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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 31, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at five... it's known as �*super saturday�* and there was a great start for team gb in the tokyo olympics with a gold and a world record in the axioom mixed medley final team work makes dream work — another gold, in the triathlon mixed relay event — and finally a first gold medal forjonny brownlee at his third olympic games victory for elaine thompson—herah ofjamaica in the women's 100—metres final in tokyo. but before that there was heartbreakfor team gb sprinter, dina asher—smith — who had to withdraw and i'm austin halewood at the bbc sports desk — with all the latest on the medals, the records and the upsets in tokyo
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another medalfor team gb on saturday — a bronze for boxer karriss artingstall in the featherweight division. afghan security forces are battling to defend three key cities from advances by the taliban. reports say militants have breached front lines in herat medical experts are warning that an oxygen monitoring device, called an oximeter, works less well for people with darker skin tones bbc news understands the government is no longer considering making it compulsory for students to be fully—vaccinates to attend lectures in england borisjohnson and his wife carrie have announced they are expecting a second child. their first child wilfred was born in april last year. and coming up at 5.30 — we'll be looking at the best and worst of this week's film and dvd releases in the film review.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. it's been another great day for team gb at the tokyo olympics — adding two more gold medals to their tally in new events involving both men and women. the first came in the triathlon mixed relay. then, in the swimming pool, great britain claimed another in the mixed axioom medley. in athletics, jamaica secured a clean sweep — first, second and third in the women's 100 metres. elaine thompson—herah stretched into the lead to take the gold medal in an olympic record time of 10.61 seconds. it comes as one of team gb�*s great medal hopes — dina asher—smith — saw her bid for the podium come to an early end afterfailing to qualify
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for the 100 metre final. she says she's still struggling with a hamstring issue and has now withdrawn from the 200 metre event. so where does that leave the medals table? well, team gb remain sixth — they have picked up eight gold medals and 28 in total. at the top is china, with 21 golds and 46 overall. for a full round up of the action — let's cross to austin halewood at the bbc sport centre. i at the bbc sport centre. just don't know how you a keeping ijust don't know how you are keeping up with all this action! it is a bit of a challenge. lots going on in tokyo and lots of medals for team gb on another really good day for them injapan. what a final of the women's 100 meters it was. jamaica's elaine thompson—herah ran the second fastest time in history
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to succesfully defend her olympic 100 metres title. she beat her compatriot shelley—anne fraser pryce — with a time of 10.61 —that times just 12—hundredths of a seconds short of the world record set 33 years ago by american florence griffith—joyner. and shericka jackson completed a jamaican 1—2—3 in tokyo. britain's deryl neita finished 8th in the final. a really quick final of the women's 100 metres. there were great hopes for britain's dina asher—smith in the 100 meters... but she failed to reach the final after revealing that she'd been struggling with a hamstring injury. she's even had to pull out of her stronger event, the 200 metres. and she was understandably emotional, as she explained her decision. i am going to pull out. john just had that conversation with me, and that's the one that... because as reigning world champion, you just... and i was in such good shape. you just know that olympic champion is not too much of a further step. i'm really proud to have been able
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to execute my races here today, and i'm really proud of everything that i've done to this point. but when you're talking about the standard that i want to be at and i know i am capable of, sometimes if you... there's plenty more championships for me to come and kill. and in the men's100—metres heats, european champion zharnel hughes ran a season's best time of 10.04, to reach the semi—finals along with team—mates cj ujah and reece prescod. but away from the athletics, it was a golden saturday for team gb in tokyo, and it was a day when team work has been the key to success, firstly in the new triathlon relay and then after that back in the pool — where the british team are enjoying their most successful games, in over a century, as adam wild reports...
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the triathlon will be golden for great britain! it's the mixed medley relay, great britain win the gold by miles! for all the individual brilliance, in tokyo today it was teamwork that triumphed. super saturday had barely begun, but team gb was already looking at four new olympic champions in this, the inaugural triathlon relay. jessica learmonth led the way for britain, then the turn ofjonny brownlee. individual bronze in london, silver in rio, this his final olympic race, a last chance to complete the set. georgia taylor—brown had given britain a 21—second advantage, and although alex yee was dramatically caught for a moment, when he came to the finish, he and gb were in a class of their own. he will win the gold. four new british olympic champions before breakfast. forjonny brownlee, gold at last. the olympics, i've completed it! i've been waiting for that one. yeah, it feels absolutely amazing. third olympics, and to finally walk away with olympic gold, and we did everything we possibly could.
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whilst over in the pool, team gb have surpassed expectations. now a moment for the team's finest to come together. the mixed medley relay, another new olympic event. in the company of the finest swimmers on earth, britain have already proved they can excel. here, they were doing it again. kathleen dawson gave way to the peerless adam peaty. he did what he always seems to do, before james guy powered britain into the narrowest of leads, and here was anna hopkin on the final leg. great britain are going| to win their fourth gold in the swimming pool! one word that has changed the whole team is belief. we've got champions who believe we can win, we've got champions who believe we can get world records, and if you've got one belief, you can build everything around that. two team relays, two olympic team titles — another golden day for team gb. karriss artingstall claimed another boxing medalfor team gb in tokyo. she was guaranteed a medal on tuesday by reaching the women's featherweight semi—finals. but she was denied the chance to fight for gold, narrowly losing
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to japan's sena irie, by a 3—2 split—decision. lewis hamilton will start on pole position as he chases a record ninth victory at the hungarian grand prix. he set the fastest time, on his first, flying lap — in the final part of qualifying, with his main championship rival max verstappen in third. hamilton trails the dutchman by 8 points in the standings and after qualifying hamilton was booed by dutch fans... something he says only insprires him more. that's all the sport for now but there's lots more on the bbc sport website, including the start of the football league season in scotland and live text commentary of the second lions test match against south africa. let's take a look at the latest coronavirus figures for the uk
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a further 26,1114 new infections have been recorded. 71 people have died in the latest 24—hour period. that's those who've died within 28 days of a positive covid test. on to vaccinations — over 46.8 million people have received their first dose of a covid vaccine. and 38.1 million people have now received two doses. that is 72.1% of the adult population. medical experts are warning that an oxygen monitoring device, called a pulse oximeter, works less well for people with darker skin tones. nhs england and the medicines regulator, the mhra, say pulse oximeters can overestimate the amount of oxygen being taken in. authorities are advising patients to speak to health care professionals before using the devices and not to rely on a single reading.
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the director of the nhs race and health observatory, dr habib naqvi, says concerns about oximeters' reliability have been mounting. although a valuable clinical tool, what we do know is that clinicians are increasingly becoming aware of the potential errors or inconsistencies in the interpretation associated with pulse oximeter readings, and so we need to have these points in mind when using these devices. this is an example of health inequalities that we see, as an example of the disproportionate, kind of, stratification that we have in terms of accessing health care. what we do know is that oxygen is probably the most common drug used in the care of patients who present with medical emergencies, and healthcare professionals are increasingly reliant on the pulse oximeter to detect early deterioration and to inform clinical decision—making, so we need to get this right. earlier i spoke to dr olamide dada, one of the authors of the report.
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i asked her how widespread this issue was. when we're considering the use of these devices, how widely accessible they are to both patients and how frequently they're also used in clinical environments, in hospitals and gps, it's really important that both patients, members of the public and clinicians are aware that the readings are less accurate and can be less accurate in darker—skinned patients. dr dada, are we talking... which way are the results skewed, lower or higher? so, the devices are actually likely to overestimate oxygen saturations, particularly in black patients, as well as other ethnic minority groups. so that means black patients... a particular study conducted in america found that black patients were three times more likely to have that oxygen saturations reading overestimated
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in comparison to white patients. i'm really glad that you've brought up america because there was a report that was conducted, some research at the end of 2020, and this was highlighted, because a lot of people have these oximeters at home to monitor themselves if they have contracted covid—19. however, there was also a report back in 2007 that, again, highlighted the issue with people with darker skin. why hasn't this been picked up? why hasn't it changed? why haven't they fixed it? that's a question for all of us and we're hoping that as the pandemic, as it's shone a light on inequalities, as well as disproportionate impact on ethnic minority groups, it is very possible that the oximeter might have contributed to that outcome, and even though it was mentioned a few years ago, the most recent study had a much larger population that was studied, further supporting the fact that these devices are likely to oversetimate the readings
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in darker—skinned patients. and when we consider the impact of this, you know, this could contribute whether or not people come into hospital, how soon they come into hospital, what care is provided when they do come into hospital. the fact that if your oxygen readings are overestimated, that means you're likely to have a lower reading. are you receiving the oxygen that is necessary to adequately treat the patient at that time? are these patients, if they're admitted to intensive care units, are they, again, receiving the treatment that they require? of course, this can have a significant impact on health outcomes. and unfortunately the pandemic has provided a suitable opening to further explore this area. that was a doctor speaking to me earlier. the prime minister's wife, carriejohnson, has announced she is pregnant. this will be the couple's second child together. announcing the news on instagram, carriejohnson also revealed
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that she had a miscarriage at the start of the year. she wrote, "i feel incredibly blessed to be pregnant again but i've also felt like a bag of nerves." earlier, i spoke to our political correspondent, nick eardley. carriejohnson �*s posted on instagram that she is expecting around christmas. remember, she and borisjohnson were married in may in that fairly small ceremony at westminster cathedral. now they are expecting their second child around christmas time. it is pretty rare for a prime minister to have children while in office. i think there's only been four in the last 150 years or so, so it is quite a rare thing. but in this post carriejohnson has put up on her instagram page, she's also revealed that she had a miscarriage at the start of this year.
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i want to read you a particular point of it which she's put up, saying "i feel incredibly blessed to be pregnant again, but i also felt like a bag of nerves. fertility issues can be very hard for people, particularly when on platforms like instagram it looks like everything is only ever going well. ifound it a real comfort to hear from people who'd also experienced lost, so i hope that in some very small way sharing this might help others too.". so, happy news for the prime minister and his wife, but also some sadness in that post as well. and mrsjohnson saying that she hopes by sharing her own experience, she might be able to help others. elaine thompson—herah ofjamaica has won the women's 100—metre final at the tokyo games — in a new olympic record time of 10.61 seconds medical experts are warning that an oxygen monitoring device, called a pulse oximeter, works less well for people
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with darker skin tones and borisjohnson and his wife carrie have announced they're expecting a second child. their son, wilfred, was born in april last year. afghan security forces are battling to defend three key cities from advances by the taliban. reports from herat in western afghanistan said the militants had broken through front lines, but a local official said that government forces were moving cautiously to try to avoid civilian casualties. fighting is also continuing in kandahar and lashkar gah in the south. hundreds of people are reported to be fleeing their homes. secunder kermani has sent this update from kabul. this is the most serious moment in the weeks of intensified fighting
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we've been seeing in afghanistan. the taliban already control vast swathes of rural territories in afghanistan and now they are really pushing into a number of cities, advancing to the heart of lashkar gar city in the southern province of helmand. one report said the taliban had reached within 300 metres of the governor's of this which is really the heart of lashkar gar. fresh troops have been sent into the city, including special forces. troops have been sent into the city, including specialforces. one troops have been sent into the city, including special forces. one local force said that the afghan air force, they believe, i reluctant to carrier air strikes because the fighting is taking place in such a central, catch congested part of the city. meanwhile, ordinary afghans caught in the middle of all of this, one hospital run by the italian ngo and urgency of addressing all its
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beds are completely full. we have seen fighting in and around the city displacing many people towards the city. now those people will be caught up again in this latest offensive of this latest push by the taliban and of course that is fighting going on elsewhere in the country too. herat in the rest of the country, this is the third day of fighting that has been taking place there between the taliban and government forces who have been backed up by a pro—government militia as well as last night american air strikes. there's also been fighting in kandahar so a really critical time for the country and for so many ordinary people because in the middle of all this awful violence. because in the middle of all this awfulviolence. —— because in the middle of all this awful violence. —— caught in the middle of all this awful violence. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet has been speaking to the eu's envoy for afghanistan tomas niklasson in kabul, on how serious this moment is.
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the best realistic scenario is one where the taliban offensive is held back. where there is a bit of push back, where there is a bit of rebalancing. all these nice words that still mean further suffering, further deaths, further larger number of afghans dying on both sides, more people on the run, leaving their homes. but with this recalibration, rebalancing, the taliban would then, after some time, be ready to come back to negotiations in doha — or to start, actually, negotiations in doha in earnest — to find a negotiated solution to afghanistan's problems. american military forces have reportedly boarded an israeli—operated oil tanker to assist it after a british and a romanian member of its crew were killed by an apparent drone strike. israel has accused iran of being behind the attack — the country's foreign minister blaming "iranian terrorism".
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the mv mercer street, operated by the london—based company zodiac maritime, was off oman�*s coast in the arabian sea when the incident occurred on thursday. an investigation has been launched, after the body of a 5—year—old boy was recovered from a river in south wales. officers were called to the scene, near pandy park in the village of sam near bridgend at 5:45 this morning. police have appealed for information from anyone who was in the area at the time. let's get the latest from our wales reporter, liz clements. this is such a tragic story. what more can _ this is such a tragic story. what more can you — this is such a tragic story. what more can you tell— this is such a tragic story. what more can you tell us? _ this is such a tragic story. what more can you tell us? it - this is such a tragic story. what more can you tell us? it was - this is such a tragic story. what more can you tell us? it was at| this is such a tragic story. what. more can you tell us? it was at 545 this morning when police were called to a report of consent for a missing five—year—old child in bridgend. —— the port of concern. they found the body of the child in a river near a park and he was taken to the prince of wales hospital where it was
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concerned the child had died. an investigation is ongoing into the circumstances of the incident and the police are keen to anyone who was in the area at around 545 this morning you may have information about how the child ended up in the water. they have called it a tragic incident and are asking the public not to speculate about the incident on social media as this is an active investigation. the family is being supported by specially trained officers. we supported by specially trained officers. ~ . ., officers. we will leave it there for now. officers. we will leave it there for nova thank _ officers. we will leave it there for now. thank you _ officers. we will leave it there for now. thank you very _ officers. we will leave it there for now. thank you very much. - bbc news has been told that the government is no longer considering making it compulsory for students to be fully vaccinated against the coronavirus to attend lectures in england. ministers had previously refused to rule out a requirement to be double—jabbed on university campuses, and said the decision would be taken in september. our political correspondent pete saull says this comes in the context of the controversial decision to consider so called vaccine
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passports in other areas. from the end of september, if you want into a nightclub, it will be a question of if you're notjabbed — or double—jabbed — you're not coming in. but ministers have been floating other settings where that might be the case, too. already it's started to open up international travel for people who've had both jabs and the idea was that once university students return from their summer break in the autumn, they will have to have both jabs to go to lectures or even stay in halls of residence. that was something they were looking at but i do understand that has been shelved, that particular proposal. meanwhile, the conversations about lots of other things, premier league football, for example, continue. why did they go back on that proposal then? i think there were two key reasons. the first being logistics,
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how could universities police this? and there were potentially some legal questions, too, because when you get an offer of an university place, that is considered to be legally binding. i think ministers are also aware that unease is growing on conservative backbenches about this wider issue of vaccine passports. the leader of the house of commons, jacob rees—mogg said last night that it wouldn't be the end of the world to have to show proof of vaccination to gain entry to venues, but he also said we should protect our ancient freedoms. and i think that sentiment about freedom is one that is shared very widely across the conservative party, and the sense that a lot of people out there might be uneasy about having to show papers to get into anywhere, whether it be the pub, the restaurant, nightclub, whatever. i think the government now feeling the heat on this issue and might ultimately decide the use of vaccine passports won't be as widespread as was thought a couple of months ago. have they laid an alternative for
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the return to university for students? not specifically. initially, they said that this would not be about covid certification in september. testing will clearly play a part of the mix as well. but the hope is by that stage, the case numbers will be down and hopefully things will start to return to normal. the singer, kt tunstall, has been speaking to the bbc about her decision to pull out of an upcoming us tour, due to problems with her hearing. the brit award winner, went completely deaf in her left ear 3 years ago. earlier this month, she noticed the early signs of deterioration starting in her right ear and decided to act. she's been speaking to our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson. # suddenly i see this is what i want to be # suddenly i see...# kt tunstall has been playing live for three decades, often doing 200 shows a year. next week, she was to start a three—month us tour
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with hall & oates, but what is happening to her hearing has caused her to pull out. it's almost like a siren goes off and you suddenly get this woo—oo—oo, and it's just a pulse of a noise. the other thing that you can get is that suddenly you can't hear anything and it feels like someone's put a vacuum over your head. her plan is now to space out live shows, allowing more recovery time, but the brit award—winning singer has been struggling with her hearing since the end of 2007. i got off a long haul flight and i was actually going to a spice girls concert, and i had a nap before i was going to go to the gig, and i woke up and i felt really discombobulated, and something was up with my left ear and i had a really, really loud ringing. i couldn't hear things
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like the shower or running water, i couldn't hear crisp packets, i couldn't hear the indicator on the car. kt tunstall leaves her hearing problems are caused by the stress kt tunstall believes her hearing problems are caused by the stress to her body of being on the road, rather than by loud music. things got worse in 2018 during a us tour, when she went permanently deaf in her left ear. when i saw a couple of specialists, they don't really know an awful lot about the inner ear — it's so fine and so complex. i also was told that the more deaf you go, the less likely it is that you'll get your hearing back, and i was at, like, 98% or something. i can't hear anything in that ear. so, i can't wear a hearing aid in that ear because there's nothing going in. your hearing is deteriorating rapidly. deafness in musicians was a theme explored in the oscar—winning film, sound of metal. i can't hear you, do. you understand me? i can't hear you!
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kt tunstall thought it was excellent and hopes it leads to more understanding of the issue. have you thought about what your life would be like if you were no longer able to play live? i would be really, really sorry to not be able to do it any more. but i think that the decision i am making with how i'm approaching my career here is to really carve a way of life that allows me to keep playing live. totally intend to continue, butjust at a slightly different pace now. colin patterson, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. sunny spells and scattered showers for many of us through the afternoon. quite a lot of cloud
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generally across the country. glad sitting through eastern scotland, north—east england, widespread showers in central and southern england as well, odd rumble of thunder but with some sunshine we could see temperatures sitting at 21 celsius, 17 fahrenheit, a little bit cooler further north and that cooler air is set to descend steadily south behind this cold front. that's going to continue to enhance and share was the sunday four southern parts of england in particular. some of those showers, as the ice about open up and the wins for lighter could be heavy and slow moving still with the odd rumble of thunder so that's going to be an issue across central and southern england. behind it sunny spells, fewer showers, but not as warm as it has been of late. top temperatures 12 to 21 degrees. hello and welcome to the film review with me, mark kermode,
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rounding up the best new movies available for viewing in cinemas and in the home. try and get it. hold on. come on. igot it! i don't got it. no, no, no! for goodness' sake! just leave me alone, that was a disaster! didn't go the way i planned. a couple of decades ago, disney conjured a blockbuster film franchise out of a theme park ride in the form of pirates of the caribbean, spawning a string of witless, turgid stinkers that have jointly grossed over $4.5 billion, proving that old hollywood adage that no one ever went broke underestimating the audience's intelligence. now we have jungle cruise, the latest big screen amusement park spin off featuring action, adventure, star names, globetrotting scenery and splashy effects. the difference is that this time, it's actually quite good.
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here we go. sometimes itjust needs a bit of a... nobody touches my engine but me. what did ijust... there you go. emily blunt is doctor lily houghton, an early 20th—century scientist adventurer seeking the mythical tree of life, with which she hopes to benefit mankind. dwayne "the rock" johnson is frank wolff, the steamboat skipper who agrees to provide passage through the amazon rivers, but who has an agenda of his own. my brother and i are looking for passage upriver. please go away. i have a lot of money. directed by jaume collet—serra, whose cv includes a string of liam neeson actioners, alongside the stripped—down shark attack thriller the shallows, jungle cruise is romping popcorn entertainment, tailor—made for the summer movie market. there are debts to the stop motion monsters of the old ray harryhausen movies and a knowing nod to the �*80s adventure romancing the stone, but it's the cast that really makes this fly. come on, lady.
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just as he did with the surprisingly likeablejumanji reboot, johnson once again proves himself a reliably winning blockbuster presence — mixing heroic heft with comic chops to crowd pleasing effect. as for blunt, whose recent hits range from mary poppins returns to a quiet place: part two, she continues to demonstrate why she's one of the silver screen's most versatile stars, with her running through the physical paces of an action sequence or relishing the wit of a verbal sparring match. in the supporting roles, jack whitehall has fun as lily's less adventurous brother, mcgregor, while paul giamatti and jesse plemons rise to the challenge of roles that call for maximum scenery chewing. oh, my god.
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hello! it all adds up to a whole bunch of fun — not citizen kane, perhaps, but infinitely preferable to the antics of captainjack sparrow and his insufferable crew. torpedo. jungle cruise is in cinemas and on disney+ with premier access now. # never thought it would come to this... # i remember every little thing... # like fighting in the playground... # cos some good looking boy... # had started to hang around... from the wilds of the amazon to the remote islands of scotland with limbo, a low—key, bittersweet comedy drama from writer—director ben sharrock.
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bifa nominated amir el—masry is omar, a syrian refugee who finds himself, along with other fellow asylum—seekers, placed on an isolated island while his claim is processed. omar is a musician who carries with him an oud, the instrument on which he once played the tunes of his homeland. housemate farhad, played by vikash bhai, dreams of being omar�*s agent. but, exiled to this alien nether world, omar keeps his instrument in its case, silent and unplayed. meanwhile, the detainees endure toe—curling classes preparing them for life in the uk, excruciating exercises that recall the tragicomic vignettes of swedish film—maker roy andersson. limbo is a beautifully poignant and brilliantly observed piece that balances deadpan comedy with heartfelt empathy to impressive effect. at times, it's laugh—out—loud funny, but other times, it's heartbreakingly sad, but crucially, it's never trite,
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cliched orformulaic. on the contrary, it's a drama about real people whose situation is so absurd that it can make you laugh and cry simultaneously. limbo is in cinemas now. back in 1971, luchino visconti's film death in venice made a screen icon of bjorn andresen, a swedish teenager whom the director famously declared to be "the most beautiful boy in the world." in the film, adapted from thomas mann's 1913 novella, andresen played the youth with whom dirk bogarde's ageing composer becomes obsessed. an obsession that was mirrored in real life, when film fans around the world fell in love
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with the fictional figure of tadzio. yet for andresen, death in venice also turned him into a commodity, an object to be marketed around the world with little regard for his own well—being. now in the documentary the most beautiful boy in the world, andresen looks back over his life, on the struggles he endured in the wake of early fame and on the ghosts of a past filled with loss and uncertainty. from the disappearance of his mother when he was a child to his own harrowing memories of parenting, andresen�*s tale is a million miles away from the image of serene, self—possessed beauty projected by his overnight stardom. important questions are raised about the commodification of young bjorn, which is likened by one contributor to child abuse. but this documentary goes much further, following the strange twists and turns of andresen�*s life, including pop—culture stardom injapan, where he became a major influence on manga and anime artists, and an acting career that recently found him appearing in the folk horror hit midsommar.
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it's a remarkable life, and one that this sometimes disturbing but ultimately eye—opening documentary investigates with tact and sensitivity. you can find it in cinemas or online at dogwoof on demand, along with other platforms. each member is chosen for his or her own completely unique set of abilities. hey, guys, sorry i'm late! had to go number two. good to know. meanwhile, back in blockbuster land, we have the suicide squad, the latest addition to the dc extended universe which previously gave us the dismal suicide squad, to which this stand—alone sequel, whatever that means, adds an all—important definite article. it's all about the "the". margo robbie's harley quinn is back, alongside the likes of idris elba's bloodsport and john cena's peacemaker, all part of a ragtag team sent
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in by tough—as—nails viola davis to do battle with project starfish, a project that does exactly what it says on the tin. really. uh-huh. written and directed byjames gunn, the suicide squad is notable primarily for the fact that sylvester stallone voicing a talking shark doesn't even come close to being the most bonkers thing on screen. hand! yes, that is your hand. very good. we're all going to die. i hope so. no, this is a world in which a giant weasel is just another passenger on the plane and polka—dot man, a character who shoots polka—dots and whom gunn himself called the dumbest dc character of all time, gets ample tragicomic screen time. the result is a huge splurge of post—deadpool sweary splatter, in which limbs and logic get rent asunder and everything gets turned up to eleventy—stupid. starfish is a slang
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term for a butthole. think there's any connection? no. it's kind of fun in a shambolic, post—howard the duck way, and it's definitely better than suicide squad, without the the, although that's kind of like saying it's definitely better than slamming your thumb in the car door. it's a very low bar. peter capaldi gives it some welly as a villain with a head full of electrical appliances, and daniela melchior does her best to inject some heart and soul into the piece as the rodent—wrangling ratcatcher, too. if it sounds like your cup of tea, then my advice would be to see it on the biggest screen possible, where the sheer size and volume of it all can simply batter your brain into stupefied submission. the suicide squad is in cinemas now. throughout all the years that i've been making music, if you get on a tour bus
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with a bunch of musicians... ..eventually, the conversation will go to sparks. i'll leave you with news of another new documentary, this one from edgar wright, director of shaun of the dead, baby driver and the forthcoming last night in soho. in the sparks brothers, wright charts the stranger than fiction tale of ron and russell mael... we are sparks. dude. ..joint creators of one of pop's most enduringly indefinable and hugely influential enigmas. from experimental american art rock projects, to breakthrough uk chart hits, outlandish film dreams and insanely challenging concert tours, wright's energetic ode to sparks marries exhaustively researched archaeology with the sugar rush thrill of a heady teenage fan letter. aided by a bewildering array of interviewees from sex pistols' stevejones to weird al yankovic and richly illustrated with stills, clips and stop motion animation, wright lovingly documents sparks's
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century—straddling career, that has spawned 25 albums and seen the maels, whose musical annette recently opened the cannes film festival, crossed paths with everyone from todd rundgren to jacques tati. with such rich history to mind, it's unsurprising that this documentary seems at time to be a grand work of comic fantasy, an elaborate hoax by a film—maker with a sharp eye for a gag and a keen earfor a well—placed pop tune. a perfect fit for ron and russell. but what's most impressive is that the sparks brothers manages both to unpack and to preserve the air of mystery that's long surrounded the duo, creating a film that's every bit as dazzling as its subjects. the sparks brothers is in cinemas now. that's it for this week. thanks for watching the film review. i'm off for a few weeks now, but anna smith will be your host for next friday. there they are! frank, follow me! stop her!
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god, sorry, frank! it's all right, strong form. lighter wind today but quite a lot of cloud around and some showers as well. some of the shares have been heavy and thundery. look at this threatening weather watcher picture that was sent in earlier on. at the satellite picture, you conceive a cloud around. the bright white as storm evert which is in scandinavia. the best of any breaks through eastern areas. you can see that cluster of sharp showers developed through the course of the afternoon, stretching across south wales, central and southern england with rumbles of thunder mixed in. showers to the east of the pennines. over
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the next few hours, those showers should start to ease just a touch. as they cleared away through the night we will see the cloud break—up in places. quiet night to come. cooler in scotland, particularly in sheltered rural areas. scattered showers in the far north. we will start off tomorrow morning on a quiet note once again. this nuisance weather front to clear away and it's going to produce the threat of more sharp fund redone pause across southern fringes of england through the after noon. isolated showers across scotland and northern ireland but generally more dry weather. showers pushing south into the afternoon. hit and miss but not ruling out the odd rumble of thunder. top temperatures of 21, noticeably cooler further north. we
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had temperatures into the high 20s a week ago. relatively quiet start to the working week but the story becomes a little more complicated. if we look at details why that's going to happen we see this brief ridge of high pressure building in from monday to tuesday. from wednesday onwards, this weather front is going to start to bring the threat of more outbreaks of rain and areas of low pressure continue to move towards the end of the week. try to start but cooler than it has been. more wind and rain later on in the week.
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good evening. team gb have won two more gold medals at the tokyo olympics, both in new events where men and women compete together. there was further success for the swimming team, who took gold in the 4—by—100 metre mixed—medley relay. our sports editor dan roan was watching the action. a first for the olympics, but a familiar feeling for team gb. a third triathlon medal today in the inaugural mixed team event, but this time gold. with each athlete facing a 300 metre
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swim, 6.8 kilometre bike ride and two kilometre run, jess learmonth got britain's bid off to a great start before jonny brownlee then extended the lead in this, his third and final olympics. team gb still had their two silver medallists from the individual events to come. first georgia taylor—brown, and, for the final leg, alex yee, who powered home to seal a 14—second victory. after a bronze and silver in his previous two games, brownlee finally emulating brother alistair and claiming olympic gold. it's something i have wanted to do for a long time. i've chased that dream for a long time. i've seen my brother obviously achieve it twice and now i've done it and it feels amazing. introduced to try and improve gender balance, the new mixed team events have been one of the features of the games here in tokyo, and britain are certainly enjoying them. team gb's swimmers have already had a remarkable olympics, but it got even better in the 4x100 mixed medley relay.
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great britain will win their fourth gold in the swimming pool! anna hopkin sealing a stunning win and new world record after kathleen dawson, adam peaty and james guy had established a lead. this, a seventh medal for the team here. one more tomorrow and it will be british swimming's best ever games. dan roan, bbc news, tokyo. britain's fastest ever woman, dina asher—smith, has pulled out of the olympic 200m after revealing she tore her hamstring earlier this month. the 25—year—old failed to make the 100m final in tokyo — her team mate daryll neita finished eighth in the race. asher—smith spoke of her upset to our sports correspondent nathalie pirks. obviously the competitive... it's just the start, we'll let it go. we'll let the start go and let me cry. the customary smile replaced with tears. the fastest woman in british history had been hiding a secret.
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dina asher—smith. just five weeks ago she'd been told there was only a 2% chance she would make it to the start line after a torn hamstring. elaine thompson—herahl is going to win it, and it's going to be del ponte i who takes second place. and dina, she'sjust not finishing — she gets out well _ and couldn't hang on. out of the final, and minutes later the reigning world 200 metres champion confirmed she was out of that too, but would still run the relay. my idea for this olympic cycle was complete dominance, and obviously, ha, didn't manage it this time. but obviously we have three more years to the next olympics, and i know the kind of shape i'm in, i know the calibre of athlete i am and i know how talented i am, so it's frustrating to not be able to put it out when it matters. but at the end of the day, with the cards that i've been given, i did very, very well. and in no way does this change anything that's going to happen in the future. well, daryll neita might not have been the name on everyone's lips, but making the 100 metre final is a huge achievement.
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she is the first british woman to do so since 2008. but this would be a tough ask from a field stacked with talent and speed. elaine thompson—herah's just got the lead at the minute, _ and it's going to be the defending champion makes it two in a row. i 10.60 — it's an olympic record. a jamaican one—two—three. the pace was blistering, the celebrations between them somewhat frosty. not that elaine thompson—herah cared. my chest is tight because i am happy, i am so lost for words. but god is amazing. heartbreak, then, for the queen of british sprinting. but the jamaican dynasty continues its reign. natalie pirks, bbc news, tokyo. in other olympic news... three team gb athletes have qualified for the final of the women's 800 metres, for the first time ever, after impressive displays in the semi—finals. 19—year—old keely hodgkinson timed her run well to finish second in her heat. she'lljoin alex bell and jemma
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reekie in the final on tuesday. on her olympic debut, emma wilson has won bronze in the women's windsurfing. the 22—year—old's mother, penny way, is a former world champion, who narrowly missed out on a medal in the 1992 and 1996 olympics. and four—time olympic champion simone biles has withdrawn from two more gymnastics events — sunday's vault and uneven bars finals. she withdrew from tuesday's women's team final as well as thursday's individual all—around final, saying she had to focus on her mental health. fighting is raging around three major cities in southern and western afghanistan as the taliban try to seize them from government forces. taliban fighters have entered parts of herat, lashkar gah and kandahar. let's speak to our correspondent, secunder kermani, in the afghan capital, kabul. how close is the taliban to taking
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control of these places? well, this is certainly the most serious moment yet we've seen in weeks of intensified fighting in afghanistan. the taliban already control vast swathes of rural territory, now they are trying to capture leather city. this evening they went right into the heart of lashkar gah city, following heavy fighting though, after the arrival of special forces, we understand the taliban were pushed a little further back. i was speaking to one lashkar gah resident and he said even if the taliban don't capture the city on has been a powerful show of strength by the mountains. he also said that alabama have taken up positions inside the homes of a number of ordinary people, making it harder to dislodge them. fighting is also ongoing in and around a number of other cities, notably herat in the west and kandahar in the south, and a formal deadline for the withdrawal of all remaining international forces, the few that are left, is the end of august. real fears that with peace talks stalled the
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violence will will get even worse. the latest government figures show there were just over 26 thousand new cases in the latest 24—hour period, meaning an average of 27,464 new cases per day in the past seven days. 71 deaths were recorded in the last 24 hours, that's an average of 70 deaths a day in the past week. the latest figure for number of people in hospital with covid is just below 6,000 — it hasn't been updated from yesterday. more than 88% of uk adults have now had theirfirstjab and more than 72% are now fully vaccinated. speaking of vaccinations, bbc news understands the government is no longer considering making it compulsory for university students to be fullyjabbed to attend lectures in england. nhs england and the body that regulates healthcare products are issuing new guidance on pulse oxygen meters — also known as oximeters — after it was found that the devices can overestimate oxygen levels
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in people with darker skin. with more here's our health correspondent, amara sophia elahi. ranjit caught coronavirus in september last year, and eventually ended up in hospital with seriously low oxygen levels. so you basically flip the lid, put yourfinger in... she'd been monitoring her levels at home with a pulse oximeter, but the metre consistently told her she was in safe levels, even as she increasingly struggled to breathe. when i went into hospital, the first thing they said was, you really did leave it too late. had you left it any longer, i would have been straight into icu. there is growing evidence that such monitors can overestimate oxygen levels in people with darker skin tones by 2%. that's led to nhs england and the body that regulates the use of medical devices, the mhra, issuing new advice. they say people shouldn't use the devices at home without speaking to a medical professional, and to monitor oxygen levels over time.
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low oxygen levels are a primary indicator of serious covid infection, and those treating patients in hospital have expressed concerns about the use of the technology on minority ethnic individuals. it is something i would pick up on at least once a day with maybe two or three patients on a daily basis. it's quite possible that someone's oxygen levels are measured and they seem normal when actually they were truly low, and because they seemed normal they might have been sent home and denied the steroids and oxygen which we would normally have been giving to patients. and it's possible that that, therefore, may have led to them becoming more unwell and potentially even dying. oxygen is one of the most common treatments given in medical emergencies, and doctors stress accurate readings are vital when assessing patients. nhs england say they are keeping the situation under review and have commissioned further research into the issue. amara sophia elahi, bbc news. carriejohnson, the prime minister's wife, has revealed on social media that she's pregnant with the couple's second child,
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who is due at christmas. she says she feels incredibly blessed, but also like a bag of nerves, after having a miscarriage at the beginning of the year. mrsjohnson gave birth to a boy, wilfred, in april 2020. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we're back with the late news at 10:15pm. now on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are. goodbye. hello there. lighter wind today but quite a lot of cloud around and some nuisance showers as well. some of the showers have been heavy and thundery. look at this threatening weather watcher picture from kent that was sent in earlier on. if we look at the satellite picture, you can see cloud around.
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the bright white is storm evert which is in scandinavia. the best of any breaks through eastern areas. you can see that real cluster of sharp showers developed through the course of the afternoon, stretching across south wales, central and southern england with one or two rumbles of thunder mixed in. showers to the east of the pennines. over the next few hours, those showers should start to ease down just a touch. as they continue to clear away through the night we will see the cloud break—up in places. a quiet night to come. cooler in scotland, particularly in sheltered rural areas. scattered showers in the far north. overnight lows of 9—14. we will start off tomorrow morning on a quiet note once again. this nuisance weather front to clear away and it's going to produce the threat of more sharp thudnery downpours across southern fringes of england through the afternoon. a few isolated showers across scotland and northern ireland
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but generally more dry weather. showers pushing steadily south into the afternoon. hit and miss, but we can not rule out the odd rumble of thunder. top temperatures of 21, noticeably cooler further north. 12-17. we had temperatures into the high 20s a week ago. relatively quiet start to the new working week but the story becomes a little more complicated. if we look at details why that's going to happen we see this brief ridge of high pressure building in from monday to tuesday. from wednesday onwards, this weather front is going to start to bring the threat of more outbreaks of rain and areas of low pressure continue to move towards the end of the week. dry to start but cooler than it has been. more wind and rain later on in the week.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at six... it's known as �*super saturday�* and there was a great start for team gb in the tokyo olympics, with a gold and a world record in the 4x100m mixed medley final. team work makes dream work — another gold, in the triathlon mixed relay event, and finally a first gold medal forjonny brownlee at his third olympic games. and victory for elaine thompson—herah ofjamaica in the women's 100m final in tokyo. we'll have the latest olympics news from tokyo on sportsday at 6:30.
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afghan security forces are battling to defend three key cities

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