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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 30, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. amazon is fined almost $900 million — the biggest fine ever — for breaking the eu's data protection laws. day eight of the olympics is kicking off in tokyo. we'll tell you what's coming up as the games reach their halfway stage. the tax returns of former president donald trump will be handed to congress — after a ruling by the us justice department. the cost of covid for pregnant women in brazil — the bbc has exclusive footage of a maternity ward treating women with the virus. turkey calls on help from neighbouring coutries — as it tackles wildfires on its southern coast.
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hello and welcome. we start with amazon, which has been fined almost $900 million for breaking the european union's data protection laws, known as gdpr. it's the biggest fine ever imposed under the eu's privacy regulations. the online retail giant has been criticised in recent years for the information it gathers from its customers shopping histories. amazon has indicated that it will contest the ruling. andrew russow is an attorney and ceo ar media consulting, and joins me now. first of all, the size of this fine is quite something. you first of all, the size of this fine is quite something.— is quite something. you are absolutely _ is quite something. you are absolutely right, _ is quite something. you are absolutely right, it's - is quite something. you are absolutely right, it's huge l is quite something. you are| absolutely right, it's huge in is quite something. you are - absolutely right, it's huge in its landmark. it's never happened before. ~ ., v
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landmark. it's never happened before. ~ . �*, ., ., landmark. it's never happened before. . �*, ., ., ., before. what's the explanation do ou think before. what's the explanation do you think for _ before. what's the explanation do you think for the _ before. what's the explanation do you think for the decision - before. what's the explanation do you think for the decision to - before. what's the explanation do you think for the decision to make the find such a sea pond given that we've had limited number of cases under the general data protection regulation, is relatively new. and in some sense people might argue that private companies are still feeling their way as to what is and what is not acceptable use of personal data?— what is not acceptable use of personal data? this law is as you said, still new, _ personal data? this law is as you said, still new, it's— personal data? this law is as you said, still new, it's only - personal data? this law is as you said, still new, it's only three - said, still new, it's only three years old. so in terms of the case scenarios here, we are very limited. in terms of what went into this, i think that's something we're going to find with this upcoming investigation depending upon the severity of the 0s and what happen here. it’s severity of the os and what happen here. i, , ,_ severity of the os and what happen here. 2, , my severity of the os and what happen here. i, , ,_ .,, here. it's presumably good to be incumbent _ here. it's presumably good to be incumbent on _ here. it's presumably good to be incumbent on amazon _ here. it's presumably good to be incumbent on amazon if- here. it's presumably good to be incumbent on amazon if going i here. it's presumably good to bei incumbent on amazon if going to contest the spine and it says it is connect contest at the stage to provide evidence to counter whatever claims the european union and the other bodies that are brought this measure, addict it's a part of the
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luxembourg commission for data protection which imposed defined as an eu member country operating the general data protection is all eu members have to do, what actually caused them to levy a?— members have to do, what actually caused them to levy a? gdpr has been a model example _ caused them to levy a? gdpr has been a model example of _ caused them to levy a? gdpr has been a model example of privacy law- a model example of privacy law around the world. and looking at the extreme penetration a big check today, having a privacy infrastructure like gdpr is the first step isn't really bringing ownership of data back to consumers. gdpr was the way to do it. the question raised is if can tumours voluntarily give their data to private companies whether it's —— consumers. whether it's using delivery services, shopping services, whether it's buying products that record data like phones or the alexa system which amazon pioneered. is there a certain
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responsibility on us to be a bit more careful with the data we give up, sometimes perhaps to willingly? absolutely. as consumers we buy into these privacy risks. inconvenience will always trump privacy no matter what device were on, no matter what electronics are coming to the not—too—distant electronics are coming to the not—too—dista nt future. electronics are coming to the not—too—distant future. 100% it is on us as well to make sure we are aware of what we are buying. do you think this is — aware of what we are buying. do you think this is the — aware of what we are buying. do you think this is the start _ aware of what we are buying. do you think this is the start of a _ aware of what we are buying. do you think this is the start of a rather - think this is the start of a rather long and bloodied fight between amazon and the eu? i long and bloodied fight between amazon and the eu?— long and bloodied fight between amazon and the eu? i think this is an important _ amazon and the eu? i think this is an important case. _ amazon and the eu? i think this is an important case. i _ amazon and the eu? i think this is an important case. i think- amazon and the eu? i think this is an important case. i think this - amazon and the eu? i think this is| an important case. i think this case is going to set further guideline and give notjust our legal landscape additional information but consumers some guidance on how to stay out of trouble. so this is the first step and i do predict that this will not be an easy battle. thank you very much for your time. day eight of the tokyo olympics is just getting under way.
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the bbc�*s sarah mulkerrins has the latest on what we can expect to see on the middle weekend of the games. well it's the middle week end of the olympics and there is some and there is some reat action ahead on the track on saturday. not least the women's 100 metres final. we've been billing that, over the last couple days because there's so many star names in that. they've all made it safely through the heat and they've been setting some very, very quick times on the track at the olympic stadium. shelley fraser prize ofjamaica, winner of two gold medals in the 100 metres. she's bidding to become the first woman to win three of those print goals. she is through safely as is the 2016 champion elaine thompson, also from jamaica. a very fast time for her. great britain's deena asher—smith also through, it easy, comfortable heat for her.
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she once over at the worlds last year. it also the ivory coast, set a national record in her heat. so there are a lot of big name in action. wanting to look out for on the track as well we are going to have the four by 400 metres mixed relay. world champions in that, it'll be the first time it takes place at the olympics. another event, another mixed event taking place for the first time at the olympics will be the mixed triathlon. just down below us here in tokyo bay men and women competing here. they will swim 300 metres then they will cycle a columbus each —— 8 kmand then they will head out for a run of two km each. that making its debut in that it's going to beat the women's tennis final as well. remember the czech republic knocked out, one of the home favourites in naomi 0saka earlier in the tournament. she is through to the final where she is going to play switzerland.
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we will keep you posted on all of those events as they take place. we will keep you posted on all of those events as they take place. the usjustice department has ordered the internal revenue service to hand over the tax returns of former president donald trump to a congressional committee. this reverses the refusal of mr trump's justice department to do so and apparently ends a long legal showdown over the records. unlike other recent presidents mr trump did not publicly disclose his tax returns. julia manchesterfrom the hill joins us from washington. lovely to have you with us again on bbc world news. tell us first of all what it exactly this decision should mean. , , ., , what it exactly this decision should mean. ,, ., , ._, ., , mean. essentially the decision means that the house _ mean. essentially the decision means that the house ways _ mean. essentially the decision means that the house ways and _ mean. essentially the decision means that the house ways and means - that the house ways and means committee will essentially get those documents and get a first look at president trump's tax returns. and down the line once the committee votes to make it public, assuming
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they will come of the american public and the world will get to look at those tax returns. so it is very much a big deal. this is a long time coming, the chairman of the committee first requested those documents in 2019. they were first, he got that request declined. however, it now it's a very about—face of a new administration. we could very soon be getting a first in—depth look at president trump's tax returns. to first in-depth look at president trump's tax returns.— first in-depth look at president trump's tax returns. to be clear, we were discussing _ trump's tax returns. to be clear, we were discussing this _ trump's tax returns. to be clear, we were discussing this a _ trump's tax returns. to be clear, we were discussing this a little - were discussing this a little earlier here at bbc and questioning whether it's still guaranteed this would happen. but this isn't the case of donald trump having did this do not disclose the document, it's the irs government agency which is presumably not in a position to say no to the justice presumably not in a position to say no to thejustice department. absolutely. this is the is the irs, the government agency that can't say no to the department ofjustice
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result president trump really has no control over what is happening right now. 0bviously control over what is happening right now. obviously is as to whether he is nervous about what is going to come out. we seen from other indications from other pieces of his tax returns that he only paid income tax returns that he only paid income tax for federal income tax for 2016 and 2017 for a period of multiple years. that's definitely raising a lot of questions as to how fairly he has contributed to the us tax system. has contributed to the us tax s stem. �* , , i, �* , system. it's interesting that it's the department _ system. it's interesting that it's the department of— system. it's interesting that it's the department ofjustice - system. it's interesting that it's the department ofjustice itself| the department ofjustice itself that's has decided it was an error two years ago. at the time it it said that the house ways and means committee request was based on a disingenuous objective at aimed at exposing the records to the public will stop now it says it has to show respect due to a coequal branch of government, requires that we presume that committee will handle the tax information it receives with
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sensitivity to taxpayer privacy concerns. it seems that president trump and his supporters will be fairly sceptical about that. absolutely. especially now that this is coming under a new administration and an administration that is not exactly an ally of the former administration or an ally of president trump. you will likely see trump respond if he hasn't already, i haven't checked my phone of the last couple of minutes but respond with a statement blasting this as a partisan political move that he is constantly the victim of a witchhunt. this is going to be come politcised very quickly and you're going to see his supporters very much rally around him. i going to see his supporters very much rally around him.- going to see his supporters very much rally around him. i looked it doesnt much rally around him. i looked it doesn't look _ much rally around him. i looked it doesn't look we've _ much rally around him. i looked it doesn't look we've heard - much rally around him. i looked itj doesn't look we've heard anything yet. we will keep our eyes as i'm sure you well. while a question, we also have details of a phone conversation involving thejustice department and the then acting attorney generaljeffrey rosen would suggest again the president was
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urging the department back at the end of last year to say the election was called two corrupt and leave the rest to be an republican congressman.— rest to be an republican congressman. rest to be an republican contressman. . , , ., , ., congressman. yeah, it 'ust shows how much president _ congressman. yeah, it 'ust shows how much president trump — congressman. yeah, itjust shows how much president trump tried _ congressman. yeah, itjust shows how much president trump tried to - congressman. yeah, itjust shows how much president trump tried to exert l much president trump tried to exert his own influence and try to decide the presidential election and overturn president byron's win. it just goes to show you the lengths he went to and how serious this really was that he thought he could go to the justice department, was that he thought he could go to thejustice department, which he appeared to sometimes think that department was loyal to him or how to be loyal to him, he kind of made it seem like he could direct the justice department on matters like these. 0bviously he cannot and this is not a good look for the former president. thank you forjoining us. the first evacuation flight of 200 afghan interpreters who served with us forces and their families has landed in america today.
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presidentjoe biden said the us was fulfilling its promise to those who served "shoulder—to—shoulder" with american forces. campaigners though have called for the process to be sped up. at the same time — britain has relocated 2,300 interpreters and their relatives, but concerns have been raised after some applicants were rejected. 0ur correspondent secunder kermani reports from kabul. tens of thousands of british soldiers served in afghanistan. crucial to their mission, the help of local interpreters. with international troops withdrawing, hundreds of them, along with their families, are being relocated to the uk. but others remain stuck in afghanistan. anas, not his real name, is one of dozens of interpreters whose applications have been rejected. he says he fears for his life. they are going to kill me. that's it. it is a big threat for my family also.
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because of me, my family will be paying for that. he served for two years with the british forces in helmand province but was then sacked. those dismissed for serious offences are not being relocated. he says he refused to go on a second consecutive mission in order to attend his engagement ceremony. defence sources allege he repeatedly failed to turn up for work. i was very sad. i wrote all of my story, what happened to me in helmand, because i did a good service so i thought that maybe i receive a positive response. some fear is only a matter of time. the taliban safe, interpreters who worked with foreign forces but now show remorse will not be harmed. few are reassured by that, dozens are reported to be killed by the group
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in recent years. reported to be killed by the group in recent years. military veterans and campaigners say the evacuation policies need to be more generous. the absolute priority for an afghan relocation and assistance policy is looking at are these people under threat because of their association with us? the only exception that needs to be made there is that if there would be any individuals who would be posing a risk to the national security of the uk, then that should be a base of exclusion. with fresh taliban assaults every day, britain's ministry of defence says it has already relocated more than 2,000 former local staff and that its scheme is one of the most inclusive in the world. everyone knows the situation has grown increasingly critical. stay with us on bbc world news, still to come... the cost of covid to pregnant women in brazil. the bbc has exclusive
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footage inside a maternity ward treating women with the virus. a covid outbreak in china has spread to five provinces and at least 13 cities, including beijing. recorded cases are so far low, with only around 200 people infected. but according to state media this represents china's worst outbreak since wuhan in 2020. howard zhang has more. at this moment, i guess there is a high, almost emergency mode in china, and people are being tested in multiple cities, and the government and the officials china's approach so far as trying to reach zero tolerance of infection. but whether in this day and age that still be feasible way to go or so possible are being questioned now. the moment they realised there was one infection i think dozens of flights were grounded, we are talking about thousands of peoples lives delayed and business delayed.
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now with millions of people being tested again in the whole of the city, is the effort in proportion to the risk is the question. this is bbc news, the latest headlines... amazon is fined almost $900 million for breaking the eu's data protection laws. the tax returns of former president donald trump will be handed to congress after a ruling by the us justice department. in the uk, pregnant women are being urged to get the covid jab as soon as possible — as the number of mothers in hospital with the virus rises. estimates suggest that hundreds of thousands of pregnant women have not had the jab. as pregnant women in the uk
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are urged to get vaccinated, for too many in brazil it's tragically too late. since the beginning of the pandemic, more than 1600 pregnant women have died. the bbc has obtained exclusive footage from the only intensive care unit for pregnant women with covid in sao paulo. bbc brasil�*s nathalia passarinho reports. music. this 23—year—old has always dreamt of being a mother. just a year ago, she was 35 weeks pregnant with twin boys. translation: we started thinking of names in casel we had boys or girls. we thought about clothes and the crib. since the beginning, we started to plan everything. but her dream was taken away too soon. after being diagnosed with covid—19, she was admitted to an icu in sao paulo. shortly after an emergency c—section, she died of a cardiac arrest. translation: when i saw the babies, i saw what true love is, _ but when i received the news, it was so difficult.
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how could my whole world fall apart in a matter of hours? she is one of more than 1,000 pregnant women who have died from covid in brazil this year. neonatal wards in the country have been filled with premature babies. deaths among pregnant women were high even before covid spread in brazil, mostly because of a lack of adequate specialist care. but the pandemic really made things worse. this is a doctor in the intensive care unit she helped open in the city of sao paulo. it is the only unit in the country dedicated to pregnant women with covid. why are so many pregnant women dying of covid in brazil? translation: we have serious problems with l the quality of assistance. one in five women that died did not have access to an intensive care unit. one in three didn't have access to intubation.
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the unit helped bring mortality rates down in the city, but in the poorer parts of brazil, access to even a hospital bed remains a challenge. in a remote village in north—eastern brazil, this man's wife was only 27 weeks pregnant when she was diagnosed with covid. she had to be driven for two hours to reach a hospital bed. she died a few days later. her babies were born on the same day. translation: for me, it was a big shock. - i fell down to my knees near the doctor's feet. i i couldn't believe it. do you believe there is something that could have been done differently to save her life? translation: i wish i had taken the vaccine for covid. _ brazil has the second—highest number of covid—related deaths worldwide, yet only over 16% of the population have been fully vaccinated so far.
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and until the pandemic is brought under control in brazil, thousands of pregnant women will remain at risk. nathalia passarinho, bbc news. in london tonight, it's the first night of the proms at the royal albert hall, one of the highlights of the cultural calendar. and for the first time since 2019 audiences will be back. but they must have proof of a negative covid test or double vaccination. mark savage reports. for music lovers of the royal albert hall, the wait is over. finally, i am absolutely thrilled, i have been waiting two years for this day. being not socially distance will be something to quickly get over.
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to be leaning forward, listening to music with the same intensity as the person next to you is going to be, it is a feeling of community. the concert was led by finnish conductor with the bbc symphony orchestra socially distance on a extended stage. how strict are they? we have a guy with a ruler. what is it like to be back? we have been waiting over one year to have a full audience and i think that we are all emotional and we are going to play really our hearts out with this concert. what is the moment of the concert you're most looking forward to? just to hear the people clapping and the whole ritual, just to start the silence and the waiting, when the first note starts to play. and the opening piece of music held a special significance. really the whole night
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is about new beginnings and celebrating together. last year's proms ended on a controversial note after the bbc announced and then reversed a decision not to sing the lyrics of rule britannia. i have kind of moved forward from all of that and what i really want to say is that i am extremely proud that the whole last night actually came together at all. this year's opening night drew a line under the controversy with a programme that was simultaneously reflective and helpful. ——hopefull and when it is all over, how are you going to feel? i think that after the journey that we have made after doing this for one and a half years and that we finish the concert and we have the audience is there,
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i think it will feel like a great victory. classical music, she says, has a healing quality, something that has never been so important. mark savage, bbc news. if you ever find yourself in london, do try to get to the promise. the experience is priceless. the experience is priceless. president erdogan of turkey says fire—fighting planes from russia, ukraine and azerbaijan are now battling the wildfires on the country's southern coast. four people have died and dozens have been taken to hospital. the flames have forced the evacuation of entire villages and mediterranean coast hotels already reeling from the shock of the coronavirus pandemic. with more, here's david campanale. soaring flames have turned summer skies blood orange over turkeys luxury hotels and villages. dozens of neighbourhoods and tourist resorts had to evacuate before the onslaught of the wildfires which
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have stretched along the mediterranean and edgy and coast. we mediterranean and edgy and coast. - don't know anything. our hotel doesn't say anything to us. so we just decided to come outside. translation: everything was normal when we _ translation: everything was normal when we came but there was no smoke in the _ when we came but there was no smoke in the background. we thought it was raining. _ in the background. we thought it was raining. all— in the background. we thought it was raining, all ofa in the background. we thought it was raining, all of a sudden we saw the flames _ raining, all of a sudden we saw the flames. . ., , , raining, all of a sudden we saw the flames. _, , , ., raining, all of a sudden we saw the flames. _,, , ., , ., , raining, all of a sudden we saw the flames. , ., , ., , ., flames. helicopters and planes have made repeat — flames. helicopters and planes have made repeat journeys _ flames. helicopters and planes have made repeat journeys to _ flames. helicopters and planes have made repeat journeys to scoop - flames. helicopters and planes have made repeat journeys to scoop up i flames. helicopters and planes have i made repeat journeys to scoop up and made repeatjourneys to scoop up and drop water. on the ground thousands of firefighters have been mobilised into action as temperatures have soared. there working alongside more than a thousand firefighting vehicles to snuff out the fires which. rolling hills parsed by another dry summer. turkey has called on its allies to help. this helicopter was sent by belarus. speaking after friday prayers president dewan said the arrival of the aircraft meant day operation was turning in a positive direction.
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translation: unfortunately, 71 wildfires have broken out. 57 forest fires were contained. efforts are under way to contain 11i wildfires so there is progress in the positive direction. �* ':: :: :: direction. almost 1000 extreme weather incidents _ direction. almost 1000 extreme weather incidents were - direction. almost 1000 extreme j weather incidents were recorded direction. almost 1000 extreme i weather incidents were recorded in turkey last year which local media have called in all—time record. despite this, turkey is the only major g20 economy not to ratify the paris agreement on climate change which aims to keep global temperatures well below 2 degrees above preindustrial levels. and how is this for a homecoming? these are pictures of britain's two—time gold medallist helen glover arriving at london heathrow from the olympics and being greeted by her three young children. her hopes of a fairy—ending at tokyo
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2020 were dashed when glover and her rowing mate polly swann finished fourth in the women's pair. glover, who won gold in 2012 and 2016, was aiming to become the first british woman to win at three olympics. she's now ruled out another olympics bid. well, friday brought quite a nasty spell of weather to some south—western and southern areas of the uk. gale—force winds around coasts briefly. they were very, very strong indeed, brought by storm evert. you can see on the satellite picture here thunderstorms and heavy showers inland, generally a really changeable day, but the weather has now shifted into the southern north sea. it's approaching parts of germany and denmark. behind it, you can see from the motion of the arrows, it's a fairly cool north—northwesterly, so it's going to be a fairly cool day for most of us. really quite nippy, in fact, in the very far north of the country. sunny spells and showers expected. so, let's have a look at the early morning hours. that northerly wind blowing across scotland and along
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the north sea coast. showers there right from the word go, but i think showers are possible almost anywhere early in the morning, apart from the extreme north west of the country here. temperatures a little on the fresh side, around 12—13 degrees in some spots. and then, tomorrow, a pretty cloudy day for many of us, in the morning at least, to start with. then the sunny spells develop, but also the showers, and some of them will be heavy. you can see here in the east of the country and the north, some thunderstorms there, too. showers also breaking out across the south. the best of the weather, i suspect, in the north west of the country, parts of northern ireland, south—western and western scotland and also cornwall, devon and southern wales shouldn't do too bad on saturday. here's a look at sunday's weather map. the weather still coming in from the north. we have a weather front crossing the country. that is expected to bring showers to more southern areas of the uk on sunday. they should be more confined
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towards the very far south towards the end of the day. that's how the end of the day starts, so a little on the chilly side in some areas. those northerly winds, feels quite nippy along the north sea coast, could even be around 11i—15 degrees during the daytime. best spots, i think, in southern wales, maybe northern ireland again, but i think in southern wales and cardiff, up to around 21 degrees or so. so, here's the weekend summary again, and the outlook into next week, not an awful lot changes. there's no warm weather on the way. i think it's going to stay more or less the same, below average and a chance of some showers. and that's it, bye—bye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines — internet giant amazon has been fined almost $900 million for breaking the eu's data protection laws. it's the biggest fine ever for a breach of the privacy regulations. the usjustice department has ruled that the tax returns of former president donald trump must be handed over to a congressional committee. the decision ends a long legal showdown over the records. president erdogan of turkey says fire—fighting planes from russia, ukraine and azerbaijan are now battling the wildfires on the country's southern coast. four people have died, and dozens have been taken to hospital. it's the middle weekend of the olympic games in tokyo, and the women's 100—metres final, as well as the women's tennis final, are among the highlights coming up on saturday.

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