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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 31, 2021 10:30pm-11:01pm BST

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after the news on bbc scotland — might want to look away now. rangers began their title defence with a 3—0 win over livingston at ibrox, extending their unbeaten league run to a0 matches. hearts beat celtic 2—1. there's more on the bbc sport website, including today's results from the hundred. but that's all from me. back to you, martine. chetan, thank you very much. you can see more on all of today's stories on the bbc news channel. that's all from me. the singer, kt tunstall, has been speaking to the bbc about her decision to pull out of an upcoming us tour, due to problems with her hearing. the brit award winner went completely deaf in her left ear three years ago.
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earlier this month, she noticed the early signs of deterioration starting in her right ear and decided to act. she's been speaking to our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson. # suddenly i see this is what i want to be # suddenly i see...# kt tunstall has been playing live for three decades, often doing 200 shows a year. next week, she was to start a three—month us tour with hall & oates, but what's happening to her hearing has caused her to pull out. it's almost like a siren goes off and you suddenly get this woo—oo—oo, and it's just a pulse of a noise. the other thing that you can get is that suddenly you can't hear anything and it feels like someone�*s put a vacuum over your head. her plan is now to space out live shows, allowing more recovery time,
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but the brit award—winning singer has been struggling with her hearing since the end of 2007. i got off a long—haul flight, and i was actually going to a spice girls concert, and i had a nap before i was going to go to the gig, and i woke up and i felt really discombobulated, and something was up with my left ear and i had a really, really loud ringing. i couldn't hear things like the shower or running water, i couldn't hear crisp packets, i couldn't hear the indicator on the car. kt tunstall leaves her hearing problems are caused by the stress to her body of being on the road, rather than by loud music. things got worse in 2018 during a us tour, when she went permanently deaf in her left ear. when i saw a couple of specialists, they don't really know an awful lot about the inner ear — it's so fine and so complex. i also was told that the more deaf you go, the less likely it is that
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you'll get your hearing back, and i was at, like, 98% or something. i can't hear anything in that ear. so, i can't wear a hearing aid in that ear because there's nothing going in. your hearing is deteriorating rapidly. deafness in musicians was a theme explored in the 0scar—winning film, sound of metal. i can't hear you, do. you understand me? i can't — i'm deaf! kt tunstall thought it was excellent and hopes it leads to more understanding of the issue. have you thought about what your life would be like if you were no longer able to play live? i would be really, really sorry to not be able to do it any more. but i think that the decision i'm making with how i am approaching my career here is to really carve a way of life that allows me to keep playing live. totally intend to continue, butjust at a slightly different pace now. colin patterson, bbc news.
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hello, you are a bit late for the olympic round at that stay with as 0lympic round at that stay with as per the papers and what they are bringing us tomorrow. with me a james lewer, journalist and sian griffiths, sunday times columnist. super saturday steals the show on the 0bserver�*s front page — with the emotional celebrations of team gb�*s gold medal winning triathlon team. the sunday telegraph splashes on celebrations of another kind —
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those of the prime minister and his wife carrie, who have announced that they are expecting a second child. the sunday express refers to the "heartbreak of miscarriage", as carriejohnson revealed she experienced a pregnancy loss earlier this year — and hoped sharing what happened to her would help others going through the same. "kebabs forjabs" declares the sunday people, on the latest efforts being suggested to encourage young people to take up the coronavirus vaccine. summer holidays are the focus of the sunday times — with its story of a letter written by the chancellor rishi sunak — urging the prime minister to make the most of the country's vaccination success and scrap travel restrictions. so let's begin... hello to you both. we start with the observer newspaper. the story on the 0bserver newspaper. the story on the front page, uber and deliveroo to lure young to get the jab. james lewer, i expected this to say that nightclubs might be starting pop—up
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jab centres within clubs themselves to get the jab programme going but it's cheap taxi rides and takeaway gait discounts from takeaway companies. mil gait discounts from takeaway companies-— gait discounts from takeaway comanies. �* , , ., , companies. all good stuff to be honest! anything _ companies. all good stuff to be honest! anything like _ companies. all good stuff to be honest! anything like this - companies. all good stuff to be honest! anything like this will l companies. all good stuff to be l honest! anything like this will be companies. all good stuff to be i honest! anything like this will be a good thing if it encourages more people to go and get those really important vaccinations. those who have not had their first one saw their second months. have not had their first one saw theirsecond months. i have not had their first one saw their second months. ithink have not had their first one saw their second months. i think the important thing to say about this, there are a lot of young people out there, over 29s who have had the firstjabs there, over 29s who have had the first jabs already. there, over 29s who have had the firstjabs already. 67%, according to the telegraph, something ijust read. those numbers are still quite good. there are still a good proportion of young people who have had those first jabs proportion of young people who have had those firstjabs but if all these companies can persuade more young people to go and get first vaccinations are second vaccinations, then great news. fiur vaccinations, then great news. our uber and deliveroo that powerful, sian griffiths? i uber and deliveroo that powerful, sian griffiths?— sian griffiths? i think it is a scheme that _
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sian griffiths? i think it is a scheme that ministers - sian griffiths? i think it is a scheme that ministers are l sian griffiths? i think it is a - scheme that ministers are talking about_ scheme that ministers are talking about with a range of companies, not 'ust about with a range of companies, not just uber_ about with a range of companies, not just uber and deliveroo but waitrose, morrisons, some othertaxi app waitrose, morrisons, some othertaxi app firms _ waitrose, morrisons, some othertaxi app firm i_ waitrose, morrisons, some othertaxi app firms. i think the idea is there will be _ app firms. i think the idea is there will be a _ app firms. i think the idea is there will be a voucher scheme and the story— will be a voucher scheme and the story in_ will be a voucher scheme and the story in the — will be a voucher scheme and the story in the sunday telegraph as suggesting you would get a 10% discount — suggesting you would get a 10% discount from groceries to pizza or cab rides. — discount from groceries to pizza or cab rides. if— discount from groceries to pizza or cab rides, if you could prove you had had — cab rides, if you could prove you had had your first jab and the story suggests— had had your first jab and the story suggests it — had had your first jab and the story suggests it might be able to prove you have _ suggests it might be able to prove you have had a first jab by sending a picture _ you have had a first jab by sending a picture of— you have had a first jab by sending a picture of a selfie in a vaccination centre. i agree with james — vaccination centre. i agree with james its— vaccination centre. i agree with james. it's a really good idea. it is a carrot— james. it's a really good idea. it is a carrot rather than a stick. anything _ is a carrot rather than a stick. anything that persuades the under 29s to _ anything that persuades the under 29s to take up the vaccination, 295 to take up the vaccination, especially— 29s to take up the vaccination, especially before september, when millions— especially before september, when millions of students are going to go back to _ millions of students are going to go back to university and schools will reopen _ back to university and schools will reopen on — back to university and schools will reopen on the potential for spreading covid again will increase. james _ spreading covid again will increase. james lewer, looking at this,
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ministers, says the article, says demand from younger age groups is levelling off. america is considering now after reaching a bit of a brick wall paying people. would cold hard cash be better than a £10 voucher? ., ., �* ~' cold hard cash be better than a £10 voucher? ., ., �* ,, voucher? no, i don't think so. i thinkthis— voucher? no, i don't think so. i think this is — voucher? no, i don't think so. i think this is the _ voucher? no, i don't think so. i think this is the right _ voucher? no, i don't think so. i think this is the right way - voucher? no, i don't think so. i think this is the right way of. voucher? no, i don't think so. i. think this is the right way of going about it. i think you need to remember, vaccines have been out to people for a very long time, especially in the older age groups. for the younger age groups, they only came in recently. they are far down the pecking order. some people will have that attitude of, it's not necessarily affecting me, i will take my time with it. i think all this will do it hopefully speed up that process a little more and i think it will have a really good effect, as well. the amount of e—mails i get from uber and all these other companies that are telling me i can get discounts on all sorts of food things in different bits and bobs i think is a really good impact. i think they will think i will going to do that now. i think great news and good work on this. i think more and more
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companies will follow suit, uber and deliveroo are just the start of it, i think, the tip of the iceberg. let's look at the next newspaper, the sunday telegraph, where the prime minister, who has worked for the newspaper in the past, a picture of him and his wife carrie on the front page. the headline of that story, garyjohnson announces story, gary johnson announces pregnancy story, garyjohnson announces pregnancy after heartbreak. —— carriejohnson. a happy announcement tinged with that sadness that she talked about in that message and this is, i was talking to a guest earlier, breaking something of a taboo? , ., earlier, breaking something of a taboo? , ,, ,., earlier, breaking something of a taboo? , ,, taboo? yes, i think so. so, as you sa , taboo? yes, i think so. so, as you say. boris — taboo? yes, i think so. so, as you say. boris and _ taboo? yes, i think so. so, as you say, boris and carrie _ taboo? yes, i think so. so, as you say, boris and carrie have - taboo? yes, i think so. so, as you i say, boris and carrie have announced that carrie's — say, boris and carrie have announced that carrie's pregnant with their second — that carrie's pregnant with their second child. she announced the news on instagram and in an interesting phrase _ on instagram and in an interesting phrase that i hadn't heard before, she said _ phrase that i hadn't heard before, she said she was pregnant and that she said she was pregnant and that she was_ she said she was pregnant and that she was hoping for a rainbow baby. a rainbow— she was hoping for a rainbow baby. a rainbow baby apparently refers to a
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baby that _ rainbow baby apparently refers to a baby that you have after having a miscarriage or stillbirth. i think it's very— miscarriage or stillbirth. i think it's very interesting that she has talked _ it's very interesting that she has talked openly about this and she says that — talked openly about this and she says that she did so because when she had _ says that she did so because when she had a — says that she did so because when she had a miscarriage earlier this year. _ she had a miscarriage earlier this year. she — she had a miscarriage earlier this year, she was heartbroken. and it had helped — year, she was heartbroken. and it had helped her that other people had shared _ had helped her that other people had shared their stories of loss, so she is now— shared their stories of loss, so she is now sharing her story publicly in a bid _ is now sharing her story publicly in a bid to _ is now sharing her story publicly in a bid to help other people. we saw meghan— a bid to help other people. we saw meghan markle do something similar when she _ meghan markle do something similar when she had a miscarriage last year _ when she had a miscarriage last year i_ when she had a miscarriage last year. i think it is brave of these women — year. i think it is brave of these women to— year. i think it is brave of these women to use their public positions to break— women to use their public positions to break down stigma, shame... a subject— to break down stigma, shame... a subject which is delayed to boost subject — subject which is delayed to boost subject. by talking about it so openly— subject. by talking about it so openly and sharing that they have had this— openly and sharing that they have had this experience, i think it makes — had this experience, i think it makes women who have been through this feel— makes women who have been through this feel less lonely and more able to talk— this feel less lonely and more able to talk openly about what has happened to them, which can only be
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a very— happened to them, which can only be a very good _ happened to them, which can only be a very good thing. happened to them, which can only be a very good thing-— happened to them, which can only be a very good thing._ i . a very good thing. james lewer? i think it's important _ a very good thing. james lewer? i think it's important to _ a very good thing. james lewer? i think it's important to normalise l think it's important to normalise miscarriage. nhs numbers say one in eight women experience miscarriage when they are pregnant. so i think it is only a good thing to be talking about this. 0bviously, sian mentioned meghan markle is another big figure who did something similar and it's nice to see carrie talking openly about it. i think it's important for men and women to talk about this as well. when a baby is lost, a lot of time, men are losing a child as well, as well as women. so it is really important that these sort of taboos are broken down and it's welcome to see this sort of discussion being had, for sure. back to the observer— discussion being had, for sure. back to the observer newspaper now, going back and forth between the observer and the telegraph. heading into the world of politics very brief to meat briefly. keir starmer aide once we've lost touch with target voters and in order to regain party, people
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have little idea what party stands for, is that fair, sian griffiths? this is what the internal polling suggests— this is what the internal polling suggests according to this splash in the observer. so they parted g strategy — the observer. so they parted g strategy chief deborah mattinson has had briefings with keir starmer and ministers _ had briefings with keir starmer and ministers and presented what the observer— ministers and presented what the observer says is a stark and bleak message, — observer says is a stark and bleak message, that their polling shows that people just don't really understand what labour stands for, they were _ understand what labour stands for, they were much clearer messaging from labour and labour red will have to pull— from labour and labour red will have to pull up— from labour and labour red will have to pull up it — from labour and labour red will have to pull up it sucks a lot if it stands _ to pull up it sucks a lot if it stands any chance at all of winning the next _ stands any chance at all of winning the next election. —— pull up its socks — the next election. —— pull up its socks. which the observer suggested may 2025 _ socks. which the observer suggested may 2023. it's not anything we have not heard _ may 2023. it's not anything we have not heard before but i think it pulls — not heard before but i think it pulls a — not heard before but i think it pulls a number of things together. one of— pulls a number of things together. one of the — pulls a number of things together. one of the things it talks about is labour— one of the things it talks about is labour needs to appeal to these older. _ labour needs to appeal to these older, non—graduate voters, who
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voted _ older, non—graduate voters, who voted brexit, who don't really kind of see _ voted brexit, who don't really kind of see the — voted brexit, who don't really kind of see the point of labour any more. but there _ of see the point of labour any more. but there is— of see the point of labour any more. but there is also an opportunity for labour, _ but there is also an opportunity for labour, according to this story in the observer, because boris johnson's personal polling is on the wanei _ johnson's personal polling is on the wane, so— johnson's personal polling is on the wane, so there is a chance for labour— wane, so there is a chance for labour to— wane, so there is a chance for labour to make some gains and win back millions of voters it has a loss _ back millions of voters it has a loss. ., ., back millions of voters it has a loss. . ., g ., , loss. that red wall, james lewer, how does labour _ loss. that red wall, james lewer, how does labour get _ loss. that red wall, james lewer, how does labour get it _ loss. that red wall, james lewer, how does labour get it back? - loss. that red wall, james lewer, | how does labour get it back? they have a lot of _ how does labour get it back? they have a lot of work _ how does labour get it back? they have a lot of work to _ how does labour get it back? they have a lot of work to do _ how does labour get it back? tie: have a lot of work to do in those areas but it is notjust there, really. people seem to forget how much ground they lost in scotland as well. i think they have work to do in that part of the country as well. i think everyone wants labour to have a policy or something that you can almost hang your hat on. i feel like it is so confusing that i think a lot of the time when you hear from shadow ministers talking about policies, they don't really sort of say what their view is and what the party's say what their view is and what the pa rty�*s stance say what their view is and what the party's stance is on something. i think that is a big problem. people don't understand what labour are
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about and they need to get that sorted first. they need to have a clear message, so we all understand what the new labour is going to be, to use old terminology. tilers? what the new labour is going to be, to use old terminology.— to use old terminology. new new labour? i certainly _ to use old terminology. new new labour? i certainly don't - to use old terminology. new new labour? i certainly don't know- to use old terminology. new new l labour? i certainly don't know what the stand labour? i certainly don't know what they stand for. _ labour? i certainly don't know what they stand for, i _ labour? i certainly don't know what they stand for, i really _ labour? i certainly don't know what they stand for, i really don't. - labour? i certainly don't know what they stand for, i really don't. backl they stand for, i really don't. back to the sunday _ they stand for, i really don't. back to the sunday telegraph are a very different and difficult story which the paper is talking about. if we go to the front page of the telegraph again, we can see the headline, care home deaths likely to be thousands higher than the official figure. amid claims the watchdog excluded when patients were discharged from hospital without tests. there the earlier stage of the pandemic? yes. earlier stage of the pandemic? yes, this is a story _ earlier stage of the pandemic? yes, this is a story that _ earlier stage of the pandemic? yes, this is a story that is _ earlier stage of the pandemic? yes, this is a story that is about this terrible — this is a story that is about this terrible tragedy of the thousands of people _ terrible tragedy of the thousands of people who died in care homes. what the story— people who died in care homes. what the story is— people who died in care homes. what the story is story is saying is the mo _ the story is story is saying is the (1°c, the — the story is story is saying is the cqc, the care the story is story is saying is the coc, the care quality the story is story is saying is the cqc, the care quality commission, came _ cqc, the care quality commission, came up—
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cqc, the care quality commission, came up with this figure of about 39.000 — came up with this figure of about 39,000 people, residents who died in cairns _ 39,000 people, residents who died in cairns but _ 39,000 people, residents who died in cairns. but about the telegraph story— cairns. but about the telegraph story is— cairns. but about the telegraph story is saying is it is much higher than _ story is saying is it is much higher than that— story is saying is it is much higher than that because the cqc only counted — than that because the cqc only counted from the 10th of april last year up _ counted from the 10th of april last year up to— counted from the 10th of april last year up to march the 315t this year. this story— year up to march the 315t this year. this story is — year up to march the 315t this year. this story is saying people who managed — this story is saying people who managed care homes think that thousands of people actually died before _ thousands of people actually died before april the 10th last year, because — before april the 10th last year, because of this policy, apparent government policy, of discharging elderly— government policy, of discharging elderly residents who had covid, it turned _ elderly residents who had covid, it turned out, — elderly residents who had covid, it turned out, from hospitals into care homes _ turned out, from hospitals into care homes, where the infection spread like wildfire. and that is what has accounted — like wildfire. and that is what has accounted for many of these deaths. this is— accounted for many of these deaths. this is not— accounted for many of these deaths. this is not a — accounted for many of these deaths. this is not a story that is going to id this is not a story that is going to go away — this is not a story that is going to go away it— this is not a story that is going to go away. it has called for a public inquiry _ go away. it has called for a public inquiry. there are legal cases ongoing. _ inquiry. there are legal cases ongoing, brought by relatives whose parents _ ongoing, brought by relatives whose parents and members... family members— parents and members... family members died in the care homes and
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they want— members died in the care homes and they want answers, they want to see they want answers, they want to see the documents. they want to know who made _ the documents. they want to know who made what _ the documents. they want to know who made what decision when they want somebody— made what decision when they want somebody to be held accountable for this terrible tragedy that has occurred _ this terrible tragedy that has occurred in the pandemic. one of the worst— occurred in the pandemic. one of the worst and _ occurred in the pandemic. one of the worst and biggest death tolls of any particular— worst and biggest death tolls of any particular sector.— particular sector. james lewer, almost every — particular sector. james lewer, almost every time _ particular sector. james lewer, almost every time you - particular sector. james lewer, almost every time you and - particular sector. james lewer, almost every time you and i - particular sector. james lewer, | almost every time you and i talk particular sector. james lewer, - almost every time you and i talk on the papers i have to ask you, should there be an inquiry on a particular subject. sian mentioned it herself just now but should there be a proper inquiry into this? absolutely, if these numbers have come to light now, it's even worse than what we imagined in the first place. obviously for a lot of families it will be very difficult to hear this, as well. there without a doubt, they will have to be, for sure, james. it's obviously higher than we ever imagined it would be at the very start of the pandemic and it's got worse and, yeah, an inquiry without a doubt has to happen, for sure. �* , without a doubt has to happen, for sure. 3 without a doubt has to happen, for sure. �*, ., ,, , sure. let's look at the sunday times
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now. the sure. let's look at the sunday times now- the main _ sure. let's look at the sunday times now. the main story _ sure. let's look at the sunday times now. the main story in _ sure. let's look at the sunday times now. the main story in that - sure. let's look at the sunday times now. the main story in that paper. sure. let's look at the sunday times now. the main story in that paper is| now. the main story in that paper is about the chancellor, rishi sunak, dump travel rules to save holidays. lift restrictions now, chancellor urges pm. i should say, i had spent hours learning green, amber, amber plus, green watch list, red, i know will be territories on each of the lists and when they move around. it's the chancellor telling us forget all that, just travel? i’m forget all that, 'ust travel? i'm ve forget all that, just travel? i'm very impressed _ forget all that, just travel? i'm very impressed because most people find it— very impressed because most people find it incredibly confusing! what the chancellor is saying, he has written — the chancellor is saying, he has written to — the chancellor is saying, he has written to borisjohnson the chancellor is saying, he has written to boris johnson and is asking — written to boris johnson and is asking the prime ministerjust to ease _ asking the prime ministerjust to ease the — asking the prime ministerjust to ease the travel restrictions. you know _ ease the travel restrictions. you know. to — ease the travel restrictions. you know, to get rid of them. a lot of people _ know, to get rid of them. a lot of people are — know, to get rid of them. a lot of people are finding them very confusing and very off— putting, people are finding them very confusing and very off—putting, this traffic— confusing and very off—putting, this traffic light system of green, amber and red _ traffic light system of green, amber and red. the idea you have to isolate — and red. the idea you have to isolate or— and red. the idea you have to isolate or have tests, depending which _ isolate or have tests, depending which category of country you are travelling — which category of country you are travelling to and when you are coming — travelling to and when you are coming back and the cost involved in the quarantining in hotels stop so
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rishi _ the quarantining in hotels stop so rishi sunak is saying, look, you know. _ rishi sunak is saying, look, you know. so— rishi sunak is saying, look, you know, so many of us are now doubled jabbed, _ know, so many of us are now doubled jabbed, let's— know, so many of us are now doubled jabbed, let's have some faith in our vaccination — jabbed, let's have some faith in our vaccination programme. you don't need _ vaccination programme. you don't need all— vaccination programme. you don't need all these very confusing and complicated travel restrictions, some _ complicated travel restrictions, some of— complicated travel restrictions, some of which are more draconian, he says. _ some of which are more draconian, he says then _ some of which are more draconian, he says then our— some of which are more draconian, he says, then our european competitors. he is— says, then our european competitors. he is really— says, then our european competitors. he is really saying, let's get rid of them — he is really saying, let's get rid of them and have a much simpler system, — of them and have a much simpler system, which will enable british people _ system, which will enable british people to — system, which will enable british people to go on holiday abroad this summer— people to go on holiday abroad this summer without all this worry and confusion — summer without all this worry and confusion about whether or not they would _ confusion about whether or not they would have — confusion about whether or not they would have to quarantine and how much _ would have to quarantine and how much it— would have to quarantine and how much it will cost them and all the rest of— much it will cost them and all the rest of it — much it will cost them and all the rest of it. , ., , much it will cost them and all the rest of it. , . , , rest of it. james lewer, 'ust -auttin rest of it. james lewer, 'ust putting the i rest of it. james lewer, 'ust putting the traffic �* rest of it. james lewer, 'ust putting the traffic light h rest of it. james lewer, justj putting the traffic light sight rest of it. james lewer, just i putting the traffic light sight of things, not as a traffic light spokesman but the idea was with red list countries, the virus is not being checked properly and unless there is a hotel quarantine system, ten days in a government managed hotel, you run the risk of what happened in april, where people with the delta variant, when it was less
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known, come in and then that spreads. there is a ration, a reason to a traffic light system which albeit confusing does offer protection to people in in the uk, surely? protection to people in in the uk, surel ? ~ , , protection to people in in the uk, surel? i, , surely? well, yes, absolutely. i think the key — surely? well, yes, absolutely. i think the key to _ surely? well, yes, absolutely. i think the key to all _ surely? well, yes, absolutely. i think the key to all of _ surely? well, yes, absolutely. i think the key to all of this - surely? well, yes, absolutely. i think the key to all of this is - think the key to all of this is testing. bringing the cost of testing. bringing the cost of testing down as well, i think that is the biggest problem about this altogether. if the testing is cheaper for people, then altogether. if the testing is cheaperfor people, then i think it resolves the problem. i think the government need to work on that. i think the last time i was on this paper review with you we were talking about the fact the government were working on bringing the cost of testing down fast i think that is the key, if everyone thinks their test will cost them under £20, i think that will be all right. at the moment, i think they are £100 each for these pcr tests and that is where the problem comes in, especially when you have big families travelling together, that is the issue with it, i think. i is the issue with it, i think. i have put off talking about the olympics as long as i can. i would have had the whole review about the
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olympics if it was up to me but luckily i am not in charge! anyway, the sunday times, there is a picture of the successful medley relay team on the top. his and hers gold rush showing the four by 100 metre, there they are in the glory in colour, adam peaty on his second gold medal for that we don't have to go into the actual sport of this but i want to bring out a wider point in this, sian griffiths. this was a new event, a medley event, a mixed event, a medley event, a mixed event, having men and women competing together. what did you make of that?— competing together. what did you make of that? yes, it was a mixed event and — make of that? yes, it was a mixed event and it _ make of that? yes, it was a mixed event and it was _ make of that? yes, it was a mixed event and it was not _ make of that? yes, it was a mixed event and it was not the _ make of that? yes, it was a mixed event and it was not the only - event and it was not the only inaugural— event and it was not the only inaugural mixed event. there was the inaugural— inaugural mixed event. there was the inaugural olympic triathlon as well, which _ inaugural olympic triathlon as well, which we _ inaugural olympic triathlon as well, which we also won a gold medal in withjonny— which we also won a gold medal in withjonny brownlee and which we also won a gold medal in with jonny brownlee and i which we also won a gold medal in withjonny brownlee and i think it's really— withjonny brownlee and i think it's really great that we have these mixed — really great that we have these mixed teams for the first time. it is happening in schools already. it
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used _ is happening in schools already. it used to— is happening in schools already. it used to be — is happening in schools already. it used to be that you have these stereotypical sports, girls played netball _ stereotypical sports, girls played netball and boys played football and never _ netball and boys played football and never the _ netball and boys played football and never the twain met. now you are increasingly having mixed teams with boys and _ increasingly having mixed teams with boys and girls play netball or football _ boys and girls play netball or football in the same teams. to see it coming _ football in the same teams. to see it coming through in athletics i 'ust it coming through in athletics i just think— it coming through in athletics i just think it's fantastic because why shouldn't it happen question i could _ why shouldn't it happen question i could think of very few sports where men and _ could think of very few sports where men and women can't compete in mixed teams _ men and women can't compete in mixed teams. maybe rugby. ithink this men and women can't compete in mixed teams. maybe rugby. i think this is so refreshing and it is so exciting to watch — so refreshing and it is so exciting to watch and it is fantastic that we have _ to watch and it is fantastic that we have won — to watch and it is fantastic that we have won two gold medals in these new inaugural mixed events today. it new inaugural mixed events today. [if is new inaugural mixed events today. is really new inaugural mixed events today. it is really interesting, james lewer, particularly watching the swimming event, where our anchor swimmer was anna, it was a woman, up against on that leg the fastest male swimmer in the world. clearly she did have a big lead, otherwise she wouldn't have won but as sian was saying, people compete in mixed sports days
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announced the olympics seems to have taken some of that to their games, to the uk's advantage because for some reason the uk is incredibly good at knowing how this works. yes. good at knowing how this works. yes, i think it's good at knowing how this works. yes, i think it's a — good at knowing how this works. yes, i think it's a really _ good at knowing how this works. is: i think it's a really good good at knowing how this works. i9:3 i think it's a really good thing. the other thing about this, while i think male and female swimmers training together will help improve each other as well, i think that happens at a lower level in schools and going into higher level as well stop that can only be a good thing. by stop that can only be a good thing. by the way, haven't the swimmers been absolutely brilliant for team gb in this olympics?! the amount they have won and it's great to see. i remember many years ago, we hardly got any medals in the swimming pool at all that now it seems ever since adam peaty has come on the scene, it's continued to get better and better from there. it's continued to get better and betterfrom there. brilliant it's continued to get better and better from there. brilliant and a great olympics so far. this way, it's been lovely to see the news is full of olympics rather than coronavirus! positive news on the front of the papers and across the entirety of the news as well, i think. t entirety of the news as well, i think. ., entirety of the news as well, i think. . , :, :, think. i am tempted to wonder
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whether or _ think. i am tempted to wonder whether or not _ think. i am tempted to wonder whether or not if _ think. i am tempted to wonder whether or not if adam - think. i am tempted to wonder whether or not if adam peaty i think. i am tempted to wonder i whether or not if adam peaty has been asked to take part in the olympics to give some good cheer. the independent front page, elaine thompson—herah, the fastest woman on the planet. a stunning race. this is one event where not women's sport isn't rising, it is at the top. this might be the great race of the games. forget the men's100 metres now usain bolt has gone. this was all about the women.— now usain bolt has gone. this was all about the women. yes, this is a fabulous picture _ all about the women. yes, this is a fabulous picture and _ all about the women. yes, this is a fabulous picture and it _ all about the women. yes, this is a fabulous picture and it is _ all about the women. yes, this is a fabulous picture and it is a - all about the women. yes, this is a fabulous picture and it is a great i fabulous picture and it is a great headline, — fabulous picture and it is a great headline, fastest woman on the planet — headline, fastest woman on the planet. elaine thompson—herah took lold planet. elaine thompson—herah took gold and _ planet. elaine thompson—herah took gold and jamaica took silver and bronze _ gold and jamaica took silver and bronze as— gold and jamaica took silver and bronze as well in that race. it is a brilliant _ bronze as well in that race. it is a brilliant picture, isn't it? she is there _ brilliant picture, isn't it? she is there mid — brilliant picture, isn't it? she is there mid stride, mouth open with 'oy. there mid stride, mouth open with joy~ an _ there mid stride, mouth open with joy. an olympic record, 10.61 seconds — joy. an olympic record, 10.61 seconds and a really exciting race.
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sadly— seconds and a really exciting race. sadly for— seconds and a really exciting race. sadly for us, dean asher—smith —— dina _ sadly for us, dean asher—smith —— dina asher—smith has a hamstring injury— dina asher—smith has a hamstring injury and — dina asher—smith has a hamstring injury and didn't make the final. jumping — injury and didn't make the final. jumping intojust so james gets a jumping into just so james gets a point, elaine is a very happy when she wins. look at shelly—ann fraser—pryce map face. they didn't really embrace at the end. sport sometimes brings people together but in this case it couldn't even bring team—mates together, very briefly? absolutely. a 1— to — three. very competitive. i think they have different training regimes going on. getting that gold medal but clearly they are not best of friends. probably a bit more rivals than friends. to probably a bit more rivals than friends. :, ., , . ., , friends. to say the least. james lewer and _ friends. to say the least. james lewer and sian _ friends. to say the least. james lewer and sian griffiths, - friends. to say the least. james lewer and sian griffiths, thank| friends. to say the least. james i lewer and sian griffiths, thank you both to use so much. james and sian will be back with me and about 45 minutes. goodbye for now.
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hello there. july 2021 has been very changeable, hasn't it? one week, we've had extreme heat. the next, very windy, damaging gusts of winds or heavy rain and it's going to stay changeable for our week ahead, i'm afraid. this weather front here, well, it's the dividing line between a northerly flow and some cooler air that's starting to arrive now. you can see that by the yellow tones. the warmer russet�*s being squeezed down into the near continent and so that means for sunday, where that frontal system is sitting, there's the potential south of the m4 corridor for a cluster of sharp, slow—moving thundery downpours. behind it, cooler, quieter. it will be largely dry, although quite a bit of cloud around but a noticeable difference with the feel of the weather if you are going to be out and about, particularly in scotland and northern ireland. highs of 12—17 degrees. a week ago, you had temperatures in the high 20s, low 30s. so that is going to certainly feel much noticeably cooler. now, that weather front will continue to ease away sunday night into monday and then allow
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this ridge of high pressure to build and quieten things down for a couple of days at least. and so that means on monday, it will be a cooler start but a cloudy one for many. we could see single figures quite widely in scotland first thing in the morning. the early morning showers across that kent coast, well, they will tend to fade away. monday will be a cloudier day but it should be largely fine and dry. that said, we still can't rule out the risk of an odd isolated shower and because the winds are so light, they could be quite slow—moving and temperatures really quite subdued, really, for the beginning of august. 12—20 celsius, 68 fahrenheit. as we move into tuesday, again, that dry story stays with us. a greater chance of seeing a little more sunshine on tuesday. still the risk of a few isolated showers but temperatures should peak at around 21 degrees, that's 70 fahrenheit. now we will start to see a change, potentially, from the west on wednesday but not for all of us. this area of low pressure will tend to move in and the position of the low could change.
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if it's a little bit further north, it could bring its rain into scotland. but at the moment, it looks likely that we'll see some showery outbreaks of rain along western fringes. eastern areas will start off dry with some sunshine in the morning, clouding over a little later on in the afternoon. and with the winds swinging back round to a lighter southerly direction, maybe with the sunshine, a degree 01’ so warmer. we could see 21 or 22 degrees, 72 fahrenheit. a similar story as we move into thursday. that low quickly weakens and will be replaced by another pushing in from the south—west, but again, the position of this low is still very much subject to question. you'll need to keep abreast of the forecast for thursday. if it's just that little bit further north, it could take its rain into central parts of wales and central and southern england as well. but at the moment, it looks likely to just be along southern fringes, with some showery outbreaks of rain out to the west as well. top temperatures, again, around 20 or 21 celsius. thejet stream has been pretty active just recently and it's been to the south of the uk.
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as soon as we're on the north side, that's the coolest side of the jet but the jet will weaken. that's going to potentially allow an area of high pressure to build for the weekend and then the jet stream sits to the north. so, we hopefully should get a little bit warmer but you can see it wants to squeeze back in on sunday. so, it isn't a consistent picture by any means. it's a really messy story to try and paint, i'm afraid. drier with lighter winds to begin with, some blustery showers through the middle part of the week and the start of the weekend looks promising.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. fierce fighting in afghanistan — three cities are battling the taliban. the taliban already control vast swathes of rural territory in afghanistan. now they're really pushing in on a number of cities, advancing right to the heart of lashkar gah, capital of helmand province. more than a dozen aid trucks have reached the capital of ethiopia's war—torn tigray region. medical experts are warning that an oxygen monitoring device called a pulse oximeter works less well for people with darker skin tones. borisjohnson and his wife, carrie, have announced they are expecting a second child. their first child, wilfred, was born in april last year. and as jamaica's elaine thompson—herah takes gold in the olympic hundred—metre final, we'll look ahead to day
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nine of the tokyo games.

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