Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 30, 2021 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

5:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines... a historic day for britain's bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shreever wins the women's racing final. just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain's first olympic medal in the men's event. latest figures from ons show that the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise — although cases have fallen in scotland. labour calls for england to follow wales and bring forward the date on which fully vaccinated people can avoid self isolation. we are seeing a real summer of chaos. you can see the impact it's having on so many businesses, so
5:01 pm
many secretaries, and the government has never really explains the logic of its 16th of august date on isolating. lewis hughes, the man who accosted england's chief medical officer chris whitty in a london park, pleads guilty to assault. meanwhile another man, jonathan chew, pleaded not guilty to the same charge. and drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row — more than 1300 people died last year. campaign is when a court battle to prevent the construction of a road tunnel near stonehenge. at 5:45pm marker mode will take a look at the best and rest releases in the film reveal, including disney'sjungle reveal, including disney's jungle cruise.
5:02 pm
good afternoon. there's been a sizeable medal haulfor team gb at the tokyo olympics. tremendous bmx racing by 22—year—old beth shreever has won her gold. and kye white took silver in the men's event. for a full round up of today's action at the olympics — let's cross to hugh ferris at the bbc sports centre. six more medals for team gb on day seven of tokyo 2020 with the bmx track delivering multiple medals and a couple of incredible stories as well. andy swiss reports. she is british sport's new two—wheeled wonder. the olympics is no stranger to fairy tales, but beth shriever�*s is something very special. the 22—year—old hadn't been among the favourites in the bmx, but the part—time teaching assistant was soon giving her rivals a lesson. she led from the start. and in this most exhilarating of
5:03 pm
events, she flew around the track. could she hang on for gold? well, it was some finish. all the way, all the way, all the way! yes! bethany shriever, olympic champion! cue elation and utter exhaustion, her team mate kye whyte lifting her aloft as the enormity of her achievment sank in. shriever had to crowdfund her own preparations for tokyo. i love you guys! and after celebrating with herfamily in essex, she said her victory defied belief. honestly, i'm in shock. like, to even be here is an achievement in itself. to make a final is another achievement in itself. to come home with a medal, let alone a gold medal, honestly, i'm so over the moon. but this was a day of double celebration. just moments earlier, kye whyte, nicknamed the prince of peckham, had produced a regal display to take a stunning silver, enjoyed as much in south—east london as it was in tokyo.
5:04 pm
it means everything. just look at that. once—in—a—lifetime opportunity. as i said, it was pretty hard to even get to the olympics in the first place. to do well and to even get a medal, yeah, it special. white then turned cheerleader, roaring shriever on, before the pair could finally celebrate together, and they weren't the only ones. former oasis star liam gallagher described shriever as a "ledge", while cyclist geraint thomas tweeted that "the one good thing aboutjet lag is that i got to watch bethany and kye smash it live, amazing!" it's a word that might also apply to this man, duncan scott, winning his third medal of the games, with silver in the 200m individual medley, while in the 200m backstroke luke greenbank took bronze. for team gb, the pool is certainly proving productive. in the trampolining, meanwhile, could bryony page bounce to glory? well, after two years out with injury, it was some display.
5:05 pm
whoa, well done, bryony! following her silver in rio, this time bronze, which she later described as amazing. there was also bronze in the rowing for the men's eight. for one of team gb�*s flagship sports, this has been a disappointing games — just two medals, and for the first time since 1980, no gold. on the first day of athletics, dina asher—smith confirmed her status as a contender in the 100m, easing through her heat and into the semifinals. and in the boxing, pat mccormack and ben whittaker are both guaranteed medals, although whittaker has more than just victory in his sights. i want to go back with a gold medal, and i want to become the mayor of wolverhampton. i want one of those nice chains round my neck, and i'll be calling all the shots! everybody in wolverhampton will have a nice ice grill and chain, courtesy of ben whittaker. excited?
5:06 pm
just a little. andy swiss, bbc news. team gb�*s medal haul won't be added to by the women's football team. they're out of the olympics after losing a roller coaster quarter final 4—3 to australia after extra time. ellen white scored all three of team gb�*s goals, and her second looked like the winner. but sam kerr equalised for australia in the 89th minute to force extra time, in which caroline weir saw her penalty saved. it changed the momentum of the game with two quick goals just after, including a second from kerr made it 4—2. white made it 4—3 with six minutes left to complete her hattrick, but team gb couldn't find an equaliser, aand australia through to the last four. the dream of a �*golden slam' is over for novak djokovic — he has been beaten by germany's alexander zverev in their olympic semi—final. the serbian number one took
5:07 pm
the the first set 6—1 — but zverev held his nerve to win over three sets to reach the olympic final, where he will meet karen khacha—nov from the russian olympic committee. djokovic's search for any olympic gold also goes on because he also lost his mixed doubles semi final. that's all the sport for now. i will have more and about half an hour or so. i will have more and about half an hour orso. many i will have more and about half an hour or so. many thanks, i will have more and about half an hour orso. many thanks, heal. the latest data from the office for national statistics shows the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continued to rise in the week to last saturday. it comes after several days of falling daily case numbers in the uk. here's our health correspondent, jim reed. there's the daily data that you might hear every evening on the news, and that's measuring people who come forward normally with symptoms of the virus
5:08 pm
and then test positive. that's what it's measuring. those figures have been very encouraging for the last week or so, showing a sharp downward trend, as you can see here on the graph. on the right—hand side of the graph, you are seeing that trend fall down. there is, though, a different way of measuring infections, also very carefully watched. and this is where the office of national statistics goes out and randomly samples people in the population, about half a million people in the uk. and that can measure notjust people with symptoms but people who are not actually sick with co—that at the time. that data is outjust in the last 15 minutes. it shows in the week to last saturday, actually, cases were rising slightly. so across the uk, just short of a million people, 950,000 people had covid in that week, up from about 830,000 the week before, up in england, wales and northern ireland, down slightly, actually, in scotland. so why these two different trends, then? it is confusing. a lot can be down to timing, so that ons survey, obviously the national statistics, measures people up to last saturday.
5:09 pm
so it might have missed this very recent fall we have seen in those daily cases. it also, as i say, also measures people without symptoms. that can make a difference. the ons said "we will continue to investigate but that the current wave of infections is stabilising or not. and that, it remains simply too early to say." jim reed there. let's take a look at the latest coronavirus figures for the uk. a further 29,622 new infections have been recorded. 68 people have died in the latest 24—hour period. that's those who've died within 28 days of a positive covid test. on to vaccinations — over 46.7 million people have received their first dose of a covid vaccine. and almost 38 million people have now received two doses. well to understand a little bit more about the latest covid figures — we can speak to paul hunter, professor of medicine at the university of east anglia. that afternoon tia professor. so
5:10 pm
jane, our correspondent there made it clear the difference between the daily figures i just it clear the difference between the daily figures ijust read out, people who have tested positive and the fact that the office for national statistics figures are based on random sampling. what do you think the significance of the ons figures is? because they suggest cases are rising. ons figures is? because they suggest cases are rising-— cases are rising. that's about two weeks out — cases are rising. that's about two weeks out of _ cases are rising. that's about two weeks out of date _ cases are rising. that's about two weeks out of date by _ cases are rising. that's about two weeks out of date by the time - cases are rising. that's about two l weeks out of date by the time they are published. there are a number of things about the ons data. the first is that they actually, it's what's called prevalence, the number of people who are positive today when you sample them. but they could have got their infection at any time, excuse me, in the previous two weeks. and so what we have seen in previous peaks is that it generally, there is a two week gap from when cases speak to when you see that's
5:11 pm
coming through in the ons data. so, you know, we were never going to see anything of the decline in this week's ons data. we have to wait until next friday before we see that coming through. until next friday before we see that coming through-— until next friday before we see that coming through. interesting. so how useful is the — coming through. interesting. so how useful is the ons _ coming through. interesting. so how useful is the ons data? _ coming through. interesting. so how useful is the ons data? the - coming through. interesting. so how useful is the ons data? the ons - coming through. interesting. so how. useful is the ons data? the ons data is incredibly useful. _ useful is the ons data? the ons data is incredibly useful. i— useful is the ons data? the ons data is incredibly useful. i think _ useful is the ons data? the ons data is incredibly useful. i think it - useful is the ons data? the ons data is incredibly useful. i think it is - is incredibly useful. i think it is one of the highlights of our response to covid is the ons both the antigen and the antibody survey is because what this has done is give us a really better idea of what is happening in the totality of the infection both asymptomatic and symptomatic, but it's about always just about a week or two weeks late, out of date, compared to the case numbers, but it has been one of the really good things that we have responded to in the uk, is this ons
5:12 pm
survey. responded to in the uk, is this ons surve . �* , ., ., ., survey. and in terms of a trend over time, survey. and in terms of a trend over time. what — survey. and in terms of a trend over time. what do _ survey. and in terms of a trend over time, what do these _ survey. and in terms of a trend over time, what do these ons _ survey. and in terms of a trend over time, what do these ons statistics | time, what do these ons statistics show? ~ , , ., ,., show? well, they did show some increase, but _ show? well, they did show some increase, but it _ show? well, they did show some increase, but it does _ show? well, they did show some increase, but it does seem - show? well, they did show some increase, but it does seem to - show? well, they did show some increase, but it does seem to be | increase, but it does seem to be flattening out and their statistics, whilst at the same time, case numbers are still falling. critically important as well is that today was the first day since june when hospital admissions were lower than on the same day in the previous week. ,., , ., , ., week. oh, so these are figures that are 'ust week. oh, so these are figures that are just out — week. oh, so these are figures that are just out from _ week. oh, so these are figures that are just out from the _ week. oh, so these are figures that are just out from the departments i are just out from the departments for health. �* ., , .,' ., for health. and does offer england fi . ures for health. and does offer england figures because _ for health. and does offer england figures because it _ for health. and does offer england figures because it always - for health. and does offer england figures because it always takes - for health. and does offer england figures because it always takes a l figures because it always takes a bit longer before we get to that data from scotland. but looking at the english for gary's, we may well have seen already that peak hospitalisation, but we will have to wait to monday before we know whether that is likely to be the
5:13 pm
case. ., y ., ~ whether that is likely to be the case. ., i. ~ _, whether that is likely to be the case. ., ~ , whether that is likely to be the case. ., ~ case. that you think it could be as soon as monday? _ case. that you think it could be as soon as monday? 0h, _ case. that you think it could be as soon as monday? oh, yes. - case. that you think it could be as soon as monday? oh, yes. i - case. that you think it could be as soon as monday? oh, yes. i think| case. that you think it could be as i soon as monday? oh, yes. i think by monda ,, soon as monday? oh, yes. i think by monday” excuse — soon as monday? oh, yes. i think by monday,, excuse me, _ soon as monday? oh, yes. i think by monday,, excuse me, the _ soon as monday? oh, yes. i think by monday,, excuse me, the problem | soon as monday? oh, yes. i think by| monday,, excuse me, the problem is that at the moment, it is still too early to see the impact of freedom day last monday. we would have started to expect to see some impact on cases today, and case numbers are still going down relative to the same period that was on the previous week. so it won't really be until monday that we know we have a better idea of what's happening to case numbers generally, but i think by monday, all being well, we should know what's going to be likely to be the impact of freedom monday, and also whether or not, as i've suggested, hospitalisation rates really have peaked, so, it's going to be an interesting few days at the
5:14 pm
beginning of next week, i think. 50 beginning of next week, i think. so i imagine you are going to give me a conscious response to this, but what is he at that feeling? do you think this weight has peaked? it is really difficult to say _ this weight has peaked? it is really difficult to say at _ this weight has peaked? it is really difficult to say at the moment. - this weight has peaked? it is really difficult to say at the moment. my| difficult to say at the moment. my guess is that it has peaked rather thanit guess is that it has peaked rather than it hasn't, but really, you know, it is a gas, and i am not confident enough to put money on it. fair enough. all right. professor paul hunter, thank you so much. get to talk to you. thank you. mi; to talk to you. thank you. my pleasure- _ a man has pleaded guilty to assaulting england's chief medical officer, professor chris whitty, in a park in central london last month. our correspondent helena wilkinson is following developments at westminster magistrates�* court. yes, the court heard that professor chris whitty had been walking through stjames' park chris whitty had been walking
5:15 pm
through st james' park last month chris whitty had been walking through stjames' park last month on a sunday evening. he had been on his way to see at the prime minister when he was accosted in that park. two men appeared here at westminster magistrates�* court today. one of them is called louis he was from essex, and he was asked to enter a plea and he pleaded guilty to one charge of assault by beating. that was an incident ofjune of last year. the court heard that lewis, who is in the dock today wearing a suit, a former estate agents, he lost hisjob as suit, a former estate agents, he lost his job as a result of the incident, and a court heard he was unreservedly apologetic for the distress that he had caused professor whitty and what had been ten seconds of complete and utter madness. thejudge ten seconds of complete and utter madness. the judge sentenced ten seconds of complete and utter madness. thejudge sentenced him to eight weeks, a suspended sentence for two years. he also ordered him to pay a fine of £100. and in his sentencing remarks, a districtjudge
5:16 pm
paul gold string said that professor beatty led the battle against coronavirus disease in his view with great dignity and professionalism, and he went on to say professor whitty was about his very difficult job without the expectation of yachts like you accosting him and assaulting him. that footage was shown wildly on social media. —— widely. a second man appeared here at magistrates�* court today, a man called jonathan chu, 2a years old, also from essex. he pleaded not guilty to that same charge of assault by beating professor chris reddy, and he also pleaded not guilty to obstructing a police officer. he was told by the district judge today that he will face a trial here at the magistrates�* court in front of the same districtjudge in front of the same districtjudge in november, and we also found out that professor chris whitty himself
5:17 pm
will be called to give evidence on behalf of the crown prosecution service. . ~ behalf of the crown prosecution service. ., ~ , ., behalf of the crown prosecution service. . ~' , ., , behalf of the crown prosecution service. ., ~ i. , . behalf of the crown prosecution service. ., ~ , . ., �*, service. thank you very much. that's helena wilkins _ service. thank you very much. that's helena wilkins and _ service. thank you very much. that's helena wilkins and their— service. thank you very much. that's helena wilkins and their reporting i helena wilkins and their reporting from central london. the headlines on bbc news... it�*s a historic day for britain�*s bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shreever wins the women�*s racing final. just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain�*s first olympic medal in the men�*s event. latest figures from ons show that the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise — although cases have fallen in scotland. lewis hughes, the man who accosted england�*s chief medical officer chris whitty in a london park, has pleaded guilty to assault. meanwhile another man, jonathan chew, pleaded not guilty to the same charge. more now on team gb�*s olympic success in the bmx — first kye whyte�*s silver medal in the men�*s race, then beth shriever�*s gold in the women�*s.
5:18 pm
i spoke to the pair a little earlier, and i asked kye what victory meant to him. 0h, oh, it's oh, it�*s phenomenal. yeah, iwas excited, it was thrilling. yeah, it�*s a bit of a dream come excited, it was thrilling. yeah, it�*s a bit of a dream come true obviously since i was a kid, and to even get to the olympics, to be selected on the team, to be called an olympian is even greater, but to be called a medallist is even better. it�*s been a crazy experience. better. it's been a crazy experience.— better. it's been a crazy exerience. �* , ., , experience. be is something that is in our experience. be is something that is in your family. _ experience. be is something that is in your family, isn't _ experience. be is something that is in your family, isn't that? _ experience. be is something that is in your family, isn't that? yeah, - in your family, isn't that? yeah, eah. in your family, isn't that? yeah, yeah- from _ in your family, isn't that? yeah, yeah. from when _ in your family, isn't that? yeah, yeah. from when i— in your family, isn't that? yeah, yeah. from when i first - in your family, isn't that? yeah, yeah. from when i first started, j in your family, isn't that? yeah, - yeah. from when i first started, my two brothers, my two older sister, my younger sister got into it. my dad was a senior coach at peckham bmx club, yeah, that club isjust dad was a senior coach at peckham bmx club, yeah, that club is just a great club, and they are doing very well but their writers, obviously. clearly they are. that�*s very modest idea. so you won your metal and then you are on the sidelines as beth got
5:19 pm
that gold medal. how did that feel? you know what connects the crazy experience i�*ve ever experienced. other bases i�*ve been to, all the team a five tier nine, bap has been through a tough ride, to see her when the medal, i wouldn�*t want to see anyone else do it better. so even the way she done it, she won from the start. she led out every race. i think she only dropped one lap today, and i think she was chilling anyway. so, but, yeah, she is a crazy writer, best i�*ve ever seen can actually come and she deserves it. seen can actually come and she deserves it-_ seen can actually come and she deserves it. 1, . ,, ., ., , deserves it. back, how does it feel? you have got _ deserves it. back, how does it feel? you have got a _ deserves it. back, how does it feel? you have got a gold _ deserves it. back, how does it feel? you have got a gold medal. - deserves it. back, how does it feel? you have got a gold medal. it - deserves it. back, how does it feel? you have got a gold medal. it is - you have got a gold medal. it is absolutely _ you have got a gold medal. it is absolutely crazy. _ you have got a gold medal. it is absolutely crazy. it _ you have got a gold medal. it is absolutely crazy. it is crazy. i am honestly — absolutely crazy. it is crazy. i am honestly speechless, the amount of support— honestly speechless, the amount of support that we both received has honestly — support that we both received has honestly been amazing, and today 'ust honestly been amazing, and today just couldn't have done any better. and you _ just couldn't have done any better. and you gave it your all, didn't and you gave it your all, didn�*t you? we say a completely exhausted.
5:20 pm
i left everything on that track. i knew _ i left everything on that track. i knew i— i left everything on that track. i knew i had _ i left everything on that track. i knew i had to work hard to get that gold _ knew i had to work hard to get that gold i_ knew i had to work hard to get that gold. i knew someone was on my tail, obviously— gold. i knew someone was on my tail, obviously a _ gold. i knew someone was on my tail, obviously a double own with a champ, isaw— obviously a double own with a champ, i saw her_ obviously a double own with a champ, i saw her coming on that last straight, _ i saw her coming on that last straight, and i knew! i saw her coming on that last straight, and i knew i had to keep smooth _ straight, and i knew i had to keep smooth and have one last place. i left everything, i couldn't even stand — left everything, i couldn't even stand he _ left everything, i couldn't even stand. he had to pick me up. it was honestly— stand. he had to pick me up. it was honestly crazy. 50 stand. he had to pick me up. it was honestly crazy-— stand. he had to pick me up. it was honestly crazy. so many thousands of mm: honestly crazy. so many thousands of young people — honestly crazy. so many thousands of young people will _ honestly crazy. so many thousands of young people will be _ honestly crazy. so many thousands of young people will be looking - honestly crazy. so many thousands of young people will be looking at - young people will be looking at where both of you are today and looking at you as inspiring for games, thinking that if you can do it, maybe they can to. what would you say to them? l. it, maybe they can to. what would you say to them?— it, maybe they can to. what would you say to them? l, of course they can do it- — you say to them? l, of course they can do it- i'm _ you say to them? l, of course they can do it. i'mjust_ you say to them? l, of course they can do it. i'm just a _ you say to them? l, of course they can do it. i'm just a kid from - can do it. i�*m just a kid from peckham, not a bad place, not a great place, it�*sjust peckham, not a bad place, not a great place, it�*s just peckham. peckham, not a bad place, not a great place, it�*sjust peckham. look where i am today, and in tokyo. the whole trip, i�*ve been saying is, peckham to tokyo and every picture, and obviously commits a dream come true for a young kid, and any kids that do have those dreams, please, please, chase it, and while you�*re chasing it, had a lot of fun.
5:21 pm
please, chase it, and while you're chasing it, had a lot of fun. beth? no, i totally. _ chasing it, had a lot of fun. beth? no, i totally, totally _ chasing it, had a lot of fun. beth? no, i totally, totally agree. - chasing it, had a lot of fun. beth? no, i totally, totally agree. if- chasing it, had a lot of fun. beth? no, i totally, totally agree. if you| no, i totally, totally agree. if you have _ no, i totally, totally agree. if you have a _ no, i totally, totally agree. if you have a dream, you chase it, you drain— have a dream, you chase it, you drain it — have a dream, you chase it, you drain it. every athlete dreams of this moment, and if he fully commit and you _ this moment, and if he fully commit and you give — this moment, and if he fully commit and you give it everything you've got, _ and you give it everything you've got, you — and you give it everything you've got, you will be rewarded. i promise you. got, you will be rewarded. i promise you so _ got, you will be rewarded. i promise you. so wherever you are from, honestly, — you. so wherever you are from, honestly, get down to the track, in any sport. — honestly, get down to the track, in any sport, just get cracking and have _ any sport, just get cracking and have a — any sport, just get cracking and have a good time. have a really good time _ have a good time. have a really good time. �* . time. beth, kai, huge congratulations - time. beth, kai, huge congratulations to - time. beth, kai, hugel congratulations to both time. beth, kai, huge- congratulations to both of you. thank you so much for talking to us. thank you so much for talking to us. thank you so much for talking to us. thank you very much.— i�*m joined now byjeremy hayes — he runs leeds urban bike park, and also spent time as a team gb coach for british cycling, where he coached kye whyte. good afternoon tia jeremy. what an extraordinary _ good afternoon tia jeremy. what an extraordinary day _ good afternoon tia jeremy. what an extraordinary day this _ good afternoon tia jeremy. what an extraordinary day this must - good afternoon tia jeremy. what an extraordinary day this must be - good afternoon tia jeremy. what an extraordinary day this must be for. extraordinary day this must be for you, you had a hand in getting that silver medalfor chi. i you, you had a hand in getting that silver medal for chi.—
5:22 pm
silver medal for chi. i originally started coaching _ silver medal for chi. i originally started coaching for _ silver medal for chi. i originally started coaching for bmx - silver medal for chi. i originally started coaching for bmx when | silver medal for chi. i originally i started coaching for bmx when it first became an olympic discipline, so we have come along way since then. and actually when chi and bad first to the gb programme, and they were about 1k years old, that�*s when i left british cycling, so i�*m going alone, but it is great to see them both, and i know how hard they both worked. every bmx there they have to go through a lot of injuries, trained really hard, and sometimes in this part they don�*t get a lot of recognition for how hard they do work. b. recognition for how hard they do work. �* ., ., , .,, recognition for how hard they do work. ., ., , ., ., ., work. a lot of people want to have known that — work. a lot of people want to have known that this _ work. a lot of people want to have known that this has _ work. a lot of people want to have known that this has been - work. a lot of people want to have known that this has been an - work. a lot of people want to have l known that this has been an olympic sport for some time.— sport for some time. yeah, it made its debut in — sport for some time. yeah, it made its debut in beijing. _ sport for some time. yeah, it made its debut in beijing. at _ sport for some time. yeah, it made its debut in beijing. at that - sport for some time. yeah, it made its debut in beijing. at that point, l its debut in beijing. at that point, i remember the world championships, she won —— he won that when he was 16 years old, then 2004, 2005, he made his debut in the gb segment programme, and that�*s when we started everything. so it goes back quite a way now. it�*s great. it�*s taken this amount of time to finally get these two guys on the podium,
5:23 pm
and it�*s been a rough road you know because mike been something, bmx coming in and having to compete side ljy coming in and having to compete side by side but the track and the more traditional rod driving and inclined and british cycling, the brits have to prove themselves, and i think yesterday they did that. they are back where they need to be, it was the heartbreak and dedication of the steel and some of those bmx those who have come before us who have forged a path, ready to take that top spot. 50 forged a path, ready to take that to sot. ., forged a path, ready to take that to--sot. ., , . ., top spot. so you would expect now that there will _ top spot. so you would expect now that there will be _ top spot. so you would expect now that there will be more _ top spot. so you would expect now that there will be more recognition as a sports and funding. it that there will be more recognition as a sports and funding.— as a sports and funding. it helps. ran the programme, _ as a sports and funding. it helps. ran the programme, until- as a sports and funding. it helps. ran the programme, until we - as a sports and funding. it helps. j ran the programme, until we get as a sports and funding. it helps. i ran the programme, until we get an olympic medal, we were told, the funding will be as much as some other disciplines, but i am hoping that will change now. there has definitely been some tough times. beth at one point, the female programme was dropped. beth had to find herself for a while. so it has
5:24 pm
been hired. and because bmx has always been seen as one of those rape cannot guarantee those metals, and some are sterile environments can even get the good times, you are pretty much going to get it, but bmx can as we know, that�*s the most exciting can and you are thinking anything can happen. i remember when kye whyte first got out there, bmx really exploded. their tracks up and down that country, there are lots of places for people to bmx, and it�*s probably one of the cheapest cycle spots out there right now, which is great for young people to access, you know? to achieve these dreams. and just where it about park that you run, can anyone come along and have a go?— have a go? yeah, it's great. so this is uuite have a go? yeah, it's great. so this is quite unique _ have a go? yeah, it's great. so this is quite unique facility. _ have a go? yeah, it's great. so this is quite unique facility. it's - have a go? yeah, it's great. so this is quite unique facility. it's free - is quite unique facility. it�*s free to access. anyone can come and ride. we had bmx bikes there, we have developed our club and our community offer. the aim here was to get
5:25 pm
people that in england and scotland and a little taste of that, but more importantly for the young people in this area. working with kye whyte as well because he�*s been down here. he can help inspire some of these young people from around here to maybe be the next olympic champions going forward. ~ ., �* ., , forward. well, wouldn't that be areat. forward. well, wouldn't that be great- very _ forward. well, wouldn't that be great- very good _ forward. well, wouldn't that be great. very good to _ forward. well, wouldn't that be great. very good to talk- forward. well, wouldn't that be great. very good to talk to. - forward. well, wouldn't that be i great. very good to talk to. thank you so much. jeremy hayes from leeds urban bike park. —— leads neck. labour is calling for the government to bring forward the date on which fully vaccinated people will no longer have to self—isolate in england. the welsh government confirmed last night that it would make the change next saturday — while scotland plans to do the same two days later. in england, the change is not due to come in until the 16th of august. our political correspondent jonathan blake explained that despite pressure on the prime minister to change that date, calls from labour are likely to go unheeded. i think the labour leader, sir kier starmer, calling for the government to shift that
5:26 pm
date earlier probably makes it less likely, if anything, but sir kier starmer is accusing the government of a chaotic approach, saying that businesses and families need certainty, and therefore, in his view, it would be right to bring that date forward from the 16th of august, which the government has identified as the point at which double vaccinated adults will not need to isolate if they come into contact with someone who has tested positive to the 7th of august. why then? well, it happens to be the date that the welsh government is due to confirm will be the end of isolation requirements for double jabbed adults there, and sir kier stamer was asked earlier more about his reasoning for specifying that date. we have been talking to scientists throughout the 18 months of this pandemic on a very regular basis. it's not that date that is driving it, it's the principle of the double vaccination, and the idea, as welsh labour have put
5:27 pm
forward, if you are double vaccinated, you don't have to isolate if you have been in contact with someone, as is automatically the _ rule at the moment. at the moment, we've got hundreds of thousands of people a week isolating, and you can see the chaos that that's causing. so, why not now, is perhaps the other obvious question for labour here. if it�*s deemed safe in nine days�* time, why isn�*t deemed safe now, where sir kier stamer�*s answer to that said that he wants a pragmatic approach and there needs to be time to put the measures in place and for the testing centres that the government has put into operation, which are in the process of being set up to get fully up and running, which means people can be tested rather than having to isolate or stay away from work. but in taking this move, it is a shift in llabour policy. it�*s one which attempts to put it in line with what the labour government in wales is doing, but very deliberately puts it at odds with what the westminster
5:28 pm
government is doing, and as i say, no sign at the moment that the government is going to shift their approach and bring forward that date of the 16th of august, which the prime minister has said is nailed on. a man has beenjailed for attacks on cats in brighton. nine of the animals died. it caused panic among pet owners in the area. he was eventually caught when cctv set up by the owner of one of the dead cats appeared to catch another attack. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. that evening. the storm on the back into the north sea is a go through the night, but it�*s wrapped disruptive winds, torrential rain, particularly to northern and eastern parts of england to the afternoon into the evening, still a few storms rambling on and as of yet, but they should fade away overnight, but there is always for eastern areas
5:29 pm
going to be some further rainfall, a lot of cloud. in fact the next harris for the respite ten —— tend to be further if you are between. a pressure night, 10—13 sunak celsius. because we are switching our wind direction to the north, notable for scotland and northern ireland tomorrow where there will still be a few showers around, but the wreck and a generally speaking, most of them will be for eastern scotland and eastern england, and enter the day, breaking out of the heat of the sun at this time, the strength of the sun this time of their crossing an investment so once again, torrential downpour as i possible. 20 in the south without that strong wind, a clear down the hall for sunday can and still at picture sunday can and still at picture sunday and into the new week. hello, this is bbc news with reeta chakrabarti. the headlines: it�*s a historic day for britain�*s bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shriever wins the women�*s racing final, just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain�*s first olympic medal in the men�*s event. latest figures from ons show
5:30 pm
that the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise, although cases have fallen in scotland. lewis hughes, the man who accosted england�*s chief medical officer chris whitty in a london park, has pleaded guilty to assault. meanwhile, another man, jonathan chew, pleaded not guilty to the same charge. labour calls for england to follow wales and bring forward the date on which fully vaccinated people can avoid self—isolation. get your covid jab — that�*s the message from england�*s chief midwife to women who are pregnant. drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row. more than 1300 people died last year. campaigners win a court battle to prevent the construction of a road tunnel near stonehenge. sport and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre,
5:31 pm
here again is you. two medals in the space of a few minutes on the bmx track delivered team gb the highlight of day seven in tokyo. after crowdfunding her way to the games, while also having to work part time as a teaching assistant, beth shriever won a gold in the women�*s race. it�*s britain�*s first gold in the sport, with shriever beating the winner at the last two olympics to claim the title. and she was met on the finish line by kye white, who just moments earlier had won silver in the men�*s event. white had to battle back from serious injury to get to tokyo as day seven started with two impressive results on two wheels. honestly, i�*m in shock. like, to even be here is an achievement in itself. to make a final as another achievement in itself. to win a gold medal, honestly, i�*m so over the moon. there was more success in the pool as duncan scott won a silver in the men�*s 200
5:32 pm
metres individual medley. it�*s his third medal of the games — the first british swimmer to do that since 1908. scott delivered team gb�*s sixth medal overall in the pool, finishing behind winner wang shun of china. scott�*s medal came shortly after luke greenbank won bronze in the men�*s 200m backstroke. and there was also a bronze medalfor bryony page in the women�*s trampoline. she led the competition after her routine, but was pushed down to third as china took gold and silver. there was also a bronze for men�*s eight in rowing. so, let�*s have a look the medals table. there was also a bronze for luke greenbank in the 200 metre backstroke, while the men�*s eight won a rowing bronze. gb finished the games with two rowing medals, their lowest rowing medal tally at an olympics since atlanta 1996. great britain remain in sixth overall with six golds.
5:33 pm
china are top ahead of hosts japan. elsehwere, arsenal have signed england international ben white from brighton for a fee thought to be 50 million pounds. white can play in defence or midfield, and was part of england�*s squad for euro 2020. he�*s completed a medical and signed a long term deal at the emirates. the amount received by brighton is a club record. marcus rashford will have surgery on his shoulder next week. the manchester united and england forward has been troubled by the problem for a number of months. united wanted to check before sanctioning the operation, but have now agreed to the surgery. it�*s thought rashford will be sidelined for around three months. south africa captain siya kolisi has backed up claims about the referee in the first test against lions made by his director of rugby rassie erasmus, saying he didn�*t feel respected at all. erasmus posted an astonishing hour—long video on social media criticising the australian official, who was in charge of the springboks�* defeat in cape town to the lions. rugby australia said "the attack on nic berry�*s integrity,
5:34 pm
character and reputation is unacceptable." kolisi says he�*s looking forward to a new game and a new referee in the second test tomorrow, while the lions have described the affair as a sideshow. we had a good meeting with the referees — we had a good meeting with the referees yesterday, and as ben o'keefe — referees yesterday, and as ben o'keefe set himself, that's not going _ o'keefe set himself, that's not going to — o'keefe set himself, that's not going to affect anything. that's 'ust going to affect anything. that's just a _ going to affect anything. that's just a sideshow. we had a discussion with the _ just a sideshow. we had a discussion with the referees and we realise they have — with the referees and we realise they have a tough job to do. their opponents had captain amy jones to thank principally for their 140 44. she made 42 not out, but that was bettered by danny by eight
5:35 pm
wickets with 18 of their hundred balls to spare. we�*ll have more for you in sportsday at half past six. some breaking cricket news, it has been confirmed that ben stokes has withdrawn from the england test squad for their five test series with india. the ucb say that is for him to concentrate on his mental well—being, but also help rehabilitate a problematic injury that he�*s had with his hand over the course of the last few months which has not properly recovered. ben stokes will not play for england in that five test series against india, which starts very shortly. that news to us in the last few moments. i�*m sure that will be available on the website very soon. chetan pathak is here with sportsday at half pack six.
5:36 pm
paul clifton is at stonehenge for us now. this is a world heritage site, so any activity around it is going to cause controversy. just remind us of the background to this and what this means today. i of the background to this and what this means today.— of the background to this and what this means today. i have to say this has taken absolutely _ this means today. i have to say this has taken absolutely everybody - this means today. i have to say this| has taken absolutely everybody here completely by surprise. the decision to approve the two mile, 1.7 billion pound tunnel past stonehenge was unlawful. thejudge has ruled the transport secretary grant shapps had not properly assessed the risk of harm to each asset within the stonehenge landscape. he found that the secretary of state had made an error of law by failing to consider alternatives such as a longer
5:37 pm
tunnel. to understand why this matters, you only have to look over there, at the queues of traffic. they stretch for miles in both directions. you can frequently sit in your carforan hour directions. you can frequently sit in your carfor an hour waiting to get past year. the plans would�*ve included deep cuttings on either side and the bypass for the village, and it would have brought relief to the people who live on that run through surrounding villages. the tunnel, and approving it, the government went against the advice of its own planning inspectors and the opponents described this as a substantial victory. they will keep so don�*t hands say for now. what so don't hands say for now. what ha--ens so don't hands say for now. what happens next _ so don't hands say for now. what happens next -- _ so don't hands say for now. what happens next -- keep _ so don't hands say for now. what happens next -- keep stone - so don't hands say for now. what happens next —— keep stone and safe? good question. the project will be put on hold. highways england did an
5:38 pm
interview with us and that interview was suddenly withdrawn. they were, i think, gob smacked. they were due to have a big row culture —— road closure to bring in the cables and water supply needed to construct the tunnel. all that will now be put on hold. there has been debate and discussion about what to do with this road past stonehenge for four decades now. ideas and plans have come and gone. this time, this project had the support of all the big environmental groups — the national trust, heritage england — all in favour of it. it seems we are back yet again to square one. the one thing people here didn�*t want was for nothing at all to happen. many of them didn�*t like the idea of the tunnel. they favoured various other alternatives, the tunnel. they favoured various otheralternatives, but the tunnel. they favoured various other alternatives, but the one thing they didn�*t want was this terrible traffic jam thing they didn�*t want was this terrible trafficjam to stay in place. for now, that is exactly what
5:39 pm
they have bought.— place. for now, that is exactly what they have bought. call, many thanks. paul clifton reporting _ they have bought. call, many thanks. paul clifton reporting from _ paul clifton reporting from stonehenge. the number of drug deaths in scotland has risen to a record level for the seventh year in a row. there was a total of 1,339 drug—related fatalities in 2020, the highest rate in europe. kirsten horsburgh leads scottish drugs forum�*s work on drug death prevention. she is a mental health nurse and has a background of working in community drug treatment, and joins me now. good afternoon to you. these are very sobering figures and clearly, there is a persistent worrying problem in scotland. why is this the case in your view? 50. problem in scotland. why is this the case in your view?— case in your view? so, thoughts go out to everyone — case in your view? so, thoughts go out to everyone who _ case in your view? so, thoughts go out to everyone who is _ case in your view? so, thoughts go out to everyone who is affected - case in your view? so, thoughts go out to everyone who is affected by | out to everyone who is affected by that and today�*s figures just highlight that we are very much will in the midst of a public health emergency in relation to drug desk which are rising year on year. one
5:40 pm
of the major problems we have, driven by deprivation and inequalities and all of these things need to be addressed. but of the 60,000 people who experienced drug problems, less than 40% of people are accessing treatment that would help to save their lives. we know treatment is a protective factor and certainly one of the issues people face in scotland.— face in scotland. there are entranced _ face in scotland. there are entranced social _ face in scotland. there are entranced social and - face in scotland. there are - entranced social and economic problems —— entrenched, but once people have a serious drug problem, you say the treatment isn�*t there. is it a question of resources or geographical spread? what is the main issue? the geographical spread? what is the main issue?— geographical spread? what is the main issue? . , main issue? the treatment is there across the whole _ main issue? the treatment is there across the whole of _ main issue? the treatment is there across the whole of scotland, - main issue? the treatment is there across the whole of scotland, but l across the whole of scotland, but just not delivered effectively. the drug deaths task force arranged treatment standards which basically mean the standards will ensure that
5:41 pm
people have same—day access to treatments so that they won�*t have to wait long, they have choice of which treatment they can access and including injectable auctions like heroin treatment, but people will access at treatment for as long as they want and we need to ensure that equitable across the country. the problem is that although there have been a lot of resources apply to this and the standards are there, the next phase will be ensuring these are absolutely embedded within service provision and not seen as a choice or an option for services to deliver that are manned a story, and that will take close monitoring to ensure. d0 that will take close monitoring to ensure. , , ., ., ensure. do drug users face a social stiuma ensure. do drug users face a social stigma that — ensure. do drug users face a social stigma that might _ ensure. do drug users face a social stigma that might mean _ ensure. do drug users face a social stigma that might mean they - ensure. do drug users face a social stigma that might mean they don'tj stigma that might mean they don�*t come forward for treatment or people who want to treatment find them if a cult to get a hold of?— cult to get a hold of? stigma is a hue cult to get a hold of? stigma is a huge issue _ cult to get a hold of? stigma is a huge issue and _ cult to get a hold of? stigma is a huge issue and it _ cult to get a hold of? stigma is a huge issue and it still _ cult to get a hold of? stigma is a huge issue and it still very - cult to get a hold of? stigma is a huge issue and it still very much| huge issue and it still very much
5:42 pm
exists. that prevents people from accessing the treatment they need. not only does society stigmatize people who use drugs, but also sadly some of our health services. people would wait until they�*re almost an emergency crisis before they would actually go and see someone for their health needs. just because the way that people feel they�*ll be treated and judge, which is sadly accurate in a lot of cases. there�*s accurate in a lot of cases. there�*s a lot of work still to be done to address the stigma that people face. thank you very much. an 18—year—old wembley steward has admitted trying to sell security wristbands and lanyards for england�*s euro 2020 final against italy. yusaf amin pleaded guilty to theft at willesden magistrates in north london. our correspondent, tom symonds, is outside the court for us. tell us more, what did the court
5:43 pm
hear? yusaf amin posted a message offering... he had two passes and two uniforms. looking for serious people only, detailed brief available, guaranteed entry or money back. he was looking for four and a half thousand pounds and return for these items, which would have enabled people potentially to get into the stadium. he put his phone number on this advert. outside the stadium on the day of the game. he did take a call from a journalist, and shortly after, he was arrested by police. the prosecutor told the court hear in wilson this afternoon that this all raised security concerns. he said what happens if
5:44 pm
someone gets a hold of items like this with perhaps nor serious intent. he raised the spectre with the prospect of a bombing like the ariana grande a bombing in manchester. of course, this was a day when we know many people were trying to get into wembley to see that game with no tickets, and tickets were exchanging for thousands of thousands of pounds. wembley is holding investigation into what happened and the metropolitan police are investigating how the event was policed. but as for yusaf amin, he�*s going to be sentenced at a later date. another man pleaded not guilty and he will face a trial in front of magistrates in december.- and he will face a trial in front of magistrates in december. the headlines on bbc news: it�*s a historic day for britain�*s bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shriever wins the women�*s racing final, just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain�*s first olympic medal in the men�*s event.
5:45 pm
latest figures from ons show that the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise, although cases have fallen in scotland. lewis hughes, the man who accosted england�*s chief medical officer chris whitty in a london park, has pleaded guilty to assault. meanwhile, another man, jonathan chew, pleaded not guilty to the same charge. now on bbc news, it�*s time for the film review with mark kermode. hello and welcome to the film review with me, mark kermode, rounding up the best new movies available for viewing in cinemas and in the home.

31 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on