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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 31, 2021 7:00am-7:31am BST

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this is bbc world news. i'm maryam moshiri. our top stories: notjust gold but a world record win for team gb in the mixed axloom relay on "super saturday" at the tokyo games. plus there's a decisive victory for team gb in their first ever triathlon mixed relay, picking up gold in one hour 23 minutes and ahead of the usa and france. the tax returns of former president donald trump will be handed to congress after a ruling by the usjustice department. the lure of cheap drugs in zimbabwe, where hospitals are buckling under the strain of crystal meth addiction. # suddenly i see
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# this is what i wanna be...# and singer kt tunstall postpones her tour over concerns she could become completely deaf. hello and welcome to bbc news. turning to the olympics now, and we've reached the middle weekend of the games. here's the medal table as it stands at the moment: china is on top with 19 gold medals followed by host nation japan with 17. with me is reporter tanya dendrinos. tanya, it is "super saturday" and we've had world records in the pool?
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it has been such an exciting super saturday already and there's plenty more action it has been such an exciting super saturday already and there's plenty more action to it has been such an exciting super saturday already and there's plenty more action to come. it has been such an exciting super saturday already and there's plenty more action to come. team it has been such an exciting super saturday already and there's plenty more action to come. team gb it has been such an exciting super saturday already and there's plenty more action to come. team gb taking gold in the pull in the inaugural axioom mix mentally and in a world record time, the cherry on the top! it's the first time it has taken place at the olympics, meaning a fourth swimming gold for team gb — the first time it's happened for more than a century at the olympic games. the quartet was catherine dawson, adam peaty, james guy and an hopkin. another world record was smashed in the pools for the usa's caleb wrestle. he claimed gold in the 100m butterfly final, adding to the two goals he has got in tokyo. celebrations all round for the us swim team with katie ledecky taking the 800 metres freestyle gold. find the 800 metres freestyle gold. and some action — the 800 metres freestyle gold. and some action in _ the 800 metres freestyle gold. and some action in the triathlon mixed
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relay and a uk gold as well? certainly was. another inaugural event for the games. normally when we think of triathlon we think of it as an incredible test of individual endurance across three disciplines — swimming, cycling, running... iam exhausted just thinking about it! what would you prefer? i exhausted just thinking about it! what would you prefer?- exhausted just thinking about it! what would you prefer? i can't say. i would say — what would you prefer? i can't say. i would say running. _ what would you prefer? i can't say. i would say running. at _ what would you prefer? i can't say. i would say running. at least - what would you prefer? i can't say. i would say running. at least i - what would you prefer? i can't say. i would say running. at least i can l i would say running. at least i can do that, i run for the basque. i do that, i run forthe basque. i could maybe walk. do that, i run for the basque. i could maybe walk. compared i do that, i run for the basque. i l could maybe walk. compared to do that, i run for the basque. i - could maybe walk. compared to these cu s we could maybe walk. compared to these guys we would — could maybe walk. compared to these guys we would not _ could maybe walk. compared to these guys we would not make _ could maybe walk. compared to these guys we would not make a _ could maybe walk. compared to these guys we would not make a very - could maybe walk. compared to these guys we would not make a very good l guys we would not make a very good there. , there. they went in with the favourites — there. they went in with the favourites tag. _ there. they went in with the favourites tag. sometimes l there. they went in with the - favourites tag. sometimes people don't like it, they want to be the underdog that they came out with a gold in the inaugural event. to men and two women per team. 300 metres for the swim, eight kilometre ride and two kilometre run and france were in bronze.—
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and two kilometre run and france were in bronze. fantastic news for team gb but _ were in bronze. fantastic news for team gb but not _ were in bronze. fantastic news for team gb but not such _ were in bronze. fantastic news for team gb but not such great - were in bronze. fantastic news for team gb but not such great news| were in bronze. fantastic news for- team gb but not such great news from simone biles, the us gymnastics superstar. simone biles, the us gymnastics su erstar. ,, simone biles, the us gymnastics suerstar. ,, ., ., superstar. she had the weight of the world and expectation _ superstar. she had the weight of the world and expectation on _ superstar. she had the weight of the world and expectation on her- world and expectation on her shoulders coming into the games. she is the face of gymnastics and a brilliant athlete. she has been suffering from a phenomenon known as the twisties, which means a gymnast can lose their sense of space and dimension when in the air, which must be terrifying when you look at the newbies they are trying to pull off. a statement from usa gymnastics red: she may be in the floor and balance beam events. they added: she has been incredible and we wish
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her all the best. bill she has been incredible and we wish her all the best.— her all the best. all the best to simone biles. _ her all the best. all the best to simone biles. everyone - her all the best. all the best to simone biles. everyone shouldj her all the best. all the best to - simone biles. everyone should watch abc news but if you are watching the olympics, what should we expect? when you think of the second week of the games you think of the athletics and we have the women's 100m later today, semi—final and then the final. word potentially history making. shelley—ann fraser—price from jamaica is vying to become the first woman in history to win and olympics athletics event three times. . , ., olympics athletics event three times-— shel olympics athletics event three . times-— she got times. incredible athlete. she got old in times. incredible athlete. she got gold in 2008 _ times. incredible athlete. she got gold in 2008 and _ times. incredible athlete. she got gold in 2008 and 2012, _ times. incredible athlete. she got gold in 2008 and 2012, can - times. incredible athlete. she got gold in 2008 and 2012, can she i times. incredible athlete. she got| gold in 2008 and 2012, can she do times. incredible athlete. she got i gold in 2008 and 2012, can she do it again here? we will have to wait and see. team gb's dina asher—smith hope to stifle that. a nigerian, okag, has been suspended following a drugs test. the athletics integrity unit has said that a 23—year—old has
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tested positive for a growth hormone. if you're interested in the athletics, we have gold matches in the women's tennis and the rugby sevens. it’s the women's tennis and the rugby sevens. �* , ., ., , ., the women's tennis and the rugby sevens. �*, ., ., , ., ., ., sevens. it's going to be an amazing su er sevens. it's going to be an amazing super saturday- — sevens. it's going to be an amazing super saturday. as _ sevens. it's going to be an amazing super saturday. as always, - sevens. it's going to be an amazing super saturday. as always, thank l sevens. it's going to be an amazing i super saturday. as always, thank you very much. let's move on to some other news making headlines around the world. the us justice department says tax returns belonging to the former president donald trump must be handed over to congress. the decision reverses a previous ruling. officials now say lawmakers have legitimate reasons for asking to see the documents. our north america correspondent, david willis, reports. donald trump has fought hard to prevent the release of his tax returns. this isjust a continuation of the most hideous witch—hunt in the history of our country. this latest ruling could mark the beginning of the end of his ferocious effort to keep those documents out of the public eye.
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then treasury secretary steven mnuchin�*s refusal to comply with a subpoena back in 2019 prompted a two—year battle for documents including asset, income and tax payment data on the part of the democrat—led house ways and means committee, which is investigating potential conflicts of interest on the part of the former president and the possibility of foreign interference. now in a 39—page ruling, the usjustice department has reversed a ruling made when trump still in office and has ordered the treasury to release six years' worth trump tax returns — a move hailed by the house speaker, nancy pelosi, who called access to the documents: every president since richard nixon has disclosed details of their tax returns, the one exception being donald trump. he claimed before he was elected
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that his records were under ordered he claimed before he was elected that his records were under audit by the authorities, a process that was apparently still under way by the time he left office. republicans say the entire issue is politically motivated. they have denounced the justice department decision and donald trump is widely expected to challenge it in court, meaning that if those highly anticipated documents are to be made public it could still be many, many months away. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. australia's third largest city, brisbane, is to go into lockdown again in another attempt to contain the spread of the delta variant of coronavirus. the deputy premier of queensland said millions of residents in brisbane and several other areas would be ordered to stay at home for three days. shaimaa khalil has the latest.
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queensland has always been the example of notjust containing and eliminating the virus for many months, but when i travelled there a few months ago, life seemed to be going back to normal. it was easy to forget about covid—i9 when you were in queensland, but that is the challenge with the delta variant. there are six new locally acquired cases of the delta variant and all linked to a 17—year—old student who tested positive on thursday. that is why the queensland state government has said that 11 areas in brisbane will go into strict lockdown until tuesday, so no—one can leave the house except for essential reasons or to go for a covid test or a vaccination. people are not allowed to travel further than 10 kilometres from their homes and students and teachers in high
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school will have to wear facemasks. this has been described as the strictest lockdown for brisbane. we heard from the state deputy premier, who said that "we have been here before but this time it is different," citing the transmissibility of delta. what is worrying medical officials is the high number of exposure sites, which is likely to increase, which means the contact tracers and maybe other cases will also turn up. here in the uk, health officials are urging anyone who's not had their coronavirus jab yet to get vaccinated this weekend. all adults in england have been able to book a first dose since mid—june, but latest figures show that nearly a third of young adults still haven't had one. walk—in centres opening over the coming days include one at burnley football club and a circus in halifax in the north of england.
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we have seen a great response to the vaccine programme so far, with nearly nine out of ten people having had their firstjabs and over seven out of ten now fully immunised. but we have got to pull out all the stops this weekend. we know getting vaccine sites popped up at those places where people are going to he is really important. so whether your with the jugglers at the circus in halifax or with the football fans in burnley or with the runners and riders at the racecourse in goodwood — if you haven't had the jab, this is your weekend to get it. here in the uk, haulage industry leaders say they're struggling to find enough heavy goods vehicle drivers to keep the economy moving. it estimates there's a shortfall of more than 100,000 hauliers, and it's causing acute problems in supply chains. the difficulties, fueled by a combination of factors, have led one english company to take desperate action. the bbc�*s amy payne reports. trucks like these keep the country moving but right now, many are parked up and going nowhere.
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haulage firms, like this leicestershire logistics company, just can't find enough drivers. it's worrying. i mean, the vehicles are just sitting there because we haven't got the drivers. and there's simply a large number of drivers that went back to europe during brexit, we've had covid which has caused us severe problems with the lack of training that's available, and that's just a few of the things, really. well, we're seeing an impact right across the board, from manufacturing, factories, farming and of course supermarkets which is probably the one thing that most people notice the most. and so translink is taking action. kev is the latest employee here to benefit from free training courses to help tackle the chronic shortage of hgv drivers. i've grown up in the transport industry all my life and obviously companies helping individuals, �*cause obviously it's a costly thing to get into but it's a good thing to help the country out, really. but many in the industry want government help and a gear change
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in how thejob is perceived. if you look at the long—term solutions, about attracting, training and retaining, we have programmes in place that we can put in place, with the industry and with the government's support. that doesn't help today. what i really want to see some sort of temporary visa scheme in place like for seasonal picking in food production. but the government isn't keen, insisting the future workforce should be made up of uk residents. for now, drivers are allowed to spend slightly longer on the road and there are plans to increase testing, but as drivers take time off in summer holiday season, there's concern the situation will get worse before it gets better. amy payne, bbc midlands today, leicestershire. more than 400,000 covid—i9 vaccines are due to arrive in kenya as part of a surplus the uk government is donating to poorer nations. the british foreign secretary has called on other countries to also donate vaccines to assist vulnerable nations dealing with fresh waves of coronavirus. let's cross to nairobi and speak to the the bbc�*s rhoda odhiambo, who's there.
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rhoda, give us an update on how can your�*s vaccination programme is going and how much they are needed by the country �*s. right going and how much they are needed by the country "5-— by the country 's. right now more than 1 million _ by the country 's. right now more than 1 million have _ by the country 's. right now more than1 million have been - by the country 's. right now more | than1 million have been vaccinated thani million have been vaccinated but if you look at those who have had two doses of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, which is currently being used, it is around 800,000. the vaccines arriving today will go a long way to ensure that those who need second doses will get them to prevent people getting seriously ill, because the country is currently in a very fierce third wave and many people who are seriously ill with the disease are in hospital in need of supplemental oxygen. in hospital in need of supplemental ox uen. . ~' in hospital in need of supplemental ox ien. ., ~' .,, in hospital in need of supplemental ox uen. ., ~ ., oxygen. talk as through the third wave because — oxygen. talk as through the third wave because kenya _ oxygen. talk as through the third wave because kenya has - oxygen. talk as through the third wave because kenya has been . oxygen. talk as through the third wave because kenya has been hit quite hard this time, hasn't it? yes, and there are numerous reasons as to why this has happened.
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firstly, if we look at how politicians have been going around the country still conducting political gatherings. this has led to entertainment people holding concerts. but also the fact people are not adhering to the measures put in place earlier, such as masks and to meet a social distance rule. also you are seeing the delta variant, which has been identified in kenya and 20 other african countries, is responsible because it is more transmissible and virulent. rhoda odhiambo, _ transmissible and virulent. rhoda odhiambo, thank _ transmissible and virulent. rhoda odhiambo, thank you _ transmissible and virulent. rhoda odhiambo, thank you very - transmissible and virulent. rhoda odhiambo, thank you very much l odhiambo, thank you very much indeed. rhoda in nairobi in kenya for a survey by roadside assistance company rac has found seven in ten british motorists believe the speed limit should be lower in wet weather.currently the speed limit is 70 miles per hour on motorways at all times. but with nearly 250 people killed on the country's roads during bad weather, many feel there should be greater efforts to force motorists to slow down. let's discuss the findings of that
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report by the rac and speak to rod dennis from the organisation. thank you forjoining us. talk me through the what the relationship is between wet roads and crashes. it is a really good — between wet roads and crashes. it 3 a really good point. around 800 people every year are killed or seriously injured on the uk's motorways. that is sadly a number that hasn't been dropping and has stayed stubbornly high. if you add in speed and wet weather as well it is an extremely dangerous cocktail and we know that a lot of people have been killed or seriously injured every year because of this and perhaps it is time that we looked at some novel ways of trying to tackle it. here at the rsc we asked drivers about their thoughts on reducing speed limits in wet weather on motorways, something that is commonplace in france. we have the infrastructure here in the uk increasingly to support a move like this and perhaps it is time we looked at these measures in order to bring the casualty rate which as i say a stubbornly high, down on our
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motorways. say a stubbornly high, down on our motorways-— say a stubbornly high, down on our motorways. you talked about other countries doing _ motorways. you talked about other countries doing this. _ motorways. you talked about other countries doing this. the _ motorways. you talked about other countries doing this. the other - countries doing this. the other countries doing this. the other countries have lower death rates when the wet weather hits? ii rare when the wet weather hits? if we look at france, _ when the wet weather hits? if we look at france, almira _ when the wet weather hits? if we look at france, almira is - when the wet weather hits? if "he: look at france, almira is unable, —— our nearest neighbour, they have a higher motor speed limit of around 80 mph. we know how common the accidents can be and how dangerous it can be so perhaps we look at something different. around three and ten motorway collisions that take place as a result of cars going too fast because the conditions were too fast because the conditions were too wet. he makes up a significant portion of casualties and we need to bring the noblest out. do portion of casualties and we need to bring the noblest out.— portion of casualties and we need to bring the noblest out. do people not use their common _ bring the noblest out. do people not use their common sense _ bring the noblest out. do people not use their common sense and -
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bring the noblest out. do people not use their common sense and slow. bring the noblest out. do people not. use their common sense and slow down naturally anyway? we use their common sense and slow down naturally anyway?— naturally anyway? we spoke to drivers and _ naturally anyway? we spoke to drivers and some _ naturally anyway? we spoke to drivers and some people - naturally anyway? we spoke to drivers and some people are i drivers and some people are concerned that some people wouldn't adhere to lower limit but i wonder whether the tides are beginning to change. we have smart motorways being rolled out across the uk now and they often feature lower speed limits to manage congestion levels. we have also recently seen them looking at ways of reducing speed limits to produce air quality across the uk. perhaps it is a natural step that we look at the opportunity to reduce speeds in which conditions full of it would depend on drivers obeying them but there is an argument, and drivers agree, that even a minor reduction in speed by a few drivers would make the roads safer for everybody. zimbabwe's president says more needs to be done to tackle the country's crystal meth crisis — which is an issue amongst children as young as ia in his country — and linked to the country's high unemployment. the government says the economy will soon improve. but millions are still struggling
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and zimbabwe has just suffered one its deadliest weeks since coronavirus was first detected there. mark lobel reports. a dangerous distraction through tough times for this 24—year—old agriculture graduate in zimbabwe's capital. translation: when i smoke crystal meth i get a lot - of energy and i don't sleep at night. ifeel like i am just waking up and anything is possible. if we were employed and occupied, it would help a lot. doing drugs is a way of healing the pain and stress of being unproductive, and not getting the opportunity to proceed with education. crystal meth is becoming worryingly common and can cost less than alcohol, so it's a convenient choice for those in poverty or with mental health issues.
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there's little hope of change as the pandemic persists with a record in daily covid deaths reported earlier this week. the government hasjust approved thejohnson &johnson vaccine but, so far, two doses of china's sinopharm jab have reached less than 10% of people the state says needs to be fully vaccinated to control the virus, so they can feel as confident as the vice president. so, after several lockdowns this past year, similar restrictions have just been extended again — a further risk to isolated people tempted by cheap drugs. amphetamine increases the risk of developing depression and suicidal ideations. in a country mired in recession after a drought and lockdown
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the past two years, encouraging tobacco sales and a bumper maize crop could offer some really. but despite the government's optimistic forecast, millions still live in poverty or on low wages. and zimbabwe's president, emmerson mnangagwa, has himself warned of a new phenomenon of unbecoming trends threatening the fate of zimbabwe's youth. there is a need for projects, projects that generate income for the youth. the young are zimbabwe's future. breaking the link between drugs and the disillusioned will help ensure they find a more positive path. mark lobel, bbc news. the singer kt tunstall has been speaking to the bbc about her decision to pull out of an upcoming us tour due to problems with her hearing. the brit award winner,
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went completely deaf in her left ear three years ago. earlier this month she noticed the early signs of deterioration starting in her right ear and decided to act. she's been speaking to our entertainment correspondent colin paterson. singing. kt tunstall has been playing live for three decades, often doing 200 shows a year. next week she wants to start a three month us tour with hall and oates but what's happening to her hearing has caused her to pull out. it's almost like a siren goes off and you suddenly get this — "woooo" — and it'sjust a pulse of a noise. the other thing that you can get is that suddenly you can't hear anything and it feels like someone's
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put a vacuum over your head. her plan is now to space out live shows allowing more recovery time, but the brit award—winning singer has been struggling with her hearing since the end of 2007. i got off a long haulflight, and i was actually going to a spice girls concert, and i had a nap before i was going to go to the gig, and i woke up and i felt really discombobulated and something was up with my left ear and i had a really, really loud ringing. i couldn't hear things like the shower, or running water, i couldn't hear crisp packets, i couldn't hear the indicator on the car. kt tunstall believes her hearing problems are caused by the stress to her body of being on the road rather than by loud music. things got worse in 2018 during a us tour when she went permanently deaf in her left ear. when i saw a couple of specialists, they don't really know
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a lot about the inner ear, it's so fine and so complex. i was also told that the more deaf you go, the less likely it is that you'll get your hearing back and i was at like 98% or something. i can't hear anything in that ear. so i can't wear a hearing aid in that year because there's nothing going in. your hearing is deteriorating rapidly. deafness in musicians was a theme explored in the oscar—winning film sound of metal. i can't hear you! do you understand me? ican't...|'m deaf! kt tunstall thought it was excellent and hopes it leads to more understanding of the issue. have you thought about what your life would be like if you are no longer able to play live? i would be really, really sorry to not be able to do it anymore but i think that the decision that i'm making with how i'm approaching my career here is to really carve a way of life that allows me to keep playing live. totally intend to continue, but just at a slightly different pace now. colin paterson, bbc news.
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cheering and applause. thanks so much, glasgow! see you soon! if you're scared of heights look away now. as if this glass—bottomed suspension bridge in china's hunan province wasn't terrifying enough — it now is offering the world's highest bungyjump from a footbridge. visitors can take in the views as they leap from the nearly 900 foot drop. the jump comes at the hefty price of around 300 dollars but gives plenty of bragging rights to those willing to brave the fall. i would personally never do. even if you paid me $300 i wouldn't do that. let's make that clear. more news on
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our website as always, the latest on the olympic games. gold tally for team gb onto bbc news website. good morning to you. storm ever yesterday brought more weather to autumn in midsummer but things are looking quieter this weekend. we will still have some showers in the forecast and they will be quite a bit of sunshine around but you will notice for the time of year it will feel fairly cool and the reason for that, northerly winds coming down from the arctic right across the uk on the back edge of this low which was storm ever yesterday. we are continuing to see some cloud and a few showers around particularly across northern and eastern parts of the country. this is a week when the
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front spreading southwards. mainly dry i think through the afternoon by the odd shower. these showers could be thundery across north—east england and heavy, maybe thundery showers, developing three southern parts of the country as well. here, winds will be coming in from the west further north, down from the north which is why it will be quite cool but for the south i think we could make 21 degrees. that is a little bit warmer than what we had on friday across southern areas. the showers across england and wales should slowly fizzle out through this evening and overnight. the odd one lingering around. variable cloud with clear spells and it will state pool across northern areas will stop further south, pool across northern areas will stop furthersouth, no pool across northern areas will stop further south, no problems there. 13 or 1a degrees. this weak weather front continues to sink south as we head on into sunday and that will bring a band of cloud and showers to southern areas. further north it will be a bit drier still with northerly winds. it will feel call for the time of year. they will be variable cloud from a sunshine
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across northern areas and the odd shower. most of the showers will be three central, southern parts of the shower. again it could be the lot heavier thundery one and the winds will be light so it will be slower moving. you will notice the temperature is lower, even across the south stop 18 to 20 degrees across the mid— teens across the north. the weather front slowly clears away from the south and you could see some showers across southern areas but the bump of high—pressure we are building in for monday and certainly tuesday and that will settle things down. it will be a quieter couple of days, monday and tuesday, by the odd shower. but from mid week onwards, sending low pressure towards our shores.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: on the middle weekend of the olympics, team gb have won two of the new mixed relay events, taking a world record in the swimming 4x100 metres and winning the inaugural olympic triathlon mixed title. us champion gymnast simone biles has withdrawn from two more competitions in tokyo. her team say she's ruled herself out of the finals of the vault and uneven bars. the us justice department has ruled that former president donald trump's tax returns must be handed over to a congressional committee. unlike other recent presidents, mr trump had resisted the demand to surrender his tax records. australia's third largest city, brisbane, is going into lockdown in an attempt to contain the spread of the delta strain of coronavirus. millions of residents of brisbane and several other areas are being ordered to stay at home for three days.
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two women have been seriously injured by a falling tree after strong winds struck the south of england. emergency services were called to ubbeston in suffolk

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