into canada and upload them into an official system. second, they had to get a coronavirus test within 72 hours of arrival. then they began their journey over by car, but they got an unexpected update that one of their covid tests came back inconclusive. but, fortunately for them, rapid testing was available at the us—canada border. once the result came back negative, they were among hundreds in the queue to enter canada, but were able to safely cross over and finally make their way to their home in ontario. mary shirley fenimore has made it and joins us from her home in lake ahmic in ontario canada.
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you must be delighted to be there after such a long wait. it you must be delighted to be there after such a long wait.— after such a long wait. it was fantastic _ after such a long wait. it was fantastic to _ after such a long wait. it was fantastic to get _ after such a long wait. it was fantastic to get across - after such a long wait. it was fantastic to get across the i after such a long wait. it was i fantastic to get across the border and come breathe fresh air from and come breathe fresh airfrom up here. and come breathe fresh air from up here. ., ., ., , ., ., ., here. you had to “ump through a lot of hoo -s here. you had to “ump through a lot of hoops to — here. you had to “ump through a lot of hoops to get — here. you had to jump through a lot of hoops to get there. _ here. you had to jump through a lot of hoops to get there. i _ here. you had to jump through a lot of hoops to get there. i just read i of hoops to get there. ijust read them out. you're probably wincing remembering, but that will be familiarfor anyone remembering, but that will be familiar for anyone who's had to travel in this period.— familiar for anyone who's had to travel in this period. yes, it was a “ourne . travel in this period. yes, it was a journey- we _ travel in this period. yes, it was a journey. we didn't _ travel in this period. yes, it was a journey. we didn't expect - travel in this period. yes, it was a journey. we didn't expect to i travel in this period. yes, it was a journey. we didn't expect to get l travel in this period. yes, it was a i journey. we didn't expect to get the inconclusive results that happened just a few hours before the border was opening, so we had to really hustle and get ourselves a new test, which there were fortunately option there. but it was stressful to get across the border and get home. i’m across the border and get home. i'm sure. across the border and get home. i'm sure- we're — across the border and get home. i'm sure. we're seeing pictures of the traffic lined up bumper—to—bumper,
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people wanting to cross the border. what was it like for you? was extremely busy? it what was it like for you? was extremely busy?— what was it like for you? was extremely busy? what was it like for you? was extremel bus ? . , : ., extremely busy? it was. we all met at duty-free — extremely busy? it was. we all met at duty-free. _ extremely busy? it was. we all met at duty-free, which _ extremely busy? it was. we all met at duty-free, which seemed - extremely busy? it was. we all met at duty-free, which seemed like i at duty—free, which seemed like a good spot to park. once a quarter to 12 hit, it was only two open queues. they finally open to third. we were may be seventh in the line, and i would say within five minutes, the line was as far back as you could see. people are really eager to get in. �* , : see. people are really eager to get in. �* , ., see. people are really eager to get in. it's a good thing you are quite near the front. _ in. it's a good thing you are quite near the front. we _ in. it's a good thing you are quite near the front. we can see i in. it's a good thing you are quite near the front. we can see a i in. it's a good thing you are quite| near the front. we can see a little bit of where you are, and it looks beautiful and peaceful. are there other americans near you who just got to their bolthole to? locate other americans near you who 'ust got to their bolthole to?i got to their bolthole to? we were all crossing _
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got to their bolthole to? we were all crossing at _ got to their bolthole to? we were all crossing at the _ got to their bolthole to? we were all crossing at the same - got to their bolthole to? we were all crossing at the same time, i got to their bolthole to? we were all crossing at the same time, so | got to their bolthole to? we were i all crossing at the same time, so we were communicating. a lot of the people on our lake are from the south, so south carolina was one of their... we're from delaware. we were all texting each other and rejoicing when we got through. it was mighty stressful. we have been longing for this day. maw; longing for this day. many congratulations _ longing for this day. many congratulations to - longing for this day. many congratulations to you i longing for this day. many congratulations to you for| longing for this day. many i congratulations to you for having made it. well done. thank you so much. and just before we go — tower bridge is one of london's most famous landmarks, but today it became the bridge to nowhere. a technicalfault left the bridge stuck on open, causing major traffic issues in the capital. the famous landmark was scheduled to open this afternoon to allow a large wooden tall ship through, but it appears to have become jammed in place. city of london police said the 127—year—old crossing had been closed to both traffic and pedestrians "due to technicalfailure".
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hello there. the past few days have seen some torrential downpours and some thunderstorms as well. that was all due to the position of the jet stream. this sort of position of the jet stream to the south of the uk over the weekend and again on monday bringing us some more heavy bursts of rain. with that sort of orientation of the jet stream, you get lower pressure, but as we head into tuesday, the lower pressure is actually moving away, so we're starting to dry off of it. still maybe one or two showers around first thing, and we can't rule out one or two showers coming into wales, again, across eastern parts of england. most of the showers on tuesday will be in scotland, but this time, further north across the country. so, a drier day through the central belt, southern scotland. will probably cloud over a bit more through the afternoon in northern ireland, but the winds are going to be light on tuesday. temperatures are going to be higher, up to around 22 or 23 degrees,
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which is more like it, really, for this time of the year. those heavy, perhaps even thundery showers will continue across northern parts of scotland in particular. the cloud continues to thicken up during the evening in northern ireland, and that's because we got a weather front arriving in from the atlantic to change things again around the middle part of the week. we're going find the cloud thickening in northern ireland and across western scotland. it's in these areas that we'll see most of the rain coming in on that weather system on wednesday. ahead of it, we could see a few showers breaking out across wales, some western parts of england. head further east across the midlands, into eastern england, it's going to be dry and there'll be some sunshine. the gentle southerly drift of the breeze means temperatures should be a little bit higher — up to 2a, maybe even 25 degrees. and that warmth comes ahead of that weather front there, which willjust edge its way into england and wales. but it's getting further and further away from that area of low pressure, so it's weakening all the while, so there's not a great deal of rain. this is what's left of that weather front here — little bit of rain and drizzle on that. to the north of it, we're going to find some sunshine,
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maybe some showers coming in through the northwest as the wind picks up. but ahead of what's left of that rain in the midlands, towards east anglia and the southeast, this is where we've got the highest temperatures. could make 25, maybe even 26 degrees. head towards the end of the week, and that weather front is going to push its way across all areas. again, not much rain on it, but this cooler air behind it, of course, and low pressure will drive in towards the northwest. going to find some stronger winds on friday and some wetter weather moving across northern ireland, particularly into scotland. one or two showers through northern parts of england and wales, but again, further south and east, it's likely to be dry with some sunshine. but that cooler air is in place on friday, so temperatures will be a little bit lower — 21 or 22 degrees at best. now, let's head into the weekend. that area of low pressure moves away, the winds start to ease a little bit. we've got this little troublemaker coming in from the atlantic, and that means probably more cloud across the southern half of the uk. but see a bit of rain and drizzle arriving here. still a few showers and that breeze,
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but winds continuing to ease down. best of the weather in northern ireland, temperatures less than 20 or 21 celsius, not particularly warm on saturday. let's look further ahead. this is the position of the jet stream into the beginning of next week, so the jet is much jet stream into the beginning of next week, so thejet is much more than earth. it's to the north of the uk. that means i —— high pressure will dominate across more than the uk. we still got the slow coming to the northwest, particularly across northern parts of scotland. we're more likely to see some rain, best of the sunshine towards the southeast of the uk. have been reports of a heat wave, that's not expected to be the case with temperatures as high as 25 celsius.
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tonight at 10, a code red for humanity — the un's stark warning on climate change. its landmark report says human activity is changing the climate in unprecedented and sometimes irreversible ways. the world listened, but didn't hear. the world listened, but it didn't act strongly enough and as a result of climate change, it's a problem that is here now. nobody is safe and it's getting worse and faster. raging wildfires in greece — one of many countries already feeling the impact — the flames fanned by strong winds and rising temperatures. the warning comes as the uk prepares to host a key climate conference — cop26 — in november. also tonight. documents obtained by the bbc
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suggest david cameron made around £7 million from the failed finance company greensill.

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