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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 30, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines — internet giant amazon has been fined almost $900 million for breaking the eu's data protection laws. it's the biggest fine ever for a breach of the privacy regulations. the usjustice department has ruled that the tax returns of former president donald trump must be handed over to a congressional committee. the decision ends a long legal showdown over the records. president erdogan of turkey says fire—fighting planes from russia, ukraine and azerbaijan are now battling the wildfires on the country's southern coast. four people have died, and dozens have been taken to hospital. it's the middle weekend of the olympic games in tokyo, and the women's 100—metres final, as well as the women's tennis final, are among the highlights coming up on saturday.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are social commentator joanna jarjue and the former conservative party press chief and political commentator giles kenningham. welcome back to both of you. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... according to the guardian, pressure is mounting on ministers to outlaw companies�* "no jab, no job" policies amid warnings that firms could be hit by a wave of legal claims for discrimination. the daily mail says families are in a fight to save summer, with holiday hotspots in europe facing new travel rules. the daily mirror speculates this summer could be one to forget as bad weather and covid rules put holidays under a cloud. the i suggests almost 3 million
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young people will be warned they must get their first vaccination within days or they will face restrictions on what they can do later in the year. according to the daily telegraph, the nhs drew up secret plans to withdraw hospital care from people in nursing homes in the event of a pandemic. the times says householders have been warned to brace themselves for the biggest energy bills rise in a decade, with more than half facing an increase of about £150 a year. according to the the financial times, a secretive club for conservative party donors known as the advisory board has been holding regular meetings with borisjohnson and rishi sunak. and the daily express highlights angry campaigners hitting out as record numbers of families hit by inheritance tax will give the government a £6 billion windfall. so, let's begin. gilles let's start with the guardian
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and talked about dominic raab needing a new legal framework for this. i needing a new legal framework for this. ~ . needing a new legal framework for this. ~' ., , needing a new legal framework for this. ~ . , ., , this. i think we have seen many american _ this. i think we have seen many american firms _ this. i think we have seen many american firms saying - this. i think we have seen many american firms saying if - this. i think we have seen many american firms saying if you - this. i think we have seen many i american firms saying if you have not had the jacket, you cannot come back to work something which i think the transport secretary has tensely welcomed. but a debate which is polarising opinion certainly. you have the equality and human rights commission saying you have to be proportionate with what is going on and people for medical reasons might be able to get the jab coming in to step back from this. so highly contentious issue and quite interesting that this issue is about a wave of legal complaints about how you choose to enforce this. in a wave of legal complaints about how you choose to enforce this.— you choose to enforce this. in the context of— you choose to enforce this. in the context of the _ you choose to enforce this. in the context of the tension _ you choose to enforce this. in the context of the tension there - context of the tension there has beenin context of the tension there has been in the conservative party between those who take a more libertarian view and the cautious approach to government had on rules and regulations and locked down and
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so on, interesting to see one tory and pete being quoted as saying this kind of corrosion will prove damaging to the fabric of society. this could be another quite difficult line for the government to tread. a ,, , difficult line for the government to tread. ,, , ~' tread. massively so. i think the tory party _ tread. massively so. i think the tory party is — tread. massively so. i think the tory party is very _ tread. massively so. i think the tory party is very skittish - tread. massively so. i think the tory party is very skittish about this as many are very hawkish about this as many are very hawkish about this saying we cannot be in lockdown forever, and we cannot wait until there are zero cases of covid—i9, we have to move on. hence we have heard about the covid group who have been forceful about those who are more cautious. as everett without trying to roll out, there are no easy answers and there is sympathy and i have a lot of sympathy for ministers here. we are going through uncharted territory. here. we are going through uncharted territo . ., , here. we are going through uncharted territo . . , territory. really groping in the dark here and _ territory. really groping in the dark here and to _ territory. really groping in the dark here and to be _ territory. really groping in the dark here and to be fair- territory. really groping in the - dark here and to be fair governments are everywhere. joanna, what do you
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make of it? it seems to have come from advice from the chartered institute of personnel development, kind of a professional body of hr basically saying he will be an intrusion on an employee's body and may disseminate on the basis of disability, religious or philosophical belief. i disability, religious or --hilosohicalbelief. , , philosophical belief. i completely a . ree with philosophical belief. i completely agree with their— philosophical belief. i completely agree with their take _ philosophical belief. i completely agree with their take on - philosophical belief. i completely agree with their take on this, - philosophical belief. i completelyj agree with their take on this, and philosophical belief. i completely. agree with their take on this, and i think_ agree with their take on this, and i think the _ agree with their take on this, and i think the government should take it seriously— think the government should take it seriously as well. we know that throughout the pandemic, there has been a _ throughout the pandemic, there has been a massive backlog in the court system _ been a massive backlog in the court system and — been a massive backlog in the court system and specifically for the tribunai— system and specifically for the tribunal system and i think that this could — tribunal system and i think that this could potentially add to it. i think— this could potentially add to it. i think people like vegans for example, i think the ethical veganism has been identified as something that is protected belief and i think this could potentially open _ and i think this could potentially open it— and i think this could potentially open it up— and i think this could potentially open it up to end cases from vegans who may be — open it up to end cases from vegans who may be disagree with the vaccine because _ who may be disagree with the vaccine because it's _ who may be disagree with the vaccine because it's been tested on animals. so i because it's been tested on animals. 50 i think— because it's been tested on animals. so i think this could be flung wide
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open _ so i think this could be flung wide open and — so i think this could be flung wide open and in a sense, fair enough, with— open and in a sense, fair enough, with the— open and in a sense, fair enough, with the us— open and in a sense, fair enough, with the us may be other countries who may— with the us may be other countries who may have had quite a low vaccine take up _ who may have had quite a low vaccine take up i_ who may have had quite a low vaccine take up i think for the uk when we are in_ take up i think for the uk when we are ina— take up i think for the uk when we are in a position where we have had about— are in a position where we have had about 70%— are in a position where we have had about 70% of adults who have been double _ about 70% of adults who have been double jabbed and about 90% i think who have _ double jabbed and about 90% i think who have had at least one jab, it just seems— who have had at least one jab, it just seems a bit extreme and i think that grant— just seems a bit extreme and i think that grant chaps saying that he is a good _ that grant chaps saying that he is a good idea _ that grant chaps saying that he is a good idea and that the reality is that some firms might do it is kind of basically — that some firms might do it is kind of basically nudging firms to do it but still— of basically nudging firms to do it but still sitting on the fence like they do— but still sitting on the fence like they do with most of the guidance i find from _ they do with most of the guidance i find from the government.- find from the government. joanna, take us to the _ find from the government. joanna, take us to the i _ find from the government. joanna, take us to the i because _ find from the government. joanna, take us to the i because you - find from the government. joanna, take us to the i because you could | take us to the i because you could argue that the guardian story is the stick and this is potentially the carrot. to stick and this is potentially the carrot. ., , ., , , , carrot. to be honest, i see this more as _ carrot. to be honest, i see this more as a _ carrot. to be honest, i see this more as a stick. _ carrot. to be honest, i see this more as a stick. another- carrot. to be honest, i see thisj more as a stick. another stick? carrot. to be honest, i see this. more as a stick. another stick? i see it as a _ more as a stick. another stick? i see it as a stick— more as a stick. another stick? i see it as a stick for— more as a stick. another stick? i | see it as a stick for young people. we know— see it as a stick for young people. we know that almost a third of your
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people _ we know that almost a third of your people have not been vaccinated yet for various _ people have not been vaccinated yet for various different reasons and i think— for various different reasons and i think this — for various different reasons and i think this is — for various different reasons and i think this is the final kind of stick— think this is the final kind of stick for— think this is the final kind of stick for them to say if you don't do that, — stick for them to say if you don't do that, then come winter you will face restrictions that other people don't _ face restrictions that other people don't and — face restrictions that other people don't. and obviously the government are saying _ don't. and obviously the government are saying that is going to apply to places— are saying that is going to apply to places like — are saying that is going to apply to places like nightclubs which we know that young people love, like myself. but i that young people love, like myself. but i think— that young people love, like myself. but i think that with this, is a must — but i think that with this, is a must as— but i think that with this, is a must as if— but i think that with this, is a must as if the government know that your people — must as if the government know that your people may be are not paying that much — your people may be are not paying that much attention to whether this has been _ that much attention to whether this has been fully permitted or not because — has been fully permitted or not because i'm sure that this has not been _ because i'm sure that this has not been fully— because i'm sure that this has not been fully passed and securely about nightclubs yet. and i think the labour— nightclubs yet. and i think the labour party and some conservatives are quite _ labour party and some conservatives are quite against it. sol labour party and some conservatives are quite against it. so i think it's a — are quite against it. so i think it's a last _ are quite against it. so i think it's a last ditch kind of attempt and to— it's a last ditch kind of attempt and to be — it's a last ditch kind of attempt and to be honest a bit of a threat to say— and to be honest a bit of a threat to say you — and to be honest a bit of a threat to say you are not going to have any life after— to say you are not going to have any life after not — to say you are not going to have any life after not being in nightclubs for over— life after not being in nightclubs for over 50 months. this is kind of the last— for over 50 months. this is kind of the last ditch attempt to get the young people to get vaccinated so i definitely _ young people to get vaccinated so i definitely see it as a stick rather
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than _ definitely see it as a stick rather than a _ definitely see it as a stick rather than a carrot.— definitely see it as a stick rather than a carrot. ., ., than a carrot. 0k, fair enough. the oint than a carrot. 0k, fair enough. the point making _ than a carrot. 0k, fair enough. the point making a _ than a carrot. 0k, fair enough. the point making a vaccinated - than a carrot. 0k, fair enough. the point making a vaccinated holiday | point making a vaccinated holiday exited to avoid new research is on travel to spain so those who have not been vaccinated might suddenly find they cannot go to some of these places that are going to remain open for those who have been vaccinated. interesting you said you were a bit of a clever or have been, have you been clubbing since freedom that? i have not but i am due to go clubbing tomorrow _ have not but i am due to go clubbing tomorrow. , ., tomorrow. right, next time you were on we will have _ tomorrow. right, next time you were on we will have to _ tomorrow. right, next time you were on we will have to ask— tomorrow. right, next time you were on we will have to ask you _ tomorrow. right, next time you were on we will have to ask you what - tomorrow. right, next time you were on we will have to ask you what it - on we will have to ask you what it was like. many people are intrigued about how different it is going to seem and how different people might behave after the pandemic than they did in the club beforehand. we will pick your brain about that in due course. giles, i don't know if you have been clubbing in the last few weeks but what do you make of this get jabbed weeks but what do you make of this getjabbed or miss out approach to young people? getjabbed or miss out approach to young neonate?— getjabbed or miss out approach to young people?— young people? yeah, i have been clubbin: young people? yeah, i have been clubbing but _ young people? yeah, i have been clubbing but i _ young people? yeah, i have been clubbing but i have _ young people? yeah, i have been clubbing but i have nothing - young people? yeah, i have been clubbing but i have nothing to - young people? yeah, i have been| clubbing but i have nothing to add but i have a bit of sympathy with i think we need to get a situation
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where there is this sort of anti—vaccine sentiment going on amongst some part of the population. clearly we need to get back to normality him he cannot be in lockdown forever and many people to actually get the jab so we can kind of move on from that. so i have it sympathy with it, i have to say. he was on then to the daily mail. summer holidays came and never mind what might happen in the future with being vaccinated and going to spank, is what's happening now that is worrying the daily mail. i5 is what's happening now that is worrying the daily mail.- worrying the daily mail. is this whole idea _ worrying the daily mail. is this whole idea that _ worrying the daily mail. is this whole idea that you _ worrying the daily mail. is this whole idea that you and - worrying the daily mail. is this whole idea that you and your | worrying the daily mail. is this - whole idea that you and your summer holiday could be thrown into disarray on the way to spain or italy within putting on the amber or red list so a situation where you are abroad and you have gone abroad and him and get up in the government and him and get up in the government and then come back and you have to quarantine and you face having to pay an amount close to £1750 also could be in some cases more. so
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obviously a nightmare and i spectrum of people it will reinforce the idea of people it will reinforce the idea ofjust of people it will reinforce the idea of just actually of people it will reinforce the idea ofjust actually going for staycation which good for the uk tour industry which needs a shot in the i but you feel for the travel sector. they are really struggling to get back on their feet. i go sector. they are really struggling to get back on their feet.- sector. they are really struggling to get back on their feet. i go to a cafe where _ to get back on their feet. i go to a cafe where one _ to get back on their feet. i go to a cafe where one of— to get back on their feet. i go to a cafe where one of the _ to get back on their feet. i go to a cafe where one of the witnesses l cafe where one of the witnesses at the moment is actually an air hostess who is dividing her time between or has been dividing her time between serving coffee at this particular cafe and then being at heathrow airport helping operate the testing system for new arrivals and so on. and she is glad she is doing something in the travel industry but she says let's face it, that's not what i joined she says let's face it, that's not what ijoined airlines to do. and as you say, it is still a period of uncertainty. are you going on or have you been on eight staycation yet, giles? i have you been on eight staycation yet. giles?— yet, giles? i have not gone away. i've not yet, giles? i have not gone away. we not been _ yet, giles? i have not gone away. i've not been abroad _ yet, giles? i have not gone away. i've not been abroad for - yet, giles? i have not gone away.
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i've not been abroad for a - yet, giles? i have not gone away. i've not been abroad for a couple | yet, giles? i have not gone away. i i've not been abroad for a couple of years. i would like to go on a staycation towards the end of august. it seems like everyone is heading towards cornwall and devon currently. i heading towards cornwall and devon currentl . ~ , ., currently. i think some comes from devon it is — currently. i think some comes from devon it is time _ currently. i think some comes from devon it is time to _ currently. i think some comes from devon it is time to find _ currently. i think some comes from devon it is time to find somewhere | devon it is time to find somewhere more novel and unexplored and unexpected may be. i was able to place it seems to be having the best of the weather in the last couple of weeks is northern ireland. that is differently a place to go on a staycation if you can go there. what do you think of this going back to the complications of the red and amber lists and the watch lists that this new idea government added quite recently whereby a country can suddenly switch from being you can travel to it to one you suddenly have to quarantine before you or when you arrive back in the country and notjust by going home and shutting the door.— and notjust by going home and shutting the door. yes, it seems like it isjust _ shutting the door. yes, it seems like it is just getting _ shutting the door. yes, it seems like it isjust getting worse - shutting the door. yes, it seems like it isjust getting worse and l like it isjust getting worse and worse — like it isjust getting worse and worse. we all thought that there was li-ht worse. we all thought that there was light at— worse. we all thought that there was light at the _ worse. we all thought that there was light at the end of the tunnel where the vaccination programme being rolled _ the vaccination programme being rolled out— the vaccination programme being rolled out so well and we thought
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some _ rolled out so well and we thought some countries have input on the green _ some countries have input on the green list~ — some countries have input on the green list. we have seen obviously with portugal that basically was put on the _ with portugal that basically was put on the green listener two weeks later it — on the green listener two weeks later it was taken off and put into amber— later it was taken off and put into amberand— later it was taken off and put into amberand then now later it was taken off and put into amber and then now there are countries like spain and the balearic— countries like spain and the balearic islands that have potentially been changed to un—amber watchlist _ potentially been changed to un—amber watchlist which means people are going _ watchlist which means people are going to — watchlist which means people are going to be hotel quarantining. i am one of— going to be hotel quarantining. i am one of those it could be potentially a victim _ one of those it could be potentially a victim of— one of those it could be potentially a victim of that which is 100% a first— a victim of that which is 100% a first world _ a victim of that which is 100% a first world problem for me as a single — first world problem for me as a single person but there are some families— single person but there are some families who have postponed their holidays _ families who have postponed their holidays time and time again and it's really— holidays time and time again and it's really ironic that it was so easy— it's really ironic that it was so easy last _ it's really ironic that it was so easy last year at the height of the pandemic— easy last year at the height of the pandemic to go away when basically dubai _ pandemic to go away when basically dubai had _ pandemic to go away when basically dubai had turned into magdala part—time with all the influencers there _ part—time with all the influencers there but — part—time with all the influencers there. but now we've got this vaccination programme and the families— vaccination programme and the families who oppose buffer so long and obviously are not in a position
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to pay— and obviously are not in a position to pay for— and obviously are not in a position to pay for if— and obviously are not in a position to pay for if they have to hotel quarantine or they face this massive £1750 per— quarantine or they face this massive £1750 per head. so actually i do really _ £1750 per head. so actually i do really feel sorry for families if this does— really feel sorry for families if this does happen. and really feel sorry for families if this does happen.— really feel sorry for families if this does happen. and at the same time i this does happen. and at the same time i sunpose _ this does happen. and at the same time i suppose it _ this does happen. and at the same time i suppose it is _ this does happen. and at the same time i suppose it is a _ this does happen. and at the same time i suppose it is a real- this does happen. and at the same time i suppose it is a real dilemmaj time i suppose it is a real dilemma for government about how do you ensure that you minimise the risk and maximise the freedom at a time when the delta variant is so prevalent in increasing numbers of countries? , ., , ., countries? yes, i mean the delta variant, i always _ countries? yes, i mean the delta variant, i always get _ countries? yes, i mean the delta variant, i always get personally l variant, i always get personally really _ variant, i always get personally really mad about the delta variant specifically with this country because the whole situation of not shutting _ because the whole situation of not shutting the borders quick enough. and i_ shutting the borders quick enough. and i feel— shutting the borders quick enough. and i feel as if obviously the delta variant— and i feel as if obviously the delta variant is— and i feel as if obviously the delta variant is running rampant in other countries _ variant is running rampant in other countries and i get that, but also we did _ countries and i get that, but also we did not— countries and i get that, but also we did not help our own situation here _ we did not help our own situation here with — we did not help our own situation here with it. obviously is something to take _ here with it. obviously is something to take into— here with it. obviously is something to take into account, but at the same _ to take into account, but at the same time _ to take into account, but at the same time vaccinations were supposed
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to give _ same time vaccinations were supposed to give us— same time vaccinations were supposed to give us freedom and itjust seems as if it _ to give us freedom and itjust seems as if it never— to give us freedom and itjust seems as if it never ending. sol to give us freedom and itjust seems as if it never ending. so i totally said without people that just want to get— said without people that just want to get on— said without people that just want to get on with it in a sense. but at the same — to get on with it in a sense. but at the same time as you say safety is paramount — the same time as you say safety is paramount and it isjust one of those push and pull things we have -ot those push and pull things we have got to— those push and pull things we have got to listen to the guidance and not focus — got to listen to the guidance and not focus on our own feelings. our own selfish — not focus on our own feelings. oi" own selfish interests! to the telegraph, joanna, modelers warned of1 million cases a week as rules were eased. this is an insight into some of the documents it had been released showing what discussions are happening between government and is attending advisers before freedom day. is attending advisers before freedom da . , ,., ., is attending advisers before freedom da . , ., , ., day. yes, so in the lead up to freedom _ day. yes, so in the lead up to freedom day _ day. yes, so in the lead up to freedom day obviously - day. yes, so in the lead up to freedom day obviously there l day. yes, so in the lead up to i freedom day obviously there was debate _ freedom day obviously there was debate everywhere about whether we even be _ debate everywhere about whether we even be opening up and some people thought— even be opening up and some people thought it _ even be opening up and some people thought it was too soon and obviously this is saying that modelers did warn that cases of over a million _ modelers did warn that cases of over a million cases a week as rules were eased _ a million cases a week as rules were eased so _ a million cases a week as rules were eased so they were expecting
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basically for covid to run right throughout the country but i was and what we _ throughout the country but i was and what we have seen since them is kind of the _ what we have seen since them is kind of the opposite. in the sense that cases— of the opposite. in the sense that cases have — of the opposite. in the sense that cases have been dropping and some people _ cases have been dropping and some people have put it down to the fact that schools have shot and kids are not being _ that schools have shot and kids are not being tested as much. but the reality— not being tested as much. but the reality is— not being tested as much. but the reality is it — not being tested as much. but the reality is it is a little bit of good _ reality is it is a little bit of good news. and obviously if we don't listen _ good news. and obviously if we don't listen to— good news. and obviously if we don't listen to this which obviously we follow _ listen to this which obviously we follow the site so much and a lot of the science — follow the site so much and a lot of the science has given us into a lot of heavy— the science has given us into a lot of heavy lockdowns as well, right now i_ of heavy lockdowns as well, right now i would not be in a position where _ now i would not be in a position where i— now i would not be in a position where i could go out tomorrow night and i_ where i could go out tomorrow night and i know— where i could go out tomorrow night and i know others would be back at work— and i know others would be back at work that— and i know others would be back at work that are in the hospitality industry— work that are in the hospitality industry that has been hit really hard _ industry that has been hit really hard so— industry that has been hit really hard so i— industry that has been hit really hard. so i think it is one of those things— hard. so i think it is one of those things where it kind of shows us that is— things where it kind of shows us that is much as can be predictions and forecasts and there is only so much _ and forecasts and there is only so much as— and forecasts and there is only so much as well sometimes that scientist _ much as well sometimes that scientist can see into the future. indeed. — scientist can see into the future. indeed, giles. | scientist can see into the future. indeed, giles.— scientist can see into the future. indeed, giles. i can agree there. i think this is _ indeed, giles. i can agree there. i think this is as _ indeed, giles. i can agree there. i think this is as situation _ indeed, giles. i can agree there. i think this is as situation also -
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think this is as situation also whereby you cannot get a situation whereby you cannot get a situation where we only get 20 covid by getting back to normality but it will come with it some risks. and the reality about how we have to function is not particularly pretty. but this is the world we are now in as opposed to what we want. it certainly is the case of that. let's move on just briefly mentioning the i. the front page of the i which has some great photos there of beth shriver and kye white kim of the bmx winners and hopefully one of our success stories and hopefully will be again in the 100 metre final on saturday, deena asher smith he was running for teams to be. he won't particularly discuss that but i thought it was worth mentioning with
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plenty of olympics news on on the front pages. as the next story, let's look at the front of the times for some families face biggest rise in fuel bills for a decade. why is that? i in fuel bills for a decade. why is that? 4' in fuel bills for a decade. why is that? ~ , in fuel bills for a decade. why is that? 4' , . in fuel bills for a decade. why is that? “ , ~ , in fuel bills for a decade. why is that? ~ , . , ., that? i think it is decided they are auoin to that? i think it is decided they are going to change — that? i think it is decided they are going to change the _ that? i think it is decided they are going to change the cap _ that? i think it is decided they are going to change the cap on - that? i think it is decided they are | going to change the cap on energy bills which could lead to i think it is more than £150 hike. this is part of the government drive to get us to net zero targets in 2050 and try to encourage people to use alternative sources of energy. and obviously we are hosting the cop this year in glasgow and you can see in the big iconic moment they are putting this in the centre of the political agenda. this is obviously quite a controversial and quite polarising issue and you have one tory mp saying this is going to hammer hard—working families so they will be some inherent tension. i think this is more exaggerated now because
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of covid—19. coming at a situation where people have jumped of covid—19. coming at a situation where people havejumped into their finances and very difficult times. we need to look at alternative sources of energy and now hitting about a £160 extra energy bill, the issue there is how can they draw this behavioural change if it feels like we are all behind the curve and if you outlaw diesel cars by 2030 as we have been told to get electric cars but it is happening quite slowly because it is expensive and the infrastructure is not there yet. so tough on the government. difficult and i think of this when i think of the smart metres debate which happened. to be driven by the industry should the consumer pay and who should pay? in the end, the whole thing has not quite been sustained and effective in the by the government had hoped and hoped that we would start to understand our energy more wisely and maybe put the washing machine on it not rather than the middle of the day and all
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those kind of things but it has not yet happened. what do you make it is, joanna? i yet happened. what do you make it is, joanna? .., yet happened. what do you make it is, joanna? . ., yet happened. what do you make it is. joanna?— is, joanna? i can echo sorry for the families. this _ is, joanna? i can echo sorry for the families. this is _ is, joanna? i can echo sorry for the families. this is a _ is, joanna? i can echo sorry for the families. this is a big _ is, joanna? i can echo sorry for the families. this is a big reality - is, joanna? i can echo sorry for the families. this is a big reality for. families. this is a big reality for a lot— families. this is a big reality for a lot of— families. this is a big reality for a lot of working—class families. a lot of— a lot of working—class families. a lot of people, maybe an increase of £150 of _ lot of people, maybe an increase of £150 of year is not a lot but realistically there has already been an increase that came in in april of £96 of— an increase that came in in april of £96 of this— an increase that came in in april of £96 of this name when you add boris johnson's _ £96 of this name when you add boris johnson's plans to hit net zero by 2050 _ johnson's plans to hit net zero by 2050 and — johnson's plans to hit net zero by 2050 and all of the applications of that, _ 2050 and all of the applications of that, that — 2050 and all of the applications of that, that could also increase energy— that, that could also increase energy bills by a further £170 a year— energy bills by a further £170 a year so — energy bills by a further £170 a year so it— energy bills by a further £170 a year so itjust adds up energy bills by a further £170 a year so it just adds up and energy bills by a further £170 a year so itjust adds up and as up and adds— year so itjust adds up and as up and adds up. so it is a families really— and adds up. so it is a families really that— and adds up. so it is a families really that i feel sorry for but i get — really that i feel sorry for but i get i— really that i feel sorry for but i get iwas— really that i feel sorry for but i get... i was going to say the silver lining _ get... i was going to say the silver lining of— get... i was going to say the silver lining of all— get... i was going to say the silver lining of all this is that the prime minister— lining of all this is that the prime minister is — lining of all this is that the prime minister is also considering giving people _ minister is also considering giving people and green checks to offset some _ people and green checks to offset some of— people and green checks to offset some of that cost some of that might
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help them _ some of that cost some of that might help them maybe but this is terrible if not _ help them maybe but this is terrible if not. a . ~ help them maybe but this is terrible if not. 1, . ,, ., help them maybe but this is terrible ifnot. ., .,, help them maybe but this is terrible ifnot. ., ., , ., help them maybe but this is terrible ifnot. ., , ., , if not. back to carrots and sticks aaain. if not. back to carrots and sticks again- thank — if not. back to carrots and sticks again. thank you _ if not. back to carrots and sticks again. thank you both _ if not. back to carrots and sticks again. thank you both very - if not. back to carrots and sticks i again. thank you both very much. have a great weekend both of you and i hope you have a great weekend as well at home. thanks for being with us for the papers this evening and coming up next is the sport with the latest from the olympics and then the weather and in the midnight hour. good evening. hello there, plenty to look forward to on day eight of the olympics. for many the highlight of the athletics, and possibly the games, is the 100 metres, and britain's dina asher—smith will be hoping to make the women's final. that gets under way at around 1:50pm saturday afternoon our time. the men's100 metres also starts. the highlight for team gb on day seven was two medals in the space of a few minutes on the bmx track.
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after crowdfunding her way to the games, beth shriever won a gold in the women's race. it's britain's first gold in the sport, with shriever beating the winner at the last two olympics to claim the title. and she was met on the finish line by kye white, who just moments earlier had won silver in the men's event. both had to battle back from injuries to get to tokyo. honestly, i'm in shock. like, to even be here is an achievement in itself. to make a final is another achievement in itself. to win a gold medal, honestly, i'm so over the moon. there was more success in the pool as duncan scott won a silver in the men's 200 metres individual medley. it's his third medal of the games, the first british swimmer to do that since 1908. scott delivered team gb�*s sixth medal overall in the pool, finishing behind winner wang shun of china. scott's medal came shortly after luke greenbank won bronze
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in the men's 200—metre backstroke. and there was also a bronze medalfor bryony page in the women's trampoline. she led the competition after her routine, but was pushed down to third as china took gold and silver. there was also a bronze for the men's eight in rowing. but there'll be no medal for team gb�*s women's football team. they've been knocked out after losing 4—3 after extra time to australia in the quarterfinals. ellen white scored all three of team gb�*s goals. they were 2—1 up with a minute to go of normal time, but sam kerr equalised here for australia to force extra time, in which caroline weir saw her penalty saved. it changed the momentum of the game, with two quick goals just after. this 3—2 from mary fowler. kerr then made it 4—2. white made it 4—3 to complete her hattrick, but team gb couldn't find an equaliser and australia through to the last four. so, let's have a look the medals
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table heading into day eight. great britain remain sixth overall with six golds. china are top, ahead of hosts japan. ben stokes "will take an indefinite break from all cricket with immediate effect" and has withdrawn from england's test squad for the series against india. that's according to a statement from the england and wales cricket board. earlier, i spoke to our cricket reporter henry morean. they paint the picture, the england and wales cricket board, ofjust how challenging the last 16 months have been for international cricketers. and it's worth remembering that ben stokes plays all formats for england. he plays t20s, one—dayers, test matches, he's been playing in the hundred for the past few weeks for his side the northern superchargers, and being one of the world's best, he's also been playing a lot of franchise cricket around the world. so, he's been a huge amount of time away from home, in quarantine, in various bubbles, and so it has been a time of immense challenge for international athletes and particularly in the world
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of cricket that is so relentless. in cricket's hundred competition, southern brave's men have chalked up their first win with a narrow victory over the birmingham phoenix in southampton. liam livingstone starred with the bat for the phoenix, crashing four sixes in his 68 not out. that left the brave chasing 152, and after a quick half century from james vince, they managed to squeeze home with four wickets and just three balls remaining. it's the brave's first win in three games. earlier, danni wyatt hit an unbeaten 69 as southern brave thrashed birmingham phoenix by eight wickets with 18 balls to spare in the women's competition. brave are top of the standings with three wins out of three. some domestic football news for you now, and arsenal have signed england international ben white from brighton for a fee thought to be £50 million. white can play in defence or midfield and was part of the england squad for euro 2020.
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he's completed a medical and signed a long—term deal at the emirates. the amount received by brighton is a club record. full—back trent alexander—arnold has signed a new contract with liverpool until the summer of 2025. the 22—year—old graduated from the club's youth academy and has made 179 appearances since his first—team debut nearly five years ago, winning the champions league and premier league. marcus rashford will have surgery on his shoulder next week. the manchester united and england forward has been troubled by the problem for a number of months. it is thought rashford will be sidelined for around three months. south africa captain siya kolisi has backed up claims about the referee in the first test against the lions made by his director of rugby rassie erasmus. erasmus posted an astonishing hour—long video on social media criticising the australian official who was in charge of the springboks' defeat in cape town to the lions.
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rugby australia said "the attack on nic berry's integrity, character and reputation is unacceptable", but kolisi has now said he didn't feel respected at all and is looking forward to a new game and a new referee in the second test tomorrow. the lions have described it all as a sideshow. we had a good meeting with the referees yesterday, and as ben o'keefe said himself, we're aware there's a lot of stuff out there on social media, but that's not going to affect anything. that's just a sideshow. we had a discussion with the referees, and we realise they have a tough job to do. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. from me and the team, that is all your sport for now. goodnight.
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well, friday brought quite a nasty spell of weather to some south—western and southern areas of the uk. gale—force winds around coasts briefly. they were very, very strong indeed, brought by storm evert. you can see on the satellite picture here thunderstorms and heavy showers inland, generally a really changeable day, but the weather has now shifted into the southern north sea. it's approaching parts of germany and denmark. behind it, you can see from the motion of the arrows, it's a fairly cool north—northwesterly, so it's going to be a fairly cool day for most of us. really quite nippy, in fact, in the very far north of the country. sunny spells and showers expected. so, let's have a look at the early morning hours. that northerly wind blowing across scotland and along the north sea coast. showers there right from the word go, but i think showers are possible almost anywhere early in the morning, apart
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from the extreme north west of the country here. temperatures a little on the fresh side, around 12—13 degrees in some spots. and then, tomorrow, a pretty cloudy day for many of us, in the morning at least, to start with. then the sunny spells develop, but also the showers, and some of them will be heavy. but also the showers, you can see here in the east of the country and the north, some thunderstorms there, too. showers also breaking out across the south. the best of the weather, i suspect, in the north west of the country, parts of northern ireland, south—western and western scotland and also cornwall, devon and southern wales shouldn't do too bad on saturday. here's a look at sunday's weather map. the weather still coming in from the north. we have a weather front crossing the country. that is expected to bring showers to more southern areas of the uk on sunday. they should be more confined towards the very far south towards the end of the day. that's how the end of the day
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starts, so a little on the chilly side in some areas. those northerly winds, feels quite nippy along the north sea coast, could even be around 1a—15 degrees during the daytime. best spots, i think, in southern wales, maybe northern ireland again, but i think in southern wales and cardiff, up to around 21 degrees or so. so, here's the weekend summary again, and the outlook into next week, not an awful lot changes. there's no warm weather on the way. i think it's going to stay more or less the same, below average and a chance of some showers. and that's it, bye—bye.
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this is bbc news, i'm nancy kacungira with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the tax returns of former president donald trump will be handed to congress — after a ruling by the us justice department. the cost of covid for pregnant women in brazil — the bbc has exclusive footage of a maternity ward treating women with the virus. day eight of the olympics is underway in tokyo — with plenty of action ahead including the women's one—hundred metres final. and a packed audience and no more social distancing at the royal albert hall
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for the first night of the proms in london.

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