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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 2, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. joyful reunions as families separated for a year and half by continents and the pandemic can finally meet. they cry from today, fully vaccinated people coming from the us and most of the eu no longer have to self—isolate. i really didn't think it was possible to come home until i actually set foot of the plane. i didn't think it was going to happen. butjust how easily can the delta variant circulate among the fully vaccinated? we cross live to provincetown, massachusetts, which has seen a wave of cases, despite having one of the highest vaccination rates in the us. an olympic sprinter from belarus who was ordered home takes refuge at the polish embassy in tokyo
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and is granted a humanitarian visa. and talk about panda—monium, we'll be going to live to the zoo that welcomed not one but two baby pandas into the world early this morning. hello and welcome. to people living in the usa and most of the eu, the uk suddenly feels much less further away. from today people arriving in this country from most of those two areas no longer have to self—isolate for ten days if they're fully vaccinated. but strict rules still apply for those who've been in france. our transport correspondent caroline davies has more. the dark and difficulty of the last few months, they have waited for this. figs
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few months, they have waited for this. �* , ,., ., few months, they have waited for this. x ., few months, they have waited for this. ~ , .,, ., few months, they have waited for this. a ., ., this. as soon as we got of the aemplane. — this. as soon as we got of the aemplane. we _ this. as soon as we got of the aeroplane, we got _ this. as soon as we got of the aeroplane, we got so - this. as soon as we got of the i aeroplane, we got so excited. this. as soon as we got of the - aeroplane, we got so excited. even the little ones were shouting, "london! ., ., “ ~ , ., ~ "london! london!" we 'ust walked in a few minutes _ "london! london!" we 'ust walked in a few minutes ago _ "london! london!" we 'ust walked in a few minutes ago but — "london! london!" we just walked in a few minutes ago but when - "london! london!" we just walked in a few minutes ago but when we - "london! london!" we just walked in a few minutes ago but when we get i a few minutes ago but when we get home _ a few minutes ago but when we get home and _ a few minutes ago but when we get home and see everybody, it will sink in. ., , home and see everybody, it will sink in. . , ., , home and see everybody, it will sink in. . , . , as home and see everybody, it will sink in-— as soon - home and see everybody, it will sink in-— as soon as i in. that is the granny. as soon as the rules change _ in. that is the granny. as soon as the rules change last _ in. that is the granny. as soon as the rules change last week, - the rules change last week, naomi booked herflight the rules change last week, naomi booked her flight to see her parents. taking a message from her children. we parents. taking a message from her children. ~ ., ,, parents. taking a message from her children. ~ ., | parents. taking a message from her children._ i really - parents. taking a message from her children._ i really miss| children. we love you! i really miss ou. in children. we love you! i really miss yom in one — children. we love you! i really miss yom in one of— children. we love you! i really miss you. in one of the _ children. we love you! i really miss you. in one of the first _ children. we love you! i really miss you. in one of the first flights - children. we love you! i really miss you. in one of the first flights to . you. in one of the first flights to land _ you. in one of the first flights to land in — you. in one of the first flights to land in the — you. in one of the first flights to land in the uk since the rules changed _ land in the uk since the rules chanced. ,. , land in the uk since the rules chanced. , ., land in the uk since the rules chanced. , . ., , , changed. her parents wait nervously. i couldn't sleep. _ changed. her parents wait nervously. i couldn't sleep. i _ changed. her parents wait nervously. i couldn't sleep. i think— changed. her parents wait nervously. i couldn't sleep. i think i _ changed. her parents wait nervously. i couldn't sleep. i think i saw- i couldn't sleep. i think i saw every hour. i think i did get sleep in between but it was just... every hour. i think i did get sleep in between but it wasjust... too excited. in between but it was 'ust... too excited. , ., ., , .,. excited. they have not seen each other since _ excited. they have not seen each other since december _ excited. they have not seen each other since december 2019. - excited. they have not seen each other since december 2019. i - excited. they have not seen each i other since december 2019. i really didn't think — other since december 2019. i really didn't think it _ other since december 2019. i really didn't think it was _ other since december 2019. i really didn't think it was possible - other since december 2019. i really didn't think it was possible to - other since december 2019. i really didn't think it was possible to come i didn't think it was possible to come home _ didn't think it was possible to come home until— didn't think it was possible to come home until i actually set foot off the plane. i have left my husband and two _
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the plane. i have left my husband and two kids at home and it pains me to have _ and two kids at home and it pains me to have left _ and two kids at home and it pains me to have left them behind but grateful that they gave me the opportunity to come. it is grateful that they gave me the opportunity to come.— grateful that they gave me the opportunity to come. it is all very emotional- _ opportunity to come. it is all very emotional- i _ opportunity to come. it is all very emotional. i love _ opportunity to come. it is all very emotional. i love you, _ opportunity to come. it is all very emotional. i love you, dad. - opportunity to come. it is all very emotional. i love you, dad. love| emotional. i love you, dad. love ou, emotional. i love you, dad. love you. mate- _ emotional. i love you, dad. love you, mate. excited _ emotional. i love you, dad. love you, mate. excited and - emotional. i love you, dad. love you, mate. excited and relieved| you, mate. excited and relieved reunions at— you, mate. excited and relieved reunions at the _ you, mate. excited and relieved reunions at the airport - you, mate. excited and relieved reunions at the airport today - you, mate. excited and relieved| reunions at the airport today but for those who have loved ones not in the us or europe, there is still some disappointment that they are not included. gopi krishna and has not included. gopi krishna and has not seen his 13—year—old daughter in the uk since last october. he is double jab but with a vaccine the uk has not approved and lived in the uae which is currently on the uk's red list. we uae which is currently on the uk's red list. ~ , ., . . red list. we were given this vaccine at that time — red list. we were given this vaccine at that time and _ red list. we were given this vaccine at that time and there _ red list. we were given this vaccine at that time and there was - red list. we were given this vaccine at that time and there was no - red list. we were given this vaccine l at that time and there was no choice you take what is given to you. it is unfair. it is pretty stressful, to be honest. i am just wondering if there is any way that i can meet her in the next six months, nine months, one year. in the next six months, nine months, one ear. . , , ., one year. the travel industry want the government _ one year. the travel industry want the government to _ one year. the travel industry want the government to go _ one year. the travel industry want the government to go further. - one year. the travel industry want the government to go further. we| the government to go further. we would like to see other amber
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countries _ would like to see other amber countries opened up to people who have been— countries opened up to people who have been doubly vaccinated. we would _ have been doubly vaccinated. we would also like to see the cost of testing _ would also like to see the cost of testing brought down. a simple way to do— testing brought down. a simple way to do that _ testing brought down. a simple way to do that would be to replace the pcr test _ to do that would be to replace the pcr test that everyone has to take poster _ pcr test that everyone has to take poster arrival with a simple lateral flow poster arrival with a simple lateral flow test _ poster arrival with a simple lateral flow test or lamp test which is much cheauen _ flow test or lamp test which is much chea er. , ., _, , ., cheaper. the list of countries rated ureen, cheaper. the list of countries rated green. amber— cheaper. the list of countries rated green, amber and _ cheaper. the list of countries rated green, amber and red _ cheaper. the list of countries rated green, amber and red is _ cheaper. the list of countries rated green, amber and red is due - cheaper. the list of countries rated green, amber and red is due to - cheaper. the list of countries rated green, amber and red is due to be | green, amber and red is due to be updated this week. caroline davies, bbc news. uk ministers are understood to have abandoned plans to introduce a so—called "amber watch list" of countries which could move at short notice into the government's red list. i'm joined now by tim hawkins, chief strategy officer of manchester airports group, which manages several airports in the uk. let's talk first of all of what happened today. what was union daylight? it happened today. what was union da liuht? ., , happened today. what was union daliuht? ., . happened today. what was union daliaht? ., . . ., daylight? it was fantastic. we have seen some great _ daylight? it was fantastic. we have seen some great meetings - daylight? it was fantastic. we have seen some great meetings at - daylight? it was fantastic. we have seen some great meetings at our. seen some great meetings at our airports for people who haven't seen each other for quite some while and the policy of allowing fully vaccinated people into the uk without having to self—isolate is a big step forward for those people.
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it was a huge undertaking for them to isolate in the uk if they came and the fact that they don't have to do that now will release those people to come and visit loved ones, to do business and to visit the uk. it really is a big step forward for those people today. that it really is a big step forward for those people today.— it really is a big step forward for those people today. that is one part ofthe those people today. that is one part of the story- — those people today. that is one part of the story. the _ those people today. that is one part of the story. the other _ those people today. that is one part of the story. the other part - those people today. that is one part of the story. the other part is - those people today. that is one part of the story. the other part is no - of the story. the other part is no amber watch list. what you make of that? it amber watch list. what you make of that? , ., ., , _, ., that? it is odd to be welcoming a chance that? it is odd to be welcoming a change that _ that? it is odd to be welcoming a change that hasn't _ that? it is odd to be welcoming a change that hasn't been - that? it is odd to be welcoming a l change that hasn't been introduced yet but i do welcome it if it is a decision to scrap the idea of an amber watchlist. we already have a hugely complex system, traffic light system, that governs international travel and i think most people are struggling to keep up with those changes. to hear that we were about to have another layer of complexity added to that i think was concerning for people. whenever rules change, it impacts people's plans and
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confidence. the fact the system will stay the same i think is welcome news. the thing we need to look at is the size of the amber list over all. i think there are far too many countries on the list at the moment. of course variants emerge really quickly and the government has said that amber has to be the default countries, only in special circumstances can they move to green. i circumstances can they move to ureen. ~' ., , ~ green. i think that is right. where there is a real _ green. i think that is right. where there is a real risk _ green. i think that is right. where there is a real risk either - green. i think that is right. where there is a real risk either in - green. i think that is right. where there is a real risk either in the i there is a real risk either in the government does has to react but we currently have 85% of the uk's travel market sat on the amber list. for us to berating all of those countries as a medium risk and only 6% of the uk's travel market as low risk, i think stands us out as a great difference between us and other european countries. decisions are not made _ other european countries. decisions are not made on _ other european countries. decisions are not made on where _ other european countries. decisions are not made on where people - other european countries. decisions are not made on where people want other european countries. decisions i are not made on where people want to 90, are not made on where people want to go, they arejust are not made on where people want to go, they are just made are not made on where people want to go, they arejust made on how prevalent the virus is. it doesn't have anything to do with the health part of that decision.—
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part of that decision. there are lots of countries _ part of that decision. there are lots of countries which - part of that decision. there are lots of countries which have - lots of countries which have significantly lower rates than the uk and have a quite some time and there isn't any real risk, is that we would identify from the data we can see, of prevalence of variance so it is unclear as to how those countries are currently still being rated as a medium risk. we think and we hope that this is the moment when we hope that this is the moment when we take a big step forward to recognise that those countries are indeed low risk not medium risk. tim hawkins, thank you forjoining us. now to massachusetts and provincetown, which was recently cited by the cdc and health experts as an example of the highly contagious nature of the delta variant, even among the fully vaccinated. provincetown — a holiday destination — has one of the highest vaccination rates in the us. but after the 11th ofjuly festivities, cases unexpectedly surged. in the weeks that followed, 469 residents tested positive for covid. almost 75% of those
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cases were so—called "breakthrough cases" or those among fully—vaccinated people. however, only four ended up in hospital, none of whom died. the provincetown outbreak was behind new mask guidance from the cdc. i'm joined now by dr andrew jorgensen, chief medical officer of outer cape health services. there are different ways of looking at this. on the one hand, it is bad that there were so many breakthrough cases. on the other hand, they all survived. ., ., cases. on the other hand, they all survived. ., ,, , ., ., ., survived. thank you for having me. you are exactly _ survived. thank you for having me. you are exactly correct _ survived. thank you for having me. you are exactly correct and - survived. thank you for having me. you are exactly correct and that. survived. thank you for having me. you are exactly correct and that is l you are exactly correct and that is the point that i think is most important. although we had many cases, the fact that we had such a highly vaccinated population really went a long way to protecting us and causing minimal hospitalisations and no deaths. ~ ., causing minimal hospitalisations and no deaths. ~ . , ., ., no deaths. what did you learn scientifically _ no deaths. what did you learn scientifically from _ no deaths. what did you learn scientifically from this - no deaths. what did you learn scientifically from this cluster| no deaths. what did you learn l scientifically from this cluster in provincetown? i scientifically from this cluster in provincetown?— scientifically from this cluster in provincetown? ~' ., ., provincetown? i think with the data we were able _ provincetown? i think with the data we were able to _ provincetown? i think with the data we were able to submit _ provincetown? i think with the data we were able to submit to - provincetown? i think with the data we were able to submit to the - we were able to submit to the department of public health and the
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cdc, it allowed them to determine that unfortunately with the delta variant, even though you are vaccinated, you still have a high likelihood of transmitting the virus if you are positive. fortunately, you have a much lower chance of hospitalisation or death but the really disappointing news for everyone in the medical community was to really learn that with the delta variant transmissibility is just as prevalent if you are vaccinated or not vaccinated. which means that — vaccinated or not vaccinated. which means that the _ vaccinated or not vaccinated. which means that the vaccinated - vaccinated or not vaccinated. which means that the vaccinated should l means that the vaccinated should wear masks?— means that the vaccinated should wear masks? that is what is being recommended _ wear masks? that is what is being recommended at _ wear masks? that is what is being recommended at this _ wear masks? that is what is being recommended at this point. - wear masks? that is what is being recommended at this point. if - wear masks? that is what is being recommended at this point. if you| recommended at this point. if you are at high prevalent area in an indoor environment with limited social distancing, it is important to know wear a mask. haifa social distancing, it is important to know wear a mask.— social distancing, it is important to know wear a mask. how safe is a safe distance _ to know wear a mask. how safe is a safe distance now— to know wear a mask. how safe is a safe distance now to _ to know wear a mask. how safe is a safe distance now to protect - safe distance now to protect infection from the delta variant? we were told previously to stay two metres away from somebody, that was before the emergence of delta. that hasn't changed _ before the emergence of delta. trust hasn't changed for indoor crowded
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locations. hopefully with continued research, they will be able to better characterise any differences with the delta variant.— with the delta variant. being fully vaccinated. _ with the delta variant. being fully vaccinated, as _ with the delta variant. being fully vaccinated, as we _ with the delta variant. being fully vaccinated, as we have _ with the delta variant. being fully vaccinated, as we have learnt - with the delta variant. being fullyi vaccinated, as we have learnt and provincetown has shown us, doesn't mean being invincible. do people go around thinking they are invincible, doing whatever they wanted? i think what we learned _ doing whatever they wanted? i think what we learned from _ doing whatever they wanted? i think what we learned from the _ doing whatever they wanted? i think what we learned from the prior - what we learned from the prior prevalence of covid, was that the vaccine would prevent transmission but we were wrong with delta. so i think there was a sense of relief that with all of the hard work that we did to get the entire population vaccinated, we would be able to resume our pre—pandemic lives and unfortunately, with great disappointment, we have learned that thatis disappointment, we have learned that that is not necessarily the case. and for a vacation town like provincetown, i have been there in the summer, in normal times it is packed. that inability to return to a normal life must be very hard. well, we are a town that is able to be very flexible. we work together,
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government and health care, and so even with these new indoor restrictions, there are many wonderful things that people can do outdoors, whether it is dining or going to the beach or a nice bicycle ride in the sand dunes. we are very confident we will be able to continue to provide an enjoyable experience for people. tithe continue to provide an en'oyable experience for peopleh continue to provide an en'oyable experience for people. one of those thin . s experience for people. one of those thins -- experience for people. one of those things -- all— experience for people. one of those things -- all of— experience for people. one of those things -- all of those _ experience for people. one of those things -- all of those things - experience for people. one of those things -- all of those things you - things —— all of those things you suggested some really fun. thank you very much. a sprinter from belarus who refused her team's order to fly home early from the olympics has been granted a humanitarian visa by poland. krystsina tsimanovskaya has taken refuge at the polish embassy in tokyo after saying she feared for her safety back in belarus. she had criticised her coaches on social media. rupert wingfield—hayes reports. this was the moment earlier this evening when krystsina tsimanouskaya stepped on the polish soil. safe from the belarusian officials she says were forcing her to leave tokyo against her will.
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the saga had begun two days earlier with this social media post. next, miss tsimanouskaya was spotted at tokyo's haneda airport about to board a flight to istanbul, but it's very clear she did not want to go. for me it was be very dangerous... the belarusian team says that claim is nonsense, that she was being sent home because of her emotional and psychological state. the polish government has decided to believe her story and offer refuge. what's going on here in tokyo has very much the whiff of history about it, because back in the days of the cold war, olympic defections were a regular event. the last one i can find was in los angeles in 1984. now we have someone defecting from belarus, a country that has been described as the last dictatorship in europe, and she's going to poland, a country that was once part
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of the soviet bloc and is now very much the opposite. chanting. last year, belarus was rocked by huge protests demanding an end to the 27 year rule of alexander lukashenko. poland was a vocal supporter of these protests. and it is clear today's offer of refuge to miss tsimanouskaya fits in with warsaw's support for the opposition. "every person who cannot return to belarus for political reasons and wants to come to poland can count on our support," the deputy foreign minister says. "miss tsimanouskaya is under the care of the polish state, she wants to come to poland, we will grant her our support." back injapan, there is relief this drama has been resolved so quickly. but with six more days until the olympics close, tokyo must be a little worried that other athletes could be tempted to follow miss tsimanouskaya's lead. rupert wingfield hayes, bbc news, in tokyo. let's get a round—up now
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of the highlights of the day's sporting action in tokyo, including the first openly transgender athlete to compete at the olympic games in a different gender to the one in which they were born. here's lucy hockings in tokyo. history was made here in tokyo today when new zealand weightlifter laurel hubbard became the first openly transgender athlete to compete in a different gender category to which she was born. she failed to stay in the running, though, and after three failed lifts crashed out of the final. hubbard's entry in the olympics is being seen as many, though, as a landmark moment for inclusion and for diversity. others have argued, though, that she has an unfair physiological advantage and that her presence undermines the struggle for women to be treated equally in sport. dutch runner sifan hassan is on course for an historic olympic treble. ethiopian born hassan put on a masterclass in distance running to claim gold in the 5000 metres, surging clear of the field with around 250 metres to go.
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just 12 hours earlier, she won another race, her 1500 metre heats, that was despite falling over because of a collision and a last lap and then she came at the very back of that field to win the race. it was amazing to watch. in the women's football, canada has stunned the four times champions, the usa, beating them 1—0. it wasjessie fleming who scored a second—half penalty which bought canada its first win over the us since 2001. canada will now play its first olympic final, taking on sweden. jasmine camacho-quinn won porto rico's first ever olympic track and field gold as she cruised to victory in the women's 100 metre hurdles here in tokyo. the 24—year—old is only the second athlete from the us territory to win an olympic medal, after monica puig in the women's tennis singles in 2016.
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i've been speaking to dawn harper fraser. she won gold in the 100 metre hurdles in beijing, about jasmine's race. oh, my goodness. one thing that she prides herself on is being ready, executing and that is what she did. you saw the stumble at nine, i caught myself, you saw her back off a tad and then she charged to the finish line. you see that clock, you saw her face like, "i did it, ifinally did it." that is the moment that you pray for and she captured it. great to hearfrom dawn harper—nelson there. time to take a quick look at the medals table. see where we're at. china at the top with 29 gold medals. then the us with 22. the hostjapan are there in third with 17 gold medals. now, matthew, we are guaranteed a blockbusterfinish to the gymnastics tomorrow. simone biles has spent the week sitting in the stands cheering on her team—mates but team usa have tweeted out and said that she will be competing tomorrow in the beam. we haven't seen her since that
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one rotation she did of the vault last week. she has taken time out to prioritise her mental health but it will be great to see her back in action tomorrow. that is an event that will have a lot of attention, of course. simone biles, back for the last day of the gymnastics. we look forward to that. stay with us on news, still to come: we'll take a visit to the french zoo that welcomed two baby pandas in the early hours of this morning. a man, a woman and a 13—year—old boy have been arrested on suspicion of murder, after the body of a five—year—old boy was pulled from a river in south wales. the boy has been named as logan mwangi. our wales correspondent hywel griffiths has been at the scene. we griffiths has been at the scene. know the police we the we know the police were called to the river bank early on saturday morning after reports he was missing. sadly within minutes they discovered his body in the river bed in the trees behind me. however,
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over the course of the investigation, police decided that this was a murder investigation, having arrested, as you said, a 39—year—old man, a 30—year—old woman and a 13—year—old boy. of the day, while people have paid tribute, investigations have continued all around us. divers in the river, forensic teams have extended the crime scene up the river bank and about 100 metres away from here at a property nearby, we have seen forensic teams again in white suits going in and out of the house. welcome back. the us says it's ready to take in thousands more afghans who may become taliban targets because of their links with the american military or diplomats. the us has withdrawn its ground forces from afghanistan. as a result, the taliban is making gains across the country. around 20,000 afghans have already applied under a programme for interpreters who helped us forces and diplomats. here's the us secretary
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of state anthony blinken, up speaking a short while ago. today the state department is announcing a new resettlement programme for afghans who assisted the united states but who do not qualify for special immigrant visas. we have created a priority two or p2 designation granting access to the us refugee admissions programme for many of these afghans and their family members. we can cross live to washington and our correspondent gary o'donoghue. how many afghans might apply and how long would it take for their applications to be processed? thea;r applications to be processed? they don't really — applications to be processed? they don't really know— applications to be processed? they don't really know how _ applications to be processed? the don't really know how many applications to be processed? tia: don't really know how many will apply. they think it could be in the tens of thousands, though, and that would include notjust people who had worked for these other organisations but also their families. the issue is that they will be required to get a nomination from the ngo all the media organisation they worked for in
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order to get onto the list to be considered. then they will have to travel to a third country, probably pakistan, possibly turkey via iran to make that application. that process could take 12 to 1a months. there are plenty of barriers in the way of any afghan who wants to take up way of any afghan who wants to take up this offer from the us government but the state department insist they understand the difficulties of that but at the moment they are not offering any relocation grants for people who want to apply under this new process. ida people who want to apply under this new process-— new process. no relocation grants, so they would _ new process. no relocation grants, so they would have _ new process. no relocation grants, so they would have to _ new process. no relocation grants, so they would have to provide - new process. no relocation grants, i so they would have to provide their own money? for so they would have to provide their own money?— so they would have to provide their own money? for that period of time when they were _ own money? for that period of time when they were going _ own money? for that period of time when they were going to _ own money? for that period of time when they were going to the - when they were going to the application process, yes. if they had to spend 1a months in pakistan supporting themselves and their family while they were vetted because there is a vetting process before you're granted one of these visas, they would, as things stand, but support themselves through that. and that is after having managed to get out of afghanistan in the first
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place. of course with the movement of the taliban and the occupation of vast swathes of the country and the communication routes and indeed some of the border crossings, there is fierce inside afghanistan amongst people here who work on behalf of those people that there will be a lot of difficulty in families and the people who worked for those organisations, us organisations, getting out of the country in the first place. getting out of the country in the first place-— getting out of the country in the first lace. , ,, ., first place. does the us feel that it owes the _ first place. does the us feel that it owes the afghans _ first place. does the us feel that it owes the afghans it _ first place. does the us feel that it owes the afghans it worked i first place. does the us feel that i it owes the afghans it worked with over 20 years, notjust interpreters but others who might be targets? i think they do. anthony blinking said straightforwardly today that they stood with us and we will stand with them. as you know, two flights have now already arrived in the last few days with some of those interpreters and drivers and the people who worked directly for the us government and military, but the statute under which they are coming
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in is a very specific one. it says you have to wait for the us government for two years, it will doubt a lot of people, including those who worked for non—governmental organisations and indeed the us media. there has been a substantial lobbying exercise hereby media organisations in particular, the new york times, fox news, others, to persuade the government to give these people visas. ., ., government to give these people visas. ., ~' , ., government to give these people visas. . ,, , ., government to give these people visas. . ,, . some rosy news before we leave. yesterday there may have been 2,264 pandas in the world. today there are 2,266. in the early hours of this morning beauval zoo in france welcomed not one but two new born pandas. huan huan and her partner yuan zi came to france on loan from china in 2012 where they've constantly been a must see attraction, and we're so glad to say delphine delord co—director
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of beauval zoo joins us now. is that then? it is. a few minutes auo the is that then? it is. a few minutes ago the baby _ is that then? it is. a few minutes ago the baby was _ is that then? it is. a few minutes ago the baby was with _ is that then? it is. a few minutes ago the baby was with her - is that then? it is. a few minutes i ago the baby was with her mother, tiny thing. and now huan huan is sleeping because it is ten o'clock in france, so it is time to sleep. we can see them... well, we can't. we can see them... well, we can't. we could see them on this screen. this is where do babies go when they are not with the mother. it is very important for them to be quiet and warm and the chinese keepers... their checking that everything is ok. we have our french keepers with them too. it was quite exciting last
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night because we had the two babies very vivid, very solid. they were crying... crying? well, they were speaking out. we crying... crying? well, they were speaking out-— speaking out. we do have some ictures speaking out. we do have some pictures of— speaking out. we do have some pictures of them _ speaking out. we do have some pictures of them that _ speaking out. we do have some pictures of them that we - speaking out. we do have some pictures of them that we are - speaking out. we do have some i pictures of them that we are going to show now. i am looking at them, i am amazed. they are the size of someone's hand. they are tiny! i don't see your screen. i am - don't see your screen. i am describing _ don't see your screen. i am describing seeing _ don't see your screen. i am describing seeing what - don't see your screen. i am describing seeing what you | don't see your screen. i am describing seeing what you must have been seeing for the last hours. how small they are! it is incredible. they are 149 grams when they | small they are! it is incredible. - they are 149 grams when they come out of the mother. the mother is 100 kilos and the babies ijust these little tiny things. i think it is one of the most amazing differences in the world between mother and child. the child is very... it is so
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fragile so they have to be extra careful. d0 fragile so they have to be extra careful. , ., ., ., , ., careful. do you have names for the baby pandas? _ careful. do you have names for the baby pandas? they _ careful. do you have names for the baby pandas? they will _ careful. do you have names for the baby pandas? they will be - careful. do you have names for the baby pandas? they will be named. careful. do you have names for the - baby pandas? they will be named with the hel of baby pandas? they will be named with the help of the — baby pandas? they will be named with the help of the chinese _ baby pandas? they will be named with the help of the chinese and _ baby pandas? they will be named with the help of the chinese and the - the help of the chinese and the first lady of china will name them. but in 100 days because it is quite a tradition that in 100 days they will be a big ceremony. for the time being, we decided to give them little names. one is little snow in french, the other is flower of curtain. ., �* , french, the other is flower of curtain. ., v ., french, the other is flower of curtain. . �* , ., ., french, the other is flower of curtain. . �*, ., ., curtain. that's great! i love those names. perhaps _ curtain. that's great! i love those names. perhaps they _ curtain. that's great! i love those names. perhaps they will - curtain. that's great! i love those names. perhaps they will get - curtain. that's great! i love those names. perhaps they will get to i curtain. that's great! i love those - names. perhaps they will get to have both a french name and in 100 days'
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time, their chinese names as well. thank you so much forjoining us. hello. the last month's heatwave took the uk to its joint fifth—warmestjuly on record. wales, northern ireland, and scotland, according to the met office, were drier than average, and another dry day across much of scotland. england was wetter than average last month, but whilst many have stayed dry today, there have been some heavy, even torrential downpours around, reports of over 100mm from one on the isle of wight with some flooding. the thundery downpours that have developed today after rumbling around through the evening will die away as we get into the night. and by morning, most places are dry, clear spells, and away from the town and city centres, many spots getting into single figures, so a fresh—feeling start in the morning. there will be plenty of sunshine around, there is a ridge of high pressure across us at the moment but, despite that, there are still these showers to contend with. and a frontal system just
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nudging its way towards some westernmost parts of the uk, with early on on tuesday, in the isles of sclly and cornwall, the chance of seeing some rain, showers into the western isles. a greater chance tomorrow of catching a shower in scotland, though most won't. in northern ireland, a brighter day with a chance of a shower later. but whilst most are dry through england and wales, we will notice again some very well—scattered but potentially torrential thundery downpours getting going. but in the sunny spells, it does feel quite warm — if anything, temperatures are a degree or two higher tomorrow compared with today. they are close to, or a little bit below average for the time of year. again, a few thundery downpours will rumble on into tuesday evening before fading. the frontal system to our west makes further progress in for wednesday, the clouds towards westernmost areas seeing some early rain. then it's sunny spells and showers breaking out again — if anything on wednesday, more focus on these downpours and western areas, northern england, northern ireland, and scotland
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with the chance of a shower possible just about. if you do get a sunshine, and many will at times, it will feel pleasantly warm. and then for thursday onwards into the weekend, or weather dominated by an area of low pressure. turning windier towards the south, but nowhere near as windy as it was last week. really from this area of low pressure, there'll be bands of rain heavy showers moving through — some places will see very wet weather at times, but there will be drier, brighter moments in between these bands of showers. certainly not raining all the time, but temperatures still below par for the time of year.
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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. relief for families, as fully—vaccinated people from the us and eu can arrive in great britain without having to self—isolate. cashing out: a ban on us investments in 59 chinese companies with alleged links to the chinese military comes into force today. with three months until the 26th un climate change conference in glasgow, some of the world's top artists are coming together to call for urgent action. and wall street is back, but looks a little different after the pandemic as the suit and tie is replaced with a more casual look.
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starting from today, coronavirus restrictions have been relaxed for travellers arriving in most of the uk from a significant number of international countries. people who have been fully vaccinated in the eu or us will not need to isolate when coming to england, scotland and wales — if they're coming from an amber list country. our correspondent nada tawfik was athk airport in new york and spoke to travellers who welcomed the news. the uk government talked about how this will help reunite people of their friends and family in the uk. you can see here athk airportjust what the easing of restrictions really means to people. i've spoken to passengers who were so excited when they heard the news. one delayed herflight when they heard the news. one delayed her flight so she wouldn't have to quarantine so she could be in that window. another was just a happy coincidence. both said they never understood why their vaccinations hadn't exempted them from quarantine before. but they are
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happy that the uk has decided to do so now. one will be seeing her family for the first time since the covid outbreak, another will be visiting the family of her boyfriend. take a listen to what they had to tell me. i’m they had to tell me. i'm surprised b how they had to tell me. i'm surprised by how many _ they had to tell me. i'm surprised by how many people _ they had to tell me. i'm surprised by how many people are - they had to tell me. i'm surprised by how many people are here - they had to tell me. i'm surprised i by how many people are here today, i expected _ by how many people are here today, i expected to _ by how many people are here today, i expected to see an airport still quite _ expected to see an airport still quite empty, but i think people are ready— quite empty, but i think people are ready to _ quite empty, but i think people are ready to be — quite empty, but i think people are ready to be travelling and seeing family— ready to be travelling and seeing family again. and when i checked in, the lady— family again. and when i checked in, the lady said, "what are your plans to take _ the lady said, "what are your plans to take was — the lady said, "what are your plans to take was michael's go and i said," — to take was michael's go and i said," im _ to take was michael's go and i said," i'm going to see mum." it was frustratin: said," i'm going to see mum." it was frustrating for _ said," i'm going to see mum." it was frustrating for me _ said," i'm going to see mum." it was frustrating for me because _ said," i'm going to see mum." it was frustrating for me because i - said," i'm going to see mum." it was frustrating for me because i was - frustrating for me because i was hoping _ frustrating for me because i was hoping to— frustrating for me because i was hoping to get _ frustrating for me because i was hoping to get that _ frustrating for me because i was hoping to get that valuable - frustrating for me because i was hoping to get that valuable time back from — hoping to get that valuable time back from quarantining. - hoping to get that valuable time back from quarantining. i- hoping to get that valuable time back from quarantining. i don't. hoping to get that valuable time - back from quarantining. i don't mind getting _ back from quarantining. i don't mind getting tested, — back from quarantining. i don't mind getting tested, it's _ back from quarantining. i don't mind getting tested, it's all _ back from quarantining. i don't mind getting tested, it's all good. - back from quarantining. i don't mind getting tested, it's all good. but - getting tested, it's all good. but it was— getting tested, it's all good. but it was odd — getting tested, it's all good. but it was odd to— getting tested, it's all good. but it was odd to me _ getting tested, it's all good. but it was odd to me that _ getting tested, it's all good. but it was odd to me that i- getting tested, it's all good. but it was odd to me that i was- getting tested, it's all good. but it was odd to me that i was in. getting tested, it's all good. butl it was odd to me that i was in the same _ it was odd to me that i was in the same bucket— it was odd to me that i was in the same bucket as _ it was odd to me that i was in the same bucket as someone - it was odd to me that i was in the same bucket as someone who - it was odd to me that i was in the same bucket as someone who isi same bucket as someone who is unvaccinated _ same bucket as someone who is unvaccinated. so _ same bucket as someone who is unvaccinated. so we _ same bucket as someone who is unvaccinated. so we would - same bucket as someone who is unvaccinated. so we would havei same bucket as someone who is i unvaccinated. so we would have to quarantine — unvaccinated. so we would have to quarantine the _ unvaccinated. so we would have to quarantine the same _ unvaccinated. so we would have to quarantine the same amount- unvaccinated. so we would have to quarantine the same amount of. unvaccinated. so we would have to i quarantine the same amount of time, there's— quarantine the same amount of time, there's no— quarantine the same amount of time, there's no incentive _ quarantine the same amount of time, there's no incentive there _ quarantine the same amount of time, there's no incentive there at- quarantine the same amount of time, there's no incentive there at all. i there's no incentive there at all. besides— there's no incentive there at all. besides giving _ there's no incentive there at all. besides giving travellers - there's no incentive there at all. i besides giving travellers valuable time back, the easing of those frictions mean there won't be as many covid tests when they arrive in the uk. that of course has grown into an industry of itself, a really
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expensive part of travelling, as a series of tests can range up to £250 by the time they get tested in the uk and tested again to return to the us. travellers see this as a window of opportunity, concerned that the highly contagious delta variant may make it difficult to travel in the fall and winter once again. let's look at some of the day's other news... israel's top court has proposed a plan to enable palestinians threatened with eviction in eastjerusalem to stay, in a closely—watched and divisive case. the supreme court was expected to issue a ruling to end a long legal battle, but urged the sides to compromise instead. it proposed that the four families could stay in their homes in sheikh jarrah if they recognised the land was owned by a jewish settlement company. uk prime minister borisjohnson has said iran must face consequences after a drone attack killed a briton and a romanian onboard a merchant tanker last week. meanwhile the iranian government called the claims baseless and provocative. the israeli—owned mt mercer street
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was attacked off oman on thursday. chinese health authorities say, they have detected seven new covid cases in wuhan, where the pandemic began. according to state media, this is the first time the virus has reappeared in the city, sincejune 2020. there are also other cases — in 15 provinces and municipalities in china, including the capital, beijing and several popular tourism areas. twitter boss jack dorsey's digital payments platform, square, is buying australia's afterpay limited for $29 billion. the deal, announced sunday, will be done entirely through a share exchange, and values the fintech at a 30% premium. a ban on us investments in chinese companies which undermine security or democratic values has come into effect today. president biden signed the executive order injune and 59 companies with alleged links to the chinese military are affected. it comes amid a crackdown by beijing on tech firms listing in the us and a broader deterioration in relations between
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the two superpowers. so what has gone wrong and where will it all end? (read on) so what has gone wrong and where will it all end? joining me from new york is professor ann lee, a leading authority on china's economic relations and author of "what the us can learn from china" and "will china's economy collapse? " professor, thanks so much for joining us. how much impact will this band ., joining us. how much impact will this band- l _ joining us. how much impact will this band- i would - joining us. how much impact will this band- i would say i joining us. how much impact will this band- i would say that| joining us. how much impact will this band haste? i would say that the this band have? i would say that the san will this band have? i would say that the span will actually _ this band have? i would say that the span will actually play _ this band have? i would say that the span will actually play right into the hands of the chinese government —— this band, because the chinese government would really prefer its chinese tech companies to list in shane causing —— to shanghai or hong kong, where they have more oversight from the chinese government to make sure there aren't any leaks of sensitive information into foreign hands. so what biden is doing is almost helping the chinese government. in regards to tech
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companies that are already listed in us stock exchanges, the fcc decides to move forward to delist some, that'll really hurt foreign investors because the money has already gone to the chinese companies that ipo on these us exchanges, so they already have us money. and if they delist, it won't hurt them — but it'll hurt the investors that have bought into those shares. so i'm not sure that thatis those shares. so i'm not sure that that is what the us government is intending to punish us investors or not, but it certainly will put a damper into the stock market, and this is one of those things coming out of left field that investors
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initially were not planning on, because investors were looking at fundamentals and growth opportunities of companies. and clearly, geopolitics is now affecting that picture. share clearly, geopolitics is now affecting that picture. are there an areas affecting that picture. are there any areas where _ affecting that picture. are there any areas where the _ affecting that picture. are there any areas where the two i affecting that picture. are there i any areas where the two countries are still cooperating quite closely and quite well?— are still cooperating quite closely and quite well? there are few and far in between. _ and quite well? there are few and far in between. clearly _ and quite well? there are few and far in between. clearly the i and quite well? there are few and far in between. clearly the us is. far in between. clearly the us is trying to send john carey to work with the chinese government to work on climate change issues. this is one area where they can certainly find common ground because this is a global issue, so it's not an either or. but aside from the climate change issue, it's tough to find more commonalities. the pandemic would have been the perfect opportunity for these two countries
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to come together and work to get it under control. of course, that has been politcised, so now they are almost working at crossroads. do you exect almost working at crossroads. do you expect things — almost working at crossroads. do you expect things to _ almost working at crossroads. do you expect things to get _ almost working at crossroads. do you expect things to get worse? - almost working at crossroads. do you expect things to get worse? i'm i expect things to get worse? i'm afraid to say _ expect things to get worse? i�*rn afraid to say that they will, even if i know in my heart i hope it doesn't get worse, because you are talking about two nuclear powers, and if they cannot find a way to de—escalate, if this becomes a shooting war, things will be very grim for everyone around the world. and certainly that's the one thing that we need to all work to make sure that cooler heads prevail. there is no issue that really can't be negotiated through diplomacy, it really should never get to that point. but unfortunately, when you
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have people who are feeling like they are losing ground and are worried in desperation —— and desperation starts to kick in, you know, things can really go into a downward spiral quickly. professor, thank ou downward spiral quickly. professor, thank you so _ downward spiral quickly. professor, thank you so much _ downward spiral quickly. professor, thank you so much for— downward spiral quickly. professor, thank you so much forjoining i downward spiral quickly. professor, thank you so much forjoining us. i thank you so much forjoining us. thank you for having me. the european union has sent assistance to turkey after it asked for help in fighting wildfires raging in villages and towns along its mediterranean and aegean coast. eight people have been killed in hundreds of blazes which have destroyed huge swathes of forest and are threatening tourist resorts including marmaris and bodrum. the authorities say the majority of the fires are now under control, but as simonjones reports, the huge firefighting operation is continuing. the fires continue to rage, fanned by strong winds, fuelled by soaring temperatures. more than 100 blazes have broken out.
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volunteers have been working night and day to try to do what they can, providing food and drink for exhausted firefighters and helping them with local knowledge. translation: while there are these fires and this disaster, _ many residents, including myself, cannot put our heads on the pillow and fall asleep peacefully. we must be responsible for our land to prevent our future from burning. but the situation is really bad now. that is evident from these pictures showing the scorched earth. if the blazes come down the ridge the coastal suffered great damage which is why we started evacuating. we are helping those who do not have any vehicles. the police are trying to establish whether some of the fires were started deliberately. the turkish government is facing
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criticism for the shortage of firefighting aircraft in the country, it insists it will do everything to help those affected by the flames rebuild their lives. it says the majority of the fires have been contained. many people are wondering what will be left of their homes and belongings when they are finally allowed to return. parts of italy, spain and greece have also been suffering, and as temperatures rise, so do the concerns. simonjones, bbc simon jones, bbc news. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: how wall street is ditchinig suits forjeans and heels for flats as workers return to the financial capital of the world. the british swimming team has returned from tokyo with a record eight olympic medals, beating the seven won in 1908. the star of this year's games, adam peaty, says he's already looking ahead to the next olympics in paris.
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we've got to find a way to be better, we have got to find a way to improve on that. and with the relay with the boys, we have got to become stronger. how do we do that? do we come together as individuals, do we come together as a team? we don't know, but we know it is probably going to be another world record to beat america. so, hopefully the investment continues. obviously, a massive thank—you to the national lottery who make these dreams happen. so, you know, it's great to have the support of the nation, and let's go get gold in paris. i just want to ask you very quickly around there seems to be a growing debate and conversation around mental health for athletes, and ijust wonder how important do you think that is as a high—profile athlete? i tweeted that today before my flight, and someone commented saying, you know, "you don't deserve a break because you're an athlete, you should work harder" and some people saying, "i can't get a break off myjob". but this job is extremely, extremely intensive. and, taking nothing away from anyone else's job, everyone's job is difficult in their own right, but sport is one of those ones where it is a 365, 24/7.
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so the amount of pressure firstly but also the amount of just the self—taught. .. if you do one thing wrong, is that going to affect your whole day? so the mental kind of well—being is more important than ever. how do you sustain success over a long period of time? holding back, is that going forward, is that taking more rests? and for me, the formula i know that works is going away from the pool, stepping back, reflecting as a whole and going, "ok, that's where i attack, that's where i need to go next." i just wonder, as someone who is such a name in british sport, do you think it is important, with your platform, to be having that conversation? of course, yes. there is so much stigma around mental health firstly, especially in men, but especially in sport because people see us as indestructible, immortal, kind, of people who get everything perfect. we are not perfect. this is bbc news, the latest headlines... it's the start of the month — and that means rent is due.
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but over the weekend, the us federal eviction moratorium officially expired — which means millions of americans who were protected from being evicted throughout the pandemic are now at risk of being told they have to pack up and leave if they can't pay up. it's an issue that all three branches of the us tried to take up, but congress was unable to pass the required new legislation to create an extension, and now renters are wondering what to do. now greg guajardo is a mobile mechanic in houston texas, who spoke to the bbc over one year ago after he received an eviction notice in spring of 2020. hejoins me now. thanks so much forjoining us, greg. we spoke to a year ago — how are things now? i... i have a feeling greg was on mute, so what we will try and do is speak to greg, see if
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you can press the button to get off mute, then he'll come back to us, then we would really like to speak to him. in the meantime... we've got him back. that was a lot quicker than i thought. hello, greg. janik hi, how are you doing? i'm good, thanks. we spoke to a year ago — how are things now? it’s thanks. we spoke to a year ago - how are things now?— are things now? it's still hard bein: are things now? it's still hard being able — are things now? it's still hard being able to _ are things now? it's still hard being able to make _ are things now? it's still hard being able to make ends i are things now? it's still hard l being able to make ends meet. are things now? it's still hard i being able to make ends meet. greg, because you — being able to make ends meet. greg, because you potentially _ being able to make ends meet. greg, because you potentially behind in rent, does that mean that right now, and an eviction notice could be posted on your front door at any time? , , . . , , time? yes, because they left in the order that was _ time? yes, because they left in the order that was on _ time? yes, because they left in the order that was on the _ time? yes, because they left in the order that was on the 31st. i time? yes, because they left in the order that was on the 31st. and i time? yes, because they left in the order that was on the 31st. and if i order that was on the 31st. and if that happens. — order that was on the 31st. and if that happens. if— order that was on the 31st. and if that happens, if and _ that happens, if and eviction notices posted, what will you do? i don't know someone and it's notjust
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you, greg, can you tell us about the family are looking after? yes, i am a single father and i have my three girls. a single father and i have my three uirls. �* ., a single father and i have my three . irls, �* ., ., a single father and i have my three uirls. �* ., ., ., a single father and i have my three irls, �* ., ., ., , girls. and how old are they, if i may ask? _ girls. and how old are they, if i may ask? they _ girls. and how old are they, if i may ask? they are _ girls. and how old are they, if i may ask? they are 15, - girls. and how old are they, if i l may ask? they are 15, my middle dau~hter may ask? they are 15, my middle daughter is _ may ask? they are 15, my middle daughter is 13, _ may ask? they are 15, my middle daughter is 13, and _ may ask? they are15, my middle daughter is 13, and my— may ask? they are 15, my middle daughter is 13, and my youngest | may ask? they are 15, my middle i daughter is 13, and my youngest one is eight years old. lltrul’hat daughter is 13, and my youngest one is eight years old.— is eight years old. what have you been able to _ is eight years old. what have you been able to explain _ is eight years old. what have you been able to explain to _ is eight years old. what have you been able to explain to them i is eight years old. what have you l been able to explain to them about what's going on? i been able to explain to them about what's going on?— what's going on? i explained to them that it's hard — what's going on? i explained to them that it's hard on _ what's going on? i explained to them that it's hard on me. _ what's going on? i explained to them that it's hard on me. explain what i that it's hard on me. explain what ou mean that it's hard on me. explain what you mean by _ that it's hard on me. explain what you mean by hard _ that it's hard on me. explain what you mean by hard on _ that it's hard on me. explain what you mean by hard on you i that it's hard on me. explain what you mean by hard on you - i that it's hard on me. explain what| you mean by hard on you - do you you mean by hard on you — do you like sleep, do you lie awake thinking about it overnight? yes. like sleep, do you lie awake thinking about it overnight? yes, a lot, 'ust thinking about it overnight? yes, a lot. just making — thinking about it overnight? yes, a lot, just making sure _ thinking about it overnight? yes, a lot, just making sure that - thinking about it overnight? yes, a lot, just making sure that there's i thinking about it overnight? yes, ai lot, just making sure that there's a roof over their head. that's my biggest concern. bud roof over their head. that's my biggest concern.— roof over their head. that's my bi est concern. �* , ., , ._ biggest concern. and is there anyway that ou biggest concern. and is there anyway that you can — biggest concern. and is there anyway that you can talk— biggest concern. and is there anyway that you can talk to _ biggest concern. and is there anyway that you can talk to any _ biggest concern. and is there anyway that you can talk to any of _ biggest concern. and is there anyway that you can talk to any of landlord i that you can talk to any of landlord or association to try and get help,
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given that eviction could come at any time? i given that eviction could come at an time? ., given that eviction could come at an time? . ., .. ., any time? i have tried to reach out and see if i — any time? i have tried to reach out and see if i could _ any time? i have tried to reach out and see if i could to _ any time? i have tried to reach out and see if i could to get _ any time? i have tried to reach out and see if i could to get help. i any time? i have tried to reach out and see if i could to get help. my i and see if i could to get help. my current landlord is pretty persistent. shall come take out all our stuff if i couldn't come up with the rent, so... yeah, it's rough. and is there anyone else who is prepared to help you? i get help from like my _ prepared to help you? i get help from like my family _ prepared to help you? i get help from like my family members, i prepared to help you? i get help i from like my family members, but they're kind of in the same boat, they're kind of in the same boat, they are in the same position that i am. so it'sjust us they are in the same position that i am. so it's just us trying to help each other. {th am. so it's 'ust us trying to help each other.— am. so it's 'ust us trying to help each other. _, , , ., each other. of course we understand that, greg. — each other. of course we understand that, greg, thank _ each other. of course we understand that, greg, thank you _ each other. of course we understand that, greg, thank you so _ each other. of course we understand that, greg, thank you so much i each other. of course we understand that, greg, thank you so much for. that, greg, thank you so much for speaking to us and we do remember
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you and your daughters. jan speaking to us and we do remember you and your daughters. ian i think you. today marks three months until the 26th un climate change conference in glasgow — known as cop 26. it is anticipated to be the most important meeting on climate change since the paris agreement was drawn up in 2015. with hopes that it will deliver significant progress in the battle against rising temperatures, the world wildlife fund is partnering with leading international artists such as tracey emin, anish kapoor, and gavin turk to inspire global action. tom webb has more. from mary mattingly�*s vanishing point on southend pier to ackroyd & harvey's beuys�* acorns here at the tate modern, artists are creating eye—catching pieces to draw attention to our changing climate. for me, the role of artists is both to demonstrate how we got to this emergency but also to help empower people with images and hope and belief that can help all of us feel empowered to take action. ahead of the climate summit
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in glasgow, artists, galleries and museums are coming together to highlight issues around climate change. art for your world is a project where we're working with a leading range of artists to really help tell the story and involve a much wider community in the fight against climate change. we are hoping the work of artists will inspire hearts and minds and audiences around the world to do something to help save their world. one british artist, gavin turk, is creating work for this campaign. i have actually gathered the sump oil from the bottom of a white transit van. then i painted the canvas with the sump oil. the painting will actually never dry, it will always be wet. slowly, the oil is descending down the canvas, which is almost like saying, "come on, we've got to get ourselves engaged in this conversation about the planet." i think it's brilliant to be able
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to associate selling art with actual physical projects that hopefully will make a change into the future. one project being funded by the sale of the artwork at auction is the uk's first seagrass restoration project in pembrokeshire's coastal national park. one million seagrass seeds were collected by a team of volunteers in england and wales before being placed into hessian bags and planted on the sea bed, following the disappearance of up to 92% of the uk's seagrass in the last century. seagrass accounts for 10% of annual ocean carbon storage, capturing carbon from the environment 35 times faster than tropical rainforests. we have been back recently to some nearby very small plots we planted about four years ago now and they have taken a while to develop. now they're expanding quite rapidly. the fact we're seeing mature plants is a very good sign. it transforms those shallow seas
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to having a hugely complex habitat. all sorts of exciting, interesting animals live in that environment. with their unique ability to inspire and communicate through creativity, campaigners hope more artists will come together to paint a brighter future for our planet. tom webb, bbc news. now when you think of wall street, you usually think of gordon gekko, leo's wolf of wall street, or christian bale's american psycho, always suited booted and ready to make money. but post pandemic something is different — whilst the aim to make tonnes of moolah whatever the cost remains, the look is changing. out are the three—piece suits for the men and high heels for women, and in is a more casual look. so what does this say about the culture on wall street and the way work is changing?
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shejoins us now. i'm seeing some chinos, i'm seeing genes, even trainers on the streets of wall street, so for a comparison with their london audience, that's the same as seeing the same types of attire in the city of london, which is very dressdown. wall street is known for being one of the last bastions of formality, suited and booted it, and people doing deals in very formal settings. so this is an interesting shift post pandemic. we've all been working from home, wearing loungewear and stretchy clothes, so lots of people returning to the office are struggling with the idea of getting back into that formal wear, wearing high heels and dress shoes, and getting back on the training getting back to work. so i think the employer's at wall street are meeting their staff halfway, saying if you're coming back into the office and not meeting clients, feel free to where the jeans. i5
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feel free to where the jeans. is there a low bar which people shouldn't come? they can'tjust show up shouldn't come? they can'tjust show up in shorts and flip—flops. thea;r up in shorts and flip-flops. they are not allowed, _ up in shorts and flip-flops. they are not allowed, so _ up in shorts and flip-flops. they are not allowed, so the - up in shorts and flip—flops. tie1 are not allowed, so the financial district still has a lot of very unwritten rules, so people will deftly get their chops busted if they show up in attire that is too casual. so the jeans and she knows i'm seeing are still pretty dressy, but casual does not mean cheap, so some of the clothing... but casual does not mean cheap, so some of the clothing. . ._ some of the clothing... that's the ke ! but some of the clothing... that's the key! itaut what _ some of the clothing... that's the key! but what if _ some of the clothing... that's the key! but what if someone i some of the clothing... that's the key! but what if someone turns i some of the clothing... that's the i key! but what if someone turns out, they're the only person in the room in a 3—piece suit with one of those thick business cards — will they look out of touch, or will somebody say they're not playing by their rules? . ., , , say they're not playing by their rules? . ., , i. say they're not playing by their rules? . ., , y., . say they're not playing by their rules? . , ., ., rules? increasingly you have to look like our rules? increasingly you have to look like your clients, _ rules? increasingly you have to look like your clients, and _ rules? increasingly you have to look like your clients, and if— rules? increasingly you have to look like your clients, and if they i rules? increasingly you have to look like your clients, and if they are i like your clients, and if they are turning up in casual wear, like if your clients are a tech company, and your clients are a tech company, and you show up in a 3—piece suit and a tie, it'll make you look out of place and may be like someone that people don't want to do business with. so this is also about blending into the culture of american
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business and seeing that everyone else is moving in a more casual direction. standing out is not always the best thing for a banker. but looking like jack dorsey might be a little bit of a step — i'm wondering if there's one step of people who don't really like this? the businesses who make those formal suits? for the businesses who make those formal suits? ., , , , ,, , ., suits? for sure the businesses that make those — suits? for sure the businesses that make those formal _ suits? for sure the businesses that make those formal suits _ suits? for sure the businesses that make those formal suits i - suits? for sure the businesses that make those formal suits i think i make those formal suits i think we'll have to shift in another direction. either they'll focus on the events and occasion where, or they'll make suits that people will buy less frequently, or shift entirely to more casual clothing. one of the things i'm hearing a lot from people is that they want that finery but not as often. for the most part people will be... they'll pull out the stops for the really important occasions. in pull out the stops for the really important occasions.— pull out the stops for the really important occasions. in one word, and wearing _ important occasions. in one word, and wearing a _ important occasions. in one word, and wearing a tie, _ important occasions. in one word, and wearing a tie, is _ important occasions. in one word, and wearing a tie, is it _ important occasions. in one word, and wearing a tie, is it over? i important occasions. in one word, and wearing a tie, is it over? yesl and wearing a tie, is it over? yes or no? ., ., , ., or no? not for television presenters. _ or no? not for television presenters, and i or no? not for television | presenters, and certainly or no? not for television i presenters, and certainly not for important meetings and interviews
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will stop but for day—to—day to you, thanks so much. do stay with bbc news. hello. thejuly heatwave took the uk to its joint fifth—warmestjuly on record, according to the met office. big differences, though, in terms of rainfall. parts of northern and western scotland had yet another drier—than—average month. parts of southern england were exceptionally wet. and as the downpours continued in london, there's a rain gauge in stjames's park, and that recorded its highest total injuly on record with over 100 millimetres, and those records go back to the 1960s. there is a chance of catching torrential, thundery downpours during tuesday, even though there's a ridge of high pressure across the uk. despite that, the clouds are going to build and some showers will break out again. they'll be very hit and miss. a greater chance, though, of catching a shower in scotland compared with monday.
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a brighter day in northern ireland, you may catch a shower later on. early rain clearing away from the isles of scilly and cornwall, but elsewhere in england and wales, look at the bright colours — there'll be some slow—moving, torrential thundery downpours around into the late afternoon and evening, though by no means everybody will catch them. and if you are drier with some sunny spells, it will feel a little bit warmer than it did on monday. now, what downpours have developed will gradually fade as we get on into tuesday night, and looking at things going into wednesday, there is a frontal system out to our west, and it will make gradual progress a little closer towards us, so westernmost areas on wednesday could well start rather cloudy with some outbreaks of rain, including northern ireland, who've also had a drier—than—average july, and parts of scotland. we'll also see a few heavy showers breaking out yet again, perhaps more focused across northern parts of the uk this time, for northern ireland, northern england and scotland into the afternoon, but there will be a few elsewhere as well. but also pleasant, sunny spells. now, as we go into thursday, looks like an area of low pressure is going to begin
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to move towards us. on its southern flank, the winds will pick up again, but not as windy as it was last week with that destructive storm evert. so this is how thursday is looking. getting quite windy towards the south—west, a band of showery rain moving in, and elsewhere some sunshine but also some heavy and thundery showers breaking out, perhaps more widespread by the time we get to thursday, and temperatures have come down a couple of degrees once again. now, very gradually friday into the weekend, this area of low pressure is expected to move across us then gradually move its way north—east away from us. but with it over us, we can expect the clouds to build again and there will be some heavy and thundery showers breaking out. some places could see quite a lot of rain in a short space of time, others hardly any, may well stay dry and you get to see some sunshine. but nowhere immune from catching a thundery downpour on friday, and indeed, going into saturday as well, as the area of low pressure, you can see, just begins to edge a little bit further away from us towards the north—east and eventually heading
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on towards scandinavia. now that could leave some longer spells of rain still impacting scotland around that area of low pressure, whereas elsewhere you get to see a bit of sunshine with a chance of catching a heavy and indeed thundery shower, with temperatures still a little bit below the average for the time of year. now as we go through sunday and into the start of next week, that low pressure moves away. a ridge of high pressure will begin to move across us, so it settles down a bit, and then it looks as if the track of low—pressure systems will be towards the north and north—west of the uk into next week, leaving southern areas with something drier, and that may go some way to, well, addressing some of those rainfall anomalies that we've seen so far this summer. bye— bye.
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tonight at ten: after months of travel restrictions, many families and friends have finally been reunited today. sobbing from now on, people fully vaccinated in the us or in most of the eu no longer have to self—isolate. i really didn't think it was possible to come home until i actually set foot off the plane. you know, i just... i didn't think it was going to happen. today the nhs covid app in england and wales was tweaked so that fewer contacts will be told to self—isolate. we'll have more on that and the change in rules for entry to the uk, which happened in the early hours of this morning. also tonight... the olympic sprinter from belarus, who took refuge at the polish embassy in tokyo, is granted a humanitarian visa.

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