Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 31, 2021 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

2:00 pm
this is bbc news — with the latest headlines: in the last few minutes, jamaica's elaine thompson—herah has won the women's 100 metres final in tokyo. earlier, there was heartache for team gb sprinter dina asher—smith — who had to withdraw from the games through injury. before that, there was gold and a world record for team gb in the 4x100 metres mixed medley final. team work makes the dream work — another gold in the triathlon mixed relay event, and the first gold medal forjonny brownlee at his third olympic games. afghan security forces are battling to defend three key cities from advances by the taliban — reports say militants have breached
2:01 pm
front lines in herat. medical experts are warning that an oxygen monitoring device, called an oximeter, works less well for people with darker skin tones. bbc news understands the government is no longer considering making it compulsory for students to be fully vaccinated to attend lectures in england. and, coming up later this hour — wejoin zeinab badawi for take me to the opera. good afternoon.
2:02 pm
in the last few minutes, jamaica have secured a clean sweep, first, second and third in the women's 100 meters at the olympic games in tokyo. this is how the race was run — with elaine thompson herah strectching into the lead to take the gold medal in an olympic record time of 10.61 seconds. shelley—ann fraser—price won silver and shericka jackson the bronze. it was the second—fastest time ever run by a female athlete. it comes as one of team gb�*s great medal hopes, dina asher—smith, saw her bid for the podium come to an early end after failing to qualify for the 100 metres final. she says she's still struggling with a hamstring issue and has now withdrawn from the 200 metre event. this is what asher—smith said afterfinishing third in her heat.
2:03 pm
i afterfinishing third in her heat. am going to pull o| had i am going to pull out. joined us had that conversation with me, and that's the one that... as reigning world champion, you just... i was in such good shape. you just know that the olympic champion is not too much of a further step. i am really proud to have been able to execute my races here today, everything i have done to this point. but when you're talking about the standard i want to be at and i know i am capable of, sometimes there is plenty more championships for me to come still. it started off as a golden saturday for team gb at the tokyo 0lympics — a day when team work has been the key in new relay 0lympic events, in triathlon and the swimming pool, where the brits are enjoying their most successful games in over a century. adam wild reports.
2:04 pm
the triathlon will be golden for great britain! it's the mixed medley relay, great britain win the gold by miles! for all the individual brilliance, in the tokyo today it was teamwork that triumphed. super saturday had barely begun, but team gb was already looking at four new 0lympic champions in this, the inaugural triathlon relay. jessica learmonth led the way for britain. then the turn ofjonny brownlee. individual bronze in london, silver in rio, this his final 0lympic race, a last chance to complete the set. georgia taylor—brown had given britain a 21—second advantage and, although alex yee was dramatically caught for a moment, when it came to the finish, he and gb were in a class of their own. he will win the gold. four new british olympic champions before breakfast. forjonny brownlee, gold at last. the olympics, i've completed it! i've been waiting for that one.
2:05 pm
yeah, it feels absolutely amazing. third olympics, and to finally walk away with olympic gold, and we did everything we possibly could. whilst over in the pool, team gb have surpassed expectations. now a moment for the team's finest to come together. the mixed medley relay, another new 0lympic event. in the company of the finest swimmers on earth, britain have already proved they can excel. here, they were doing it again. kathleen dawson gave way to the peerless adam peaty. he did what he always seems to do. before james guy powered britain into the narrowest of leads. and here was anna hopkin in the final leg. great britain are going to win their fourth gold in the swimming pool! one word that has changed the whole team is belief. we've got champions who believe we can win, champions who believe we can get world records, and if you've got one belief, you can build everything around that. two team relays, two olympic team titles, another golden day for team gb.
2:06 pm
let's get more now on the women's 100 metre result. we are going to cross to lea valley athletics centre in north london. disappointing news then for it dina asher—smith? flat then for it dina asher-smith? not what she then for it dina asher—smith? iirrt what she wanted or anyone expected. we have been watching here on the big screen, really exciting. desiree henry is here, she raced with dean asher smith at rio. {flare henry is here, she raced with dean asher smith at rio.— asher smith at rio. give us your reaction. asher smith at rio. give us your reaction- i'm _ asher smith at rio. give us your reaction. i'm kind _ asher smith at rio. give us your reaction. i'm kind of— asher smith at rio. give us your reaction. i'm kind of shocked, i asher smith at rio. give us your. reaction. i'm kind of shocked, but asher smith at rio. give us your i reaction. i'm kind of shocked, but i made _ reaction. i'm kind of shocked, but i made this— reaction. i'm kind of shocked, but i made this prediction yesterday when i said people should not count out elaine _ i said people should not count out elaine thompson—herah, she is the previous— elaine thompson—herah, she is the previous olympic champion. that does not come _ previous olympic champion. that does not come lightly. i am just shocked how she _ not come lightly. i am just shocked how she did it, and at the time, 10131— how she did it, and at the time, 1061 is— how she did it, and at the time, 10.61 is absolutely incredible. she
2:07 pm
did it _ 10.61 is absolutely incredible. she did it in _ 10.61 is absolutely incredible. she did it in class and style. you 10.61 is absolutely incredible. she did it in class and style.— did it in class and style. you did call out. did it in class and style. you did call out- i _ did it in class and style. you did call out. ijust _ did it in class and style. you did call out. i just cannot _ did it in class and style. you did call out. ijust cannot believe i did it in class and style. you did| call out. ijust cannot believe it, call out. i 'ust cannot believe it, but we all’— call out. ijust cannot believe it, but we all want _ call out. ijust cannot believe it, but we all want our _ call out. ijust cannot believe it, but we all want our favourites i call out. ijust cannot believe it, | but we all want our favourites to end, _ but we all want our favourites to end. but — but we all want our favourites to end, but for them to go out and do it it is _ end, but for them to go out and do it it is a _ end, but for them to go out and do it it is a whole other ball game. also, _ it it is a whole other ball game. also, it — it it is a whole other ball game. also, it was a jamaican one, two, three. _ also, it was a jamaican one, two, three. which— also, it was a jamaican one, two, three, which i expected but doubt they'll— three, which i expected but doubt they'll expect it to see it live. hugely— they'll expect it to see it live. hugely disappointing for acting dina asher—smith, but she made it through to the final? i asher-smith, but she made it through to the final? ., ., , to the final? i thought for daryl, this is still— to the final? i thought for daryl, this is still an _ to the final? i thought for daryl, this is still an amazing _ to the final? i thought for daryl, this is still an amazing thing - to the final? i thought for daryl, this is still an amazing thing to i to the final? i thought for daryl, i this is still an amazing thing to be celebrated. she made an olympic finai _ celebrated. she made an olympic finai yes. — celebrated. she made an olympic final. yes, it may now have been the oppressed _ final. yes, it may now have been the oppressed forms that you wanted, but she should _ oppressed forms that you wanted, but she should still be able to hold her head up— she should still be able to hold her head up high. she should still be able to hold her head up high-— head up high. congrats to darryl oso. head up high. congrats to darryl 0s0- huge _ head up high. congrats to darryl oso. huge disappointment - head up high. congrats to darryl oso. huge disappointment for i head up high. congrats to darryl- oso. huge disappointment for dean asher smith, she has been struggling with a hamstring injury, she has also pulled out of the 200. can you just talk us through how
2:08 pm
disappointing that will be for her? this will be extremely disappointing. you know the fact that she — disappointing. you know the fact that she came down to the elements and try— that she came down to the elements and try to _ that she came down to the elements and try to compete in every single hound _ and try to compete in every single bound possible, you knew that her mind _ bound possible, you knew that her mind frame was in a mindset of let's see what— mind frame was in a mindset of let's see what my— mind frame was in a mindset of let's see what my body can do and if it can hold — see what my body can do and if it can hold up _ see what my body can do and if it can hold up. unfortunately, it was not the _ can hold up. unfortunately, it was not the case and i am just extremely sad for— not the case and i am just extremely sad for her— not the case and i am just extremely sad for her because i know she was on a quest — sad for her because i know she was on a quest of coming back with olympic— on a quest of coming back with olympic medals in multiple events and it— olympic medals in multiple events and it has— olympic medals in multiple events and it has not worked out. all she can do— and it has not worked out. all she can do is— and it has not worked out. all she can do is keep your head up, they will champion ships are at next year. _ will champion ships are at next year, there are so many championship. this is not the end for her~ _ championship. this is not the end for her. , , ., , ., for her. definitely not, showing her class a . ain for her. definitely not, showing her class again today, _ for her. definitely not, showing her class again today, very _ for her. definitely not, showing her class again today, very quick - for her. definitely not, showing her class again today, very quick to - class again today, very quick to congratulate her team—mate on that 100 metres final. next up we have the men's. 100 metres final. next up we have the men's-— tokyo has reported that
2:09 pm
new daily coronavirus cases have surged to a record high of 4,058. a spike in cases in recent days has prompted an extension of the capital's state of emergency. it's also been expanded to cover other parts of the country. olympics organisers have reported 21 new games—related covid cases. no athletes are affected by the latest cases, but this takes the total games—linked number of infections sincejuly1 to 241. to afghanistan — where the fighting has escalated around three strategic cities that security forces are trying to defend from taliban militants. the insurgents have intensified their attacks on herat, in western afghanistan, and clashes are continuing in lashkar gah and kandahar in the south of the country. with us—led foreign forces nearing a complete withdrawal of troops, the taliban have made swift territorial gains over the last two
2:10 pm
months. our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, has been speaking to the eu's envoy for afghanistan tomas niklasson, in kabul, on how serious this moment is. the best realistic scenario is one where the taliban offensive is held back. where there is a bit of push back, a bit of rebalance. all these nice words that still mean further suffering and deaths, a number of afghans dying on both sides. more people on the run, leaving their homes. but with this recalibration, rebalancing, the taliban would then, after some time, be ready to come back to negotiations in doha or start negotiations in doha in earnest, to find a negotiated solution to afghanistan's problems. earlier i spoke to lyse, from kabul, where she gave us the latest of the taliban's advancements.
2:11 pm
when the taliban went on the offensive a few weeks ago, it did take people by surprise how quickly the taliban were able to overrun districts in all parts of afghanistan, even in northern afghanistan, which is not the traditional stronghold. is not their traditional stronghold. but of course some of the districts they overran had a little more than a flag in the district centre, the afghan national security forces retreated tactically or they did not put up a fight. in some cases, their fighters went over to the taliban side. but the moment of reckoning is starting now, as the taliban push into strategic provincial capitals on all sides of the country — herat in the west, kandahar in the south, takhar in the north. we have known that the taliban have been pushing out towards these capitals, surrounding some of them for some time, but now they are actually inside, and in some cases as far as city centre. but the afghan national security
2:12 pm
force is supported in some places by continuing us air strikes, they are pushing back the taliban. so the fight is now under way and it is certain to continue for some time to come with dire humanitarian consequences. american military forces are said to have boarded an israeli—operated oil tanker, after a british and a romanian member of its crew were killed by a reported drone strike. an israeli government minister's accused iran of exporting terrorism in the wake of the alleged attack off the coast of oman. medical experts are warning that an oxygen monitoring device, called an oximeter, works less well for people with darker skin tones. nhs england and the medicines regulator, the mhra, say pulse oximeters can overestimate the amount of oxygen being taken in. authorities are advising patients to speak to health care professionals before
2:13 pm
using the devices and not to rely on a single reading. although a valuable clinical tool, what we do know is that clinicians are increasingly becoming aware of the potential errors or inconsistencies in the interpretation associated with pulse oximeter readings, so we need to have these points in mind when using these devices. this is an example of health inequalities that we see, an example of the disproportionate kind of stratification we have in terms of accessing health care. what we do know is that oxygen is probably the most common drug used in the care of patients who present medical emergencies, and health care professionals are increasingly reliant on the pulse oximeter to detect early deterioration and to inform clinical decision—making, so we need to get this right.
2:14 pm
haulage industry leaders in the uk say they're struggling to find enough heavy goods vehicle drivers to keep the economy moving. it estimates there's a shortfall of more than 100,000 hauliers, and it's causing acute problems in supply chains. the difficulties — fueled by a combination of factors — have led one english company to take desperate action. amy payne reports. trucks like these keep the country moving, but right now many are parked up and going nowhere. haulage firms, like this leicestershire logistics company, just can't find enough drivers. it's worrying. i mean, the vehicles arejust sitting there because we haven't got the drivers. and there's simply a large number of drivers that went back to europe during brexit, we've had covid which has caused us severe problems with the lack of training that's available, and that's just a few of the things, really. well, we're seeing an impact right across the board, from manufacturing, factories, farming and of course supermarkets, which is probably the one thing that most people notice the most.
2:15 pm
and so translink is taking action. kev is the latest employee here to benefit from free training courses to help tackle the chronic shortage of hgv drivers. i've grown up in the transport industry all my life and obviously companies helping individuals, cos obviously it's a costly thing to get into but it's a good thing to help the country out, really. but many in the industry want government help and a gear change in how thejob is perceived. if you look at the long—term solutions, about attracting, training and retaining, we have programmes in place that we will put in place, with the industry and with the government's support. that doesn't help today. what i really want to see some sort of temporary visa scheme in place, like for seasonal picking in food production. but the government isn't keen, insisting the future workforce should be made up of uk residents. for now, drivers are allowed to spend slightly longer on the road and there are plans to increase testing, but as drivers take time off in summer holiday season,
2:16 pm
there's concern the situation will get worse before it gets better. amy payne, bbc midlands today, leicestershire. the headlines on bbc news: in the last few minutes, elaine herah—thompson ofjamaica has won the women's100—metre final at the tokyo games in a new olympic record time. afghan security forces are battling to defend three key cities from advances by the taliban. reports say militants have breached frontlines in herat. medical experts are warning that an oxygen monitoring device, called an oximeter, works less well for people with darker skin tones. a survey by roadside assistance company, rac, has found seven in ten british motorists believe the speed limit should be lower in wet weather. currently, the speed limit is 70mph on motorways at all times.
2:17 pm
but with nearly 250 people killed on the country's roads during bad weather, many feel there should be greater efforts to force motorists to slow down. rod dennis is from the rac. around about 800 people every year are killed or seriously injured on the uk's motorways and, sadly, that is a number that hasn't been dropping in recent years. it's stayed stubbornly high. if you add in speed and you add in wet weather, as well, it's an extremely dangerous cocktail, and we know that a lot of people are being killed or seriously injured every year by this and perhaps it's time we looked at some novel ways of trying to tackle it. here at the rac, we asked drivers about their thoughts on reducing speed limits in wet weather on motorways, something that is commonplace in france at the moment. we have the infrastructure here in the uk increasingly to support a move like this, and perhaps it is time we looked at these sorts of measures in order to bring those casualty rates, which as i say are stubbornly high,
2:18 pm
finally down our motorways. health officials in england are urging anyone who's not had their coronavirus jab yet to get vaccinated this weekend. all adults have been able to book a first dose since mid—june, but latest figures show that nearly a third of young adults still haven't had one. walk—in centres opening over the coming days include one at burnley football club and a circus in halifax. bbc news understands the government is no longer considering making it compulsory for students to be fully vaccinated to attend lectures in england. let's get more on this from our political correspondent, pete saull. lectures political correspondent, pete saull. that off with tt background lectures that off with the background to this. == lectures that off with the background to this. -- lets 'ust start. the �* background to this. -- lets 'ust start. the issue i background to this. -- lets 'ust start. the issue of i background to this. -- lets 'ust start. the issue of maxim h background to this. -- letsjust - start. the issue of maxim passport has become a big political debate of the summer. from nine september, if
2:19 pm
you want into a nightclub, you don't get in if you are not double—jabbed. ministers have been floating other settings where that could be the case. opening up international travel for people who have had both jabs. the idea was that once university students return from their summer break in the autumn, they will have had to have had both jabs to go to lectures or even stay in halls of residence. that was something they were looking at but i do understand that particular proposal has been shelved. meanwhile conversations about other things, premier league football, for example, continues.- premier league football, for example, continues. premier league football, for examle, continues. ~ , , ., example, continues. why did they go back on that — example, continues. why did they go back on that proposal— example, continues. why did they go back on that proposal then? - example, continues. why did they go back on that proposal then? i - example, continues. why did they go back on that proposal then? i think. back on that proposal then? i think the were back on that proposal then? i think they were two _ back on that proposal then? i think they were two key _ back on that proposal then? i think they were two key reasons. - back on that proposal then? i think they were two key reasons. the . back on that proposal then? i think. they were two key reasons. the first being logistics, how could universities police lists? there were legal questions as well. when you get an offer of a university place, that is considered to be legally binding. i think ministers are also aware that an ease is growing on conservative backbenchers
2:20 pm
about this wider issue of vaccine passports. jacob rees—mogg last night said it would not be at the end of the world to have to show proof of vaccination to gain entry to venues, but he also said we should protect our ancient freedoms. i think that sentiment about freedom is one the shed vary widely across the conservative party, and i sense a lot of people out there might be uneasy about having to show papers to get into anywhere, whether it be the pub, nightclub, restaurants, whatever. i think the government now he take two feeling the heat on this issue and might ultimately decide the use of vaccine passports might not be as widespread as it was a couple of months ago. had not be as widespread as it was a couple of months ago.— not be as widespread as it was a couple of months ago. had they laid out a return — couple of months ago. had they laid out a return to _ couple of months ago. had they laid out a return to micro-alternative - couple of months ago. had they laid out a return to micro-alternative to | out a return to micro—alternative to a return to university for students? not specifically. initially, they say that this would not be about covid certification in september. testing would play a part of the mix as well. it is hoped case numbers
2:21 pm
will be down and hopefully things will be down and hopefully things will start to return to normal. as ever with coronavirus, a very fluid situation. the chief executive of nhs england, sir simon stevens, steps down today after seven years in the job. he'll be replaced by amanda pritchard, the first woman to take the role. she says there are plenty of critical issues for her to address. the uk telecommunications industry hopes a satellite that has gone into orbit will help maintain its global leadership in the sector. a quarter of the world's big telecoms spacecraft are manufactured in britain, and the new quantum platform is billed as the market's next—generation product. quantum was launched on an ariane rocket, from french guiana, on friday night. here's our science correspondent, jonathan amos. another rocket climbs skyward to bolster a sector that europe, and the uk in particular, has come to dominate — the business
2:22 pm
of telecommunications satellites. there are hundreds of these spacecraft overhead — bouncing tv, phone calls, broadband and other data services around the planet. but the new satellite going into orbit, called quantum, represents a big step forward in technology. while traditional telecom spacecraft are configured before launch to do very specific tasks, quantum has been built for flexibility. it is the sector's first fully reprogrammable spacecraft. it is able to rapidly change the coverage, bandwidth, power and frequency of its signals. one of its uses will be for disaster response, providing emergency communications to the teams that are sent to help people in places hit by catastrophic floods or earthquakes. quantum's manufacturers in the uk, that is airbus and surrey satellite technology ltd, will incorporate the prototype's technology into their future spacecraft, hoping to maintain their world leading
2:23 pm
status in what has become a highly competitive field. jonathan amos, bbc news. emily gravestock, head of applications strategy at the uk space agency, described the satellite as a major milestone for the uk. she was talking to my colleague, ben mundy. it isa it is a giant of the sky, three and a half tonnes. this is a telecommunications satellite, and it will deliver the ability to make phone calls, deliver messaging, internet to people in aeroplanes, supporting communications between bouts and at the maritime sector. but the beauty of it and the worlds first about it is that it will be able to change what it does as our needs here on earth changes. if we
2:24 pm
needs here on earth changes. if we need more bandwidth in a particular point, it will be able to change its focus to provide it to people there. traditionally, these are configured in the factories. haifa traditionally, these are configured in the factories.— in the factories. how much of a breakthrough — in the factories. how much of a breakthrough is _ in the factories. how much of a breakthrough is that? - in the factories. how much of a breakthrough is that? that - in the factories. how much of a breakthrough is that? that is l in the factories. how much of a | breakthrough is that? that is an enormous breakthrough, it really does give the uk a leading edge. because the fact that this is reprogrammable and it is going to be up there for around 15 years in its lifetime means that as our needs change, if you think back 15 years ago how our lives were different, in 15 years' time, it is likely they will be different again. and so the fact that we've got and delivered this from the uk is a real milestone for space technology. and we are already at the point where airbus is receiving orders for another version the same type of technology and capability, putting the world right at the forefront of a major space initiative. the manufacturing of this has been led from the uk but has had involvement from elsewhere. how important is thatjoint approach to these types of satellites? i important is that joint approach to these types of satellites?- these types of satellites? i think workin: these types of satellites? i think working within _ these types of satellites? i think working within the _ these types of satellites? i think working within the european - these types of satellites? i think l working within the european space agency and the member states of
2:25 pm
family, for others it is absolutely brilliant. we are the leaders in europe for this type of technology. but pairing up with other member states in europe means we can bring the best of the best and we can take companies like airbus and bring people together to work on it. more than 1000 people across europe have worked on a satellite over the last few years as it has gone towards orbit. bringing together at the european family through esa is brilliant. _, european family through esa is brilliant. ., ., ., brilliant. going forward, what can we now learn _ brilliant. going forward, what can we now learn now _ brilliant. going forward, what can we now learn now it _ brilliant. going forward, what can we now learn now it is _ brilliant. going forward, what can we now learn now it is in - brilliant. going forward, what can we now learn now it is in orbit? l brilliant. going forward, what can we now learn now it is in orbit? i | we now learn now it is in orbit? i think what we can learn from this is that we have the opportunity to revolutionise space technologies. we have known for a long time that space technologies underpinning a lot of what we do on rf, be that satellite broadcasting, remain medicine and health care, the sea and utilisation is of that. what this kind you can change with us as
2:26 pm
our needs on earth changes. that is what it will give us in the future, that opportunity to minute weekly satellites that we put in space to grow with us, meaning there will be less spacejunk in grow with us, meaning there will be less space junk in the future. the singer, kt tunstall, has been speaking to the bbc about her decision to pull out of an upcoming us tour due to problems with her hearing. the brit award winner went completely deaf in her left ear three years ago. earlier this month, she noticed the early signs of deterioration starting in her right ear and decided to act. she's been speaking to our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson. # suddenly i see this is what i want to be # suddenly i see...# kt tunstall has been playing live for three decades, often doing 200 shows a year. next week, she was to start a three—month us tour with hall &
2:27 pm
oates, but what is happening to her hearing has caused her to pull out. it's almost like a siren goes off and you suddenly get this woo—oo—oo, and it is a pulse of the noise. the other thing that you can get is that suddenly you can't hear anything and it feels like someone has put a vacuum over your head. her plan is now to space out live shows allowing more recovery time, but the brit award winning singer has been struggling with her hearing since the end of 2007. i got off a long haul flight and i was actually going to a spice girls concert, and i had a nap before i was going to go to the gig and i woke up and i felt really discombobulated, and something was up with my left ear and i had a really, really loud ringing. i couldn't hear things
2:28 pm
like the shower or running water, i couldn't hear crisp packets, i couldn't hear the indicator on the car. kt tunstall leaves her hearing problems are caused by the stress kt tunstall believes her hearing problems are caused by the stress to her body of being on the road, rather than by loud music. things got worse in 2018 during a us tour, when she went permanently death in her left ear. when i saw a couple of specialists, they don't really know an awful lot about the inner ear, it is so fine and so complex. i also was told that the more deaf you go, the less likely it is that you will get your hearing back, and i was at, like, 98% or something. i can't hear anything inner ear. i can't hear anything in that ear. so, i can't wear a hearing aid in that area because there is nothing going in. your hearing is deteriorating rapidly. deafness in musicians was a theme explored in the oscar—winning film, sound of metal. i can't hear you, do. you understand me? i can't hear you! kt tunstall thought it was excellent and hopes it leads to more
2:29 pm
understanding of the issue. have you thought about what your life would be like if you were no longer able to play live? i would be really, really sorry to not be able to do it any more. but i think that the decision i am making with how i am approaching my career here is to really carve a way of life that allows me to keep playing live. totally intend to continue, but just at a slightly but just at a slightly different pace now. colin patterson, bbc news. after 17 years at radio 1, annie mac has presented herfinal show on the station. the last 17 years has been the most amazing, magical experience. thank you so much for listening. shejoined radio 1 as an assistant producer before
2:30 pm
hosting her first show in 200a. she's previously said one of the reasons she's leaving the station is to spend more time with herfamily. now it's time for a look at the weather. sunny spells and scattered showers for many of us for the remainder of the afternoon. quite a lot of cloud generally for much of the country. more widespread showers through central and southern wales, down into central and southern england. the odd rumble of thunder here, but with some sunshine, we could see temperatures peaking at 21 celsius, a bit of cooler further north. coolerair celsius, a bit of cooler further north. cooler air is set to descend steadily south behind a cold front, that will continue to enhance showers for sunday across southern parts of england in particular. some
2:31 pm
of those showers

20 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on