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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 30, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines — internet giant amazon has been fined almost $900 million for breaking the eu's data protection laws. it's the biggest fine everfor a breach of the privacy regulations. two crew mebers have been killed after an israeli—operated oil tanker was attacked by a suspected drone off the coast of oman. the israeli company said that one of the dead was british and the other romanian. a covid outbreak discovered in the chinese city of nanjing has spread to five provinces and beijing, with state media calling it the most extensive contagion since wuhan. almost 200 people have been infected. japan's prime minister has warned that covid is spreading at "unprecedented speed" across the country and could increase the strain on hospitals, though he says the tokyo olympics are not to blame.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are social commentator joanna jarjue and the former conservative party press chief and political commentator giles kenningham. welcome to both of you. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... according to the guardian, pressure is mounting on ministers to outlaw companies�* "no jab, no job" policies amid warnings that firms could be hit by a wave of legal claims for discrimination. the daily mail says families are in a fight to save summer, with holiday hotspots in europe facing new travel rules. the daily mirror speculates this summer could be one to forget as bad weather and covid rules put holidays under a cloud. the i suggests almost 3 million young people will be warned they must get their first vaccination within days or they will face restrictions on what they can do later in the year.
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according to the daily telegraph, the nhs drew up secret plans to withdraw hospital care from people in nursing homes in the event of a pandemic. the times says householders have been warned to brace themselves for the biggest energy bills rise in a decade, with more than half facing an increase of about £150 a year. according to the financial times, a secretive club for conservative party donors known as the advisory board has been holding regular meetings with borisjohnson and rishi sunak. and the daily express highlights angry campaigners hitting out as record numbers of families hit by inheritance tax will give the government a £6 billion windfall. so, let's begin. joanna, kick us off this evening with summer holidays in europe on the brink. sounds horribly familiar, this. it the brink. sounds horribly familiar, this. ., , the brink. sounds horribly familiar, this. ., ., _ this. it does sound horribly familiar- — this. it does sound horribly familiar. i— this. it does sound horribly familiar. ithink_ this. it does sound horribly familiar. i think the - this. it does sound horribly familiar. i think the first i this. it does sound horribly i familiar. i think the first time this. it does sound horribly - familiar. i think the first time i did the papers with you i talked
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about how excited i was for a summer holiday. i booked one at a time when i thought it was the green list and honestly that got changed two weeks later, and ifeel as if the general public, yet another bloat to them. so, ministers are now threatening to put spain and france and italy on a new kind of danger list which is like the new amber watchlist, which means that these particular countries could be changed to be on the red list, which means people will have to obviously do hotel quarantine at the cost of £1750 per person. 0n short notice. so, with this whole thing, with the whole vaccinations as well, i think everybody thought that that was going to be the light at the end of the tunnel for the people were looking forward to some level of kind of freedom, but in a sense i kind of freedom, but in a sense i kind of freedom, but in a sense i kind of find it a little bit cruel, even though i'm in a sense the pandemic obviously is important in making sure that everybody is safe
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is important, but at the same time there are a lot of families who were losing a lot of money if they have to cancel but also could potentially be in a position where they have to fork out £1750 per person on the hotel quarantine at the very last minute. so i'm definitely not happy about this headline.— about this headline. giles, i su ose about this headline. giles, i sunpose this _ about this headline. giles, i suppose this is _ about this headline. giles, i suppose this is a _ about this headline. giles, i suppose this is a political i about this headline. giles, i. suppose this is a political risk here, it's pretty complicated system this traffic light system. it's gotten much more obligated by the addition of watchlist and a sense it's ended up in a situation where the government is making it all a bit impossible for people to go on for the holidays unless they are very wealthy. being in a sense it ends up being trying to open things up ends up being trying to open things up but the blame is shutting them down. �* , ., up but the blame is shutting them down. �* ,, . ~' up but the blame is shutting them down. �* ,, ., ~ ., up but the blame is shutting them down. �* .,~ ., ., down. and you make a fair point there. down. and you make a fair point there- the _ down. and you make a fair point there. the quarantine _ down. and you make a fair point there. the quarantine at - down. and you make a fair point there. the quarantine at a - down. and you make a fair point there. the quarantine at a cost i down. and you make a fair pointl there. the quarantine at a cost of £1750, _ there. the quarantine at a cost of £1750, on— there. the quarantine at a cost of £1750, on top of your holiday. i suppose — £1750, on top of your holiday. i suppose the only silver lining is
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once _ suppose the only silver lining is once you — suppose the only silver lining is once you get a boost or reinforce the idea — once you get a boost or reinforce the idea of— once you get a boost or reinforce the idea of a stake asian for people who are _ the idea of a stake asian for people who are desperate. but you are right, a — who are desperate. but you are right, a hit_ who are desperate. but you are right, a bit of a first raw problem to have _ right, a bit of a first raw problem to have your holiday, so let's not forget _ to have your holiday, so let's not forget that — to have your holiday, so let's not forget that germany... all these things— forget that germany... all these things is— forget that germany... all these things is about... how else are we going _ things is about... how else are we going to _ things is about... how else are we going to get — things is about... how else are we going to get a break at some point? is a point— going to get a break at some point? is a point we have to come out of this and — is a point we have to come out of this and except there is a new reality — this and except there is a new reality. but we have to get back to normality — reality. but we have to get back to normality it — reality. but we have to get back to normality it sometime. giles reality. but we have to get back to normality it sometime.— reality. but we have to get back to normality it sometime. giles took us onto the mirror— normality it sometime. giles took us onto the mirror because _ normality it sometime. giles took us onto the mirror because you - onto the mirror because you mentioned staycations and the weather certainly has not been ideal especially in the west country over the last 2a hours. i especially in the west country over the last 24 hours.— the last 24 hours. i have not seen the last 24 hours. i have not seen the front page — the last 24 hours. i have not seen the front page of _ the last 24 hours. i have not seen the front page of the _ the last 24 hours. i have not seen the front page of the daily - the last 24 hours. i have not seen
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the front page of the daily mirror| the front page of the daily mirror but i _ the front page of the daily mirror but i know— the front page of the daily mirror but i know in certain parts of the country. — but i know in certain parts of the country, looks like last week everyone _ country, looks like last week everyone was predicting you are going _ everyone was predicting you are going to — everyone was predicting you are going to have it storms weaving to the country. which has not been great _ the country. which has not been great and — the country. which has not been great. and certainly not making you want to _ great. and certainly not making you want to stay here in the country certainty — want to stay here in the country certainty i_ want to stay here in the country certainly. i have been in london all week_ certainly. i have been in london all week and _ certainly. i have been in london all week and last week was rough but todaym _ week and last week was rough but toda ., , , , week and last week was rough but toda .,, , , ., , today... hols help is how the daily mirror describes it _ today... hols help is how the daily mirror describes it listed _ today... hols help is how the daily mirror describes it listed about - today... hols help is how the daily mirror describes it listed about a l mirror describes it listed about a couple sheltering under an umbrella. this is a bit rotten people are state tensioning and the hope is at least given them a cause for optimism but there is a lot you can do in the rain. you said you are not going away now. what are you doing
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instead? i going away now. what are you doing instead? ., going away now. what are you doing instead? . .. ., , going away now. what are you doing instead? . ., , ., going away now. what are you doing instead? . ., ., instead? i am actually going away. 0h, ou instead? i am actually going away. oh. you are? _ instead? i am actually going away. oh, you are? you _ instead? i am actually going away. oh, you are? you are _ instead? i am actually going away. oh, you are? you are breaking - instead? i am actually going away. oh, you are? you are breaking it. | instead? i am actually going away. | oh, you are? you are breaking it. i originally booked portugal and they took that off the green list and i change that to ibiza but they put that may be on the amber watchlist when bracing myself for it. but you cannot even write —— rely on a staycation in the uk because people want to go because you could spend thousands of pounds in the moment in the uk. it is really expensive to have some time away somewhere here and i would see the weather is not very preventable so i think really people are paying more for the certainty of knowing that you are going to get a bit of sun abroad. i more serious subject we move onto it with the daily telegraph in a couple of covid related stories in the first is a warning from modelers helping government predict what might happen in the case of
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restrictions being lifted. and to be fair obviously it's been overtaken by events but it's interesting sense of quite how nervous people must have been inside government and the specific establishment about what would happen on and after freedom day. would happen on and after freedom da . , , �* , would happen on and after freedom da., , �*, , day. definitely. so it's documents bein: day. definitely. so it's documents being released _ day. definitely. so it's documents being released by _ day. definitely. so it's documents being released by sage _ day. definitely. so it's documents being released by sage that - day. definitely. so it's documents being released by sage that showj being released by sage that show that they kind of predicted that there would be at least, there was a last—minute warning before the final lockdown that restrictions, that cases could go up to 1 million as soon the rules were eased and obviously throughout this pandemic we have said that we need to follow the science and it is probably a prediction that was made in good faith. betterto prediction that was made in good faith. better to be safe than sorry. but obviously since then, since restrictions have been lifted, we have seen cases have been falling and in a sense i feel as a people should be allowed to be a little bit optimistic. whenever we do get good
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news about cases dropping, there is always a but, but i think what this story reveals is that sometimes these predictions can be wrong and these predictions can be wrong and the scientists can do only so much when they predict and sometimes is better for them to when they predict and sometimes is betterfor them to go when they predict and sometimes is better for them to go for even the most extreme in terms of being cautious but realistically if we had followed that got us we would still be a lot that and obviously we know that there are so many other repercussions that come from lockdown. we have seen all the habit that has been called for the nhs waiting list of people are dying regardless, even if it is not of covid because there are other conditions they have got that are not being treated. so there is a direct knock on effect sometimes with these predictions being wrong, but luckily we have power through and been able to lift the restrictions and it's good news that cases are in fact dropping and we have not hit that1 million cases a week prediction that sage had given at the time. i
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week prediction that sage had given at the time. , , , at the time. i suppose it is the curse of government. - at the time. i suppose it is the curse of government. prepare | at the time. i suppose it is the i curse of government. prepare for the worst and hope for the best. i think the whole pandemic— worst and hope for the best. i think the whole pandemic around - the whole pandemic around expectation management. classic with the government wanting to push the whole _ the government wanting to push the whole time and it becomes a story about _ whole time and it becomes a story about i— whole time and it becomes a story about... i think public sentiment certainiy— about... i think public sentiment certainly has been with the government throughout this, but certainiy— government throughout this, but certainly the government at times should _ certainly the government at times should have been a bit more candid and same _ should have been a bit more candid and same you know what, we don't know _ and same you know what, we don't know it. _ and same you know what, we don't know it. we — and same you know what, we don't know it, we have not got a schedule, this is— know it, we have not got a schedule, this is unprecedented. there will be a timetable but we will need to take this and _ a timetable but we will need to take this and not run it by an agenda and up in— this and not run it by an agenda and up inthe— this and not run it by an agenda and up in the public would've been with them _ up in the public would've been with them. there have always been these deadlines— them. there have always been these deadlines that have been put out that had — deadlines that have been put out that had been quite frankly not always — that had been quite frankly not always helpful. and the media itself can stop _ always helpful. and the media itself can stop being so sensationalist attout— can stop being so sensationalist about things and say we have to give
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a little _ about things and say we have to give a little bit _ about things and say we have to give a little bit of leeway.— a little bit of leeway. interesting oint. a little bit of leeway. interesting point. another _ a little bit of leeway. interesting point. another story _ a little bit of leeway. interesting point. another story in - a little bit of leeway. interesting point. another story in the - a little bit of leeway. interesting point. another story in the front | a little bit of leeway. interesting i point. another story in the front of the telegraph. this is kind of a again a story about something that did not actually happen in the end but it's interesting insight into some of the thinking ahead of the pandemic of the kind of what if scenarios. when we do this happened? this is kind of dramatic in the context of what elderly people might have had to experience if the pandemic had gotten further out of hand. it pandemic had gotten further out of hand. ., pandemic had gotten further out of hand. . . ,., pandemic had gotten further out of hand. . ., , ., , ., hand. it talks about the plans drawn u . hand. it talks about the plans drawn u- b nhs hand. it talks about the plans drawn on by nhs england _ hand. it talks about the plans drawn up by nhs england to _ up by nhs england to withdraw potentially or suspend or look at the idea — potentially or suspend or look at the idea of withdrawing i suppose treatment for the elderly. and to some _ treatment for the elderly. and to some extent there is a bit of a disparity— some extent there is a bit of a disparity in certain areas of the media — disparity in certain areas of the media with care homes and they were
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not given— media with care homes and they were not given that help and it was sort of the _ not given that help and it was sort of the case — not given that help and it was sort of the case they were looking at do we prioritise young people. and there _ we prioritise young people. and there has— we prioritise young people. and there has been this whole route raging _ there has been this whole route raging hy— there has been this whole route raging by the pandemic that we have had to— raging by the pandemic that we have had to put— raging by the pandemic that we have had to put our lives on hold for a year— had to put our lives on hold for a year and — had to put our lives on hold for a year and a — had to put our lives on hold for a year and a half to basically help a section of— year and a half to basically help a section of the population who are so much _ section of the population who are so much older— section of the population who are so much older than us and it's not clear— much older than us and it's not clear as — much older than us and it's not clear as sad _ much older than us and it's not clear as sad as it is would they have _ clear as sad as it is would they have died _ clear as sad as it is would they have died anyway. but a huge new talking _ have died anyway. but a huge new talking point and really want to talking point and really want to talk about this inquiry and i think this will— talk about this inquiry and i think this will be one of the the big political— this will be one of the the big political part. this will be one of the the big political part-— this will be one of the the big political part. there will be very interesting- _ political part. there will be very interesting. jim _ political part. there will be very interesting. jim what _ political part. there will be very interesting. jim what do - political part. there will be very interesting. jim what do you - political part. there will be very i interesting. jim what do you make of it? to interesting. jim what do you make of it? ., 4' interesting. jim what do you make of it? ., ~ , , it? to me, i think this is something that complements _ it? to me, i think this is something that complements that _ it? to me, i think this is something that complements that massive - that complements that massive scandal that we have already seen with the care homes and i think it is something that has been probably the biggest scandal of the pandemic.
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0bviously matt hancock saying he put a decorative ring around care homes which we are missing know that was not true. so for this to come out and also for us to find out that potentially there was no plans put in place to actually protect them, i think if you were saying, when there is a public inquiry, they will get what the government did after the pandemic yet but also how prepared we were and to get any indication that maybe the government, you know, our making plans to deny elderly care people makes it look as if it was kind of premeditated which is obviously not going to look good whatsoever. find obviously not going to look good whatsoever-— obviously not going to look good whatsoever. �* ., , ., ., whatsoever. and to be fair that we should be clear _ whatsoever. and to be fair that we should be clear that _ whatsoever. and to be fair that we should be clear that this _ whatsoever. and to be fair that we should be clear that this was - whatsoever. and to be fair that we should be clear that this was plans drawn up by nhs england, not even clear that they were ever seen by ministers and they were never actually put into place like i could literally take your point and it is probably the reason why the telegraph audits and a good lead story because it sort of creates a
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mindset possibly of officials that actually when push comes to shove the people are not important as other sets of patients potentially most of them that i think is an interesting of discussion. i think you would also insist that his ring of protection was there but it was just of the testing facilities had not been developed at that time but thatis not been developed at that time but that is one for the inquiry. joanna, two port stories, and let's start with a wonderful photo this of bethany shreve or an tight white. taking gold and silver in the bmx races. and after as a point being made that funding had been withdrawn after rio went it's pouring over saying we are going to back the sports that are going to win us metals and they proved their judgment was not quite right. definitely. this has probably been the best story really for bmx as a sport, especially forfemale bmx
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sportsmen light bethany. i watch actually the interview with her earlier on today and you could just see how proud she was, but it kind of shows as well that a level of investment does need to be made in certain sports and they did to be taken seriously. when i first heard that it was a female bmx that have been withdrawn for funding, i kind of looked at it with a bit of a side eye. the king what is it specifically female bmx so that's definitely an issue. but i think she is in a position now where she will be kind of a hero of the sport and i be kind of a hero of the sport and i be very surprised there was not more investment because it is notjust any metal that she has got but she has the gold medal in the first 0lympics as well. as similar as well for kye white, who i'm kind of rooting for because i can kind of tell his working—class background and am always shaping that. absolutely. it is a wonderful
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picture. the

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