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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 31, 2021 12:00pm-12:46pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben mundy. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. mixed fortunes for team gb on �*super saturday�* at the tokyo olympics. gold — and a world record — in the a—by—ioo—metres mixed medley relay. team work makes the dream work, because there was another gold in the triathlon mixed relay event — where jonny brownlee won his first gold medal at his third olympic games i'm sarah mulkerrins, here in tokyo — where there's been disappointment for dina asher—smith — who has failed to qualify for the women's 100—metres final. fighting is raging around three strategic cities in afghanistan — which the security forces are trying to defend from taliban militants. reports say fighters have breached front lines in the southern part of herat.
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donald trump's been ordered to hand over his tax returns to congress. the usjustice department overturned a ruling — made when he was in office — that the information could stay private. medical experts are warning that an oxygen monitoring device, called an oximeter, works less well for people with darker skin tones. bbc news understands the government is no longer considering making it compulsory for students to be fully vaccinated to attend lectures in england. a british satellite has launched from french guiana — in a boost to the uk tele communications industry. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world.
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we start in tokyo, at the olympics, where it's been another great start for team gb. they've added two more gold medals to their tally — in new events involving both men and women. the first came in the triathlon mixed relay. alex yee and georgia taylor brown added to their individual silvers from the opening week at the games; they were joined byjonny brownlee and jessica learmonth. then, in the swimming pool, great britain claimed another gold. this time in the mixed four by 100 metres medley. so where does that leave the medal table? well, team gb remain sixth — they have picked up eight gold medals and 28 in total. at the top is china with 21 golds and 45 overall. meanwhile the american gymnast, simone biles, has pulled out of two more olympic events — as she deals with mental health issues. on the track, the leading nigerian sprinter, blessing okagbare, has failed a drugs test and is out of the games. she won her heat in the 100 metres on friday and had been due to run
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in the semi—finals later. let's go live to tokyo, the bbc�*s sarah mulkerrins is there. so we know the line—up for the women's 100m final. some quick times in the semis but no dina asher smith. disappointment for those looking for dina asher smith tobacco perform in recent years, knowing she has performed on the very high stage —— to back up her performance. probably better in the 200 metres, had a little niggle in the ldap to this, you can see that in the semifinal, she finished third in the semifinal, not quite as sharp as people would be used to seeing dina asher smith when she is competing. there was a chance she might go through as the fastest loser but did lose out on that. i have got to talk about the jamaican sprinters because i think we may potentially be looking at a one, two, three forjamaica, because
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we have these three semifinals and blistering fast times to qualify for the finals, all of the sprinters through have gone sub 11 seconds. phenomenal, really. you look at shelly ann fraser, 3a years old, just strolled through to her when with a distance to the rest of the fuel binder. she won gold back in beijing, then again in 2012. she has changed coaches and qualified fastest, however look out for elaine thomson, defending champion from rio, and two swiss athletes in there, no americans, quite interesting, but really good news for one team gb member who has made it through. going in the third semifinal, she has got in on the final fastest loser spot. she has
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been improving coming through the rounds, set a pb been improving coming through the rounds, seta pb in been improving coming through the rounds, set a pb in preliminaries and you could see they were going down to the wire to decide to see her time, down to the wire to decide to see hertime, because down to the wire to decide to see her time, because it went down to ioooth of her time, because it went down to 1000th of a second, so she was hanging around on the finish line waiting to see if she had got through. a couple of minutes later you could see the joy on her face, the shock when she realised she was the shock when she realised she was the one through to the final. no dina asher smith in that final, but for great britain. but a successful morning for team gb in the triathlon and the pool again. absolutely, great morning the saturday morning in tokyo in some of the new mixed events we are seeing at the olympics for the first time. we know that the usual success for british triathletes continued, a mixed relay was author of the day this morning here in tokyo bay behind me. that is where they swim —— order of the day. on the bike and four of them take part, to men and
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two women. it was alex yee who anchored them in that final leg, well ahead, anchored them in that final leg, wellahead, really anchored them in that final leg, well ahead, really good strong performance from team gb in that and alex yee, to get overtaken sightly on the bike leg which is run with the strength and he was able to cross the finish line, and there they are the four of them celebrating the gold medals. he worked forjonny brownlee, that is a gold after he had previously won a silver five years ago in rio and a bronze in london, so he says he has completed it. there has also been really good success in the pool for team gb for the whole olympics, and in the mixed relay this morning here in the mixed relay this morning here in tokyo there was a world record and a gold medal, adam peaty part of that team. he started off this real run of medals that team gb's for gold—medal in the pool of the games. this was the mixed medley, a
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freestyle, backstroke, butterfly and breaststroke, two men, two women all taking part. it is interesting, in terms of who swims, what, when, and hopkin there you can see on the podium, she spanned the final agony freestyle and she was out in front but the american kaleb tressel, setting records here, following her, but she held him off. the mixed relay events, really interesting that the olympics are embracing it. interesting to see a lot of the joy around and the support that people have been giving, seeing them being able to compete together in the same events. ., , events. certainly getting quite the attention. away _ events. certainly getting quite the attention. away from _ events. certainly getting quite the attention. away from team - events. certainly getting quite the attention. away from team gb, i events. certainly getting quite the - attention. away from team gb, some success for new zealand's women in the rugby sevens today.— the rugby sevens today. absolutely. the won the rugby sevens today. absolutely. they won the _ the rugby sevens today. absolutely. they won the rugby _ the rugby sevens today. absolutely. they won the rugby sevens. - the rugby sevens today. absolutely. they won the rugby sevens. they i the rugby sevens today. absolutely. i they won the rugby sevens. they beat france, outclassed them in that final. the first ever gold medal for new zealand at the olympics, big smiles on theirfaces.
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new zealand at the olympics, big smiles on their faces. 26—12 the score in that gold—medal match. the goal for score in that gold—medal match. the goalfor new zealand, score in that gold—medal match. the goal for new zealand, silver for france. we had a bronze medal match which had great britain up against fiji. unfortunately for great britain, they missed out and finished fourth in rio five years ago. heartbreak again for them again. a ago. heartbreak again for them a bronze medalfor fiji, the men had great success in the last olympics, the first ever gold medal for fiji, backedit the first ever gold medal for fiji, backed it up in the men's and now the women have a first ever olympic medal won by women after their bronze medal. we have also had some tennis today as well, novak djokovic, so many people thought he may when the tennis title in the absence of some of the big names here. he was going for a golden slam with the grand slam titles and the olympic title to his name but was knocked out in the semifinals last night. he was in action in the bronze medal match, had lost the first set, come back to claim the
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second, went to a decider and it kind of lost his cool. at one stage she was frustrated and threw his racket up into an empty stadium and through another racket a short time later against the post of the net. he ended up losing, with spain's pablo fall into the ground and celebrating, djokovic not quite the happy camper at the end of that round. staying on the games — and tokyo has reported that new daily coronavirus cases have surged to a record high of 4,058. a spike in cases in recent days has prompted an extension of the capital's state of emergency. it's also been expanded to cover other parts of the country. olympics organisers have reported 21 new games—related covid cases. no athletes are affected by the latest cases, but this takes the total games—linked number of infections since july the 1st to 241.
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to afghanistan, where the fighting has escalated around three strategic cities, that security forces are trying to defend from taliban militants. the insurgents have intensified their attacks on herat in western afghanistan and clashes are continuing in lashkar gah and kandahar in the south of the country. with us—led foreign forces nearing a complete withdrawal of troops, the taliban have made swift territorial gains over the last two months. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet has been speaking to the eu's envoy for afghanistan tomas niklasson in kabul, on how serious this moment is. the best realistic scenario is one where the taliban offensive is held back. where there is a bit of push a bit of rebalance. and all these words that still mean further suffering and desperately number of afghans dying on full size.
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of afghans dying in those sides, more people on the run, leaving their homes. but that with this recalibration, rebalancing, the taliban would then, after some time, be ready to come back to negotiations in doha or start negotiations in doha in earnest, to find a negotiated solution to afghanistan's problems. and lyse doucetjoins me now. the scale and speed of the taliban's advance has taken many by surprise. what's the latest on the balance will field? . ., will field? the taliban went on the offensive a — will field? the taliban went on the offensive a few _ will field? the taliban went on the offensive a few weeks _ will field? the taliban went on the offensive a few weeks ago - will field? the taliban went on the offensive a few weeks ago and - will field? the taliban went on the | offensive a few weeks ago and took people by surprise. how quickly they were able to overrun districts in all parts of afghanistan, even in northern afghanistan, which is not their traditional stronghold. of course, some of the districts they overran had little more than a flag in the district centre, the afghan national security forces retreated tactically or they did not put up a
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fight. in some cases, the fighters went over to the caliban site. a moment of reckoning are starting now is the caliban push into strategic provincial capitals on all sides of the capital —— taliban. we have known that the taliban have been pushing towards these capitals, surrounding some of them for some time, but now actually inside, and in some cases, as far as city centre. but the afghan national security forces supported in some places, by continuing us air strikes, pushing back the taliban. the fight is now under way. and it is certain to continue for some time to come with dire humanitarian consequences.— consequences. what about the negotiations? _ consequences. what about the negotiations? what _ consequences. what about the negotiations? what is - consequences. what about the negotiations? what is the - consequences. what about the . negotiations? what is the realistic hope of halting the violence? there have been endless _ hope of halting the violence? there have been endless calls _ hope of halting the violence? there have been endless calls for - hope of halting the violence? there have been endless calls for a - have been endless calls for a
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ceasefire. notjust from the afghan government but by afghans across the country who are absolutely exhausted and fearful about this war. it is, after all, a a0 year war. most afghans have never known anything but water. i was just recently in the gulf state of qatar where the taliban have one of their political offices, a high—level government delegation had gone there as well to try and see if they could kick—start the long stalled negotiations, but it is clear the taliban want to push forward on the battlefield to gain advantage of the negotiating table. if not, simply, for some of the taliban leaders, to try and achieve a military victory, so the government to is now emphasising that as much as they want peace, the focus is on the front, the fighting front. the usjustice department says tax returns belonging to the former president, donald trump must be handed over to congress.
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the decision reverses a previous ruling. officials now say lawmakers have legitimate reasons for asking to see the documents. our north america correspondent, david willis, reports. donald trump has fought hard to prevent the release of his tax returns. this isjust a continuation of the most hideous witch—hunt in the history of our country. this latest ruling could mark the beginning of the end of his ferocious effort to keep those documents out of the public eye. then treasury secretary steven mnuchin�*s refusal to comply with a subpoena back in 2019 prompted a two—year battle for documents including asset, income and tax payment data on the part of the democrat—led house ways and means committee, which is investigating potential conflicts of interest on the part of the former president and the possibility of foreign interference.
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now, in a 39—page ruling, the usjustice department has reversed a ruling made when trump still in office and has ordered the treasury to release six years' worth of trump tax returns — a move hailed by the house speaker, nancy pelosi, who called access to the documents: every president since richard nixon has disclosed details of their tax returns, the one exception being donald trump. he claimed before he was elected that his records were under ordered by the authorities, a process that was apparently under audit by the authorities, a process that was apparently still under way by the time he left office. republicans say the entire issue is politically motivated. they have denounced
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thejustice department decision and donald trump is widely expected to challenge it in court, meaning that if those highly anticipated documents are to be made public it could still be many, many months away. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. australia's third largest city, brisbane, has gone into lockdown in another attempt to contain the spread of the delta variant of coronavirus. the deputy premier of queensland said millions of residents in brisbane and several other areas would be ordered to stay at home for three days. it comes a day after authorities deployed hundreds of soldiers and police in sydney to enforce its covid lockdown. and, for a nation so invested in sport the latest restrictions are casusing chaos for competitions across the country. rugby, cricket and australian rules football have already struggled to get games played across the country. and today's lockdown has thrown fixtures into chaos and put the viability of some sports intojeopardy, with all the financial implications that brings. let's get an idea ofjust how much
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disruption the lockdown in brisbane has caused to sporting events all across australia this weekend and head to melbourne to speak with mitch cleary. he's a journalist and podcaster at afl dot com dot a—u covering australian rules football. give us some context. we all know australians love their sport. this is a real blow.— is a real blow. absolute frenzy toda . is a real blow. absolute frenzy today. thanks _ is a real blow. absolute frenzy today. thanks for _ is a real blow. absolute frenzy today. thanks for having - is a real blow. absolute frenzy today. thanks for having me. | is a real blow. absolute frenzy i today. thanks for having me. we is a real blow. absolute frenzy - today. thanks for having me. we woke up today. thanks for having me. we woke up today expecting five games of australian rules football, but no game in the traditional saturday night spot. no game typecast, everyone over here is watching the olympics as we speak. brisbane and gold coast areas of south—east queensland have been sent into a three day locked in. it could be much more than that. 60 cases of coronaviruses all it took. living government area shuttle. no professional community sport. it means three games across the weekend, to have been moved straight
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from melbourne. absolute chaos for teams to get to and from these games. one example where the melbourne demons football club based in victoria in melbourne flew two hours of nerves ahead of their game today, arrive to learn of the lockdown when they landed, got on the plane straight back to victoria two hours south and are preparing to play tomorrow. two of those games scheduled for today are being played tomorrow. there is big complications now for the national rugby league, the nrl as well. hat now for the national rugby league, the nrl as well.— the nrl as well. not 'ust financially i the nrl as well. not 'ust financially but i the nrl as well. not 'ust financially but to i the nrl as well. not 'ust financially but to the h the nrl as well. not just i financially but to the morale the nrl as well. not just - financially but to the morale of the nation, watching sport has helped many nations through their lockdown is... we many nations through their lockdown is... ~ ., , many nations through their lockdown is... we are very lucky to have the ol mics is... we are very lucky to have the olympics on _ is... we are very lucky to have the olympics on right _ is... we are very lucky to have the olympics on right now. _ is... we are very lucky to have the olympics on right now. a - is... we are very lucky to have the olympics on right now. a lot - is... we are very lucky to have the olympics on right now. a lot of. is... we are very lucky to have the | olympics on right now. a lot of this has got people through, in particular to night on saturday night, if it was not for the olympics we would all be sitting around watching the australian rules football our national rugby league, so games in brisbane and gold coast in south—east queensland are often
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now, and it is probably the strictest logjam we have seen in the south—east queensland region. a big amount of the games have already been moved up, we would normally have that many moved up to that idiot to begin with, new south wales has been shut off the best part of month now. they are seeing daily numbers in the triple figures of covid—19. no other parts of the world have had those sorts of numbers and continue to push through, but surely it has been really serious when it comes to covid—19, and? come now and what happens with the final series. we are only a few weeks away from the final series of the australian rules and the rugby finals, plus the grand finals are the big showpiece events. later in the year we have the ashes around the corner, so a big a few months coming up. real around the corner, so a big a few months coming up.— months coming up. real strong criticism in _ months coming up. real strong criticism in australia _ months coming up. real strong criticism in australia of - months coming up. real strong criticism in australia of the - criticism in australia of the vaccine will out there. i was going to ask you about the upcoming sporting fixtures, in particular cricket's ashes series. the element
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thatis cricket's ashes series. the element that is the big one. we are still a couple of months away and we have seen australia... be couple of months away and we have seen australia. . ._ seen australia... be able to get on to of the seen australia... be able to get on top of the coronavirus _ seen australia... be able to get on top of the coronavirus in _ seen australia... be able to get on top of the coronavirus in some - top of the coronavirus in some cities in some respects quickly. but as we are seeing in new south wales, they've been fighting for more than a month now and are still in lockdown. it depends on how quickly we can get through this. we saw games last year, that's the case in melbourne at the moment, coming off the back of lockdown with football codes, games being played here this weekend with no fans. there is every chance and ashes test series of five matches, usually played in front of a0, 50, even up to 80,000 people at some venues, played in front of no one. that's how quickly this whole thing has made. fingers crossed we can get on top of it because the football codes mean a lot to students in winter, nothing bigger than ashes when summer rolls around in a couple of months' time —— it means a lot to australians in winter. medical experts are warning that
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an oxygen monitoring device, called an oximeter, works less well for people with darker skin tones. nhs england and the medicines regulator, the mhra, say pulse oximeters can overestimate the amount of oxygen being taken in. authorities are advising patients to speak to health care professionals before using the devices and not to rely on a single reading. health officials in england are urging anyone who's not had their coronavirus jab yet — to get vaccinated this weekend. all adults have been able to book a first dose since mid—june, but latest figures show that nearly a third of young adults still haven't had one. walk—in centres opening over the coming days include one at burnley football club and a circus in halifax. bbc news understands the government is no longer considering making it compulsory for students to be fully vaccinated to attend lectures in england. let's get more on this from our political correspondent pete saull. good to see it. what is happening to
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your request maximum science earlier this week from the government that this week from the government that this was on. —— what is happening here? this was on. -- what is happening here? �* ., , this was on. -- what is happening here? 1, _., this was on. -- what is happening here? ., ., . ., here? boris johnson announcing a few ears auo here? boris johnson announcing a few years ago that — here? boris johnson announcing a few years ago that in _ here? boris johnson announcing a few years ago that in september - here? boris johnson announcing a few years ago that in september if - here? boris johnson announcing a few years ago that in september if you - years ago that in september if you want to go to a nightclub or venue with large crowds you will have to show proof of double vaccination. lots of other settings have been considered by ministers, one suggestion was that once the university students return to campus in september, they will have to show proof of double vaccination to go to lectures, to even stay in their halls of residence. now, that has been looked at, i'm told that does not have been shelved. that particular idea. we don't know why. certainly there has been a big backlash to the widespread use of vaccine passports among conservative mps. they leader of the house of commons jacob rees mogg is saying last night that that is not the end of the idea of a vaccine pass but we
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should protect our ancient freedoms. a sense that people are instinctively uneasy about having to show papers to get anywhere, but if that price worth paying to protect people's public health that is something people might be able to accept. certainly on university campuses its own sake this will happen now. —— will not happen now. the uk telecommunications industry hopes a satellite that has gone into orbit will help maintain its global leadership in the sector. a quarter of the world's big telecoms spacecraft are manufactured in britain, and the new quantum platform is billed as the market's next—generation product. quantum was launched on an ariane rocket from french guiana last night. here's our science correspondentjonathan amos. another rocket climbs skyward to bolster a sector that europe, and the uk in particular, has come to dominate — the business of telecommunications satellites. there are hundreds of these
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spacecraft overhead, bouncing tv, phone calls, broadband and other data services around the planet. but the new satellite going into orbit, called quantum, represents a big step forward in technology. while traditional telecom spacecraft are configured before launch to do very specific tasks, quantum has been built for flexibility. it is the sector's first fully reprogrammable spacecraft. it is able to rapidly change the coverage, bandwidth, power and frequency of its signals. one of its uses will be for disaster response, providing emergency communications to the teams that are sent to help people in places hit by catastrophic floods or earthquakes. quantum's manufacturers in the uk, that is airbus and surrey satellite technology ltd, will incorporate the prototype's technology into their future spacecraft, hoping to maintain their world leading status in what has become a highly competitive field.
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israel has accused iran of being behind an attack on an oil tanker in which two crew members were killed, including a british national. the mv mercer street, was off the coast of oman in the arabian sea when the incident occurred on thursday. israeli sources say the tanker was attacked by a drone. the briton, and a romanian national who was also killed, have not yet been named. residents in the chinese city of nanjing are being asked not to leave the area, in an attempt to contain the latest more than 200 people have been infected since the virus was first detected at the city's busy airport onjuly the 20th. cases have now spread to several other provinces and to the capital beijing. all flights from nanjing airport have been suspended for the next two weeks.
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you are watching bbc news. let's get more olympics action — mike bushell has a full round—up. good afternoon....she was one of team gb's great medal hopes, but dina asher smith's bid for a medal in the women's 100 metres, is over. the sprinter has failed to qualify for the final, coming third in her heat which was won by reigning olympic champion, elaine thompson—herah... asher smith then had to wait to see if she'd still qualify, as one of the fastest, third place athletes, but her time of 11.05 seconds was not quick enough. she says she's still struggling with a hamstring issue and there's speculation she might pull out of the 200 metres. asha philip is also out, but britain's daryll neita has made the 110—metres final — she ran 11 seconds exactly, to go through as one
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of the fastest losers. it was, predictably, the two—time olympic champion shelly—ann fraser—pryce who won that race in the fastest time of the semis — but absolute delight for neita. and zharnel hughes ran a season's best to reach the semi—finals of the men's100—metres. those heats are still going on. it has already been a golden saturday for team gb at the tokyo olympics. and it's been a day when team work has been the key, in new relay olympic events, in triathlon and the swimming pool, where the brits are enjoying their most successful games, in over a century, as adam wild reports. the triathlon will be golden for great britain. it's the mixed medley relay, great britain win the gold by miles. for all the individual brilliance, in the tokyo today it was teamwork that triumphed.
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super saturday had barely begun, but team gb was already looking at four new olympic champions in this, the inaugural triathlon relay. jessica learmonth led the way for britain. then the turn ofjonny brownlee. individual bronze in london, silver in rio, this his final olympic race, a last chance to complete the set. georgia taylor—brown had given britain a 21 seconds advantage and, although alex yee was dramatically caught for a moment, when he came to the finish, he and gb were in a class of their own. he will win the gold. four new british olympic champions before breakfast. forjonny brownlee, gold at last. the olympics? i've completed it. i've been waiting for that one. yeah, it feels absolutely amazing. third olympics and to finally walk away with olympic gold, and we did everything we possibly could. whilst over in the pool, team gb have surpassed expectations. now a moment for the team's finest to come together. the mixed medley relay, another new olympic event.
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in the company of the finest swimmers on earth, britain have already proved they can excel. here they were doing it again. kathleen dawson gave way to the peerless adam peaty. he did what he always seems to do. before james guy powered britain into the narrowest of leads. and here was anna hopkin in the final leg. great britain are going to win their fourth gold in the swimming pool. one word that has changed the whole team is belief. we've got champions who believe we can win, champions who believe we can get world records and if you've got one belief, you build everything around that. two team relays, two olympic team titles, another golden day for team gb. emma wilson has taken windsurfing bronze on her olympic debut. she was already guaranteed a medal going into the final, after winning four of her 12 races — and she crossed the finish line in second place — but with cumulative, scores counting, that gave her bronze behind china's lu yunxiu and the rio
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champion, charline picon of france. that's all the sport for now. more than a00,000 covid—19 vaccines are due to arrive in kenya as part of a surplus the uk government is donating to poorer nations. the british foreign secretary, has called on other countries to also donate vaccines to assist "vulnerable" nations dealing with fresh waves of coronavirus. rhoda odhiambo in nairobi has more on covid vaccinations in kenya. so, right now more than a million people have been vaccinated, but if you look at the people who have received two doses of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, which is currently being used in the country, it is about 800,000, so the vaccines that will be arriving today in the country will go a long way in ensuring that people who need their second doses will get them, and also to prevent people from becoming severely ill with the disease, because the country is currently in a very fierce third wave and many
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people who are severely ill with the disease are currently in hospitals in need of supplemental oxygen. talk us through the third wave, because kenya has been hit quite hard this time. yes, it has been hit quite hard and there are numerous reasons as to why. number one, if we look at how the politicians have been going around the country, still conducting political gatherings, this has also led to entertainment people holding concerts, but also the fact that people are not adhering to the measures put in place earlier, such as wearing of masks and observing the two—metres social distance rule. other than that we are also seeing that the delta variant, which has been identified in kenya and another 20 african countries is responsible for the third wave because it is more transmissible and virulent. two women have been seriously injured by a falling tree after strong winds struck the south of england. emergency services were called to ubbeston
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in suffolk on friday evening. police say the two, who are in their 20s were at an outdoor party. it came after storm evert led to gusts of winds nearing 70mph across cornwall — prompting a number of rescues. a survey by roadside assistance company rac has found seven in ten british motorists believe the speed limit should be lower in wet weather. currently the speed limit is 70 miles per hour on motorways at all times. but with nearly 250 people killed on the country's roads during bad weather, many feel there should be greater efforts to force motorists to slow down. rod dennis is from the rac. around about 800 people every year are killed or seriously injured on the uk's motorways and, sadly, that is a number that hasn't been dropping in recent years. it's stayed stubbornly high. if you have in speed and you add in wet weather, as well, it's an extremely dangerous cocktail and we know that a lot of people
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are being killed or seriously injured every year by this and perhaps it's time we looked at some novel ways of trying to tackle it. here at the rac, we asked drivers about their thoughts on reducing speed limits in wet weather on motorways, something that is commonplace in france at the moment. we have the infrastructure here in the uk increasingly to support a move like this and perhaps it is time we looked at these sorts of measures in order to bring those casualty rates, which as i say are stubbornly high, finally down our motorways. the singer kt tunstall has been speaking to the bbc about her decision to pull out of an upcoming us tour due to problems with her hearing. the brit award winner, went completely deaf in her left ear three years ago. earlier this month she noticed the early signs of deterioration starting in her right ear and decided to act. she's been speaking to our entertainment correspondent colin paterson kt tunstall has been playing live for three decades, often doing 200 shows a year.
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next week she wants to start a three month us tour with hall and oates but what's happening to her hearing has caused her to pull out. it's almost like a siren goes off and you suddenly get this — "woooo" — and it'sjust a pulse of a noise. the other thing that you can get is that suddenly you can't hear anything and it feels like someone's put a vacuum over your head. her plan is now to space out live shows allowing more recovery time, but the brit award—winning singer has been struggling with her hearing since the end of 2007. i got off a long haulflight, and i was actually going to a spice girls concert, and i had a nap before i was going to go to the gig, and i woke up and i felt really discombobulated and something was up with my left ear and i had a really,
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really loud ringing. i couldn't hear things like the shower, or running water, i couldn't hear crisp packets, i couldn't hear the indicator on the car. kt tunstall believes her hearing problems are caused by the stress to her body of being on the road rather than by loud music. things got worse in 2018 during a us tour when she went permanently deaf in her left ear. when i saw a couple of specialists, they don't really know a lot about the inner ear, it's so fine and so complex. i was also told that the more deaf you go, the less likely it is that you'll get your hearing back and i was at like 98% or something. i can't hear anything in that ear. so i can't wear a hearing aid in that year because there's nothing going in. your hearing is deteriorating rapidly. deafness in musicians was a theme explored in the oscar—winning film sound of metal.
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i can't hear you! do you understand me? ican't...|'m deaf! kt tunstall thought it was excellent and hopes it leads to more understanding of the issue. have you thought about what your life would be like if you are no longer able to play live? i would be really, really sorry to not be able to do it anymore but i think that the decision that i'm making with how i'm approaching my career here is to really carve a way of life that allows me to keep playing live. totally intend to continue, butjust at a slightly different pace now. colin paterson, bbc news. cheering and applause. and after 17 years at radio 1, annie mac has presented herfinal show on the station. the last 17 years have been the most
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amazing, magical experience and, yeah, thank you so much for listening. the dj and broadcasterjoined radio 1 as an assistant producer before hosting her first show in 200a. she's previously said one of the reasons she's leaving the station is to spend more time with herfamily. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello, there. storm evert yesterday brought some damage and disruption across southern parts of the country. it brought almost autumnal weather rather than mid—summer weather to our shores. this weekend, though, it's looking a bit better. it's going to be a little bit quieter. we'll have sunshine and showers in the forecast, but it will remain on the cool side for the time of year. that's because we've got northerly winds running down across the uk. that area of low is what was storm evert. we've got showers in the forecast, mainly across england and wales through the day. some showers also across eastern scotland, north—east england. this will tend to turn heavier into the afternoon, but it's part of wales, the midlands, southern england which will see the heaviest of the showers. hitand miss. some places will stay dry.
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we could see quite a bit of dry weather for scotland and northern ireland, albeit rather cloudy. the winds are going to be lighter today than what they were yesterday, particularly across england and wales. it's not going to feel particularly warm for the time of year, particularly across the north of the country, 15 to 19 degrees here, but we could make 21 or 22 across the south—east. the winds will be lighter and, given the sunshine is pretty strong this time of year, it shouldn't feel too bad. as we head through this evening and overnight, most of the showers die away, but a few will linger here and there. most places will be dry, variable cloud and clear spells. temperatures in double figures for england and wales, but some chillier spots across scotland and northern ireland. so into sunday, we've got this very weak weather front spreading south across the country. that's going to introduce the cooler air. maybe a bit more cloud for england and wales as we head on into the afternoon. so it's going to be one of sunshine and showers again. most of them for england and wales closer to that weather front. again, into the afternoon, it could turn out to be heavy and thundery in places. the odd shower, as well, for the north and east of scotland.
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we will hold on to a bit more breeze here. otherwise, the winds will be light so any showers will tend to be fairly slow moving. so that cooler air will push its way southwards, so i think highs of 20, maybe 21 degrees in the south, around the mid to upper—teens celsius further north. as we head on into the start of next week, this bump, this ridge of high pressure noses in from the south—west. that will settle things down a bit. there will still be a few showers around, but a more active jet stream later in the week will fire low pressure systems towards our shores. so the general thinking is next week we start off generally fine and settled with some sunshine before it turns a lot more unsettled towards the end of the week.
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hello. tea m team gb secured two more gold medals at the tokyo olympics, both in new and thence with men and women competing together. and further success with a swimming team who won gold in the four by 100 metre mixed rayleigh. dan rowan was watching the action. a first for the olympics but a familiar feeling a first for the olympics but a familiarfeeling for
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a first for the olympics but a familiar feeling for team gb, a first for the olympics but a familiarfeeling for team gb, third triathlon medal today in the inaugural mixed team event, that this time gold. with each athlete having to complete 300 metre swim, 6.8 kilometre bike ride and two kilometre run, britain's bid got off to a good start beforejonny brownlee extended the lead in this his third and final olympics. team gb still had the two medallists from the individual lamps to come. after a bronze and silver in his previous two games, brownlee finally emulating his brother and claiming gold. it’s emulating his brother and claiming old. �* , �* ., emulating his brother and claiming old. 3 �* ., ., gold. it's something i've wanted to do a lona gold. it's something i've wanted to do a long time- — gold. it's something i've wanted to do a long time. i've _ gold. it's something i've wanted to do a long time. i've chased - gold. it's something i've wanted to do a long time. i've chased that. do a long time. i've chased that rain for a long time. see my brother achieve it twice and now i've done it. and it feels amazing. introduced to t to it. and it feels amazing. introduced to try to approve — it. and it feels amazing. introduced to try to approve gender— it. and it feels amazing. introduced to try to approve gender balance, l to try to approve gender balance, the new mixed team events have been one of the features of the games here in tokyo. and britain are certainly enjoying them. team gb's
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swimmers have already had a remarkable olympics, but it got even better in the four by 100 metre mixed medley relay.— better in the four by 100 metre mixed medley relay. great britain are auoin mixed medley relay. great britain are going to _ mixed medley relay. great britain are going to win _ mixed medley relay. great britain are going to win their— mixed medley relay. great britain are going to win their fourth - mixed medley relay. great britain are going to win their fourth gold | are going to win their fourth gold in pool. are going to win their fourth gold in ool. �* ., ., ,~' , are going to win their fourth gold in ool.�* ., ,, ., are going to win their fourth gold in ool. �* ., ., , , ., ., in pool. anna hopkins sealing a stunnin: in pool. anna hopkins sealing a stunning when _ in pool. anna hopkins sealing a stunning when a _ in pool. anna hopkins sealing a stunning when a new _ in pool. anna hopkins sealing a stunning when a new world - in pool. anna hopkins sealing a i stunning when a new world record after her team—mates established a lead. this seventh medalfor the team here, one more tomorrow it will be british swimming's best ever games. today's other main news, nhs england in the body which regulates health care products is issuing new guidance on pulse ox metres after they found they can overestimate readings on those with darker skin tones. they were advising people to speak to health care deficient. american military forces are set to have boarded an israeli operated oil tanker after a british and romanian member of its crew were killed by a reported drone strike. an israeli government minister has accused iran
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of exporting terrorism in the wake of exporting terrorism in the wake of the alleged attack. let's return to the olympics, nathalie perks is at this athletic stadium. big news in the last hour or so and hundred metres events. yes, the world 100 metres silver medallist dean asher smith did not make it through to the final of the women's100 metres and she's just told me she's pulled out of the 200 metres as well in which she is the reigning world champion. there were high hopes she would be writtenjew first medallist since 1960 but she had a poorfinish, only third, she's been nursing a hamstring injury and shejust been nursing a hamstring injury and she just told been nursing a hamstring injury and shejust told me been nursing a hamstring injury and she just told me that when she damaged it earlier in the month she was told there was only a 2% chance she would make the start line. she wanted to do everything she could, she says she's heartbroken but still going the relay. good news for
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britain's first woman in the 100 metre final since 2008.- britain's first woman in the 100 metre final since 2008. many thanks. the next news — metre final since 2008. many thanks. the next news on _ metre final since 2008. many thanks. the next news on bbc _ metre final since 2008. many thanks. the next news on bbc one _ metre final since 2008. many thanks. the next news on bbc one is - metre final since 2008. many thanks. the next news on bbc one is at - metre final since 2008. many thanks. the next news on bbc one is at a - the next news on bbc one is at a quarter to six. have a good afternoon. you're watching the bbc news channel. now, it's time for click. it is the land of fire and ice.
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where the earth is literally splitting apart. this is iceland, home to so much amazing scenery, created by the superheated rock that lurks just below the surface. as recently as march this year, a new volcano's been erupting and attracting tourists and scientists alike to watch and learn as it rewrites the geography once again. and, later in the programme, we will be there to see how — as long as you're careful — volcanoes and drones can mix. now, iceland is putting all of this heat to good use. it drives the geothermal power stations which provide clean, cheap electricity, and that means that now, nearly half of all of the cars here are electric. the country is second only to norway in its adoption.

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