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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 30, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines: an historic day for britain's bmx riders at the tokyo olympics — bethany shriever wins the women's racing final, just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain's first olympic medal in the men's event. latest figures from ons show that the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise — although cases have fallen in scotland. get your covid jab — the message from england's chief midwife to women who are pregnant. drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row — more than 1,300 people died last year. disruption to dairy deliveries says a major company — due to a dip in the number
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of drivers. we'll be getting more reaction after today's team gb olympic wins. beth shriever�*s raced to gold in the bmx women's competition, and her mother kate told us how proud she is. once she gets going and she's out the gate, as with the races that she did in the early hours of the morning, been out front and looking comfortable and happy. you know, i'm just so proud that she did it, and it's just so amazing. good afternoon. there's been a sizeable medal haul for team gb at the tokyo olympics. tremendous bmx racing by 22—year—old beth shriever has won her gold, and kye white took silver
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in the men's event. for a full round—up of today's action at the olympics — let's cross to hugh ferris at the bbc sports centre. good afternoon. six more medals for team gb on a day seven of tokyo 2020. more in the coming days as the result of some particularly impressive performances. it was on the bmx track were the biggest achievements took place and at the best stories told. she achievements took place and at the best stories told.— best stories told. she is a british bot's nude _ best stories told. she is a british bot's nude two _ best stories told. she is a british bot's nude two wheeled - best stories told. she is a british bot's nude two wheeled wonder. j best stories told. she is a british - bot's nude two wheeled wonder. the olympus is no stranger to you for details, but beth shriever�*s is something very special. they 22—year—old has not been amongst the favourites in at the bmx. but the part—time teaching assistant was soon giving her rivals a lesson. she led from the start in the most exhilarating of events, she flew
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around the track. could she hang on for gold? it around the track. could she hang on for old? . , , , around the track. could she hang on for old? ., , , ~ for gold? it was summer finish. all the wa , for gold? it was summer finish. all the way. all _ for gold? it was summer finish. all the way. all the — for gold? it was summer finish. all the way, all the while, _ for gold? it was summer finish. all the way, all the while, although i the way, all the while, although why! _ the way, all the while, although wh ! , , . . ., , ., the way, all the while, although wh! , ., why! the olympic champion! to elation and _ why! the olympic champion! to elation and utter _ why! the olympic champion! to elation and utter exhaustion. i why! the olympic champion! to . elation and utter exhaustion. team night kye whyte lifting her aloft as the enormous year of her achievement starts sinking in. beth shriever had to can fund her own preparations for tokyo. after celebrating with her family in essex, she said her victory defied belief. honestly, i'm in a shock- — victory defied belief. honestly, i'm in a shock- t _ victory defied belief. honestly, i'm in a shock. t even _ victory defied belief. honestly, i'm in a shock. t even be _ victory defied belief. honestly, i'm in a shock. t even be here - victory defied belief. honestly, i'm in a shock. t even be here is - victory defied belief. honestly, i'm in a shock. t even be here is an . in a shock. t even be here is an achievement in itself. to make a final is another achievement. to come away with a medal, let alone a gold medal, honestly, i'm so over the moon. gold medal, honestly, i'm so over the moon-— the moon. but this was a day of double celebration. _ the moon. but this was a day of double celebration. just - the moon. but this was a day of. double celebration. just moments double celebration. just moments later, kye whyte, nicknamed the prince of peckham, had produced a regal display to take a stunning silver, enjoyed as much in the south—east london as it was in
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tokyo. it south-east london as it was in to 0. ., , , south-east london as it was in to 0. . , , ., tokyo. it means everything. yeah, it means everything. _ tokyo. it means everything. yeah, it means everything. once _ tokyo. it means everything. yeah, it means everything. once in _ tokyo. it means everything. yeah, it means everything. once in a - tokyo. it means everything. yeah, it means everything. once in a life - means everything. once in a life time _ means everything. once in a life time achievement. as i say, it's pretty— time achievement. as i say, it's pretty hard _ time achievement. as i say, it's pretty hard to even get to the olympics in the first place. to do well, _ olympics in the first place. to do well, to— olympics in the first place. to do well, to even get a medal, yeah, it's speciat — well, to even get a medal, yeah, it's special-— it's special. white then turned cheerleader, _ it's special. white then turned cheerleader, roaring - it's special. white then turned cheerleader, roaring beth - it's special. white then turned - cheerleader, roaring beth shriever on before the pair could finally celebrate together. they were not the only ones. for more star, liam gallagher, described beth shriever as a legend. it isa it is a word that might also apply to this man. duncan scott winning his third medal of the games, with silver and the student metres individual medley. while in at the 200 metre backstroke, bronze. for team gb, the pill is certainly proving productive a stop in at the trampolining crowd but page balance to cloudy? after two days out out
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with injury, it was some display. —— two years out. following her silver in rio, this time bronze, which she later described as amazing. there was also bronze in the billing for the men's eight. for one of team gb's flagship sports, this has been a disappointing games. just to medals and for the first time since 1980 no gold. aren't the first day of athletics, dina asher—smith confirmed her status as a contender in the 100 metres — even through her feet and into the semifinals. in the boxing, pat mccormick and i were to occur about guaranteed medals. although whitaker has manages victory in his sights. i although whitaker has manages victory in his sights.— although whitaker has manages victory in his sights. i want to go back with a _ victory in his sights. i want to go back with a gold _ victory in his sights. i want to go back with a gold medal- victory in his sights. i want to go back with a gold medal and - victory in his sights. i want to go back with a gold medal and i - victory in his sights. i want to go | back with a gold medal and i want victory in his sights. i want to go - back with a gold medal and i want to become the mayor of wolverhampton. i want one of those nice chains around my neck. a nice ice grille and a
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nice big chain, courtesy of ben whittaker. nice big chain, courtesy of ben whittaker-— nice big chain, courtesy of ben whittaker. ., , “ , ., ., whittaker. team gb's medal haul will not be added — whittaker. team gb's medal haul will not be added to _ whittaker. team gb's medal haul will not be added to by _ whittaker. team gb's medal haul will not be added to by the _ whittaker. team gb's medal haul will not be added to by the women's - not be added to by the women's football team. they lost to australia for — three after extra time. sam care, of chelsea, equalised for australia in at the 89th minute to force extra time. caroline we saw her penalty save. change the momentum of the game. a second from care made it 4—2. white made it 43 just after this, with six minute left to complete her hat—trick. unfortunately team gb could not find an equaliser and australia are through to the last four. there is always the context and the balance of some disappointment. much more to celebrate. if you want to find out
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the results from today. a lot going on the from tokyo, head to the bbc sport website. there is also the app for all the news that you could possibly want from the olympics. the olympics have been increasingly overshadowed by a spike in covid—19 cases in tokyo and around the country. japan's prime minister, yoshihide suga, has said that coronavirus is spreading with unpredecented speed injapan, fuelled by the delta variant. mr suga warned that the medical system is at risk of strain, and at a news conference he urged people to watch the games at home. translation: earlier l today, novel coronavirus headquarter meeting was held. saitama, chiba, kanagawa and osako — we are going to issue a state of emergency to those prefectures. in hokkaido, ishikawa, kyoto, hyogo and fukuoka, for those prefectures
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we are going to implement priority measures for the period from august 2 to august 31. this is the period for the measures. the state of emergency in okinawa is also extended to august 31. this is the decision that was made. our correspondent, mariko oi, is in tokyo, where coronavirus case numbers have been increasing. the lastest number for tokyo came in at 3300, which is slightly lower compared to yesterday, but still well above 3000, which was unheard of until this week. in all ofjapan, it was another record high, topping 10,000 once again. we'vejust been hearing from prime minister suga, as well as one of the country's top medical advisers, officially declaring the expansion and the extension of the state of emergency here in tokyo and the surrounding prefectures as well.
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how effective that will be remains to be seen, because of course the japanese capital has been under the state of emergency for two weeks now, but we are still seeing that surge in covid—19 cases. we have been hearing from the ioc and other government officials, emphasising that this most recent surge has nothing to do with the olympics. some of them seem to imply that it's because of young people who are not listening to the government's request to stay at home, and they have also been encouraged to get vaccinated encouraged to get vaccinated when there is not is not enough jabs around. i found it a little unfair, so i decided to go to shibuya, where a lot of young people hang out, to find that what they thought of the government's comments. translation: i haven't even received a ticket to get vaccinated. _ my parents onlyjust got theirjabs. i can sense that we are getting too used to the state of emergency, so it's not stopping people from going out. she just had her first shot yesterday, and i have - made my appointment, so we are getting - vaccinated when we can. if the government really wants to stop the spread of the virus,
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they have to lock us down and offer financial support, because without it people will go out and go to work because they need to earn money. now, japan's vaccine roll—out has been really slow and inefficient at the beginning. they've managed to pick it up, but now they are facing this supply shortage. the country's health ministry is apparently considering using the astrazeneca vaccine for those above the age of a0. the astrazeneca jab was approved back in may, but it has not been in use forjapanese people, partly because of the rare blood clots it has been causing in other parts of the world. of course, the government really needs to clearly explain if they are going to make a shift in that vaccine strategy. the communication has really been an issue for this government. we have noticed the prime minister have been holding press conferences on television for over an hour. but of course we all know that young
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people, who they really want to reach out to, they do not necessarily watch tv for that long, and they need to really change how they communicate with the younger population, because the prime minister has been tweeting about gold medals that have been won by japanese athletes, but he has not even tweeted once about the most recent surge in covid—19 cases. if they really want to reach out to the young population, they need to rethink how to communicate their message. here, the latest data from the office for national statistics shows the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continued to rise in the week to last saturday. it comes after several days of falling daily case numbers in the uk. here's our health correspondent, jim reed. the daily data you might hear every evening on the news, measuring people who come forward normally with symptoms of the virus and then test positive. those figures have been very encouraging for the last week
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showing a sharp downward trend as you can see on the graph. on the right hand side you are saying seeing that trend fall. there is a different way of measuring infections carefully watched and this is where the office of national statistics goes out and randomly samples people in the population, about half—a—million people in the uk. that can measure notjust people with symptoms but people who are not sick with covid at the time. that data shows in the week to last saturday, actually, cases were rising slightly, across the uk, short of a million people, 950,000 had covid in that week, up from 830,000 the week before. up in england, wales and northern ireland, down slightly in scotland. why these two different trends? a lot could be down to timing, that ons survey measures people up to last saturday, so it might have missed this very recent fall in those daily cases.
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it also measures people without symptoms, which can make a difference. they ons said they will continue to investigate whether the current wave of infections is stabilising or not and it remains too early to say. england's chief midwife has written to gp practices, obstetricians and midwives, stressing the need to encourage pregnant women to be vaccinated against coronavirus. estimates suggest that only one in ten pregnant women have had the jab, but the number of mothers—to—be in hospital with the virus is rising. as our health correspondent cath burns reports. the message couldn't be any clearer. expectant mothers should take action to protect themselves and their babies by getting the covid vaccine. any midwife not encouraging pregnant women to do so will now be going against official guidance. at the antenatal clinic at chelsea and westminster hospital, most of the pregnant women we spoke
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to had beenjabbed. it is just for the safety, i started getting worried especially during my third trimester. luckily i haven't had covid, i have been very lucky, but i thought it was important to have it to protect me and the baby now as well. so, yes, i decided to do it. i was really nervous before i had it done. then i did a bit more reading, i thought this is perfect. i've had it done and feel much safer, happier and freer to go out. i decided i was in a betterl position having the vaccine than i was potentially being exposed to the risk of covid. _ but it is not always a straightforward decision. if it had been going for five years or something, confident to get it done, but because it is so new, i think that is why i am still hesitating. so i think that is what is keeping me from getting vaccinated. new data from the uk obstetrics surveillance system shows of the 742 pregnant women admitted to hospital
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with covid since the start of february, only four had received a single dose of the vaccine, and none had been double—jabbed. the later also suggested the delta variant has increased the likelihood of pregnant patients having more severe symptoms. at chelsea and westminster, they outline other risks too. if you are umming and aahing about having the covid vaccination, it is really important to remember that in pregnancy, if you aren't vaccinated, you are more likely to end up needing respiratory support. unfortunately it can lead to early miscarriages or preterm births which can have a detrimental impact on your baby's health. more than 51,000 pregnant women in england have had theirfirstjab and nearly 21,000 have had their second. but that means hundreds of thousands remain unvaccinated.
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medical experts insist there had been no safety concerns for pregnant women who have taken the jab, and it is safe. catherine burns, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: a historic day for britain's bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shreiver wins the women's racing final just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain's first olympic medal in the men's event. latest figures from ons show that the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise — although cases have fallen in scotland. get your covid jab — the message from england's chief midwife to women who are pregnant. the number of drug deaths in scotland has risen to a record level for the seventh year in a row. there was a total of 1,339 drug—related fatalities in 2020 — the highest rate in europe. our correspondent, james shaw, in glasgow,
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says the problem has been described as a "public health emergency." one of the things that is particularly shocking is the fact that it has been going on for so many years, the seventh record year for the drug death rate in scotland, and in fact the drugs policy minister here, angela constance, has admitted that it is a national disgrace, as she put it, and the number of deaths, the death rate, was unacceptably high. to put it in context, this is 3.5 times the drug death rate for the whole of the uk. and it is particularly affecting deprived parts of scotland much more than it is the least deprived areas, and that gap has been increasing over the last 20 years. now, the scottish government is setting aside £250 million to deal with this, to try and make sure that everyone who needs it gets treatment and that there is emergency treatment for people
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who suffer from overdoses. but the opposition, the political opposition here, the scottish conservatives, say really that the scottish government's response is inadequate. there needs to be legislation, a right to recovery bill to guarantee that people get the treatment they need. james shaw. drjohn budd, is a gp in edinburgh caring for the homeless, and a board member of the scottish drugs forum. he's been explaining some of the factors that have contributed to those figures in scotland. he was speaking to my colleague, rebecca jones. the problem with drugs is that it is multifactorial. likely to be a complex set of circumstances leading to the situation we are in. but it goes back to the late 1970s, 1980s with the economic recession. scotland was hit particularly badly by deindustrialisation after the war, worse than other parts of the country. we've had, probably, a bit of a disastrous housing
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policy since that time, which has broken up communities and caused housing schemes which have deteriorated in terms of living circumstances for people and over the last ten years, 15 years, we've seen rising levels of poverty as a result of the economic downturn in 2007—8, and ten years of austerity from the uk conservative—led governments which have undermined public services and made treatment services far less available to people — so it's a combination of those factors. a combination of social and economic factors. the scottish government has announced a quarter of a billion pounds to be invested over five years. there is clearly no single answer to this, but what sort of things might help improve the situation?
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well, that reinvestment in treatment services and support services is really welcome, and there is money also going in to support individuals and families who are affected by drug use. there is money going into actually support people with lived and living experience of drug use to actually raise the voice of those people in terms of shaping policy and, hopefully, in shaping services and even the delivery of services, so those things are really positive and to be welcomed. i think we need to have an understanding, as i said, but drug dependence is a long—term problem that needs long—term solutions. the decriminalisation of drug use for personal use would be a hugely positive step forward, so rather than punishing people for a long—term health condition, we would actually help to reduce the stigma and encourage people into treatment and support.
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we need to, with that investment with treatment and support services needs to take very much a harm reduction approach to meet people where they are, provide compassionate, humane care. we need to be accessible and going out to where people are for those that struggle to access services centrally, and we need a full range of treatment options. labour is calling for the government to bring forward the date on which people in england, who are fully vaccinated will no longer have to self—isolate. the welsh government has already confirmed it will make the change next saturday, while scotland plans to do the same two days later. in england, the change isn't due until august 16. our political correspondent, iain watson, is at westminster. there could be some pretty big changes actually in wales on august 7, they are planning, should all the data go in the right direction, they're planning to make some of the changes that were already introduced in england onjuly 19 — reopening night clubs,
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changing the social distancing requirements and so on. although it will still be a requirement to wear masks in some settings, face coverings in some settings. but the biggest change is this one on self isolation, if you have been double jabbed, and you are a close contact of somebody who has coronavirus, then you will be no longer required to self—isolate for ten days. you will be advised to take a test, and as you say, that is nine days ahead of the planned date in england and a couple of days ahead of scotland. so the four nations are going in different directions, but what sir keir starmer is arguing is that effectively, the whole of the uk should move towards that system on august 7. he is arguing that this would save many, many days that are lost to self isolation, around 700,000 people last week were advised to self—isolate. he says the economy is being crippled. but he also said the government hasn't really fully explained august 16. their expiration is quite simply this —
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it will allow more people to get vaccinations. so he was asked on what basis, what scientific basis was the date of august 7 chosen? we've been talking to scientists throughout the 18 months of this pandemic on a very regular basis. it's not the date that is driving it, it's the principle of double vaccination. the idea, as welsh labour have put forward, that if you are double vaccinated, you don't have to isolate if you have been in contact with someone, as is automatically the rule at the moment. at the moment, we've got hundreds of thousands of people a week isolating, and you can see the chaos that that's causing. now, interestingly, of course, if this is all about double vaccination, rather than dates, well, there are certain people in his own party, and there are certainly plenty of conservative mps saying, why not simply end self—isolation right now? that's something keir starmer hasn't called for. his answer is simply that it will take time for changes to be introduced and this is a pragmatic and sensible solution to the chaos caused by the pingdemic.
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that said, though, the conservatives are suggesting that he is simply, the motivation here is he's simply chasing newspaper headlines. and you can certainly see whatever the medical reasons of going for august 7, there may be some political advantages because he will then be aligning himself with those people in business and in politics who are calling for borisjohnson to change his mind on august 16. that said, if the labour leader is calling for something to happen, that probably makes it less likely that the government will concede. the first person to be convicted under hong kong's controversial new security law has been sentenced to nine years injail. tong ying—kit rode a motorbike towards police officers while flying a flag with the protest slogan "liberate hong kong, revolution of our times." more than 100 people have been arrested since the law came into force last year. it's been confirmed that human remains found in the pyrenees mountain range are those
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of a british woman who went missing last november. esther dingley, who was 37, was hiking near the spanish border with france when she disappeared. she and her partner had been on an open—ended camper van tour of europe, but he wasn't with her at the time of her disappearance. the uk's biggest dairy company, arla, has told the bbc it failed to make a quarter of its deliveries to supermarkets last weekend because of a lack of lorry drivers. the firms said 600 stores did not receive deliveries. they say the ongoing shortage of drivers, alongside staff having to isolate because of covid alerts, is causing major disruption. the company's boss has been speaking to our business correspondent, emma simpson. this is the world's largest fresh milk dairy. we process over a billion litres of milk from our cooperative farmer owners a year, so you can see this is a vast operation.
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in fact, one in every five bottles of milk that's sold in the uk is made here. since the beginning of april, we have experienced driver shortages, so being able to take the products from a factory like here in aylesbury to the supermarkets, and that has now increased to such a level where we're not able to deliver milk to every store that would like it. can you quantify this? normally, we deliver milk to 2,400 stores daily, so we're a very big milkman. unfortunately at the moment, there's about 10% of the stores every day that we can't deliver to, and at the weekend it's worse. last saturday, there were 600 stores that we couldn't deliver milk to. that's a lot of milk. that's a lot of milk and it's very worrying for customers when they go into shops — and it's notjust milk, it's an industry issue — it's worrying for customers when they go into shops and find
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that the shelves are empty. what do you want to see happen here? i think it's a structural issue of a shortage of drivers in the uk, and it needs a structural solution. however, going into the summer with lots more holidays coming up, there's a short—term crisis that we need to make sure that we don't have food shortages in the summer and therefore, we would like to work with the government first to recognise that it's a crisis. secondly, there's a backlog of tests for hgv drivers. we predict about 30,000 drivers are waiting to be tested. we want the government to work with us to accelerate that. secondly, we believe that driving should be recognised as a skilled shortage and therefore open up temporary visas for the industry to be able to bring european drivers back into the country. the government says the industry needs to find the solutions to this, which means better working conditions, better pay. what are you doing? i would absolutely agree with that, and arla, through our third—party hauliers who do our distribution for us, has significantly increased pay.
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in fact, this week we have announced a 2000 signing—on bonus for the drivers tojoin and work on weekends. and we've introduced an academy to make sure that we're growing the home talent, because what we really want in the long term is for british young people to come into the industry as well. how serious is this? well, i think when you're not able to supply 10% of the stores that would be expecting to get milk every day, i think that's quite worrying for a customer walking into a store and not being able to have milk for their teas and coffees, so we're taking it very seriously. so a summer of disruption, potentially? well, that's what we're trying to avoid. emma simpson speaking to arla's managing director, ash amirahmadi. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. hello there. storm evert is producing gale force winds across some southern coasts of england and wales. we've seen gusts in excess of 70 miles an hour in the most exposed areas. and the winds are still going to be pretty strong across southern and eastern areas throughout
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the rest of the day. we have also got spiralling bands of rain for northern areas, really heavy showers, hail and thunder setting up across eastern parts of england throughout the rest of the day. it's a little bit quieter further north, some patchy rain to northern scotland. a few showers around southern scotland and northern ireland but fewer and further between and feeling quite pleasant with the lighter winds here. obviously it feels quite cool where we've got the brisk winds further south, which will continue to blow in a lot more showers through the first part of tonight before they tend to ease away, except for eastern areas. a slightly cooler night, a fresher start to our weekend. but the northerly wind will ensure that temperatures remain a little below par for most and with low pressure still around, we are going to have further showers, particularly heavy in england and wales.
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hello, this is bbc news with clive myrie. the headlines. it's a historic day for britain's bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shreiver wins the women's racing final. just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain's first olympic medal in the men's event. latest figures from ons show that the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise although cases have fallen in scotland. get your covid jab — the message from england's chief midwife to women who are pregnant.
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drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row. more than 1,300 people died last year. disruption to dairy deliveries, says a major company, is due to a dip in the number of drivers. let's return to sport now. and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's hugh ferris. thank you, happy i can help you out with some more sport! many stories about overcoming physical adversity. beth shriever got the bmx gold
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medal, she had to do crowdfunding and work as a teaching assistant. moments earlier kye whyte had won a silver medal. they seven started with impressive results on two wheels. more success in the pool as well, as duncan scott got his third medal of the games and great britain's sixth overall in the swimming with a silver in the men's 200 metres overall medley. even finished not point to the winner from china, was his wait for a first olympic individual gold goes on. scott's medal came shortly after luke greenback had won a bronze in the 200 metres breaststroke. bryony page got a bronze medal in the women's trampoline, she was leading at one stage but pushed down to third as the third —— final to numbers from china took bronze and silver. also a middle in the men's
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eight rowing, bronze. the women's sprints will be the most anticipated, all the key contenders made it through the individuals he, dino asher—smith —— dino dina asher—smith made it through with a solid time. she admitted she will have to set up a gear in the semifinals. i will have to set up a gear in the semifinals-— will have to set up a gear in the semifinals. ., ., _, ., semifinals. i want to come out in the heats and _ semifinals. i want to come out in the heats and get _ semifinals. i want to come out in the heats and get a _ semifinals. i want to come out in the heats and get a place - semifinals. i want to come out in the heats and get a place of- semifinals. i want to come out in the heats and get a place of thel the heats and get a place of the next round and do a solid run, at the same time, without doing too much. we have got another level to go tomorrow. so i am happy to have come out here and done that this morning. come out here and done that this morninu. . , �* ., ., morning. team gb will not have another medal _ morning. team gb will not have another medal from _ morning. team gb will not have another medal from the - morning. team gb will not have l another medal from the women's football team, they are out of the olympics after losing 4—3 to australia. ellen white scored all three of team gb's goals and her second looked like the winner. but sam kerr equalised for australia in the 89th minute to force extra time,
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in which caroline weir saw her penalty saved. it changed the momentum of the game with two quick goals just after including a second from kerr made it 4—2. white made it 4—3 with six minutes left to complete her hattrick. but team gb couldn't find an equaliser abnd australia are through to the last four. and australia are through to the last four. the dream of a golden slime is over for novak djokovic, he has been beaten by —— a golden slime. he was beaten by —— a golden slime. he was beaten by —— a golden slime. he was beaten by alexander spero. —— a golden slime novak djokovic's search for and any olympic gold goes on because he lost his mixed doubles as well. marcus rashford will have surgery on his shoulder next week. the
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manchester united and england forward has been troubled by a problem for a number of months. united wanted to spend some time with him to check the nature of the injury but have agreed to the surgery. he will be sidelined for around three months. in rugby union, australia have condemned an outburst by the south african director of rugby aimed at one of their referees. erasmus posted the hour—long video on social media just two days before the springboks play the british and irish lions in the second test, criticising the refereeing from the series last week. rugby australia said the attack on nick berry's integrity, character and reputation is unacceptable. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. whether you like it or not, i will have some more sport later! i love it! thank you. _ have some more sport later! i love it! thank you, man. _
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let's go back to bethany shriever�*s stunning performance in the women's bmx finals. the 22—year—old used crowdfunding to raise £50,000 to keep her olympic dream on track, and it paid off with a gold. this is the moment her bethany�*s parents spoke to her after she'd picked up her medal. there it is! look at that! awww! earlier my colleague martine croxall spoke to bethany�*s family to get their reaction. i saw something from an early age. we have all ridden a bmx since the children could and beth immediately took to it and was very good and got more and more adventurous and pushed it early on. as her mum, what is
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going through your head? you must be so proud and anxious. anxious comes first. because it is a really dangerous sport and as a mum i worry all the time. once she gets going and is out the gate as with the races she did in the early hours being out front and looking comfortable, i am just so proud she did it and it is amazing. it is a real testament to your sister's determination, she has had to work part—time and crowdfund because the funding initially was not forthcoming from the sport. she has worked really hard over lthe years and we are all reallyl proud of what she has achieved. | it could not have gone to a better| person, we all love her very much
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and she has worked really hard to where she has got to todayl so couldn't be happier. very emotional this morning. she makes you get up in the middle of the night to watch. how do you think this will inspire other people, other women in particular because in the past it has been a very male dominated sport but when you see women like your sister succeeding hopefully more will come forward? i think it will inspire loads of people, she has done so much in sport for women, people will pick up a bike and go down to the local track, just amazing. how hard has it been for her? do you think the funding might improve because it is often based on success and beth has shown what she is capable of without the backing she might have had. to be honest we are fortunate we both have jobs and able
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to support beth to a certain level. it would have been more beneficial if she had had proper backing at certain times along the way but we did it unconditionally and would continue to do that and i would not have done it any other way. we wanted it for her, she has always been driven and focused and wanted to do the best you possibly could and it just kind of clicked over the past few days and leading up to this she has got more and more focused and it has ended the way it has which is mind—boggling. you could not ask for more. she seems so matter of fact about it when she was interviewed and there was i not even knowing her and i shed a tear whenever we win anything. i think her main dream was to get to the olympics and once
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she was there the next goal from that was to make a semi and when she got to the semi all she was thinking about was to get to her ultimate goal and she was pretty shocked with getting out front and doing it but she has not dropped a lap all day so she was obviously confident, she hasn't raced that much in the last 18 months but the last two races is with the girls she was at the olympics with and she is good friends with them and it was just an amazing achievement. she is not one of these people that brags, she is quite low—key but also driven and she loves sharing the news and promoting the sport for girls. has she ever taken you out on a bike, rebecca and rose? definitely not but maybe
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now we can have a go. i think i am a bit long in the tooth but you can give it a try. well, team gb has never won an olympic medal in bmx before, and events in tokyo are likely to inspire a whole new generation of riders. let's talk to luke anderson, cycling delivery manager for the south east, for british cycling. good to see you, thank you for joining us. a big day, a proud day for britain winning a gold medal, and also getting a silver. ijust wonder, how much investment has there been from the british olympic association into the sport of bmx? i can't really comment on the poa, but as far as british cycling goes, we have recently invested
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have recently £3.6 as far as british cycling goes, we have recently £3.6 million in bmx, mainly through facilities. we have got lots of contracts opening up around the country as part of our ride to ride and scheme, most places will have a local place for young people to go and get into bmx. mainly the kind of pump tracks are the local access point, which is a nice, safe version of the bmx tracks he will have seen in tokyo. little rollers and jumps and bands that you can go and learn the skill on. so there is a way for people who are inspired by what has happened in tokyo perhaps to get involved with the sport now? tokyo perhaps to get involved with the sport now?— tokyo perhaps to get involved with the sport now? yeah, and i say, the um . the sport now? yeah, and i say, the pump tracks — the sport now? yeah, and i say, the pump tracks are _ the sport now? yeah, and i say, the pump tracks are getting _ the sport now? yeah, and i say, the pump tracks are getting more - the sport now? yeah, and i say, the i pump tracks are getting more popular all over the country. we have loads going on around london, and then bmx clubs where you have got the more traditional racetracks and big environments, they are the best way for people who really want to progress into the sport and get into racing, because there you have got a network of coaches, and access to
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equipment as well. the bikes, they are not very cheap if you want to race at the soap clubs can lend you a top—level soap clubs can lend you agreement so you can have a —— they are not very cheap if you want to race at the top level so clubs can lend you equipment if you are keen to have a go at bmx. i want to net into are keen to have a go at bmx. i want to get into the _ are keen to have a go at bmx. i want to get into the funding, _ are keen to have a go at bmx. i want to get into the funding, clearly - to get into the funding, clearly comparisons are being made with british rowing. comparatively speaking, compared to the success that team gb has had in the last few olympics, it hasn't been the greatest antics in tokyo. we know that bethany had to work as a supply teacher, and crowdfund to get the necessary funding to follow her dreams and get this gold medal. i wonder how you feel about the funding that goes into this particular discipline and other
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sports like rowing? iblur particular discipline and other sports like rowing? our funding comes from _ sports like rowing? our funding comes from two _ sports like rowing? our funding comes from two different - sports like rowing? our funding i comes from two different sources, really, all derived from lottery funding. we get development funding through sport england which pays for our staff roles and club development and things like that, and facility building and then we get the funding through uk sport. uk sport unfortunately decided to withdraw some funding for off—road disciplines in 2016, and we had to then try and convince some of our commercial partners to put that back in to support riders like kye whyte and like best. ultimately the more successful you get in the disciplines, we have had tremendous success today, and also tom pidcock�*s told medal pidcock�*s told —— success today, and also tom pidcock�*s told —— gold medal in the mountain bike event on monday, that will mean that these disciplines will mean that these disciplines will grow and hopefully they will be as big as our participation on the road events and historically as we have done so well in the track
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disciplines in the olympic cycles. that helps more riders into the sport, and it pays for more tracks and clubs and coaches, and they will go its strength to strength. what go its strength to strength. what comes first. _ go its strength to strength. what comes first, the _ go its strength to strength. what comes first, the money - go its strength to strength. what comes first, the money of - go its strength to strength. what comes first, the money of the success? if you don't have investment, if people like bethany have two crowd source to get the money they need. would you like to see more money going to bmx because of the success we have seen, and perhaps less money go elsewhere? i don't know about less money going elsewhere, but for sure, the more money that comes into these disciplines, which are a little bit smaller, the more they can grow. there are other disciplines which don't benefit from that uk sport like cyclo—cross where we are also very successful. the more money that comes in, the more champions we will grow for the future. you comes in, the more champions we will grow for the future.— grow for the future. you are expeeting — grow for the future. you are expecting more _ grow for the future. you are expecting more cash - grow for the future. you are expecting more cash now? | grow for the future. you are expecting more cash now? i grow for the future. you are - expecting more cash now? i hope so.
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come on, expecting more cash now? i hope so. come on. i — expecting more cash now? i hope so. come on, i would _ expecting more cash now? i hope so. come on, i would have _ expecting more cash now? i hope so. come on, i would have thought, - expecting more cash now? i hope so. | come on, i would have thought, given the success of team gb in bmx at the tokyo olympics, if you don't get more cash in the next few years, you're going to be upset, aren't you? you're going to be upset, aren't ou? �* ., , you? i... at the ground roots level, i will be, but _ you? i... at the ground roots level, i will be, but we _ you? i... at the ground roots level, i will be, but we did _ you? i... at the ground roots level, i will be, but we did manage - you? i... at the ground roots level, i will be, but we did manage to - i will be, but we did manage to convince our commercial partners to put some funding back in. into those disciplines. and also uk sport have continued supporting the riders in other ways. so, yeah. continued supporting the riders in otherways. so, yeah. i continued supporting the riders in other ways. so, yeah.— other ways. so, yeah. i hope that wasn't uk — other ways. so, yeah. i hope that wasn't uk sport — other ways. so, yeah. i hope that wasn't uk sport turning _ other ways. so, yeah. i hope that wasn't uk sport turning lights - other ways. so, yeah. i hope that wasn't uk sport turning lights off| wasn't uk sport turning lights off there! ., ., ., , we there! no, no, i am still here! we will leave you _ there! no, no, i am still here! we will leave you to _ there! no, no, i am still here! we will leave you to fill _ there! no, no, i am still here! we will leave you to fill with - there! no, no, i am still here! we will leave you to fill with your - will leave you to fill with your electrics! thank you so much for joining us, thank you.— the headlines on bbc news... it's a historic day for britain's bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shriever wins
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the women's racing final. just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain's first olympic medal in the men's event. drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row. more than 1,300 people died last year. disruption to dairy deliveries, says a major company, is due to a dip in the number of drivers. a first group of 200 afghan interpreters who served with us forces and their family members have landed in america today. presidentjoe biden said the us was fulfilling its promise to those who served "shoulder—to—shoulder" with american forces. campaigners though have called for the process to be sped up. britain meanwhile has relocated 2,300 interpreters and their relatives, but concerns have been raised after some applicants were rejected for having been dismissed from service. secunder kermani reports from kabul. tens of thousands of british soldiers served in afghanistan.
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crucial to their mission, the help of local interpreters. with international troops withdrawing, hundreds of them along with theirfamilies have been relocated to the uk. but others remain stuck in afghanistan. annis, not his real name, is one of dozens of interpreters whose applications have been rejected. he says he fears for his life. they're going to kill me. that's it. and it's a big threat for my family also. because of me, my family will be paying for that. annis served for two years of british forces in helmand province but was then sacked. those dismissed for serious offences aren't being relocated. he says he refused to go on a mission in order to attend his engagement ceremony. defence sources alleged he repeatedly failed to turn up to work. i was very sad. i wrote all of my story,
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what happened to me in helmand, because i did the good service. so i thought that maybe i'd receive a positive response. the taliban now control swathes of the country. they haven't taken any cities yet, but some fear it's only a matter of time. the taliban say former interpreters who worked with foreign forces but now show remorse will not be harmed. few are reassured by that, though. dozens are reported to have been killed by the group in recent years. military veterans and campaigners say the evacuation policies need to be more generous. the absolute priority for an afghan relocation and assistance policy is looking at, are these people under threat because of their association with us? and the only exception that needs to be made there is that if there would be any individuals who would be posing a risk to the national security of the uk, then that should be a base for exclusion. with fresh taliban assaults every day, britain's ministry of defence
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says it's already relocated more than 2000 former local staff and that its scheme is one of the most inclusive in the world. everyone knows the situation is growing increasingly critical. secunder kermani, bbc news, kabul. the first person to be convicted under hong kong's controversial new security law has been sentenced to nine years injail. tong ying—kit rode a motorbike towards police officers while flying a flag with the protest slogan "liberate hong kong, revolution of our times". more than 100 people have been arrested, since the law came into force last year. australia's prime minister scott morrison has said that almost all of the country's adult population would have to be vaccinated against covid—19 before the country can start reopening its borders to selected countries. last week, the country closed a travel �*corridor�* to new zealand amid growing infections. troops have been deployed in sydney to enforce a lockdown as cases
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there continue to rise. our correspondent in sydney, shaimaa khalil, says australia's low vaccination rate is an issue. it is the availability of the vaccine, the fact that there has been so much mixed messaging around astrazeneca that not many people have gone for it for weeks. also remember, this is a country where for the longest time life had gone back to near normal. as recently as may. there was not that push in the beginning to get people to get vaccinated because people felt there wasn't an urgency. now of course with the situation in new south wales going from bad to worse, there is a big push from the government to get people vaccinated but numbers are nowhere near when they need to be, near where they need to be, only 17% of the population is vaccinated. here in new south wales, we have seen the biggest spike yesterday, 239 cases in one day. that is the biggest — notjust in this outbreak — but since beginning of the pandemic
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for new south wales. today it is about 170 but this is after five weeks of lockdown, which has been extended to another four weeks. on top of that, there are eight areas in the west and south—west of sydney that have been identified as hotspots. this is going to be where the police and the army presence, the heavy army presence, where we will find it concentrating most. they are going to be on the streets but also knocking on doors to make sure people stay at home. there has been criticism that has been heavy—handed. authorities are saying this is one of the crucial ways to make sure people abide by the rules and abide by the lockdown. israel has become the first country in the world to start giving a third coronavirus vaccination to those aged 60 and older. the israeli president isaac herzog kicked off the new campaign by receiving the booster injection with his wife. israel was one of the first and fastest in giving vaccinations to its citizens,
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but it has started restoring some restrictions amid a surge in infections. ran baliser is the chairman of israel's national advisory experts team on covid—19 response. he explains the reasons behind the move. we have seen an increasing surge of cases in the last two months that we have not been able to control with methods that we reintroduced, including masks, as well as a green pass policy in the last few days that was reinstated. the numbers right now are we have over 2000 cases per day, which is numbers we have not seen for the last six months. a good proportion of these cases are among the elderly who have been vaccinated. so we have a clear indication that the vaccinated elderly that were vaccinated over five or six months ago are not as protected
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as they have been. but it is quite difficult to draw clear conclusions and specific estimates on vaccine effectiveness in the current situation in israel, because the cases, the number of severe cases is still relatively small and the population that has been inflicted most severely until now has been concentrated in specific localities and sectors. so this is not a country wide dissemination yet, which makes it a little more difficult to have a sound estimate. however, it is clear that in terms of likelihood of infection, there is a reduction, a significant reduction in vaccine effectiveness regarding severe illness. it is a little bit early to have a clear estimate. scarlettjohansson, the star of the marvel superhero film black widow, is suing the walt disney company over its simultaneous release of the movie in cinemas
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and on its streaming service. msjohannson alleges the move will cost her millions of dollars. a warning, this report from mark lobel contains flashing images. before i got this family... ..i made mistakes, choosing between what the world wants you to be... ..and who you are. the hardened hollywood star is now seeking to avenge a breach of contract. taking on the might of the walt disney company in a battle over box office bonuses, which lasers in on how the film black widow was released. �*cantina band�* plays. the red carpet was rolled out for the movie's premiere on disney's streaming service at the same time as in cinemas.
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so viewers who paid $30 on disney+ premier access added $60 million worth of rentals. but scarlettjohansson says she was promised the film would hit the big screen first, where she profits. before the pandemic, that would usually mean a three—month window before it hits the small screen. but the actress is arguing that by streaming the movie at the same time, box office receipts were hit. disney says scarlettjohansson has already earned the equivalent of around $15 million for her role in the film and that it had fully complied with the actor's contract. it's one of many hollywood film studios releasing its movies in this way because of the pandemic. so, many will be watching to see if this lawsuit provides a precedent for the entertainment industry, and for actors�* and producers' earnings. as scarlettjohansson insists, disney's turned its back
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on her contractual arrangements. an la court will decide who is left standing. mark lobel, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willets. good afternoon. storm evert has brought some unseasonably windy weather already for parts of south wales and south—west england, where winds have exceeded 70 miles an hour and gusts, but quite widely exceeded 50 miles an hour in exposed areas. they have yet to escalate further east, so the winds will pick up here for the next few hours around that storm system. as well as that, we have got these bands of showers, longer spells of rain, some of them will turn heavy and thundery with some hail forecast, particularly across the eastern side of england this afternoon, some more persistent rain for northern england and parts of north wales. a few showers certainly for northern ireland, heavy ones here, and for parts of scotland.
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the far north a little cooler and cloudier. but the south of scotland, parts of northern ireland where we could feel 19 or 20, pleasantly warm with the lighter winds, cooler across england and wales were we still have a number of showers and thunderstorms into the evening starting to fade away. always the chance of rain for eastern parts of scotland and england. a subtle change in wind direction means it will freshen up through the night, certainly not a cold one for most of us. it will feel cooler than it should at this time of year over the weekend, that is down to wind direction, coming right the way down from the arctic. warming up as it comes over the sea but also picking up some moisture. there will be various weather systems running their way south. over the weekend, expecting things to feel a little on the cool side, or some scattered showers but also some sunny spells, particularly for the northern half of the country. for scotland, north and western scotland, northern ireland, fewest showers. you can see weather fronts close to eastern areas. this weather system working southwards will just generate
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a few heavy showers, england and wales generally more prone to some heavy, slow—moving showers at times as they start to set up with the strength of the july sunshine. 20 in the sunshine, in sheltered parts of southern scotland, 20, 21. the south feeling a little bit warmer today because we will have lost that brisk wind. again, that northerly makes us prone to showers, particularly in eastern areas initially on sunday, perhaps some patchy rain on this weather front. then heavy showers to the south of that. perhaps a little more confined to southern areas compared to saturday, certainly much drier for many parts of scotland and northern ireland. there are warnings out, details on our website.
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this is bbc news — i'm clive myrie. the headlines: it's an historic day for britain's bmx riders at the tokyo olympics — bethany shriever wins the women's racing final, just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain's first olympic medal in the men's event. latest figures from ons show that the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise — although cases have fallen in scotland. labour calls for england to follow wales and bring forward the date on which fully vaccinated people can avoid isolation. we are seeing a real summer of chaos, you can see the impact it is having on so many businesses, so
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many sectors. the having on so many businesses, so many sectora— having on so many businesses, so many sectors. the government has never really — many sectors. the government has never really explained _ many sectors. the government has never really explained the - many sectors. the government has never really explained the logic - many sectors. the government has never really explained the logic of i never really explained the logic of its august 16 date on isolating. get your covid jab — the message from england's chief midwife to women who are pregnant. drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row — more than 1,300 people died last year. we'll be getting more reaction after today's team gb olympic wins. beth shreever�*s mother, kate, told us just how proud she is. once she gets going and she's out the gate, as with the races that she did in the early hours of the morning, been out front and looking comfortable and happy. you know, i'm just so proud that she did it, and it's just so amazing.
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good afternoon. there's been a sizeable medal haulfor team gb at the tokyo olympics. tremendous bmx racing by 22—year—old beth shreever has won her gold, and kye white took silver in the men's event. for a full round—up of today's action at the olympics — let's cross to hugh ferris at the bbc sports centre. good afternoon. six more medals for team gb on day seven of tokyo 2020, with the bmx track delivering multiple medals and a couple of incredible stories, as well. andy swiss reports. she is british sport's new two—wheeled wonder. the olympics is no stranger to fairy tales, but beth shriever�*s is something very special. the 22—year—old hadn't been among the favourites in the bmx, but the part—time teaching assistant was soon giving her rivals a lesson. she led from the start. and in this most exhilarating of events, she flew around the track.
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could she hang on for gold? well, it was some finish. all the way, all the way, all the way! yes! bethany shriever, olympic champion! cue elation and utter exhaustion, her team mate kye whyte lifting her aloft as the enormity sank in. shriever had to crowdfund her own preparations for tokyo. i love you guys! and after celebrating with herfamily in essex, she said her victory defied belief. honestly, i'm in shock. like, to even be here is an achievement in itself. to make a final is another achievement in itself. to come home with a medal, let alone a gold medal, honestly, i'm so over the moon. but this was a day of double celebration. just moments earlier, kye whyte, nicknamed the prince of peckham, had produced a regal display to take a stunning silver, enjoyed as much in south—east london as it was in tokyo.
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it means everything. just look at that. once—in—a—lifetime opportunity. as i said, it was pretty hard to even get to the olympics in the first place. to do well and to even get a medal, yeah, it special. white then turned cheerleader, roaring shriever on before the pair could finally celebrate together, and they weren't the only ones. former oasis star liam gallagher described shriever as a "ledge", while cyclist geraint thomas tweeted that "the one good thing aboutjet lag is that i got to watch bethany and kye smash it live, amazing!" it's a word that might also apply to this man, duncan scott, winning his third medal of the games, with silver in the 200m individual medley, while in the 200m backstroke, luke greenbank took bronze. for team gb, the pool is certainly proving productive. in the trampolining, meanwhile, could bryony page bounce to glory? well, after two years out
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with injury, it was some display. whoa, well done, bryony! following her silver in rio, this time bronze, which she later described as amazing. there was also bronze in the rowing for the men's eight. for one of team gb's flagship sports, this has been a disappointing games — just two medals, and for the first time since 1980, no gold. on the first day of athletics, dina asher—smith confirmed her status as a contender in the 100m, easing through her heat and into the semifinals. and in the boxing, pat mccormack and ben whittaker are both guaranteed medals, although whittaker has more than just victory in his sights. i want to go back with a gold medal, and i want to become the mayor of wolverhampton. i want one of those nice chains round my neck, and i'll be calling all the shots!
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everybody in wolverhampton will have a nice ice grill and chain, courtesy of ben whittaker. excited? just a little. andy swiss, bbc news. team gb's medal haul won't be added to by the women's football team. they're out of the olympics after losing a roller coaster quarter—final 4—3 to australia after extra time. ellen white scored all three of team gb's goals and her second looked like the winner. but sam kerr equalised for australia in the 89th minute to force extra time, in which caroline weir saw her penalty saved. it changed the momentum of the game, with two quick goals just after, including a second from kerr made it 4—2. white made it 4—3 with six minutes left to complete her hat—trick, but team gb couldn't find an equaliser, and australia through to the last four. the dream of a �*golden slam' is over for novak djokovic — he has been beaten by germany's alexander zverev in their olympic semi—final. the serbian number one took
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the the first set 6—1, but zverev held his nerve to win over three sets to reach the olympic final, where he will meet karen khachanov from the russian olympic committee. djokovic's search for any olympic gold also goes on, because he also lost his mixed doubles semi—final. that's all the sport for now. the olympics have been increasingly overshadowed by a spike some breaking news concerning a mild cold lewis hughes, who is 24, and has pleaded guilty to assault at manchester magistrates�* court after england was my chief medical officer, chris witty, was accosted at st james�*s park officer, chris witty, was accosted at stjames�*s park in officer, chris witty, was accosted at st james�*s park in central officer, chris witty, was accosted at stjames�*s park in central london onjune 27. a mild arrested in connection with the incident involving chris witty last month. that might a mild arrested. he has
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now pleaded guilty to assault at westminster magistrates�* court. lewis hughes, aged 24. the olympics have been increasingly overshadowed by a spike in covid—19 cases in tokyo and around the country. japan�*s prime minister, yoshihide suga, has said that coronavirus is spreading with unpredecented speed injapan, fuelled by the delta variant. mr suga warned that the medical system is at risk of strain. and at a news conference he urged people to watch the games at home. translation: earlier l today, novel coronavirus headquarter meeting was held. saitama, chiba, kanagawa and osako — we are going to issue a state of emergency to those prefectures. in hokkaido, ishikawa, kyoto, hyogo and fukuoka, for those prefectures we are going to implement priority measures for the period from august 2 to august 31.
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this is the period for the measures. the state of emergency in tokyo and okinawa is also extended to august 31. this is the decision that was made. our correspondent, mariko oi, is in tokyo — where coronavirus case numbers have been increasing. the lastest number for tokyo came in at 3300, which is slightly lower compared to yesterday, but still well above 3000, which was unheard of until this week. in all ofjapan, it was another record high, topping 10,000 once again. we�*vejust been hearing from prime minister suga, as well as one of the country�*s top medical advisers, officially declaring the expansion and the extension of the state of emergency here in tokyo and the surrounding prefectures as well. how effective that will be remains
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to be seen, because of course the japanese capital has been under the state of emergency for two weeks now, but we are still seeing that surge in covid—19 cases. we have been hearing from the ioc and other government officials, emphasising that this most recent surge has nothing to do with the olympics. some of them seem to imply that it�*s because of young people who are not listening to the government�*s request to stay at home, and they�*ve also been encouraged to get vaccinated when there is not enough jabs around. i found it a little unfair, so i decided to go to shibuya, where a lot of young people hang out, to find that what they thought of the government�*s comments. translation: i haven't even received a ticket to get vaccinated. _ my parents onlyjust got theirjabs. i can sense that we are getting too used to the state of emergency, so it's not stopping people from going out. she just had her first shot yesterday, and i have - made my appointment, so we are getting - vaccinated when we can. if the government really wants to stop the spread of the virus, they have to lock us down and offer financial support, because without it people will go out and go to work because they need
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to earn money. now, japan�*s vaccine roll—out has been really slow and inefficient at the beginning. they�*ve managed to pick it up, but now they are facing this supply shortage. the country�*s health ministry is apparently considering using the astrazeneca vaccine for those above the age of 40. the astrazeneca jab was approved back in may, but it has not been in use forjapanese people, partly because of the rare blood clots it has been causing in other parts of the world. of course, the government really needs to clearly explain if they are going to make a shift in that vaccine strategy. the communication has really been an issue for this government. we have noticed the prime minister has been holding press conferences on television for over an hour. but of course we all know that young people, who they really want to reach out to, they do not necessarily watch tv for that long, and they need to really change how
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they communicate with the younger population, because the prime minister has been tweeting about gold medals that have been won by japanese athletes, but he has not even tweeted once about the most recent surge in covid—19 cases. if they really want to reach out to the young population, they need to rethink how to communicate their message. here, the latest data from the office for national statistics shows the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continued to rise in the week to last saturday. it comes after several days of falling daily case numbers in the uk. here�*s our health correspondent, jim reed. the daily data you might hear every evening on the news, measuring people who come forward normally with symptoms of the virus and then test positive. those figures have been very encouraging for the last week showing a sharp downward trend.
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as you can see on the graph. on the right hand side you are seeing that trend fall. there is a different way of measuring infections carefully watched, and this is where the office of national statistics goes out and randomly samples people in the population, about half—a—million people in the uk. that can measure notjust people with symptoms but people who are not sick with covid at the time. that data shows in the week to last saturday, actually, cases were rising slightly, across the uk, short of a million people — 950,000 had covid in that week, up from 830,000 the week before. up in england, wales and northern ireland, down slightly in scotland. why these two different trends? a lot could be down to timing, that ons survey measures people up to last saturday, so it might have missed this very recent fall in those daily cases. it also measures people
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without symptoms, which can make a difference. the ons said they will continue to investigate whether the current wave of infections is stabilising or not and it remains too early to say. england�*s r number has fallen slightly to between 1.1 and 1.4. that means, on average, for every ten people who become infected with covid—19, they will pass it on to between 11 and 14 others. last week, the number was between 1.2 and 1.4. labour is calling for the government to bring forward the date on which fully vaccinated people will no longer have to self—isolate in england. the welsh government confirmed last night that it would make the change next saturday, while scotland plans to do the same two days later. in england, the change is not due to come in until august 16. our political correspondent,
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jonathan blake, is at westminster. jonathan, lots of pressure coming on borisjohnson to relax this date. do you think he is going to yield? i don't think so. i think the labour don�*t think so. i think the labour leader sir keir starmer calling for the government to shift that they are early probably makes it less likely than anything. keir starmer accusing the government of a chaotic approach, saying that businesses and families need certainty, there for in his view it would be right to bring the date forward from august 16, the date identified by the government at which point the bow vaccinated adults will not need to isolate if they come into contact with someone who has tested positive, two august 7. that happens to be the day that the welsh government is due to confirm will be the end of isolation requirements for double—jabbed adults there. sir keir starmer was asked earlier more about his reasoning for specifying
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that date. we've been talking to scientists throughout the 18 months of this pandemic on a very regular basis. it's not the date that is driving it, it's the principle of double vaccination. the idea, as welsh labour have put forward, that if you are double vaccinated, you don't have to isolate if you have been in contact with someone, as is automatically the rule at the moment. at the moment, we've got hundreds of thousands of people a week isolating, and you can see the chaos that that's causing. so, why not now is perhaps the obvious question for labour here. sir keir starmer in answer to that has said that he wants a pragmatic approach and there is to be time to put measures in place, and for the testing centres, which are in the process of being set up, to get fully up and running, meaning people can be tested rather than having to
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isolate or stay away from work. in taking this move, it is a shift in labour policy. it is one which attempts to put it in line with what the labour government in wales is doing, but very deliberately pieces at odds with what the westminster government is doing. no sign at the moment that the government is going to shift their approach and bring forward that date of august 16, which the prime minister has said is nailed on. england�*s chief midwife has written to gp practices, obstetricians and midwives, stressing the need to encourage pregnant women to be vaccinated against coronavirus. estimates suggest that only one in ten pregnant women have had the jab, but the number of mothers—to—be in hospital with the virus is rising — as our health correspondent, cath burns, reports. the message couldn�*t be any clearer. expectant mothers should take action to protect themselves and their babies by getting the covid vaccine. any midwife not encouraging pregnant
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women to do so will now be going against official guidance. at the antenatal clinic at chelsea and westminster hospital, most of the pregnant women we spoke to had beenjabbed. it is just for the safety, i started getting worried, especially during my third trimester. luckily i haven�*t had covid, i have been very lucky, but i thought it was important to have it to protect me and the baby now as well. so, yes, i decided to do it. i was really nervous before i had it done. then i did a bit more reading, i thought this is perfect. i've had it done and feel much safer, happier and freer to go out. i decided i was in a betterl position having the vaccine than i was potentially being exposed to the risk of covid. _ but it is not always a straightforward decision. if it had been going for five years or something, i would feel confident to get it done, but because it is so new, i think that is why i am still hesitating. so i think that is what is keeping me from getting vaccinated.
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new data from the uk obstetrics surveillance system shows of the 742 pregnant women admitted to hospital with covid since the start of february, only four had received a single dose of the vaccine, and none had been double—jabbed. the data also suggested the delta variant has increased the likelihood of pregnant patients having more severe symptoms. at chelsea and westminster, they outline other risks too. if you are umming and aahing about having the covid vaccination, it is really important to remember that in pregnancy, if you aren�*t vaccinated, you are more likely to end up needing respiratory support. unfortunately it can lead to early miscarriages or preterm births, which can have a detrimental impact on your baby�*s health. more than 51,000 pregnant women in england have had theirfirstjab and nearly 21,000 have had their second. but that means hundreds of thousands
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remain unvaccinated. medical experts insist there had been no safety concerns for pregnant women who have taken the jab, and it is safe. catherine burns, bbc news. i�*m joined now by adam finn, a professor of paediatrics at the university of bristol and member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. and member of thejoint committee we and member of thejoint committee just heard fror figures we just heard from that report the figures that suggested that in england up to february, 742 pregnant women were admitted to hospital with covid, only 4 had one dose of a vaccine and none of them had two. that points to a fundamental failure in the messaging of the efficacy and safety of these vaccines to pregnant women, doesn�*t it? i safety of these vaccines to pregnant women, doesn't it?— women, doesn't it? ithink what it in fact points _ women, doesn't it? ithink what it in fact points to _ women, doesn't it? ithink what it in fact points to is _ women, doesn't it? ithink what it in fact points to is that _ women, doesn't it? ithink what it in fact points to is that at - women, doesn't it? ithink what it in fact points to is that at that - in fact points to is that at that point in time people at the age
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where people get pregnant were it not been offered the vaccine. we actually had very limited information at that point about the safety of the vaccines in pregnancy. that has really changed now and we are in a completely new situation, where we have got a summer wave, there is a lot of iris around, and we do know for sure that pregnant women and their babies are at significant risk of this virus. pregnant women are more likely to get seriously ill that women who are not pregnant at the same age, and they are more likely to lose their babies or have a premature delivery if they do get the infection. we have much more experienced now of the vaccines been given to pregnant women, so we are much more confident that there are some risks associated with the vaccine. all in all, new balance has shifted and we should be encouraging pregnant women to get vaccinated as soon as possible. i take your point about the fact that
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the vaccine roll out to begin with did not cover women of child—bearing age. but do you think the message that you are putting adults is getting out far and wide enough? we have had the chief midwife had to intervene today. i have had the chief midwife had to intervene today.— have had the chief midwife had to intervene today. i guess not, hence this interview. _ intervene today. i guess not, hence this interview. i— intervene today. i guess not, hence this interview. i think _ intervene today. i guess not, hence this interview. i think we _ intervene today. i guess not, hence this interview. i think we need - intervene today. i guess not, hence this interview. i think we need to i this interview. i think we need to be communicating more effectively with pregnant women and their carers, the come up with the midwives and obstetricians looking after them, to make sure that everybody is completely clear now that both thejcvi and the who are now completely clear that we are recommending that pregnant women do receive these vaccines as a matter of urgency. we need to get that message across. the figures quoted make it quite clear there are a lot of pregnant women out there who have not been immunised and we need to inform them about the urgency of getting immunised as soon as can.
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part of the problem is that you have had to come up with evidence proving that this vaccine was ok for pregnant women, when in fact actually finding enough women to take part in a study might have been difficult? ., ., , difficult? you are partly right about that. _ difficult? you are partly right about that. certainly - difficult? you are partly right about that. certainly we - difficult? you are partly right| about that. certainly we have difficult? you are partly right i about that. certainly we have to difficult? you are partly right - about that. certainly we have to be very careful in the early stages of any medicine or vaccine trials. in fact, we exclude pregnant women and women who are breast—feeding in the first instance because we do not dare expose them to any risks until we have at least some confidence that the medicine of the vaccine we are testing is overall safe. in normal circumstances, that is fine, we can do that, then move on to doing the tests in the pregnant women. but in a pandemic where you are falling over yourself to get the vaccine programme going, everything gets constantine out, so there has not been time initially to do those
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test before they roll out began. that is why it has been a bit of a scramble, and it has only been recently that we have been confident enough to be able to strongly recommend that the vaccine be given. very interesting, good to have your perspective. thank you forjoining us. i brought you that breaking news earlier about a man who pleaded guilty to assaulting england and�*s chief medical officer, professor chris witty, after he was accosted in a park in london. that was lewis hughes from essex, who admitted to one charge of assault by beating professor witty. another man who was also arrested at the time from brentwood in essex appeared at the same hearing today and he pleaded not guilty to the same charge of assault by beating. he also denied a
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second charge of obstructing a police constable in the execution of his duty on the same date as the incident involving professor chris witty. one man has admitted one charge of assault involving that incident with professor chris witty incident with professor chris witty in st james�*s incident with professor chris witty in stjames�*s park onjune 27. a second man from essex appearing at the same hearing has pleaded not guilty and denied the charge. it�*s been confirmed that human remains found in the pyrenees mountain range are those of a british woman who went missing last november. esther dingley, who was 37, was hiking near spain�*s border with france when she vanished. she and her partner had been on an open—ended campervan tour of europe, but he wasn�*t with her at the time of her disappearance. a labour mp has been cleared in court of making fraudulent housing claims. apsana begum was accused of three counts of making dishonest
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applications for council homes. she told the court her husband, who she called "controlling", was in charge of her finances and that she was shocked to discover the paperwork was in her name. the uk�*s biggest dairy company, arla, has told the bbc that it failed to make 25% of its deliveries to supermarkets last weekend because of a lack of lorry drivers. the firms said 600 stores did not receive deliveries. they say the ongoing shortage of drivers, alongside staff having to isolate because of covid alerts, is causing major disruption. the company�*s boss has been speaking to our business correspondent, emma simpson. this is the world�*s largest fresh milk dairy. we process over a billion litres of milk from our cooperative farmer owners a year, so you can see this is a vast operation. in fact, one in every five bottles of milk that�*s sold in the uk is made here. since the beginning of april,
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we have experienced driver shortages, so being able to take the products from a factory like here in aylesbury to the supermarkets, and that has now increased to such a level where we�*re not able to deliver milk to every store that would like it. can you quantify this? normally, we deliver milk to 2,400 stores daily, so we�*re a very big milkman. unfortunately at the moment, there�*s about 10% of the stores every day that we can�*t deliver to, and at the weekend it�*s worse. last saturday, there were 600 stores that we couldn�*t deliver milk to. that�*s a lot of milk. that�*s a lot of milk and it�*s very worrying for customers when they go into shops — and it�*s notjust milk, it�*s an industry issue — it�*s worrying for customers when they go into shops and find that the shelves are empty. what do you want to see happen here? i think it�*s a structural issue of a shortage of drivers in the uk, and it needs a structural solution. however, going into the summer with lots more holidays coming up, there�*s a short—term crisis that we need to make sure
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that we don�*t have food shortages in the summer and therefore, we would like to work with the government first to recognise that it�*s a crisis. secondly, there�*s a backlog of tests for hgv drivers. we predict about 30,000 drivers are waiting to be tested. we want the government to work with us to accelerate that. secondly, we believe that driving should be recognised as a skilled shortage and therefore open up temporary visas for the industry to be able to bring european drivers back into the country. the government says the industry needs to find the solutions to this, which means better working conditions, better pay. what are you doing? i would absolutely agree with that, and arla, through our third—party hauliers who do our distribution for us, has significantly increased pay. in fact, this week we have announced a 2000 signing—on bonus for the drivers tojoin and work on weekends. and we�*ve introduced an academy to make sure that we�*re growing the home talent,
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because what we really want in the long term is for british young people to come into the industry as well. how serious is this? well, i think when you�*re not able to supply 10% of the stores that would be expecting to get milk every day, i think that�*s quite worrying for a customer walking into a store and not being able to have milk for their teas and coffees, so we�*re taking it very seriously. so a summer of disruption, potentially? well, that�*s what we�*re trying to avoid. emma simpson speaking to arla�*s managing director, ash amirahmadi. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. hello there. storm evert is producing gale force winds across some southern coasts of england and wales. we�*ve seen gusts in excess of 70 miles an hour in the most exposed areas. and the winds are still going to be pretty strong across southern and eastern areas throughout the rest of the day. we have also got spiralling bands of rain for northern areas, really heavy showers, hail and thunder setting up across eastern parts of england throughout the rest of the day.
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it�*s a little bit quieter further north, some patchy rain to northern scotland. a few showers around southern scotland and northern ireland but fewer and further between and feeling quite pleasant with the lighter winds here. obviously it feels quite cool where we�*ve got the brisk winds further south, which will continue to blow in a lot more showers through the first part of tonight before they tend to ease away, except for eastern areas. a slightly cooler night, a fresher start to our weekend. but the northerly wind will ensure that temperatures remain a little below par for most and with low pressure still around, we are going to have further showers, particularly heavy in england and wales. hello, this is bbc news with clive myrie. the headlines. it�*s a historic day for britain�*s bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shriever wins the women�*s racing final. just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain�*s first olympic medal in the men�*s event.
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latest figures from the office of national statistics show that the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise, although cases have fallen in scotland. labour calls for england to follow wales and bring forward the date on which fully vaccinated people can avoid isolation. lewis hughes, the man who accosted england�*s chief medical officer chris whitty in a london park, has pleaded guilty to assault. meanwhile another man, jonathan chew, pleaded not guilty to the same charge. get your covid jab — the message from england�*s chief midwife to women who are pregnant. drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row. more than 1,300 people died last year. time to go over to the bbc sports
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centre and get more of an update with you. two medals in the space of a few minutes on the bmx track delivered team gb the highlight of day seven in tokyo. after crowdfunding her way to the games while also having to work part time as a teaching assistant, beth shriever won a gold in the women�*s race. it�*s britain�*s first gold in the sport with shriever beating the winner at the last two olympics to claim the title. and she was met on the finish line by kye white who just moments earlier had won silver in the men�*s event. white had to battle back from serious injury to get to tokyo as day seven started with two impressive results on two wheels. honestly, i�*m in shock. to even be here is an achievement in itself. to make a final is another achievement in itself, to come away with a medal, let alone a gold medal, honestly, i�*m so over the moon. there was more success in the pool as duncan scott won
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a silver in the men�*s 200 metres individual medley. it�*s his third medal of the games, the first british swimmer to do that since 1908. scott delivered team gb�*s sixth medal overall in the pool finishing behind winner wang shun of china. scott�*s medal came shortly after luke greenbank won bronze in the men�*s 200m backstroke. and there was also a bronze medalfor bryony page in the women�*s trampoline. she led the competition after her routine but was pushed down to third as china took gold and silver. there was also a bronze for men�*s eight in rowing. the athletics has begun in the olympic stadium. and all the key contenders made it through the women�*s 100 metres heats including dina asher smith who began her bid to become the first british woman to win a olympic individual sprint gold. with no usain bolt to dominate the headlines, it�*s the women�*s sprints that are likely to be the most anticipated and asher smith made it safely through with a solid time of 11.07 seconds, finishing behind american, teahna daniels.
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you want to come out and get a place in the next round and do a solid run, at the same time without doing too much, because you have another level to go to tomorrow, so i�*m happy to have done that this morning. team gb�*s women�*s football team are out of the games losing 4—3 after extra time to australia in the quarter finals. ellen white scored all three of team gb�*s goals and her second looked like the winner. but sam kerr equalised for australia in the 89th minute to force extra time. in which caroline weir saw her penalty saved. it changed the momentum of the game with two quick goals just after. including a second from kerr made it 4—2. white made it 4—3 with six minutes left to complete her hattrick. but team gb couldn�*t find an equaliser and australia through to the last four. while the dream of a golden slam is over for novak djokovic. he was beaten by germany�*s alexander zverev in their olympic singles semifinal. the serbian number one took the the first set 6—1. but zverev came back to win in three
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sets to reach the olympic final, where he will meet karen khachanov from the russian olympic committee. djokovic also won�*t be able to win that illusive gold in the mixed doubles either after losing that semifinal as well today. away from the olympics and marcus rashford will have surgery on his shoulder next week. the manchester united and england striker has been troubled by the problem for a number of months. united wanted to check, but have now agreed to the surgery. it is thought rashford will be sidelined for around three months. rugby australia have condemned an outburst by south africa director of rugby rassie erasmus aimed at one of their referees. erasmus posted an hour—long video on social media just two days before the springboks play the british and irish lions in the second test, criticising the refereeing from last weekend�*s series opener which the lions won 22—17. rugby australia said "the attack on nic berry�*s integrity, character and reputation is unacceptable." that�*s all the sport for now.
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i�*ll have more for you in the next hour. thank you, for that. kye whyte claimed team gb�*s first olympic medal in bmx racing with a silver in the men�*s final. our correspondent eleanor roper has been spending the day at peckham bmx track in south london where kye trained. from peckham to tokyo, we�*re here where it all started for kye. four years old, he was on this track, and we�*rejoined now by his dad who�*s got a massive smile on his face! how are you doing? i�*m fine, thank you. have you been awake all night? yep! what were you thinking watching, did you expect him to get a medal? i knew he was going to do something special. he always does. and, yes, i believed he was going to make the final and do us all proud, yeah. and, yeah, you do look very, very proud of this morning. i want to ask you a bit about your family because you�*ve got three sons and they are all bmxers. yeah. and top quality bmxers as well,
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tell us about them. so, daniel is the oldest, he led the way to british cycling, and tre followed. and obviously little sibling kye wanted to be with his brothers. so he ended up chasing his dream and following his brothers and being a cyclist for british cycling. wow, he wanted in on the action? yeah, definitely. how long until you get kye back home here then? oh, i�*m not really sure, i�*m not sure. i think from what i�*ve heard, i think they might be getting kicked out in 48 hours or something! yeah, not very long. how proud are you? what does this mean to have started here, and now to be watching him? obviously you�*re not able to be there with him but it obviously must mean an enormous amount. i�*m s u p e r p r o ud ,s u p e r , s u p e r it�*s crazy, it�*s amazing, and it always makes me proud, he always makes me proud. but, yeah, it�*s been a greatjourney and it hasn�*t finished. no, i imagine it�*sjust getting started, his first olympics. and amazing as well to see those pictures of him with beth.
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oh, that is brilliant, that�*s just kye all over. yeah, kids love him, parents love him, he�*ll talk to anybody, you know, and he�*ll make you feel like you�*re the star. thank you for chatting to us, we hope you get some sleep. everyone here in peckham today so excited. as we saw today, amazing pictures of him celebrating with beth as she won her gold medal as well. it is 3:40pm. the number of drug deaths in scotland has risen to a record level for the seventh year in a row. there was a total of 1,339 drug—related fatalities in 2020, the highest rate in europe. our correspondentjames shaw in glasgow says the problem has been described as a "public health emergency". one of the things that is particularly shocking is the fact that it has been going on for so many years, the seventh record year for the drug death rate in scotland,
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and in fact the drugs policy minister here, angela constance, has admitted that it is a national disgrace, as she put it, and the number of deaths, the death rate, was unacceptably high. to put it in context, this is 3.5 times the drug death rate for the whole of the uk. and it is particularly affecting deprived parts of scotland much more than it is the least deprived areas, and that gap has been increasing over the last 20 years. now, the scottish government is setting aside £250 million to deal with this, to try and make sure that everyone who needs it gets treatment and that there is emergency treatment for people who suffer from overdoses. but the opposition, the political opposition here, the scottish conservatives, say really that the scottish government�*s response is inadequate. there needs to be legislation, a right to recovery bill to guarantee that people get the treatment they need.
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james shaw. earlier doctorjohn budd, who�*s a gp in edinburgh caring for the homeless and a board member of the scottish drugs forum, explained some of the factors that have contributed to those figures in scotland. he was speaking to my colleague rebecca jones. the problem with drugs is that it is multifactorial. likely to be a complex set of circumstances leading to the situation we are in. but it goes back to the late 1970s, 1980s with the economic recession. scotland was hit particularly badly by deindustrialisation after the war, worse than other parts of the country. we�*ve had, probably, a bit of a disastrous housing policy since that time, which has broken up communities and caused housing schemes which have deteriorated in terms of living circumstances for people and over the last ten years,
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15 years, we�*ve seen rising levels of poverty as a result of the economic downturn in 2007—8, and ten years of austerity from the uk conservative—led governments which have undermined public services and made treatment services far less available to people — so it�*s a combination of those factors. a combination of social and economic factors. the scottish government has announced a quarter of a billion pounds to be invested over five years. there is clearly no single answer to this, but what sort of things might help improve the situation? well, that reinvestment in treatment services and support services is really welcome, and there is money also going in to support individuals and families who are affected by drug use. there is money going into actually support people with lived and living
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experience of drug use to actually raise the voice of those people in terms of shaping policy and, hopefully, in shaping services and even the delivery of services, so those things are really positive and to be welcomed. i think we need to have an understanding, as i said, that drug dependence is a long—term problem that needs long—term solutions. the decriminalisation of drug use for personal use would be a hugely positive step forward, so rather than punishing people for a long—term health condition, we would actually help to reduce the stigma and encourage people into treatment and support. we need to, with that investment with treatment and support services needs to take very much a harm reduction approach to meet people where they are, provide compassionate, humane care. we need to be accessible and going out to where people are for those that struggle
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to access services centrally, and we need a full range of treatment options. a man�*s beenjailed for more than five years for killing nine cats and attacking seven more in brighton, in southern england. security guard steven bouquet�*s crimes caused panic among pet owners in the area. he was eventually caught when cctv set up by the owner of one of the dead cats appeared to capture another attack. he had denied the charges and told police that he was no threat to animals. a first group of 200 afghan interpreters who served with us forces and their family members have landed in america today. presidentjoe biden said the us was fulfilling its promise to those who served "shoulder—to—shoulder" with american forces. campaigners though have called for the process to be sped up. britain meanwhile has relocated 2,300 interpreters and their relatives, but concerns have been raised after some applicants were rejected for having been dismissed from service.
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secunder kermani reports from kabul. tens of thousands of british soldiers served in afghanistan. crucial to their mission, the help of local interpreters. with international troops withdrawing, hundreds of them along with theirfamilies have been relocated to the uk. but others remain stuck in afghanistan. annis, not his real name, is one of dozens of interpreters whose applications have been rejected. he says he fears for his life. they�*re going to kill me. that�*s it. and it�*s a big threat for my family also. because of me, my family will be paying for that. annis served for two years of british forces in helmand province but was then sacked.
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those dismissed for serious offences aren�*t being relocated. he says he refused to go on a mission in order to attend his engagement ceremony. defence sources alleged he repeatedly failed to turn up to work. i was very sad. i wrote all of my story, what happened to me in helmand, because i did the good service. so i thought that maybe i�*d receive a positive response. the taliban now control swathes of the country. they haven�*t taken any cities yet, but some fear it�*s only a matter of time. the taliban say former interpreters who worked with foreign forces but now show remorse will not be harmed. few are reassured by that, though. dozens are reported to have been killed by the group in recent years. military veterans and campaigners say the evacuation policies need to be more generous. the absolute priority for an afghan relocation and assistance policy is looking at, are these people under threat because of their association with us? and the only exception that needs to be made there is that if there would be any individuals who would be posing a risk
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to the national security of the uk, then that should be a base for exclusion. with fresh taliban assaults every day, britain�*s ministry of defence says it�*s already relocated more than 2000 former local staff and that its scheme is one of the most inclusive in the world. everyone knows the situation is growing increasingly critical. secunder kermani, bbc news, kabul. the headlines on bbc news. it�*s a historic day for britain�*s bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shriever wins the women�*s racing final. just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain�*s first olympic medal in the men�*s event. latest figures from the office of national statistics show that the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise — although cases have fallen in scotland. labour calls for england to follow wales and bring forward
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the date on which fully vaccinated people can avoid isolation. israel has become the first country in the world to start giving a third coronavirus vaccination to those aged 60 and older. the israeli president isaac herzog kicked off the new campaign by receiving the booster injection with his wife. israel was one of the first and fastest in giving vaccinations to its citizens, but it has started restoring some restrictions amid a surge in infections. ran balicer is the chairman of israel�*s national advisory experts team on covid—19 response. he explains the reasons behind the move. we have seen an increasing surge of cases in the last two months that we have not been able to control with methods that we reintroduced, including masks, as well as a green pass policy in the last few days
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that was reinstated. the numbers right now are we have over 2000 cases per day, which is numbers we have not seen for the last six months. a good proportion of these cases are among the elderly who have been vaccinated. so we have a clear indication that the vaccinated elderly that were vaccinated over five or six months ago are not as protected as they have been. but it is quite difficult to draw clear conclusions and specific estimates on vaccine effectiveness in the current situation in israel, because the cases, the number of severe cases is still relatively small and the population that has been inflicted most severely until now has been concentrated in specific localities and sectors. so this is not a country
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wide dissemination yet, which makes it a little more difficult to have a sound estimate. however, it is clear that in terms of likelihood of infection, there is a reduction, a significant reduction in vaccine effectiveness regarding severe illness. it is a little bit early to have a clear estimate. scarlettjohansson, the star of the marvel superhero film black widow, is suing the walt disney company over its simultaneous release of the movie in cinemas and on its streaming service. msjohannson alleges the move will cost her millions of dollars. a warning, this report from mark lobel contains flashing images. before i got this family... ..i made mistakes, choosing between what the world wants you to be... ..and who you are. the hardened hollywood star
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is now seeking to avenge a breach of contract. taking on the might of the walt disney company in a battle over box office bonuses, which lasers in on how the film black widow was released. �*cantina band�* plays. the red carpet was rolled out for the movie�*s premiere on disney�*s streaming service at the same time as in cinemas. so viewers who paid $30 on disney+ premier access added $60 million worth of rentals. but scarlettjohansson says she was promised the film would hit the big screen first, where she profits. before the pandemic, that would usually mean a three—month window before it hits the small screen. but the actress is arguing that by streaming the movie at the same
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time, box office receipts were hit. disney says scarlettjohansson has already earned the equivalent of around $15 million for her role in the film and that it had fully complied with the actor�*s contract. it�*s one of many hollywood film studios releasing its movies in this way because of the pandemic. so, many will be watching to see if this lawsuit provides a precedent for the entertainment industry, and for actors�* and producers�* earnings. as scarlettjohansson insists, disney�*s turned its back on her contractual arrangements. an la court will decide who is left standing. mark lobel, bbc news. one of george eliot�*s most famous novels written in 1861, silas marner, about a religious outcast, has been reimagined as a musical and is premiering this weekend in coventry with a cast of professionals and amateur community actors. joan cummins has been along to rehearsals find out more.
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a claret and blue big top at a school in coventry is an unusual location for a reinterpretation of a victorian classic. but this weekend sees the launch of a musical version of the george eliot novel silas marner. raveloe in the sory is basically in the story is basically allesley. it seems like a fantastic idea to set the story in the place it is set, and make good people who live here now, like the descendants of the people in the story, as it were. at technical rehearsal a pub scene is recreated that is reputed to have been inspired by the 17th—century rainbow inn in nearby allesley village. it allows community cast members to flex their acting abilities. it is our city.
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we would be mad not to get involved. we are all local. yeah, within at least a mile of this spot. i it is all about home. and i think being at peace with who you are. and i think people can relate to that quite a lot today. the poignancy of the story of an outsider being slowly integrated into a community isn�*t missed by a member of the cast, who is also a new arrival in coventry. now, in another country, in the middle of culture, i�*m in. that�*s really crazy, you know? it has helped me to know more about the culture, more about the people, one about everything. i want to do everything as can be done for the child. silas is played by a professional actor, who says the combination
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of working with community players and performing in a tent enhances the experience for everyone, including the audience. it gives them more of an experience. the fact they are outside and closer to the environment, when probably we would have been in, we can feel how cold it is, we can hear the rain. if it gets too hot we are going to be sweating and so are they. it is like a shared experience. there is debate over where the fictional raveloe village is. some say it is nuneaton. the cast of silas marner believe it is based here in allesley, and they say they are determined that silas marner is going to put coventry on the map. joan cummins, bbc midlands today, coventry. the bbc proms gets under way tonight with a full audience, although there are some restrictions to make the event as covid secure as possible. audience members are being "strongly
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encouraged" to wear masks and they�*re required to provide proof of a negative covid test, natural immunity or double vaccination. last year there was a reduced orchestra, playing to an empty royal albert hall. abel selaocha is a south african cellist and singer, who�*ll be playing at the proms. i mean, it�*s a real dream come true, you know? from coming from the township in south africa, from an unknown place, almost, and getting to this point, is really full circle for me. and to be able to celebrate people and to celebrate community and to celebrate my heritage, and also educate people about other cultures. so i�*m very, very excited and i�*m privileged. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. good afternoon. storm evert has brought some unseasonably windy weather already for parts of south wales and south—west england, where winds have exceeded 70 miles an hour in gusts, but quite widely exceeded 50 miles
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an hour in exposed areas. they have yet to escalate further east, so the winds will pick up here for the next few hours around that storm system. as well as that, we have got these bands of showers, longer spells of rain, some of them will turn heavy and thundery with some hail forecast, particularly across the eastern side of england this afternoon, some more persistent rain for northern england and parts of north wales. a few showers certainly for northern ireland, heavy ones here, and for parts of scotland. the far north a little cooler and cloudier. but the south of scotland, parts of northern ireland where we could feel 19 or 20, pleasantly warm with the lighter winds, cooler across england and wales where we still have a number of showers and thunderstorms into the evening starting to fade away. always the chance of rain for eastern parts of scotland and england. a subtle change in wind direction means it will freshen up through the night, certainly not a cold one for most of us. it will feel cooler than it should at this time of year over the weekend, that is down to wind direction, coming right the way
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down from the arctic. warming up as it comes over the sea but also picking up some moisture. there will be various weather systems running their way south. over the weekend, expecting things to feel a little on the cool side, or some scattered showers but also some sunny spells, particularly for the northern half of the country. for scotland, north and western scotland, northern ireland, fewest showers. you can see weather fronts close to eastern areas. this weather system working southwards will just generate a few heavy showers, england and wales generally more prone to some heavy, slow—moving showers at times as they start to set up with the strength of the july sunshine. 20 in the sunshine, in sheltered parts of southern scotland, 20, 21. the south feeling a little bit warmer today because we will have lost that brisk wind. again, that northerly makes us prone to showers, particularly in eastern areas initially on sunday, perhaps some patchy rain on this weather front. then heavy showers to the south of that. perhaps a little more confined to southern areas compared to saturday,
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certainly much drier for many parts of scotland and northern ireland. there are warnings out, details on our website.
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this is bbc news, i�*m clive myrie. the headlines: it�*s a historic day for britain�*s bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shreever wins the women�*s racing final, just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain�*s first olympic medal in the men�*s event. latest figures from ons show that the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise — although cases have fallen in scotland. labour calls for england to follow wales and bring forward the date on which fully vaccinated people can avoid self isolation. we are seeing a real summer of chaos, you can see the impact it is having on so many businesses, so many sectors. the government has
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never really explained the logic of its august 16 date on isolating. lewis hughes, the man who accosted england�*s chief medical officer chris whitty in a london park, has pleaded guilty to assault. meanwhile another man, jonathan chew, pleaded not guilty to the same charge. get your covid jab — that�*s the message from england�*s chief midwife to women who are pregnant. drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row — more than 1300 people died last year. hello, and welcome to bbc news. team gb�*s olympics success continues, with another six medal wins. there was a bronze for
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bryony page in trampolining, and more success in the pool, where duncan scott claimed his third medal of the games with silver in the men�*s 200m individual medley. but the story of the day was in bmx, where kye whyte took silver in the men�*s race, before bethany shreiver, who had to fund much of her own qualification campaign after uk sport cut its support, took a spectacular gold in the women�*s race. our sports correspondent, andy swiss, has a round—up of all of the latest action. she is british sport�*s new two—wheeled wonder. the olympics is no stranger to fairy tales, but beth shriever�*s is something very special. the 22—year—old hadn�*t been among the favourites in the bmx, but the part—time teaching assistant was soon giving her rivals a lesson. she led from the start. and in this most exhilarating of events, she flew around the track. could she hang on for gold? well, it was some finish. all the way, all the way, all the way! yes!
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bethany shriever, olympic champion! cue elation and utter exhaustion, her team mate kye whyte lifting her aloft as the enormity of her achievment sank in. shriever had to crowdfund her own preparations for tokyo. i love you guys! and after celebrating with herfamily in essex, she said her victory defied belief. honestly, i�*m in shock. like, to even be here is an achievement in itself. to make a final is another achievement in itself. to come home with a medal, let alone a gold medal, honestly, i�*m so over the moon. but this was a day of double celebration. just moments earlier, kye whyte, nicknamed the prince of peckham, had produced a regal display to take a stunning silver, enjoyed as much in south—east london as it was in tokyo. it means everything. just look at that.
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once—in—a—lifetime opportunity. as i said, it was pretty hard to even get to the olympics in the first place. to do well and to even get a medal, yeah, it special. white then turned cheerleader, roaring shriever on, before the pair could finally celebrate together, and they weren�*t the only ones. former oasis star liam gallagher described shriever as a "ledge", while cyclist geraint thomas tweeted that "the one good thing aboutjet lag is that i got to watch bethany and kye smash it live, amazing!" it�*s a word that might also apply to this man, duncan scott, winning his third medal of the games, with silver in the 200m individual medley, while in the 200m backstroke luke greenbank took bronze. for team gb, the pool is certainly proving productive. in the trampolining, meanwhile, could bryony page bounce to glory? well, after two years out with injury, it was some display. whoa, well done, bryony!
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following her silver in rio, this time bronze, which she later described as amazing. there was also bronze in the rowing for the men�*s eight. for one of team gb�*s flagship sports, this has been a disappointing games — just two medals, and for the first time since 1980, no gold. on the first day of athletics, dina asher—smith confirmed her status as a contender in the 100m, easing through her heat and into the semifinals. and in the boxing, pat mccormack and ben whittaker are both guaranteed medals, although whittaker has more than just victory in his sights. i want to go back with a gold medal, and i want to become the mayor of wolverhampton. i want one of those nice chains round my neck, and i�*ll be calling all the shots! everybody in wolverhampton will have a nice ice grill and chain, courtesy of ben whittaker. excited? just a little. andy swiss, bbc news.
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the olympics have been increasingly overshadowed by a spike in covid—19 cases in tokyo and around the country. japan�*s prime minister, yoshihide suga, has said that coronavirus is spreading with unpredecented speed injapan, fuelled by the delta variant. mr suga warned that the medical system is at risk of strain. and at a news conference he urged people to watch the games at home. translation: earlier l today, novel coronavirus headquarter meeting was held. saitama, chiba, kanagawa and osako — we are going to issue a state of emergency to those prefectures. in hokkaido, ishikawa, kyoto, hyogo and fukuoka, for those prefectures we are going to implement priority measures for the period from august 2 to august 31. this is the period for the measures.
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the state of emergency in tokyo and okinawa is also extended to august 31. this is the decision that was made. lucy hockings has all the latest from tokyo. welcome back to tokyo, where on day seven we have reached the midpoint of the games. the sports are being somewhat overshadowed right now, because what we�*re in tokyo and around japan is a spike in covid cases. this afternoon we saw a news conference here in tokyo given by the prime minister which went on for quite some time, in which prime minister suga said that the coronavirus rate is going up. it is unprecedented and at speed, all being fuelled by the delta variant, like it is elsewhere. the prime minister also warning the medical system is at risk of strain, and telling people that they should be at home, staying at home, and watching the games from there.
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here he is speaking a little earlier. translation: earlier l today, novel coronavirus headquarter meeting was held. saitama, chiba, kanagawa and osako — we are going to issue a state of emergency to those prefectures. in hokkaido, ishikawa, kyoto, hyogo and fukuoka, for those prefectures we are going to implement priority measures for the period from august 2 to august 31. this is the period for the measures. the state of emergency in tokyo and okinawa is also extended to august 31. this is the decision that was made. the prime minister there. let�*s get more of the very latest on the figures, which are going up, from mariko oi. the lastest number for tokyo came in at 3300, which is slightly lower compared to yesterday, but still well above 3000, which was
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unheard of until this week. in all ofjapan, it was another record high, topping 10,000 once again. we�*vejust been hearing from prime minister suga, as well as one of the country�*s top medical advisers, officially declaring the expansion and the extension of the state of emergency here in tokyo and the surrounding prefectures as well. how effective that will be remains to be seen, because of course the japanese capital has been under the state of emergency for two weeks now, but we are still seeing that surge in covid—19 cases. we have been hearing from the ioc and other government officials, emphasising that this most recent surge has nothing to do with the olympics. some of them seem to imply that it�*s because of young people who are not listening to the government�*s request to stay at home, and they have also been encouraged to get vaccinated when there is not enough jabs around. i found it a little unfair, so i decided to go to shibuya, where a lot of young people hang
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out, to find that what they thought of the government�*s comments. translation: i haven't even received a ticket to get vaccinated. _ my parents onlyjust got theirjabs. i can sense that we are getting too used to the state of emergency, so it's not stopping people from going out. she just had her first shot yesterday, and i have - made my appointment, so we are getting - vaccinated when we can. if the government really wants to stop the spread of the virus, they have to lock us down and offer financial support, because without it people will go out and go to work because they need to earn money. now, japan�*s vaccine roll—out has been really slow and inefficient at the beginning. they�*ve managed to pick it up, but now they are facing this supply shortage. the country�*s health ministry is apparently considering using the astrazeneca vaccine for those above the age of 40. the astrazeneca jab was approved back in may, but it has not been in use forjapanese people, partly because of the rare blood clots it has been causing in other parts of the world.
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of course, the government really needs to clearly explain if they are going to make a shift in that vaccine strategy. the communication has really been an issue for this government. we have noticed the prime minister has been holding press conferences on television for over an hour. but of course we all know that young people, who they really want to reach out to, they do not necessarily watch tv for that long, and they need to really change how they communicate with the younger population. the prime minister has been tweeting about gold medals that have been won by japanese athletes, but he has not even tweeted once about the most recent surge in covid—19 cases. if they really want to reach out to the young population, they need to rethink how to communicate their message. mariko oi there. one of the big stories from the games in the last couple of hours is that the world number one tennis player, novak djokovic, has been knocked out in the men�*s
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semifinal by germany�*s alexander zverev. it dashes the serbian�*s dream of winning his first singles gold medal and completing a golden slam, that is all four tennis majors and the olympic title. here�*s our tennis correspondent, russell fuller. it is a surprise, and i think alexander zverev completely appreciated the magnitude of the moment. he knew that novak djokovic was trying to do what only one tennis player in history had done — and that was steffi graf winning the golden slam in 1988. having won the first three grand slams of the year and having won his first four matches in tokyo, he was very much on track ahead of the us open, which starts at the end of august. but from the middle of the match, alexander zverev started swinging, swinging for the hills, if you like, trying to be much more aggressive, and he won ten of the last 11 games of the match as novak djokovic ran out of energy in the sapping humidity, taking the decider by 6—1. he was always a very dangerous opponent for dangerous opponent for novak djokovic,
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because he has wan many times at atp tour level, but still a surprise when you consider how well novak djokovic has been playing this year. indeed. a few other sporting headlines for you. we have had the men�*s 10,000 metres run in the past few hours. a shock win for selemon barega of ethiopia, winning the gold medal, the first of the olympics athletics programme. he defeated the world champion and world record—holder, joshua cheptegei of uganda, who had been the favourite. we have seen a really wonderful story on the bmx track, where a former teaching assistant who partly crowdfunded herjourney into the olympics become team gb�*s first female gold medal winner in the sport. beth shriever followed up team—mate kye whyte�*s stunning silver medal in the men�*s race to become the first british medallist in the sport since it was made an olympic event back in 2008. south africa�*s tatjana schoenmaker won the women�*s 200 metres breaststroke and it will record time. that delivered her nation�*s first gold medal of these games.
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in what is considered the biggest draw of the games in many ways, the women�*s 100 metres, dina asher—smith failed to find her best form at the heat at the olympic stadium. we saw the british athletics team captain seeming to run it within herself. she finished second to american. russia for the second time is competing under a different name. here intercut they will be represented as the neutral russian olympic committee because russia is currently serving a two—year ban from all major sporting events for a programme of state—sponsored doping which russia denies. it means we were not hear the russian anthem or see the flag here in tokyo. during the opening ceremony, russian athletes carried the rac flag. the team were parading to music by tchaikovsky, which is what plays when they went. russian athletes competing here in tokyo do so as neutrals. as you can see russian
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symbols and the flag had been removed from the uniforms. however, the uniforms are red, white and blue, the colours of the russian flag. the former chief investigator for the world anti—doping agency joining from london. i asked for the world anti—doping agency joining from london. iasked him about what he thinks of the fact that there are over 300 athletes from russia competing here in tokyo. this has been agreed by the court of arbitration in sport, that they compete as neutral athletes. in terms of white there at tokyo, they are entitled to be. eh? over the neutral appearance. by by that do you mean the fact that their uniform is at the colours of their uniform is at the colours of the russian flag? it is their uniform is at the colours of the russian flag?— their uniform is at the colours of the russian flag? it is supposed to be neutral colours. _ the russian flag? it is supposed to be neutral colours. clearly, - the russian flag? it is supposed to be neutral colours. clearly, the - be neutral colours. clearly, the uniform, you could express the opinion that it is not neutral, it is clearly related to the russian
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colours. what they have done is manage to present the rules under which they should be viewed under neutral colours. irate which they should be viewed under neutral colours.— neutral colours. we sought us swimmer _ neutral colours. we sought us swimmer ryan _ neutral colours. we sought us swimmer ryan murphy - neutral colours. we sought us swimmer ryan murphy saying | neutral colours. we sought us - swimmer ryan murphy saying that his two metres backstroke final was probably not clean. he did later withdraw that allegation. it was won by the roc winner, who said he believes the sport should be clean and he is clean from the bottom of his heart. but do you think we�*ll see more allegations like this here in tokyo? it see more allegations like this here in to 0? , , . ., see more allegations like this here into o? , '. in tokyo? it is difficult to say, time will _ in tokyo? it is difficult to say, time will tell. _ in tokyo? it is difficult to say, time will tell. ioc— in tokyo? it is difficult to say, time will tell. ioc are - in tokyo? it is difficult to say, time will tell. ioc are entitledj in tokyo? it is difficult to say, i time will tell. ioc are entitled to keep samples for ten years, who will know what will emerge over that time. i would say that russia has been under considerable pressure to clean up its act. hopefully they are sticking by the rules. tells clean up its act. hopefully they are sticking by the rules.— sticking by the rules. tells about our sticking by the rules. tells about your investigation, _ sticking by the rules. tells about your investigation, what - sticking by the rules. tells about your investigation, what did - sticking by the rules. tells about your investigation, what did you | your investigation, what did you find? , ., . ., , ., .,
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find? just to clarify, i do not represent — find? just to clarify, i do not represent the _ find? just to clarify, i do not represent the organising - find? just to clarify, i do not i represent the organising here. find? just to clarify, i do not. represent the organising here. i find? just to clarify, i do not - represent the organising here. i was chief investigating officer at the saatchi olympics, reporting. we found it was a systematic process by which samples of urine which were taken during testing at the olympics were swapped for cleaner samples. there was a very sophisticated scheme operating around that. i can absolutely see why clean, hard—working athletes at tokyo might feel somewhat aggrieved at seeing, certainly, russians competing in non—neutral colours in my opinion. the russians here say that they are clean. do you think lessons have been lent from your investigation and from the band? i been lent from your investigation and from the band?— been lent from your investigation and from the band? i certainly hope so. russia has _ and from the band? i certainly hope so. russia has been _ and from the band? i certainly hope so. russia has been going -
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and from the band? i certainly hope so. russia has been going under- so. russia has been going under intense scrutiny over the past few years and hopefully they have learnt the lesson that state—sponsored doping cannot be tolerated, certainly any form of doping cannot be tolerated. i would hope that message has got through to all russian athletes.— message has got through to all russian athletes. that's all from us here in tokyo- _ the headlines on bbc news: it�*s a historic day for britain�*s bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shreever wins the women�*s racing final, just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain�*s first olympic medal in the men�*s event. lewis hughes, the man who accosted england�*s chief medical officer chris whitty in a london park, has pleaded guilty to assault. meanwhile another man, jonathan chew, pleaded not guilty to the same charge. labour calls for england to follow wales and bring forward the date on which fully vaccinated people can avoid self isolation.
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the latest data from the office for national statistics shows the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continued to rise in the week to last saturday. it comes after several days of falling daily case numbers in the uk. here�*s our health correspondent, jim reed. there�*s the daily data you might hear every evening on the news, measuring people who come forward normally with symptoms of the virus and then test positive. those figures have been very encouraging for the last week, showing a sharp downward trend, as you can see on the graph. on the right hand side you are seeing that trend fall. there is a different way of measuring infections carefully watched, and this is where the office of national statistics goes out and randomly samples people in the population, about half—a—million people in the uk. that can measure notjust people with symptoms but people who are not sick with covid at the time. that data shows in the week to last
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saturday, actually, cases were rising slightly, across the uk, short of a million people — 950,000 had covid in that week, up from 830,000 the week before. up in england, wales and northern ireland, down slightly in scotland. why these two different trends then? a lot could be down to timing, that ons survey measures people up to last saturday, so it might have missed this very recent fall in those daily cases. it also measures people without symptoms, which can make a difference. the ons said they will continue to investigate whether the current wave of infections is stabilising or not and it remains too early to say. let�*s take a look at the latest coronavirus figures
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for the uk. a further 29,622 new infections have been recorded. 68 people have died in the latest 24—hour period. that�*s those who�*ve died within 28 days of a positive covid test. on to vaccinations — over 46.7 million people have received their first dose of a covid vaccine. and almost 38 million people have now received two doses. labour is calling for the government to bring forward the date on which fully vaccinated people will no longer have to self—isolate in england. the welsh government confirmed last night that it would make the change next saturday, while scotland plans to do the same two days later. in england, the change is not due to come in until august 16. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, explained that despite pressure on the prime minister to change that date, calls from labour are likely to go unheeded. i think the labour leader, sir keir starmer, calling for
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the government to shift that date earlier probably makes it less likely than anything. keir starmer accusing the government of a chaotic approach, saying that businesses and families certainty, therefore in his view it would be right to bring the date forward from august 16, the date identified by the government at which point double vaccinated adults will not need to isolate if they come into contact with someone who has tested positive, to august 7. that happens to be the day that the welsh government is due to confirm will be the end of isolation requirements for double—jabbed adults there. sir keir starmer was asked earlier more about his reasoning for specifying that date. we've been talking to scientists throughout the 18 months of this pandemic on a very regular basis. it's not the date that is driving it, it's the principle of double vaccination. the idea, as welsh labour have put forward, that if you are double vaccinated, you don't have to isolate if you have been in contact
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with someone, as is automatically the rule at the moment. at the moment, we've got hundreds of thousands of people a week isolating, and you can see the chaos that that's causing. so, why not now is perhaps the othe obvious question for labour here.r sir keir starmer in answer to that has said that he wants a pragmatic approach and there needs to be time to put measures in place, and for the testing centres, which are in the process of being set up, to get fully up and running, meaning people can be tested rather than having to isolate or stay away from work. in taking this move, it is a shift in labour policy. it is one which attempts to put it in line with what the labour government in wales is doing, but very it at odds with what the westminster government is doing. no sign at the moment that the government is going to shift their approach and bring forward that date of august 16,
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which the prime minister has said is nailed on. police investigating non—recent child sexual abuse in kirklees have arrested 40 people as part of a major ongoing operation. kirklees district police have said they will leave no stone unturned in order to secure justice for victims, after arresting 38 men and two women in an operation. officers conducted the arrest activity as part of operation teeford, an ongoing enquiry into the sexual abuse of nine female victims, predominantly in the dewsbury and batley areas between 1989 and 1999. it�*s been confirmed that human remains found in the pyrenees mountain range are those of a british woman who went missing last november. esther dingley, who was 37, was hiking near spain�*s border with france when she vanished. she and her partner had been on an open—ended campervan tour of europe, but he wasn�*t with her at the time of her disappearance. england�*s chief midwife has written to gp practices,
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obstetricians and midwives, stressing the need to encourage pregnant women to be vaccinated against coronavirus. estimates suggest that only one in ten pregnant women have had the jab, but the number of mothers—to—be in hospital with the virus is rising — as our health correspondent, cath burns, reports. the message couldn�*t be any clearer — expectant mothers should take action to protect themselves and their babies by getting the covid vaccine. any midwife not encouraging pregnant women to do so will now be going against official guidance. at the antenatal clinic at chelsea and westminster hospital, most of the pregnant women we spoke to had beenjabbed. it�*s just for the safety, i started getting worried, especially during my third trimester. luckily i haven�*t had covid, i have been very lucky, but i thought it was important to have it to protect me and the baby now as well. so, yeah, i decided to do it. i was really nervous before i had it done.
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then i did a bit more reading, i thought this is perfect. i've had it done and feel much safer, happier and freer to go out. i decided i was in a betterl position having the vaccine than i was potentially being exposed to the risk of covid. _ but it�*s not always a straightforward decision. if it had been going for five years or something, i would feel confident to get it done, but because it�*s so new, i think that�*s why i am still hesitating. so i think that is what�*s keeping me from getting vaccinated. new data from the uk obstetrics surveillance system shows of the 742 pregnant women admitted to hospital with covid since the start of february, only four had received a single dose of the vaccine and none had been double—jabbed. the data also suggested the delta variant has increased the likelihood of pregnant patients having more severe symptoms. at chelsea and westminster, they outline other risks too. if you are umming and aahing
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about having the covid vaccination, it�*s really important to remember that in pregnancy, if you aren�*t vaccinated, you are more likely to end up needing respiratory support. unfortunately it can lead to early miscarriages or preterm births, which can have a detrimental impact on your baby�*s health. more than 51,000 pregnant women in england have had theirfirstjab and nearly 21,000 have had their second. but that means hundreds of thousands remain unvaccinated. medical experts insist there had been no safety concerns for pregnant women who have taken the jab, and it is safe. catherine burns, bbc news. a man has pleaded guilty to assaulting england�*s chief medical officer, professor chris whitty, in central london. our correspondent helena wilkinson is following developments at westminster magistrates�* court.
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just take us through what happened today. you may remember that they don�*t that went on social media and event viral of chris which the —— chris whitty being accosted in london last month. today at westminster magistrates�* court two men appeared in the dock. lewis hewed from essex was asked to enter a plea today, he pleaded guilty to one charge of assault beating professor chris whitty in st james�*s park on june professor chris whitty in st james�*s park onjune 27. —— lewis hughes. the court heard that he was unreservedly apologetic for any distress that he had caused professor chris witty in that incident. the districtjudge sentenced him to eight weeks suspended sentence for two years and also asked him to pay £100 compensation to professor chris
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whitty himself. in his sentencing remarks to lewis hughes, thejudge said that professor chris whitty goes about his very difficultjob without the expectation of yobs like you are costing him, assaulting him, and then to compound it all, he is further humiliated by the video posted. thejudge further humiliated by the video posted. the judge went on to say to the defendant that he recognised he himself had not actually posted that video on the internet. the second man who appeared in the dock today, 24—year—old also from essex, he pleaded not guilty to the same charge. ——jonathan pleaded not guilty to the same charge. —— jonathan chew. pleaded not guilty to the same charge. ——jonathan chew. not pleaded not guilty to the same charge. —— jonathan chew. not guilty to assault by beating to professor chris whitty. he also pleaded not guilty to a second charge of obstructing a police officer. these districtjudge told him that he is going to face a trial he had before the districtjudge at westminster
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magistrates�* court which will take place on november 23. we also heard today in court that professor chris whitty himself is going to be called as a witness to give evidence in that trial by the crown prosecution service. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. good afternoon. storm evert has brought some unseasonably windy weather already storm evert is producing gale force winds across some southern coasts of england and wales. we�*ve seen gusts in excess of 70 miles an hour in the most exposed areas. and the winds are still going to be pretty strong across southern and eastern areas throughout the rest of the day. we have also got spiralling bands of rain for northern areas, really heavy showers, hail and thunder setting up across eastern parts of england throughout the rest of the day. it�*s a little bit quieter further north, some patchy rain to northern scotland. a few showers around southern scotland and northern ireland but fewer and further between and feeling quite pleasant with the lighter winds here.
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obviously it feels quite cool where we�*ve got the brisk winds further south, which will continue to blow in a lot more showers through the first part of tonight before they tend to ease away, except for eastern areas. a slightly cooler night, a fresher start to our weekend. but the northerly wind will ensure that temperatures remain a little below par for most and with low pressure still around, we are going to have further showers, particularly heavy in england and wales. hello, this is bbc news with clive myrie. the headlines. it�*s a historic day for britain�*s bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shriever wins the women�*s racing final. just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain�*s first olympic medal in the men�*s event. lewis hughes, the man who accosted england�*s chief medical officer chris whitty in a london park, has pleaded guilty to assault. meanwhile another man, jonathan chew, pleaded not guilty to the same charge. latest figures from ons show that the number of people testing
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positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise — although cases have fallen in scotland. labour calls for england to follow wales and bring forward the date on which fully vaccinated people can avoid self isolation. get your covid jab, that�*s the message from england�*s chief midwife to women who are pregnant. drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row. more than 1300 people died last year. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here�*s hugh. two medals in the space of a few minutes on the bmx track delivered team gb the highlight of day seven in tokyo. after crowdfunding her way to the games while also having to work part time
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as a teaching assistant beth shriever won a gold in the women�*s race. it�*s britain�*s first gold in the sport with shriever beating the winner at the last two olympics to claim the title. and she was met on the finish line by kye white who just moments earlier had won silver in the men�*s event. white had to battle back from serious injury to get to tokyo as day seven started with two impressive results on two wheels. honestly, i�*m in shock. to even be here is an achievement in itself. to make a final is another achievement in itself, to come away with a medal, let alone a gold medal, honestly, i�*m so over the moon. there was more success in the pool as duncan scott won a silver in the men�*s 200 metres individual medley. it�*s his third medal of the games. the first british swimmer to do that since 1908. scott delivered team gb�*s sixth medal overall in the pool finishing behind winner wang shun of china. scott�*s medal came shortly after luke greenbank won bronze in the men�*s 200m backstroke. and there was also a bronze medalfor bryony page in the women�*s trampoline.
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she led the competition after her routine but was pushed down to third as china took gold and silver. there was also a bronze for men�*s eight in rowing. the athletics has begun in the olympic stadium and all the key contenders made it through the women�*s 100 metres heats including dina asher smith, who began her bid to become the first british woman to win a olympic individual sprint gold. with no usain bolt to dominate the headlines, it�*s the women�*s sprints that are likely to be the most anticipated. and asher smith made it safely through with a solid time of 11.07 seconds, finishing behind american, teahna daniels. you want to come out and get a place in the next round and do a solid run, at the same time without doing too much, because you have another level to go to tomorrow, so i�*m happy to have done that this morning. team gb�*s women�*s football team are out of the games, losing 4—3 after extra time to australia in the quarter finals. ellen white scored all three of team gb�*s goals
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and her second looked like the winner, but sam kerr equalised for australia in the 89th minute to force extra time in which caroline weir saw her penalty saved. it changed the momentum of the game with two quick goals just after, including a second from kerr which made it 4—2. white made it 4—3 with six minutes left to complete her hattrick. but team gb couldn�*t find an equaliser and australia through to the last four. while the dream of a golden slam is over for novak djokovic. he was beaten by germany�*s alexander zverev in their olympic singles semifinal. the serbian number one took the the first set 6—1. but zverev came back to win in three sets to reach the olympic final, where he will meet karen khachanov from the russian olympic committee. djokovic also won�*t be able to win that illusive gold in the mixed doubles either after losing that semi final as well today. away from the olympics, and arsenal have signed england international ben white from brighton for a fee thought to be £50 million.
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white can play in defence or midfield and was part of england�*s squad for euro 2020. he�*s completed a medical and signed a long term deal at the emirates. the amount received by brighton is a club record. marcus rashford will have surgery on his shoulder next week. the manchester united and england striker, has been troubled by the problem for a number of months. united wanted to check it out, but have now agreed to the surgery. it is thought rashford will be sidelined for around three months. south africa captain siya kolisi has backed up claims about the referee in the first test against lions made by his director of rugby rassie erasmus, saying he didn�*t feel respected at all. erasmus posted an astonishing hour—long video on social media criticising the australian official who was in charge of the springboks�* defeat in cape town to the lions. rugby australia said "the attack on nic berry�*s integrity, character and reputation is unacceptable." kolisi says he�*s looking forward to a new game and a new referee
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in the second test tomorrow while the lions have described the affair as a sideshow. no, we had a good meeting with the referees yesterday. and as ben o�*keefe said himself, he said, listen, we are aware that there is a lot of stuff out there on social media, but that�*s not go to affect anything, that�*sjust media, but that�*s not go to affect anything, that�*s just a sideshow. we had a positive discussion with the referees. everyone realises they are in a tough place, they have a tough job to do. in a tough place, they have a tough “0b to do. ., , .., in a tough place, they have a tough “0b to do. ., , , job to do. that second test in cape town is tomorrow _ job to do. that second test in cape town is tomorrow at _ job to do. that second test in cape town is tomorrow at 5pm. - job to do. that second test in cape town is tomorrow at 5pm. that - job to do. that second test in cape town is tomorrow at 5pm. that is l job to do. that second test in cape i town is tomorrow at 5pm. that is all for now, clive. that will be a cracking game, thank you. plans to bury the main road past stonehenge in a two mile tunnel have been thrown into doubt. a decision by transport secretary grant shapps to approve the scheme has been declared unlawful. the high court has
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ruled that mr shapps had not properly assessed the risk of harm to each heritage asset within the stonehenge world heritage site. the ruling is a victory for campaigners against the tunnel, who crowdfunded to bring a judicial review. the uk�*s biggest dairy company, arla, has told the bbc that it failed to make 25% of its deliveries to supermarkets last weekend, because of a lack of lorry drivers. the firms said 600 stores did not receive deliveries. they say the ongoing shortage of drivers, alongside staff having to isolate because of covid alerts is causing major disruption. the company�*s boss has been speaking to our business correspondent emma simpson. this is the world�*s largest fresh milk dairy. we process over a billion litres of milk from our cooperative farmer owners a year, so you can see this is a vast operation. in fact, one in every five bottles of milk that�*s sold in the uk is made here.
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since the beginning of april, we have experienced driver shortages, so being able to take the products from a factory like here in aylesbury to the supermarkets, and that has now increased to such a level where we�*re not able to deliver milk to every store that would like it. can you quantify this? normally, we deliver milk to 2,400 stores daily, so we�*re a very big milkman. unfortunately at the moment, there�*s about 10% of the stores every day that we can�*t deliver to and at the weekend, it�*s worse. last saturday, there were 600 stores that we couldn�*t deliver milk to. that�*s a lot of milk. that�*s a lot of milk and it�*s very worrying for customers when they go into shops — and it�*s notjust milk, it�*s an industry issue — it�*s worrying for customers when they go into shops and find that the shelves are empty. what do you want to see happen here? i think it�*s a structural issue of a shortage of drivers in the uk, and it needs a structural solution.
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however, going into the summer with lots more holidays coming up, there�*s a short—term crisis that we need to make sure that we don�*t have food shortages in the summer and therefore, we would like to work with the government first to recognise that it�*s a crisis. secondly, there�*s a backlog of tests for hgv drivers. we predict about 30,000 drivers are waiting to be tested. we want the government to work with us to accelerate that. secondly, we believe that driving should be recognised as a skilled shortage and therefore open up temporary visas for the industry to be able to bring european drivers back into the country. the government says the industry needs to find the solutions to this, which means better working conditions, better pay. what are you doing? i would absolutely agree with that and arla, through our third—party hauliers who do our distribution for us, has significantly increased pay. in fact, this week we have announced a 2000 signing—on bonus for the drivers tojoin and work on weekends. and we�*ve introduced an academy
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to make sure that we�*re growing the home talent, because what we really want in the long term is for british young people to come into the industry as well. how serious is this? well, i think when you�*re not able to supply 10% of the stores that would be expecting to get milk every day, i think that�*s quite worrying for a customer walking into a store and not being able to have milk for their teas and coffees, so we�*re taking it very seriously. so a summer of disruption, potentially? well, that�*s what we�*re trying to avoid. emma simpson speaking to arla�*s managing director, ash amirahmadi. the number of drug deaths in scotland has risen to a record level for the seventh year in a row. there was a total of 1,339 drug—related fatalities in 2020, the highest rate in europe. our correspondentjames shaw in glasgow says the problem has been described as a "public health emergency". one of the things that is particularly shocking is the fact that it has been
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going on for so many years, the seventh record year for the drug death rate in scotland, and in fact the drugs policy minister here, angela constance, has admitted that it is a national disgrace, as she put it, and the number of deaths, the death rate, was unacceptably high. to put it in context, this is 3.5 times the drug death rate for the whole of the uk. and it is particularly affecting deprived parts of scotland much more than it is the least deprived areas, and that gap has been increasing over the last 20 years. now, the scottish government is setting aside £250 million to deal with this, to try and make sure that everyone who needs it gets treatment and that there is emergency treatment for people who suffer from overdoses. but the opposition, the political opposition here, the scottish conservatives, say really that the scottish government�*s response is inadequate.
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there needs to be legislation, a right to recovery bill to guarantee that people get the treatment they need. james shaw. let�*s speak to scotland�*s minister for drug policy, angela constance. good afternoon, thank you for being with us. the first minister nicola sturgeon says the figures out today are shameful. you�*re responsible for dealing with this problem. what are your thoughts?— your thoughts? well, the scale of the loss of— your thoughts? well, the scale of the loss of life _ your thoughts? well, the scale of the loss of life is _ your thoughts? well, the scale of the loss of life is utterly - the loss of life is utterly unacceptable. as it is heartbreaking. i want to offer my condolences to everyone who had lost a loved one and also reaffirm my commitment is the recently appointed minister for drugs policy in scotland to ensure that we do absolutely everything that is possible in our new national mission to save lives, improve lives, reduce harm, promote recovery and get more
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of our people into the treatment they deserve. of our people into the treatment they deserve-— of our people into the treatment they deserve. of our people into the treatment the deserve. ., ., they deserve. you made the point you are recently — they deserve. you made the point you are recently appointed _ they deserve. you made the point you are recently appointed and _ they deserve. you made the point you are recently appointed and we - they deserve. you made the point you are recently appointed and we are - are recently appointed and we are talking about a drug problem that goes back decades, no one is under any illusions that you�*re going to be able to sort this out in quick time. ijust wonder, can you point to three concrete policies that you are bringing in a place or you have already put in place that you believe will affect this critical problem? and what is the timescale for change? 50. problem? and what is the timescale for chance? problem? and what is the timescale for change?— problem? and what is the timescale for chance? ., ., ., , ., for change? so, we have already made a commitment — for change? so, we have already made a commitment to _ for change? so, we have already made a commitment to increase _ for change? so, we have already made a commitment to increase investmentl a commitment to increase investment to improve access and capacity for residential rehab, £100 million over the lifetime of this parliament, the next five years. i have already funded 56 grassroot organisations because local organisations in the third sector have a particular reach within communities. and i have also published new standards of care and
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treatment backed up with a £4 million implementation plan which will introduce services such as same—day prescribing, which we know works in other parts of the world. so we are taking action here and now to invest in services, increase the capacity of our services, and the core of our national mission is to get more of our people into treatment. treatment that is right for them, treatment. treatment that is right forthem, irrespective treatment. treatment that is right for them, irrespective of where they live in the country. you for them, irrespective of where they live in the country.— live in the country. you talk about treatment. _ live in the country. you talk about treatment, let's _ live in the country. you talk about treatment, let's think _ live in the country. you talk about treatment, let's think outside - live in the country. you talk about treatment, let's think outside the | treatment, let�*s think outside the box here. the criminalisation of personal drug use, reduce the stigma, and encourage people to get the help they need, what about that? well, there is one solution to the drugs death crisis there are many. in terms of decriminalisation, i and the government have an open mind. i appreciate there are mixed views in our communities and society with regards to decriminalisation, but it is important that going forward we
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have a debate about what the evidence shows of, so that we can implement initiatives that work. we know that quick access to treatment, whether that�*s medication assisted treatment also more practical help, or access to residential rehab also works. we also have some pioneering works. we also have some pioneering work in scotland around heroin assisted treatment, we would like to also implement safe consumption rooms as well.— also implement safe consumption rooms as well. ok, you say you have an 0 en rooms as well. ok, you say you have an open mind _ rooms as well. ok, you say you have an open mind about— an open mind about decriminalisation, and you know that some communities will find that difficult. this is a pressing problem here. whenever 1000 people died in 2020, you know how difficult —— well over 1000 people died in 2020, you know how difficult the situation is, having an open mind doesn�*t really cut it, what you going to do? we have spoken to an eminent gp who deals with this issue and he believes decriminalisation is one of the best ways in order to de—stigmatise this whole situation and get people into treatment. the
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misuse of and get people into treatment. iie: misuse of drugs act is and get people into treatment. i“ie: misuse of drugs act is reserved and get people into treatment. iie: misuse of drugs act is reserved to the uk parliament and the scottish parliament, i don�*t have the power to have the power... but parliament, i don't have the power to have the power. . .— to have the power... but are you lobb in: to have the power... but are you lobbying and _ to have the power... but are you lobbying and pushing? _ to have the power. .. but are you lobbying and pushing? i - to have the power... but are you lobbying and pushing? i am - to have the power... but are you - lobbying and pushing? i am lobbying and -aushin lobbying and pushing? i am lobbying and pushing the _ lobbying and pushing? i am lobbying and pushing the uk _ lobbying and pushing? i am lobbying and pushing the uk government - lobbying and pushing? i am lobbying and pushing the uk government for| lobbying and pushing? i am lobbying| and pushing the uk government for a reform of the misuse of drugs act which is 50 years old, because again, ithink which is 50 years old, because again, i think we do need to have this debate across the country based on the evidence. i have heard many experts, both from the lived and lived in experience community as well as clinicians, who want to have that debate. well as clinicians, who want to have that debate-— that debate. there are going to be --eole that debate. there are going to be people who _ that debate. there are going to be people who are — that debate. there are going to be people who are going _ that debate. there are going to be people who are going to _ that debate. there are going to be people who are going to say, - that debate. there are going to be | people who are going to say, these are fine words and you are new to thejob and it is an are fine words and you are new to the job and it is an intractable, difficult situation to deal with. it goes back to the 1970s, the deindustrialisation, economic decline, a whole host of things. but the snp has been in powerfor the last seven years of this increase in drug use, now reaching the point
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where once again, it�*s the worst record in europe. what would you say to those people who say that fundamentally, the snp simply cannot get on top of this? it�*s fundamentally, the snp simply cannot get on top of this?— get on top of this? it's important to remember— get on top of this? it's important to remember that _ get on top of this? it's important to remember that when - get on top of this? it's important to remember that when you - get on top of this? it's important to remember that when you lookj get on top of this? it's important i to remember that when you look at the evidence elsewhere in the world, that there are actions we can take that there are actions we can take that will turn the tide against rising drug deaths. so change is possible. i meet people day in and day out who are living proof that change is possible, people who are living in recovery. but we also need to ensure that our services are far more person centred and provide the care and treatment that is appropriate to each individual, whether that�*s assisting someone on the road to recovery, whether it�*s harm reduction intervention. so changes possible. what i�*m not going to do is make false promises about when we will see change. what i am committed to doing is, as well as the annual reporting of drugs
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—related deaths, to move to quarterly reporting of suspected drug—related deaths, so that we can have better information about what�*s happening on the ground, so that we can move faster and swifter to implement evidence—based interventions. that we know from elsewhere in the world work. scotland�*s minister for drug policy, angela constance, thank you for your time. ., �* . ., it�*s a historic day for britain�*s bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shriever wins the women�*s racing final. just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain�*s first olympic medal in the men�*s event. lewis hughes, the man who accosted england�*s chief medical officer chris whitty in a london park, has pleaded guilty to assault. meanwhile another man, jonathan chew, pleaded not guilty to the same charge. latest figures from ons show that the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise — although cases have fallen in scotland.
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let�*s return to the olympics now, and team gb�*s first ever medals in bmx racing. after their outstanding performances, britain�*s new cycling heroes bethany shreiver and kye whyte spoke to my colleague reeta chakra barti. she began by asking kye what victory meant to him. it�*s phenomenal. yeah, it was exciting, it was thrilling. yeah, it�*s been a dream come true since obviously i was a kid, and to even to get to the olympics, to be selected, to be on the team, to even be called an olympian is great. but to be called a medallist even better. so, yeah, it�*s been a crazy experience. bmx is something that is in yourfamily, isn�*t it? from when i even first started, it was my two brothers and my older sister, then my younger sister got into it, my dad is the senior coach at peckham bmx club.
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that club is just a great club, and they are doing very well with the riders obviously. clearly they are! that is very modest of you. so you won your medal and then you were watching on the sidelines as beth got that gold medal. how did that feel? it�*s the craziest experience i�*ve ever experienced. out of all the races i�*ve been to, out of all the team and i�*ve cheered on, beth has been through a tough ride. to see her win the medal, i wouldn�*t want to see anyone else do it better. even at the way she done it, she won from the start, she led out every race. i think she only dropped one lap today. and i think she was chilling anyway. she�*s a crazy rider, the best i�*ve ever seen actually, she deserves it. beth, how does it feel? you have got a gold medal. it's absolutely crazy, it's crazy. i'm honestly speechless. like, the amount of support
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that we have both received has honestly been amazing. todayjust could not have gone any better. and you gave it your all, didn�*t you? we saw you at the end completely exhausted. yeah, i literally left everything on that track. i knew i had to work hard to get that gold. i knew someone was on my tail, obviously previous double olympic champ. i saw her coming on that last straight and i knew i had to keep smooth, and you have one last push. yeah, i literally left everything, i had nothing left, i couldn't even stand, kye picked me up. it was honestly crazy. well, so many thousands of young people will be looking at where both of you are today and looking at you as inspiring figures, thinking that if you can do it, maybe they can too. what would you say to them? kye first. of course they can do it. i�*m only a kid from peckham — not a bad place, not a great place.
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it�*s just peckham. yeah, look where i am today in tokyo. the whole trip all i�*ve been saying is peckham to tokyo in every picture. yeah, it�*s obviously a dream come true for a young kid. and any kids that do have them dreams, please, please chase it, and while you�*re chasing it have a lot of fun. yeah. beth? no, i totally agree with kye. if you have got a dream, you chase it, you dream it. every athlete dreams of this moment, and if you fully commit and you give it everything you have got, you will be rewarded, i promise you. so, wherever you are from, honestly, just get down to the track. in any sport, just get cracking and have a good time, have a really good time. beth shriever, kye whyte, huge congratulations to both of you. thank you so much for talking to us. thank you very much. thank you. our correspondent eleanor roper has been spending the day at peckham bmx track in south london where kye trained. from peckham to tokyo, we�*re here where it all started for kye. four years old, he was on this track, and we�*rejoined now by his dad who�*s got a massive smile
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on his face! how are you doing? i�*m fine, thank you. have you been awake all night? yep! what were you thinking watching, did you expect him to get a medal? i knew he was going to do something special. he always does. and, yes, i believed he was going to make the final and do us all proud, yeah. and, yeah, you do look very, very proud of this morning. i want to ask you a bit about your family because you�*ve got three sons and they are all bmxers. yeah. and top quality bmxers as well, tell us about them. so, daniel is the oldest, he led the way to british cycling, and tre followed. and obviously little sibling kye wanted to be with his brothers. so he ended up chasing his dream and following his brothers and being a cyclist for british cycling. wow, he wanted in on the action? yeah, definitely. how long until you get kye
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back home here then? oh, i�*m not really sure, i�*m not sure. i think from what i�*ve heard, i think they might be getting kicked out in 48 hours or something! yeah, not very long. how proud are you? what does this mean to have started here, and now to be watching him? obviously you�*re not able to be there with him but it obviously must mean an enormous amount. i�*m s u p e r p r o ud ,s u p e r , s u p e r it�*s crazy, it�*s amazing, and it always makes me proud, he always makes me proud. but, yeah, it�*s been a greatjourney and it hasn�*t finished. no, i imagine it�*sjust getting started, his first olympics. and amazing as well to see those pictures of him with beth. oh, that is brilliant, that�*s just kye all over. yeah, kids love him, parents love him, he�*ll talk to anybody, you know, and he�*ll make you feel like you�*re the star. thank you for chatting to us, we hope you get some sleep. everyone here in peckham today so excited. as we saw today, amazing pictures of him celebrating with beth as she won her gold medal as well. now it�*s time for a look
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at the weather with helen willetts. good afternoon. storm evert has brought some unseasonably windy weather already for parts of south wales and south—west england, where winds have exceeded 70 miles an hour in gusts, but quite widely exceeded 50 miles an hour in exposed areas. they have yet to escalate further east, so the winds will pick up here for the next few hours around that storm system. as well as that, we have got these bands of showers, longer spells of rain, some of them will turn heavy and thundery with some hail forecast, particularly across the eastern side of england this afternoon, some more persistent rain for northern england and parts of north wales. a few showers certainly for northern ireland, heavy ones here, and for parts of scotland. the far north a little cooler and cloudier. but the south of scotland, parts of northern ireland where we could feel 19 or 20, pleasantly warm with the lighter winds, cooler across england and wales where we still have a number of showers and thunderstorms into the evening starting to fade away. always the chance of rain
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for eastern parts of scotland and england. a subtle change in wind direction means it will freshen up through the night, certainly not a cold one for most of us. it will feel cooler than it should at this time of year over the weekend, that is down to wind direction, coming right the way down from the arctic. warming up as it comes over the sea but also picking up some moisture. there will be various weather systems running their way south. over the weekend, expecting things to feel a little on the cool side, or some scattered showers but also some sunny spells, particularly for the northern half of the country. for scotland, north and western scotland, northern ireland, fewest showers. you can see weather fronts close to eastern areas. this weather system working southwards will just generate a few heavy showers, england and wales generally more prone to some heavy, slow—moving showers at times as they start to set up with the strength of the july sunshine. 20 in the sunshine, in sheltered parts of southern scotland, 20, 21. the south feeling a little bit warmer today because we will have lost that brisk wind.
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again, that northerly makes us prone to showers, particularly in eastern areas initially on sunday, perhaps some patchy rain on this weather front. then heavy showers to the south of that. perhaps a little more confined to southern areas compared to saturday, certainly much drier for many parts of scotland and northern ireland. there are warnings out, details on our website.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... a historic day for britain�*s bmx riders at the tokyo olympics. bethany shreever wins the women�*s racing final. just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain�*s first olympic medal in the men�*s event. latest figures from ons show that the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in england, wales and northern ireland continue to rise — although cases have fallen in scotland. labour calls for england to follow wales and bring forward the date on which fully vaccinated people can avoid self isolation. we are seeing a real summer of chaos. you can see the impact it�*s having on so many businesses, so many secretaries, and the government
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has never really explains the logic

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