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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 9, 2021 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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that your animal is one of the 1 or 2%, maybe a little bit more, where it is a false positive result. a petition to spare geronimo has received around 100,000 signatures. a warrant from the courts means officials still have four weeks to put geronimo down. helen and a team of volunteers say they will do everything they can to stop that from happening. andrew plant, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. they come from darren bett. hello. hello there. just like over the weekend, we have got low pressure in charge of our weather today, which is why we are going to see more of these heavy and thundery downpours. but it is not as windy as it has been over the weekend, so when the sun is out, it may feel a little bit warmer. but we are seeing more of these showers breaking out at the moment, and through this morning some of the wettest weather has been
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in the central belt of scotland, now getting one or two thunderstorms with those downpours. it has been particularly wet around lothian and the borders into fife as well, more downpours to come here, and further south we are starting to see these showers breaking out across southern parts of england, they will be slow moving, heavy and thundery, the threat of some local flooding, and we could get showers into east anglia. there will be some sunshine around as well, but despite that sunshine, and those lighter winds, temperatures are not as high as they should be at this time of the year. there is heavy, thundery downpours that do develop this afternoon will develop into this evening before gradually fading away overnight. some clearer spells developing, a little mist here and there, and temperature should remain in double figures, typically 13 in towns and cities. heading into tomorrow we have got the prospect of more dry weather around for more of the country, and more sunshine too. can't rule out one or two showers in wales in the east of england, most
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of the showers in scotland but further north this time, so a drier day through the central belt, and it will cloud over a little more in the afternoon for northern ireland but with light winds and more sunshine, temperatures will be higher, up to 22 or 23 celsius. we have a little nose on higher temperatures on tuesday, but out into the atlantic, this low pressure is pushing well ahead of it this way the front which will change things on wednesday for northern and western parts of the uk. cloud, a stronger breeze and more rain coming to northern ireland, western parts of scotland, and i had a few showers breaking out in wales and western parts of england. further east through england, dry with some sunshine around, continuing to warm up a bit, 24 around, continuing to warm up a bit, 2a or even 25 degrees. under the rainbow in glasgow and belfast, 19 celsius here. the weather system bringing the rain on wednesday pushes some rain into england and wales on thursday, but not much at all, and then the low pressure will bring wet and windy weather to the north—west of the uk on friday. low
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pressure as to the north—west instead of right over the uk as it was over the weekend. so this weekend doesn't look like it is going to be quite as wet, and we will see those temperatures are rising a bit higher as well. that is it. darren, thank you very much indeed, darren, thank you very much indeed, darren bett. a reminder of our top story this lunchtime. it is code red for humanity. a united nations report says carbon emissions have warmed to the climate in every part of the globe. and that is all from the news at one four today. we join our news times wherever you are. by. good afternoon, i'm austin halewood with your latest sports news. the tokyo 0lympics came to a close yesterday, with team gb enjoying one of their most successful games — 22 golds won, in a total of 65
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medals, matching the achievement of london 2012. and within the last hour, many of team gb�*s medallists have landed at heathrow. laura kenny, who won a gold and a silver, and who also carried the flag in the closing ceremony, led the team off the plane with her husband, jason, gold medallist in the men's keirin, just behind. well, adam peaty has been back in the uk for a day or two, after winning two golds and a silver in tokyo, and he said he's already thinking ahead to paris in three years time. and he said he's already thinking ahead to paris in three years�* time. it is always in the back of your mind you are thinking how can do this again because it feels so good. but it is almost a tactical retreat now, i am choosing to take the time away from the sport because i know i want to peak again, if not, i want to have the best race
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of my life race in paris. it is going to be a home game pretty much, london is one hour away. british swimming is coming up so it is how do we get as many kids through. well, like peaty, max whitlock was another olympic champion to retain his title in tokyo. the gymnast won gold in the men's pommel horse, just like he did in rio five years earlier. he's been talking to us about the stress involved in defending an olympic title. i feel fortunate to have gone through both stages, as a youngster with itjust going all out and giving it my best shot, to now trying to retain titles, i've realised it is a million times harderfor quite a few reasons. part is the expectancy. 2018 was a year of silvers for me, to everybody else that was seen as a failure
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because i did not bring back gold medals but because i brought back a gold at the last olympics in rio everybody expects the same again, but as every year goes by it gets harder and harder. the pressure is there massively to not disappoint but the pressure from myself, and i learned being out in tokyo, i was seeing athletes from team gb coming back with medals and i had not yet had my opportunity to try for my own and i knew it was coming up, but i could really relate to them standing on the podium because i knew what it felt like and i really wanted to try and get that feeling again. my own pressure was wrapped up, outside pressure was wrapped up, so that was all coming together, waiting for so long to compete, it was difficult. england forward george burgess is returning to australia, to play for the nrl side st george illawarra dragons. he was released by wigan in february and had surgery on a hip injury which ruled him out of the 2021 super league season. before joining wigan last year
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he'd spent eight seasons with the south sydney rabbitohs, where his twin brother tom still plays. the rumours continue about where lionel messi will play next season. the record six—time ballon d'or winner said that french side paris saint germain is just one possibility, after ending his 21—year association with barcelona, who cannot afford to honour the new contract they agreed with him because of la liga's salary limit. well, fans in paris think they have their man. hundreds of them waited outside charles de gaul airport on sunday, hoping messi would arrive. there's been no sign of him yet, but plenty think he's on his way. well there's more on all of those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport but that's
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all the sport for now. welcome back. the british heart foundation is warning that the number of people waiting for heart surgery in england could rise by more than 40% by next spring. the government say it has invested £1 billion this year to reduce waiting lists. dr charmaine griffiths, ceo of the british heart foundation says without extra government funding, it would take between three and five years for treatment to return to pre—pandemic levels. there is no doubt that we are worried about what the increase in waiting lists would mean for so many people, even before the covid pandemic people were waiting too long for both procedures and surgery, with over 250,000 people waiting on this, and that is of course causing untold anxiety, as well as impacting people's health and their lives. and modelling out in a report today has shown that
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without intervention, if we face a tough winter, and also cardiac care and doesn't recover at the rate that we would hope, we might face a doubling of waiting lists byjanuary 2024, and that could take up to five years to clear. we are urging government to invest in cardiac care at this point, with a clear plan and clear investment, notjust to clear the backlog, but to make sure we've got our health system that can support everybody with heart and circulatory disease. a lot of people have been estimating what the backlog of care across the nhs and across the uk's four nations might we have looked at the challenges facing people and we are worried that peak could, that waiting list could peak at 500,000 people, and you are riling, the reason, there are lots of reasons behind that but we know people there been scared to come forward during the pandemic to seek hundred and reluctant to seek help, and also, that some people have been unable to do so, and we
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know that the nhs would call on anybody who was feeling unwell to seek help urgently, with an existing or new condition. the taliban has claimed it has captured aibak, the provincial capital of samangan province in afghanistan. if confirmed it would be the sixth provincial capital the group has seized in the past week. their offensive has been intensifying as western troops have been withdrawing from the country. let's speak to the bbc�*s syed anwar who is in kabul. kind of disturbing situation developing, is there any explanation of how and why the taliban have apparently been able to advance so quickly despite the presence of troops of the afghan army? weill. quickly despite the presence of troops of the afghan army? well, the afu han troops of the afghan army? well, the afghan government _ troops of the afghan army? well, the afghan government saying _ troops of the afghan army? well, the afghan government saying they - troops of the afghan army? well, the afghan government saying they are i afghan government saying they are preparing to launch again attacks in those provinces where taliban captured areas, to the military
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commander in north of afghanistan told that they are preparing to launch an attack. today taliban entered the capital of a province, the governor told the bbc that taliban entered the city and fighting is ongoing. taliban are saying they are advancing in some areas, where there are reports of fighting in the area of a province but afghan forces in this area say they have pushed the taliban to another area. the situation is expending in some other provinces and harvey —— heavy clashes are i don't know going. the and harvey -- heavy clashes are i don't know going.— and harvey -- heavy clashes are i don't know going. the president told afu hans don't know going. the president told afghans last — don't know going. the president told afghans last week _ don't know going. the president told
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afghans last week he _ don't know going. the president told afghans last week he and _ don't know going. the president told afghans last week he and his - afghans last week he and his government had a six month strategy for repelling the taliban. how is that going down with afghans, who you have spoken to, given the speed with which the taliban appear to be advancing with which the taliban appear to be advancin: ~ ., , with which the taliban appear to be advancin: a, , ., advancing more, it is not emerging are the six months _ advancing more, it is not emerging are the six months strategy - advancing more, it is not emerging are the six months strategy of, - advancing more, it is not emerging are the six months strategy of, the afghan president and other high ranking officials are repeatedly saying they have six months plan and they will recapture the areas where taliban are present. 0ne apparently, one of the points of the strategy is to increase air strikes on taliban in some areas that air strikes was apparently useful, for example in kandahar in helmand province. where the afghan army says they pushed
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back taliban, but more they are not clear what is in the six month strategy, but afghan army officers, commanders and political leaders are saying they have, in six months, afghan people will see a change many ground situation in afghanistan. that is something to hope for but i guess it feels a long way off. is there any sign of for example of civilians trying to leave kabul? ida. civilians trying to leave kabul? no, from kabul — civilians trying to leave kabul? iifr, from kabul through is no sign of civilian leaving kabul but in those provinces where fighting is ongoing, they are displacing in a big number and civilians are also in prisoned today. unicef today says that in the past, 72 adults and 27 children
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killed and more than 130 children wounded, civilians and children are suffering inthose areas, wherein fighting are ongoing and theyifies a huge number of display placement in war zones. war zones. war zones. —— displayment. the headlines on bbc news... a united nations report warns of a "code red for humanity", saying carbon emissions have warmed the climate in every part of the world. team gb�*s athletes have landed back in the uk, after one of their most successful olympic games — with a haul of 65 medals. no more social distancing — almost all coronavirus restrictions are now lifted in scotland; though nicola sturgeon warns the pandemic isn't over. those areas, wherein fighting are
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let's get more on the climate report. lukwesa burak has been speaking to our energy and environment analyst roger harrabin and ceo of the organisation climate policy radar, dr michal nachmany. they've been taking your questions on the findings in your questions answered. joining me is our energy and environment analyst roger has been bin. hi rogerand i amjoined by dr michal, who is the ceo of the organisation climate policy radar, and visiting lecturer at the london school of economic, thank you both forjoining us. let us kick off. roger, we have had a question sent in, by paul, who is based in kent.
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he says why hasn't more been done to ban meat and dairy? what is the thinking behind this? film. ban meat and dairy? what is the thinking behind this?— thinking behind this? 0h, welll thinking behind this? 0h, welll think frankly — thinking behind this? 0h, welll think frankly if _ thinking behind this? 0h, welll think frankly if he _ thinking behind this? 0h, welll think frankly if he were - thinking behind this? 0h, welll think frankly if he were prime i think frankly if he were prime minister and you tried to ban meat and dairy you wouldn't be in downing street for very long, because if all the voteers voted you out, your backbenchers would have hauleded you out kicking and screaming. that the issue, people are very very attached to what they eat, and a lot of people do not want to change their diets and politicians are very very nervous to say anything about that. i mean, ispoke nervous to say anything about that. i mean, i spoke to a climate change minister a few years ago, and we werejust chatting and minister a few years ago, and we were just chatting and she admitted she was a vegetarian. later on i broadcast that she was a vegetarian, and she came after me, she said it was, she was furious, she said that was, she was furious, she said that was beyond the pale for me to use that sort of a comment, she was embarrassed having been outed. that
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is how sensitive it is. if you talk to scientists, they will say politicians have to get round this, they don't say meat or dairy or fish has to be banned. but they could at least set an example and... it would be a good idea to eat less. dr michal. i wonder if i could ask you a general question, what did you make of what was discussed and presented today at that conference? what we hear today from the ipcc which _ what we hear today from the ipcc which is _ what we hear today from the ipcc which is a — what we hear today from the ipcc which is a report commissioned by the world — which is a report commissioned by the world governments, so this is notjust— the world governments, so this is notjust a — the world governments, so this is notjust a science the world governments, so this is not just a science telling the world governments, so this is notjust a science telling us the world governments, so this is not just a science telling us what you do. — not just a science telling us what you do, this is governments asking us what _ you do, this is governments asking us what we — you do, this is governments asking us what we should do, and the report is superciear— us what we should do, and the report is superclear that climate change is happening — is superclear that climate change is happening now, fast and faster than we thought. what that means is even it may— we thought. what that means is even it may have _ we thought. what that means is even it may have been weird to admit you are a _ it may have been weird to admit you are a vegetarian a few years ago, these _ are a vegetarian a few years ago, these changes are necessary, these
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changes— these changes are necessary, these changes are cross cutting across government, corporationser, business need to— government, corporationser, business need to happen as soon as possible. the sooner— need to happen as soon as possible. the sooner we act the less suffering that we _ the sooner we act the less suffering that we will— the sooner we act the less suffering that we will encounter by the radicai— that we will encounter by the radical consequences of climate change — radical consequences of climate chan . e. ., radical consequences of climate chance. ., ., , radical consequences of climate chance. . . , ., change. that leads nicely into hen 's change. that leads nicely into henry's question, _ change. that leads nicely into henry's question, henry - change. that leads nicely into henry's question, henry is - change. that leads nicely into henry's question, henry is in | henry's question, henry is in manchester dr michal and he says our individuals, or businesses responsible for climate change? this is the big thing isn't it. whoever is the big thing isn't it. whoever is responsible is the person who pays. thank you for asking this question and the _ thank you for asking this question and the answer is it is corporation and the answer is it is corporation and governments and there is a nice triangle _ and governments and there is a nice triangle of— and governments and there is a nice triangle of action between those, because — triangle of action between those, because we make a decision to buy something — because we make a decision to buy something but our decision is informed _ something but our decision is informed by price and the price is set by— informed by price and the price is set by how— informed by price and the price is set by how much we want something, but also _ set by how much we want something, but also it— set by how much we want something, but also it is— set by how much we want something, but also it is set by the policies is, going — but also it is set by the policies is, going back to the meat and dairy there _ is, going back to the meat and dairy there are _ is, going back to the meat and dairy there are huge subsidies for example --oin there are huge subsidies for example going into _ there are huge subsidies for example going into the meat and dairy industry— going into the meat and dairy industry which make it cheaper than
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alternatives, there are huge subsidies going into fossil fuels which _ subsidies going into fossil fuels which makes it cheaper some time, not any— which makes it cheaper some time, not any more to produce energy by fossil— not any more to produce energy by fossil fuels, not any more to produce energy by fossilfuels, changing not any more to produce energy by fossil fuels, changing the toll i —— policies _ fossil fuels, changing the toll i —— policies is — fossil fuels, changing the toll i —— policies is that is something, that has an— policies is that is something, that has an impact on how they are produced _ has an impact on how they are produced and the price signals and the availability we have. electric vehicles — the availability we have. electric vehicles make up more than half of the vehicles sold. that is... we want _ the vehicles sold. that is... we want to— the vehicles sold. that is... we want to lmy— the vehicles sold. that is... we want to buy an electric vehicle it is because — want to buy an electric vehicle it is because increasingly corporations are understanding this that there are understanding this that there are bands— are understanding this that there are bands going on o are understanding this that there are bands going on 0 there is a ban going _ are bands going on 0 there is a ban going on— are bands going on 0 there is a ban going on on— are bands going on 0 there is a ban going on on internal combustion engine _ going on on internal combustion engine car— going on on internal combustion engine car in the uk and other place. — engine car in the uk and other place, prices are going down for electric— place, prices are going down for electric vehicles, therefore they are going — electric vehicles, therefore they are going up for other, corporations are going up for other, corporations are saying _ are going up for other, corporations are saying i— are going up for other, corporations are saying i am not going to invest in research — are saying i am not going to invest in research and development into old technologies, i will put my energy into the _ technologies, i will put my energy into the future not the past. there is a cycle —
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into the future not the past. there is a cycle between all three, which is a cycle between all three, which is why— is a cycle between all three, which is why we — is a cycle between all three, which is why we as individuals are responsible. not only as consumers but citizen, — responsible. not only as consumers but citizen, to signal and press on to make _ but citizen, to signal and press on to make sure that policies are being put in _ to make sure that policies are being put in place, and that, are elected officials _ put in place, and that, are elected officials see that we need this to happen, — officials see that we need this to happen, so we can then be subject and available to these opportunities for a better future. i for a better future. i am _ for a better future. i am sure you saw reports renal e about a front—page story, in the times or the telegraph, saying hopefully whitehall workers will be encouraged to return to the office. this is part of the covid pandemic. it ties in nicely with climate change and travelling to work of course because christopher dickinson from inverness says why are ministers demanded remote workers to return when not travelling and reducing office and travel helps to tackle climate change. what are your thoughts on that? it is
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tackle climate change. what are your thoughts on that?— thoughts on that? it is a bit of a mixed answer, _ thoughts on that? it is a bit of a mixed answer, because - thoughts on that? it is a bit of a mixed answer, because if - thoughts on that? it is a bit of a mixed answer, because if you . thoughts on that? it is a bit of a i mixed answer, because if you have workers working at home, and they are having to heat their home, that is one of the admissions coming from the heating. they have cut out the admission but they have it from the extra heating. having said that, it is a broad principle that if people can use zoom or any of the other conferencing techniques, they can safe notjust conferencing techniques, they can safe not just a conferencing techniques, they can safe notjust a lot of missions but awe lot of time and money. and there was a poll out last week that suggested there would be a long—term shift to people going into tough a fist less often and making less work based trips. that will be governed by the desire to have more comfortable live and saving money in travel expenses. i am going to put paul's question to you mihal. paul is is in littlehampton. his question is why don't we focus on controlling the earth's population it has doubled
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since he was born. that is an excellent question. one i think that moves _ that is an excellent question. one i think that moves the _ that is an excellent question. one i think that moves the focus - that is an excellent question. one i think that moves the focus away . that is an excellent question. one i think that moves the focus away from those _ think that moves the focus away from those responsible for global emission, global emissions have happened — emission, global emissions have happened mostly in industrialised nations, _ happened mostly in industrialised nations, where with birth rates are already— nations, where with birth rates are already very low and the countries with highest birth rates are the one responsible for the least emissions, that a _ responsible for the least emissions, that a key— responsible for the least emissions, that a key point to remember. they are the _ that a key point to remember. they are the ones— that a key point to remember. they are the ones suffering the most from the impact _ are the ones suffering the most from the impact of climate change. as we move _ the impact of climate change. as we move on— the impact of climate change. as we move on to — the impact of climate change. as we move on to a — the impact of climate change. as we move on to a future in which, a collective — move on to a future in which, a collective wellbeing is improve. 0f collective wellbeing is improve. of course _ collective wellbeing is improve. of course we — collective wellbeing is improve. of course we will need to make sure that we _ course we will need to make sure that we don't make, that we don't raise _ that we don't make, that we don't raise the — that we don't make, that we don't raise the life quality of everyone based _ raise the life quality of everyone based on — raise the life quality of everyone based on fossil fuels. we see though as wellbeing improves, as growth happen, — as wellbeing improves, as growth happen, birth rates drop and that is something — happen, birth rates drop and that is something that happens with industrialised nation, all we need to do— industrialised nation, all we need to do is—
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industrialised nation, all we need to do is make sure that industrialisation happens in a sustainable way, powered by renewable energy and not by fossil fuels _ renewable energy and not by fossil fuels if _ renewable energy and not by fossil fuels. if we don't use fossil fuels we would — fuels. if we don't use fossil fuels we would be in big trouble. if he used _ we would be in big trouble. if he used renewable energy, that will not be a key— used renewable energy, that will not be a key problem i think. let used renewable energy, that will not be a key problem i think.— be a key problem i think. let us turn to roger— be a key problem i think. let us turn to roger and _ be a key problem i think. let us turn to roger and judith, - be a key problem i think. let us turn to roger and judith, she i be a key problem i think. let us l turn to roger and judith, she says when will climate change have an immediate impact on the lives of most ordinary people in it is get, to see the results isn't it. that feedback room, roger? itrefoil to see the results isn't it. that feedback room, roger? well -- what we have seen — feedback room, roger? well -- what we have seen from _ feedback room, roger? well -- what we have seen from the _ feedback room, roger? well -- what we have seen from the report - feedback room, roger? well -- what we have seen from the report this - we have seen from the report this morning, is that climate change is already with us, here and now, climate change was responsible for the heat wave that ravaged a lot of north america injune, and climate change is fuelling every world fire in the sense that there is, the earth has heated up so it makes fire more easy, it is fuelling things
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like the rains we had in northern europe, because moist air can carry more water, so the truth is people used to think about climate change being somewhere in the future, somewhere else, the truth is climate change is here, it is here now and it is going to get worse because we mentioned that 1.5 thresholdel, that is the amount we shouldn't exceed preindustrial temperatures, hitting that will be very very very tough, yet the same today on the panel we do hit it. we can restrict the worst catastrophes of climate change. 0therwise catastrophes of climate change. otherwise it is here with us now and it is here to stay. fik otherwise it is here with us now and it is here to stay.— it is here to stay. ok 0 let us end with tom's _ it is here to stay. ok 0 let us end with tom's question. _ it is here to stay. ok 0 let us end with tom's question. dr- it is here to stay. ok 0 let us end with tom's question. dr michal. l it is here to stay. ok 0 let us end i with tom's question. dr michal. tom asks he wants to get on with it. is there a good source for what we can do? how do we know how to help? that is an excellent — do? how do we know how to help? that is an excellent question, i am so glad _ is an excellent question, i am so glad many— is an excellent question, i am so glad many of you are asking these question. — glad many of you are asking these question, there is so much we can
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do. question, there is so much we can do there — question, there is so much we can do there is — question, there is so much we can do there is a _ question, there is so much we can do. there is a lot of political action— do. there is a lot of political action we. _ do. there is a lot of political action we, we need policy, we need to ring _ action we, we need policy, we need to ring up _ action we, we need policy, we need to ring up cowen lours, we need to write _ to ring up cowen lours, we need to write letters, we need to see where we are _ write letters, we need to see where we are in _ write letters, we need to see where we are in our— write letters, we need to see where we are in our local community, are you on— we are in our local community, are you on the — we are in our local community, are you on the pta, part of a religious congregation, speak up. up. be aware countries— congregation, speak up. up. be aware countries every single one of us is critical— countries every single one of us is critical so — countries every single one of us is critical so talking about i and making — critical so talking about i and making sure that awareness is raised. — making sure that awareness is raised, across our communities, across— raised, across our communities, across our— raised, across our communities, across our families, is critical. of course _ across our families, is critical. of course our— across our families, is critical. of course our personal choices are relevant — course our personal choices are relevant. the, it is less plastic straws, that is important, but we need to... responsible investment, we need to ask our— responsible investment, we need to ask our banks where are your investment, who are you lending money— investment, who are you lending
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money to — investment, who are you lending money to. to apply pressure through pockets _ money to. to apply pressure through pockets and choice, and finally, yes~ _ pockets and choice, and finally, es, , , ., ' pockets and choice, and finally, yes-_ no. - pockets and choice, and finally, yes-_ no. no. i pockets and choice, and finally, l yes._ no, no, and yes. sorry finish off. no, no, and finallyjust— yes. sorry finish off. no, no, and finallyjust remember— yes. sorry finish off. no, no, and finallyjust remember there - yes. sorry finish off. no, no, and finally just remember there is . yes. sorry finish off. no, no, and finallyjust remember there is no j finallyjust remember there is no silver bullet. there is not one single thing we can do, we need to do as much as we can as soon as possible. do as much as we can as soon as ossible. , ~ . ., , do as much as we can as soon as ossible. , ~ . . , ~ . ., possible. ok. dr michal dr michal, thank ou possible. ok. dr michal dr michal, thank you and _ possible. ok. dr michal dr michal, thank you and environment - possible. ok. dr michal dr michal, | thank you and environment analyst roger than bin, thank you too —— roger than bin, thank you too —— roger harrabin. thank you too. more of of your questions answered hopefully this afternoon. let me take you to heathrow airport. this easy are pictures that come through over the last hour. these are arrivals of athletes from team gb. here we are, simon kenny and laura
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kenny with their multi—success, jason, i called him simon. with their multi—award—winning success, with their gold medals in cycling. we have also gotjoe choong, joe was of course won gold in the modern pentathlon, they are being sprayed by staff and british airways, the airline that brought them back. big hug forfamily, friends airline that brought them back. big hug for family, friends and everybody else, their mum, michael and beverley there to greet him. you may remember we spoke to them on bbc news during course of the weekend at their delight. and possibly that is grandma. not sure. and then we have also got frazer clark the bronze superheavyweight boxer, who has also arrived, with somebody who has really missed him. lots more arrivals, we will bring you the best of those here on bbc news. let us look at the weather that will greet them back home. here is
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darren. we are seeing more ever i have thundery showers, particularly in parts of scotland, northern ireland, southern england too. some showers elsewhere, developing, some sunshine around as well and the winds are not as strong today but temperatures aren't as high as they would normally be at this time of the year. so we still have the heavy thundery drown pours into this evening, they will gradually fade away overnight. we will see clearer spells developing. and temperatures are likely to remain in double figures overnight so typically 12 or 13 in towns and cities. tomorrow looks like it will be a drier day for more of the country. we will have more sunshine round as well. can't rule out one or two showers in wales, eastern part of england but most of the showers will be further north in scotland this time. heavy ones here, a dry day, it will tend to cloud over a bit more in the afternoon for northern ireland. but afternoon for northern ireland. but a warmer day with light winds, we are looking at top temperatures of 22 or 23 celsius.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: code red for humanity — a un report says carbon emissions have warmed the climate in every part of the globe — and that human activity is affecting land, air and seas. it is indisputable that human activities are causing planet change and making extreme weather events more frequent and severe. applause. team gb�*s athletes have landed back in the uk, after one of their most successful olympic games — with a haul of 65 medals. no more social distancing — almost all coronavirus restrictions are now lifted in scotland, though nicola sturgeon warns the pandemic isn't over.

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