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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 30, 2021 10:00am-12:00pm BST

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i'm lucy hockings live in tokyo, with all the latest on the medals and records at the games. day seven of the olympics and more medals for team gb, as bethany shriever wins the women's bmx racing final, just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain's first olympic medal in the men's event. it comes as tokyo extends its state of emergency, after record—breaking numbers of covid infections across japan. but how effective has it been? and i'm rebecca jones in london. drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row. more than 1,300 people died last year. pregnant women are urged to get vaccinated, as estimates from england suggest about nine out
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of ten have not had the jab. nine years in prison for incitement to secession and terrorist activities. pro—democracy activist tong ying—kit is the first person to be convicted under hong kong's new security law. and it's an epic battle between a star and her studio, s scarlettjohansson sues disney for streaming her latest movie. hello, and welcome to tokyo, where on day seven we have now reached the midpoint of the games. and a day where we've seen a former teaching assistant who partly crowdfunded herjourney to the olympics become team gb's first female
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gold medal winner in the bmx. beth shriever followed up team—mate kye whyte's stunning silver medal in the men's race to become the first british medalists in the sport since it was made an olympic event back in 2008. in the pool, duncan scott won silver in the men's 200m final to keep alive his hopes of a historic haul of four medals at a single games. no british athlete has won four medals at any one games. new zealand have claimed two more rowing golds, with emma twigg powering to victory in the single sculls and the men's eight upsetting the odds to beat much more fancied rivals. the men's eight only scraped into the final and were not expected to reach the podium, let alone win. in what's considered the biggest draw of these games, the women's 100m, dina asher—smith failed to find her best form in the heats at the olympic stadium. britain's athletics team captain
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seemed to run within herself here, as she finished second to america's teahna daniels. an san kept south korea's olympic flag flying in women's archery, as she took the individual title to become the first archer to win three golds at a single games. brushing off some online trolling, about her hairstyle of all things, the 20—year—old added to her golds in the women's and mixed team events. a little earlier, i spoke to michaela walsh. she's a boxerfor team ireland. she fought on monday and was beaten, but she's here with her brother, aidan walsh, who's due to fight fight great britain's pat mccormack in his semifinal on sunday. isa is a brilliant buzz around the
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village, you are seeing all these different athletes from different countries, what sport do you do, what sport do you do? you are seeing the best athletes in the world right now, all together in the village, all competing for one thing. so the village is unbelievable, so it is. and the covid restrictions, does it make people feel allergy or add extra pressure? to make people feel allergy or add extra pressure?— make people feel allergy or add extra pressure? to be honest, you 'ust aet extra pressure? to be honest, you just get on — extra pressure? to be honest, you just get on with — extra pressure? to be honest, you just get on with it, _ extra pressure? to be honest, you just get on with it, we _ extra pressure? to be honest, you just get on with it, we have - extra pressure? to be honest, you just get on with it, we have learnt | just get on with it, we have learnt to live with it, so we have, we have had to do it to be here, so it is not going to stop my olympic dream. if it is something i have to do, you just get on with it. was if it is something i have to do, you just get on with it.— just get on with it. was your ol mic just get on with it. was your olympic dream _ just get on with it. was your olympic dream tarnished i just get on with it. was your- olympic dream tarnished because there were no spectators and your family were not here? i there were no spectators and your family were not here?— family were not here? i had my brother and _ family were not here? i had my brother and my _ family were not here? i had my brother and my team-mates i family were not here? i had my l brother and my team-mates with family were not here? i had my - brother and my team-mates with me, i brother and my team—mates with me, i had them to cheer me on. it would have been lovely to have my family, butjust have been lovely to have my family, but just the way have been lovely to have my family, butjust the way it is in the world, there are bigger things going on, so ifelt the support there are bigger things going on, so i felt the support from back at home
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and around the country, so i really felt that competing, i felt that love from back home. tell felt that competing, i felt that love from back home.- felt that competing, i felt that love from back home. tell me how secial it love from back home. tell me how special it is — love from back home. tell me how special it is to _ love from back home. tell me how special it is to be _ love from back home. tell me how special it is to be here _ love from back home. tell me how special it is to be here with - love from back home. tell me how special it is to be here with your. special it is to be here with your brother. it special it is to be here with your brother. , , ., , brother. it is unbelievable, we started boxing _ brother. it is unbelievable, we started boxing when _ brother. it is unbelievable, we started boxing when we - brother. it is unbelievable, we started boxing when we were l brother. it is unbelievable, we . started boxing when we were kids together, we have had highs and lows, and to see him today, it is a m lows, and to see him today, it is a i°yi lows, and to see him today, it is a joy i have never felt. lows, and to see him today, it is a joy i have neverfelt. i have seen the stuff he has went through, and for him to achieve one of his goals is unbelievable. find for him to achieve one of his goals is unbelievable.— is unbelievable. and it is not over et. it is is unbelievable. and it is not over yet- it isjust _ is unbelievable. and it is not over yet- it isjust a — is unbelievable. and it is not over yet. it isjust a beginning, - is unbelievable. and it is not over yet. it isjust a beginning, so - is unbelievable. and it is not over yet. it isjust a beginning, so it i yet. it is 'ust a beginning, so it is, one yet. it isjust a beginning, so it is, one fight — yet. it isjust a beginning, so it is, one fight at _ yet. it isjust a beginning, so it is, one fight at a _ yet. it isjust a beginning, so it is, one fight at a time, - yet. it isjust a beginning, so it is, one fight at a time, he - yet. it isjust a beginning, so it| is, one fight at a time, he aims yet. it isjust a beginning, so it. is, one fight at a time, he aims to perform the best he can, and i believe he could go all the way. what is his mindset at the moment? what is his mindset at the moment? what is his mindset at the moment? what is he working on? just what is his mindset at the moment? what is he working on?— what is he working on? just his belief, his _ what is he working on? just his belief, his belief— what is he working on? just his belief, his belief is _ what is he working on? just his i belief, his belief is unbelievable, we had kyle walker beating the number one seed, and the belief throughout the team has been phenomenal. myself and the team—mates who have lost, we started out believing we would win, we have a very strong mindset in the team, and people say you will never beat
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the irish! ~ , , ., and people say you will never beat the irish! ~ , , ., ., the irish! mindset is a huge part of it, but what _ the irish! mindset is a huge part of it, but what is _ the irish! mindset is a huge part of it, but what is it _ the irish! mindset is a huge part of it, but what is it about _ the irish! mindset is a huge part of it, but what is it about his - the irish! mindset is a huge part of it, but what is it about his boxing l it, but what is it about his boxing that makes him so special? his movement _ that makes him so special? h 3 movement and his reactions, he is so hard to hit. i know a lot of people hate training with him, because he is so hard to hit. we used to spar before he got bigger, i would have fallen out with him if we had kept sparring, he is so elusive and so fast, able to really fight with his very special talent, i have been saying that for so many years, and now he is doing it on the biggest stage in the world, where i always believed he would be.— stage in the world, where i always believed he would be. where you are from, believed he would be. where you are from. there — believed he would be. where you are from. there is— believed he would be. where you are from, there is a _ believed he would be. where you are from, there is a strong _ believed he would be. where you are from, there is a strong history - believed he would be. where you are from, there is a strong history of - from, there is a strong history of boxing, isn't there? the from, there is a strong history of boxing, isn't there?— from, there is a strong history of boxing, isn't there? the amount of success in belfast _ boxing, isn't there? the amount of success in belfast is _ boxing, isn't there? the amount of success in belfast is unbelievable, | success in belfast is unbelievable, you can go to a boxing club, walk five minutes and there is another boxing club, the talent is unbelievable, to do it for ireland and for belfast is unbelievable, and
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i know that means so much to him, because he looked up to people at home, you know, he looked up to them, so for him to be one of them, i do not think it will settle in for a very long time.— i do not think it will settle in for a very long time. i do not think it will settle in for a ve lona time. ., , ,, ., ., a very long time. you must know that ounu a very long time. you must know that young peeple — a very long time. you must know that young people watching _ you and him box, it is hugely inspirational, it must feel amazing to know you are perhaps inspiring another generation. what is the best thing about the sport? for another generation. what is the best thing about the sport?— thing about the sport? for me, an a , thing about the sport? for me, anyway. i _ thing about the sport? for me, anyway. i try — thing about the sport? for me, anyway. i try to _ thing about the sport? for me, anyway. i try to be _ thing about the sport? for me, anyway, i try to be the - thing about the sport? for me, anyway, i try to be the hardest| anyway, i try to be the hardest worker. women's boxing wasn't big when i started, they said to me, you can't fight because you are a girl, but that just made can't fight because you are a girl, but thatjust made me stronger, it made me want to achieve more, and seeing each other achieve, it made us want it that bad. through the hard times, we had our heads down and believed in ourselves 100%, and you dream is possible. the and believed in ourselves 10096, and you dream is possible.—
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you dream is possible. the attitude towards women's _ you dream is possible. the attitude towards women's boxing _ you dream is possible. the attitude towards women's boxing has - you dream is possible. the attitude towards women's boxing has really| towards women's boxing has really shifted. ':: :: , ., �*, towards women's boxing has really shifted. 21:1, ., �*, towards women's boxing has really shifted. ':: f. ., t a, shifted. 10096, women's boxing and mail boxing. _ shifted. 10096, women's boxing and mail boxing. it _ shifted. 10096, women's boxing and mail boxing, it is _ shifted. 10096, women's boxing and mail boxing, it isjust _ shifted. 10096, women's boxing and mail boxing, it isjust boxing, - shifted. 10096, women's boxing and mail boxing, it isjust boxing, we i mail boxing, it isjust boxing, we are one spot, we are one team, there is no different from a man or a woman going on, it is one sport, and thatis woman going on, it is one sport, and that is the way it should be looked at, because the women are so skilful, just the same as the men, and it is great to have the same recognition as the men, i am proud to be part of that elite group. michaela walsh there, they love and pride that she has in her brother aidan, due to fight on sunday, guaranteed a medal, great to have her with us. but the summer games are being increasingly overshadowed by a spike in covid—19 cases in tokyo and around the country. the capital has announced 3,300 new cases — after a record 3,865 the day before. the medical system is beginning to feel the strain. over 60% of tokyo's hospital beds available for serious covid—19 cases have already been filled.
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i'm joined now by mariko oi, who is in the shimbashi district in tokyo. bring us up—to—date on the covid situation around the country. weill. situation around the country. well, as ou situation around the country. well, as you said. _ situation around the country. well, as you said. lucy. _ situation around the country. well, as you said, lucy, 3300 _ situation around the country. well, as you said, lucy, 3300 new- situation around the country. well, as you said, lucy, 3300 new cases in tokyo. _ as you said, lucy, 3300 new cases in tokyo. which— as you said, lucy, 3300 new cases in tokyo. which is— as you said, lucy, 3300 new cases in tokyo, which is not— as you said, lucy, 3300 new cases in tokyo, which is not another- as you said, lucy, 3300 new cases in tokyo, which is not another record, i tokyo, which is not another record, but still_ tokyo, which is not another record, but still way — tokyo, which is not another record, but still way above _ tokyo, which is not another record, but still way above 3000, - tokyo, which is not another record, but still way above 3000, which - tokyo, which is not another record, | but still way above 3000, which was unheard _ but still way above 3000, which was unheard of— but still way above 3000, which was unheard of until— but still way above 3000, which was unheard of until this _ but still way above 3000, which was unheard of until this week. - but still way above 3000, which was unheard of until this week. now, - but still way above 3000, which was unheard of until this week. now, wei unheard of until this week. now, we have been_ unheard of until this week. now, we have been hearing _ unheard of until this week. now, we have been hearing from _ unheard of until this week. now, we have been hearing from the - unheard of until this week. now, we have been hearing from the ioc- unheard of until this week. now, we have been hearing from the ioc and| have been hearing from the ioc and japanese _ have been hearing from the ioc and japanese government _ have been hearing from the ioc and japanese government officials - have been hearing from the ioc and| japanese government officials saying that this _ japanese government officials saying that this surge — japanese government officials saying that this surge has _ japanese government officials saying that this surge has nothing _ japanese government officials saying that this surge has nothing to - japanese government officials saying that this surge has nothing to do- that this surge has nothing to do with the — that this surge has nothing to do with the olympics, _ that this surge has nothing to do with the olympics, and - that this surge has nothing to do with the olympics, and some - that this surge has nothing to do with the olympics, and some ofl that this surge has nothing to do- with the olympics, and some of them seem _ with the olympics, and some of them seem to _ with the olympics, and some of them seem to imply— with the olympics, and some of them seem to imply it _ with the olympics, and some of them seem to imply it is _ with the olympics, and some of them seem to imply it is all— with the olympics, and some of them seem to imply it is all because - with the olympics, and some of them seem to imply it is all because of- seem to imply it is all because of young _ seem to imply it is all because of young people _ seem to imply it is all because of young people who— seem to imply it is all because of young people who are _ seem to imply it is all because of young people who are out - seem to imply it is all because of young people who are out and i seem to imply it is all because of- young people who are out and about, not listening — young people who are out and about, not listening to — young people who are out and about, not listening to the _ young people who are out and about, not listening to the request _ young people who are out and about, not listening to the request to - young people who are out and about, not listening to the request to stay i not listening to the request to stay at home. _ not listening to the request to stay at home. and — not listening to the request to stay at home, and they— not listening to the request to stay at home, and they have _ not listening to the request to stay at home, and they have been- at home, and they have been encouraged _ at home, and they have been encouraged to _ at home, and they have been encouraged to get _ at home, and they have been encouraged to get vaccinatedi at home, and they have been. encouraged to get vaccinated as well _ encouraged to get vaccinated as well i_ encouraged to get vaccinated as well i thought _ encouraged to get vaccinated as well. i thought that _ encouraged to get vaccinated as well. i thought that was - encouraged to get vaccinated as well. i thought that was a - encouraged to get vaccinated as well. i thought that was a bit i well. i thought that was a bit unfair. — well. i thought that was a bit unfair, because _ well. i thought that was a bit unfair, because i— well. i thought that was a bit unfair, because i have - well. i thought that was a bit unfair, because i have notice well. i thought that was a bit i unfair, because i have notice not 'ust unfair, because i have notice not just young — unfair, because i have notice not just young people _ unfair, because i have notice not just young people but _ unfair, because i have notice not just young people but every- unfair, because i have notice not just young people but every agei just young people but every age group _ just young people but every age group out — just young people but every age group out and _ just young people but every age group out and about, _ just young people but every age group out and about, and - just young people but every age group out and about, and also. just young people but every age i group out and about, and also there is not _ group out and about, and also there is not enough — group out and about, and also there is not enoughjabs_ group out and about, and also there is not enough jabs to _ group out and about, and also there is not enoughjabs to go _ group out and about, and also there is not enoughjabs to go around, i is not enoughjabs to go around, especially— is not enoughjabs to go around, especially for— is not enoughjabs to go around, especially for those _ is not enoughjabs to go around, especially for those in _ is not enoughjabs to go around, especially for those in their-
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is not enoughjabs to go around, especially for those in their 20s i especially for those in their 20s and 30s. — especially for those in their 20s and 30s. so— especially for those in their 20s and 30s. so we— especially for those in their 20s and 30s, so we went _ especially for those in their 20s and 30s, so we went to- especially for those in their 20s i and 30s, so we went to shibuya, where _ and 30s, so we went to shibuya, where a — and 30s, so we went to shibuya, where a lot— and 30s, so we went to shibuya, where a lot of— and 30s, so we went to shibuya, where a lot of young _ and 30s, so we went to shibuya, where a lot of young people i and 30s, so we went to shibuya,| where a lot of young people hang out, where a lot of young people hang out. to _ where a lot of young people hang out. to find — where a lot of young people hang out, to find out _ where a lot of young people hang out, to find out what _ where a lot of young people hang out, to find out what they - where a lot of young people hang out, to find out what they made i where a lot of young people hang i out, to find out what they made of the comments _ out, to find out what they made of the comments from _ out, to find out what they made of the comments from the _ out, to find out what they made of i the comments from the government. translation: i haven't even received a ticket to get vaccinated. _ my parents onlyjust got theirjabs. translation: i can sense that we're getting too used - to the state of emergency, so it's not stopping people from going out. translation: she just- had her first shot yesterday, and i've made my appointment, so we're getting vaccinated when we can. translation: if the government really wants to stop _ the spread of the virus, they have to lock us down and offer financial support, because without it, people would go out and go to work because they need to earn money. some of those young people talking to you about getting their first jabs, what is the situation with the vaccination programme around japan? well, initially it was very slow and inefficient, and then the speed really picked up, but thenjapan faced that supply issue, and that is why those, especially in their 20s and 30s, are not getting fully
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vaccinated just yet. and today apparently the health ministry is now considering using astrazeneca vaccine for those above the age of 40. vaccine for those above the age of a0. now, the astrazeneca vaccine was approved back in may, but the japanese government has not been using it, but now they are considering it, but without explaining why that change is. i think it could possibly fuel further anti vaccine sentiment. of course, some people have been reluctant to get vaccinated and they were speculating that they were not using the astrazeneca vaccine because of the astrazeneca vaccine because of the rare blood clots that we saw in other countries. now, if the government suddenly decides to start using it injapan, they would need a clear explanation, and the communication really has been one of the key issues, government officials have been somewhat blaming the young people, and yet they haven't really been reaching out to that generation. you know, i have noticed the prime minister has been tweeting to congratulate every japanese
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athlete for winning a gold medal, a nice thing to do, but not even once about this most recent surge in covid—19 cases, and if they want to reach out to the younger population, they have to change the way they communicate in order to get that message across.— communicate in order to get that message across. really interesting to hearthat. _ message across. really interesting to hear that, mariko, _ message across. really interesting to hear that, mariko, thanks i message across. really interesting to hear that, mariko, thanks for i to hear that, mariko, thanks for that. before we hand back to you in the studio, rebecca, everyday has produced so many inspirational stories, and perhaps today it is beth shriever who won olympic gold in bmx. she was a part—time nursery teacher and had to crowdfund, partially crowdfund herjourney here to the olympics, so a really inspirational story, to the olympics, so a really inspirationalstory, bringing home gold. and i could be more to come today, lucy, we will stay in touch, good to see you, many thanks for now. israel has become the first country
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in the world to start giving a third coronavirus vaccination to those who are 60 years old and above. the israeli president kicked off the new campaign by receiving the booster injection with his wife michal. he described the third vaccination as an important step for social solidarity in israel. the country was one of the first and fastest in giving vaccinations to its citizens but has started restoring some restrictions as cases have been rising again. i'm joined now by ran balicer, chairman of israel's national advisory experts team on covid—19 response. very good to have you with us, professor, thank you forjoining us. i wonder if you could set this into some context, about the current rate of infections in israel. 50 some context, about the current rate of infections in israel.— of infections in israel. so we have seen an increasing _ of infections in israel. so we have seen an increasing surge - of infections in israel. so we have seen an increasing surge of i of infections in israel. so we have seen an increasing surge of cases| of infections in israel. so we have l seen an increasing surge of cases in the last two months, which we have not been able to control with
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measures that we have reintroduced, including masks, as well as the green pass policy in the last few days that it was reinstated. the numbers right now are we have over 2000 cases per day, which is numbers we have not seen for the last 2000 cases per day, which is numbers we have not seen for the last six months. a good proportion of these cases are among the elderly who have been vaccinated, so we have a clear indication that the vaccinated elderly that were vaccinated more than five or six months ago are not as protected as they have been. i want to come onto the booster, but let's stay with that, israel was a world leader in the terms of speed or vaccination roll—out, so what does that tell us about the efficiency of the vaccine and how long protection lasts? 50. efficiency of the vaccine and how long protection lasts?— efficiency of the vaccine and how long protection lasts? so, you know, it is uuite long protection lasts? so, you know, it is quite difficult _ long protection lasts? so, you know, it is quite difficult to _ long protection lasts? so, you know, it is quite difficult to draw _ long protection lasts? so, you know, it is quite difficult to draw clear i it is quite difficult to draw clear conclusions and specific estimates
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on vaccine effectiveness in the current situation in israel, because the cases, the number of severe cases, is still relatively small, and the population that has been affected most severely until now has been concentrated in specific localities and sectors, so this is not a countrywide dissemination yet, which makes it a little more difficult to have a sound estimate. however, it is clear that in terms of likelihood of infection, there is a significant reduction in vaccine effectiveness regarding severe illness it is a little bit early to have a clear estimate. d0 illness it is a little bit early to have a clear estimate. do you therefore _ have a clear estimate. do you therefore support _ have a clear estimate. do you therefore support the - have a clear estimate. do you | therefore support the decision have a clear estimate. do you i therefore support the decision to offer a booster? so therefore support the decision to offer a booster? 50! therefore support the decision to offer a booster?— therefore support the decision to offer a booster? so i think that by now, offer a booster? so i think that by now. since _ offer a booster? so i think that by now. since we _ offer a booster? so i think that by now, since we see _ offer a booster? so i think that by now, since we see the _ offer a booster? so i think that by now, since we see the majority i offer a booster? so i think that by now, since we see the majority ofi now, since we see the majority of severe cases that we see are over the age of 60 and have been previously vaccinated, and the numbers are continuously increasing as the disease continues its
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dissemination, i think it is a rational decision to make. we do not yet have good information about the adverse effects expected of a third dose, so there is a lot of uncertainty in the decision. however, we cannot stand on the sideline when we are the only country that has nearly over 90% of its elderly with over five months since they got their second vaccine dose, so we had to make a decision to allow individuals to have the option to get vaccinated at this point with a third booster dose. i think it is a sensible decision at this point and every individual can make their own risk assessment. so you see a sensible and rational decision, i did wonder if there was an ethical dimension to this. the
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head of the _ an ethical dimension to this. the head of the world health organization has said countries shouldn't be considering vaccine booster shots when some countries haven't been able to even give a first shot. what are your thoughts about that? i first shot. what are your thoughts about that?— first shot. what are your thoughts about that? ~ . ., ., , about that? i think that none of us is auoin about that? i think that none of us is going to — about that? i think that none of us is going to be _ about that? i think that none of us is going to be safe _ about that? i think that none of us is going to be safe before - about that? i think that none of us i is going to be safe before everybody is going to be safe before everybody is safe, and before the vast majority of the population globally will be vaccinated, we will continue to see additional infections and additional variants come in, so i think the who approach is a very correct call. in the specific case of israel, we are in a unique situation, because no other country has experienced such a surge of cases on one hand and on the other hand has nearly all of its elderly population seem to be less protected than they should be, and therefore to offer them the option to get vaccinated in his booster dose is something that is, i think, the right decision.— something that is, i think, the right decision. ok, really good to hear our right decision. ok, really good to hear your thoughts _ right decision. ok, really good to hear your thoughts and _ right decision. ok, really good to hear your thoughts and insights, | hear your thoughts and insights, many thanks. hear your thoughts and insights, many thanks-—
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australia's prime minister, scott morrison, has said that almost all of the country's adult population would have to be vaccinated against covid—19 before the country can start reopening its borders to selected countries. last week, the country closed a travel corridor to new zealand amid growing infections. troops have been deployed in sydney to enforce a lockdown as cases there continue to rise. our correspondent in sydney, shaimaa khalil, says australia's low vaccination rate is an issue. it is the availability of the vaccine, the fact that there has been so much mixed messaging around astrazeneca that many people have not gone forward for weeks. also this is a country where, for the longest time, life had gone back to near normal. as recently as may. there was not that push in the beginning to get people to get vaccinated because people felt there wasn't an urgency. now, of course, with the situation in new south wales going from bad
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to worse, there is a big push from the government to get people vaccinated, but numbers are nowhere near where they need to be, only 17% of the population are vaccinated. in new south wales, we have seen the biggest spike yesterday, 239 cases in one day. that is the biggest — notjust in this outbreak — but since the beginning of the pandemic for new south wales. today it is about 170, but this is after five weeks of lockdown, which has been extended to another four weeks. on top of that, there are eight areas in the west and south—west of sydney that have been identified as hotspots. this is going to be where the police and army presence, they have the army presence, where we're going to find it concentrating most. they're going to be on the streets but also knocking on doors to make sure people stay at home. there has been criticism that has been heavy—handed. the authorities are saying this is one of the crucial ways to make sure people abide by these rules
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and abide by the lockdown. the chief midwife for england, jacqueline dunkley—bent, has written to gp practices, obstetricians and midwives, stressing the need to encourage pregnant women to be vaccinated against coronavirus. estimates suggest that about nine out of ten have not had the jab, as the bbc�*s ellie price reports. it is a message that could not be clearer. expectant mothers should take action to protect themselves and their babies by getting the covid vaccine. any midwife not encouraging pregnant women to do so will now be going against official advice. at the antenatal clinic at the chelsea and westminster hospital, most of the pregnant women we spoke to had beenjabbed. it is just for the safety. i think i started getting worried, especially in my third trimester. luckily i haven't had covid at all, i've been very lucky that way. i thought it important
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to have it to protect me and the baby now as well, so i decided to do it. i was really nervous before i had it done. i did some reading and thought, "this is perfect." having it done, i feel much safer, happier and much freer to go out and about now. i decided it was kind of better —i i was in a better position having i the vaccine than i was potentiallyl being exposed to the risk of covid. but it has not been a straightforward decision for everyone. if it had been going for five years or something like that, like whooping cough, i would feel more confident to get it done. because it's so new, that's why i am still hesitating. i think that is what is keeping me from getting vaccinated. new data from the uk and obstetrics surveillance system shows of the 7a2 pregnant women admitted to hospital with covid since the start of february, only four had received a single dose of vaccine, and none had received both doses.
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the data also suggests the delta variant had increased the likelihood of pregnant patients having more severe symptoms. at the kensington and chelsea, they outlined other risks too. if you are umming and ahhing about having the covid vaccination, it's really important to remember that in pregnancy, if you aren't vaccinated, you are more likely to end up needing respiratory support. unfortunately, it can lead to early miscarriages or preterm births, which you can imagine has a detrimental impact on your baby's health. it is thought more than 51,000 pregnant women in england have had a firstjab and nearly 21,000 have had their second. that means hundreds of thousands remain unvaccinated. medical experts insist there have been no safety concerns for pregnant women who have taken the jab already and it is safe. ellie price, bbc news.
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let's speak now to dr sarah mcmullen, of the charity national childbirth trust. a very good morning to you, doctor, good to have you with us. i am assuming you would encourage all pregnant women to have the jab, would you? pregnant women to have the 'ab, would you?�* pregnant women to have the 'ab, would you? pregnant women to have the 'ab, would ou? . ., . ., would you? thanks for having me on. we are strongly _ would you? thanks for having me on. we are strongly encouraging - would you? thanks for having me on. we are strongly encouraging all i we are strongly encouraging all pregnant women to consider having the vaccine to make sure they are accessing trusted information, talking to their gp, talking to their midwife. we are really worried to hear about the number of women in hospital. you know, there is good news in there that so few people have been vaccinated, good evidence that it have been vaccinated, good evidence thatitis have been vaccinated, good evidence that it is really protective, but really worried at how many pregnant women are talking about misinformation, not knowing where to turn, and are remaining and vaccinated.— turn, and are remaining and vaccinated. ., , , .., . vaccinated. nonetheless, encouraging women to consider— vaccinated. nonetheless, encouraging
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women to consider having _ vaccinated. nonetheless, encouraging women to consider having the - vaccinated. nonetheless, encouraging women to consider having the vaccine | women to consider having the vaccine isn't quite the same as telling them to have it. ~ isn't quite the same as telling them to have it. . , ., ,, ., , to have it. well, you know, it is women's _ to have it. well, you know, it is women's decision, _ to have it. well, you know, it is women's decision, it _ to have it. well, you know, it is women's decision, it is - to have it. well, you know, it is women's decision, it is their i women's decision, it is their decision, and we really want to make sure that they are able to make that decision in an informed way. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists and the royal college of midwives are strongly encouraging that women do, we have good evidence on the safety of vaccines, and we have got a very real evidence of the risks of covid—19 if you are not vaccinated. what we are hearing is that women have had lots of misinformation, a lot of confusion and anxiety about it, but i think actually there is good clear evidence now, and we would like all health professionals to be making sure that the conversations they have, you know, make every contact count, help women to make that important decision. you count, help women to make that important decision.— important decision. you are obviously — important decision. you are obviously talking _ important decision. you are obviously talking to - important decision. you are obviously talking to a i important decision. you are obviously talking to a lot i important decision. you are obviously talking to a lot of| important decision. you are - obviously talking to a lot of women, and i am assuming you can understand the hesitancy, and i know you say
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there is evidence out there that these vaccines are safe, but i think one of the arguments is that there is not enough evidence, because this is not enough evidence, because this is such a new vaccine. what do you say to that? it is such a new vaccine. what do you say to that?— say to that? it is a new vaccine, but things _ say to that? it is a new vaccine, but things have _ say to that? it is a new vaccine, but things have moved - say to that? it is a new vaccine, but things have moved very i say to that? it is a new vaccine, i but things have moved very quickly. i can understand why pregnant women are hesitant and worried and want to be given real confidence before making this decision, i think we can all understand how that feels during pregnancy. i think because the roll—out has been rapid, we have now got over 200,000 pregnant women who have had the vaccination, and 55,000 now in the uk, so we have this huge amount of real—world evidence gathered with no safety concerns, and i think the royal colleges are right in trying to get that message out to give women more confidence in the safety aspects of their decision. the safety aspects of their decision-— the safety aspects of their decision. �* .. the safety aspects of their decision. �* . , decision. am i right that there is evidence that _ decision. am i right that there is evidence that vaccinated - decision. am i right that there is evidence that vaccinated women | decision. am i right that there is i evidence that vaccinated women pass on antibodies to their babies, can you tell me more about that? yes.
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you tell me more about that? yes, that is part — you tell me more about that? yes, that is part of _ you tell me more about that? yes, that is part of the _ you tell me more about that? yes, that is part of the evidence - you tell me more about that? “a: that is part of the evidence and information that women can use when making the decision. bud information that women can use when making the decision.— making the decision. and easy to sense that _ making the decision. and easy to sense that women _ making the decision. and easy to sense that women are _ making the decision. and easy to sense that women are starting i making the decision. and easy to sense that women are starting to hear these arguments i wonder if you are sensing a shift in the way that some of your members are talking to you? idole some of your members are talking to ou? ~ .. some of your members are talking to ou? . . . some of your members are talking to ou? . ., ., ., ., you? we are getting a lot of engagement. _ you? we are getting a lot of engagement, lots _ you? we are getting a lot of engagement, lots of- you? we are getting a lot ofi engagement, lots of women you? we are getting a lot of i engagement, lots of women talking about it, asking questions, wanting to understand it more. i think as restrictions have eased, it has become much more relevant. you know, when we were in lockdown, pregnant women were having very minimal contact, particularly if we think of last summer, where we were all at home. but now with restrictions easing, with people out and about, people are much more likely to be in contact with people who may be positive, and so the vaccination is becoming much more important to have in the protection. so i think that is why it is becoming more important, more people are engaging
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on that, a lot of questions being asked, and really important that it is trusted, evidence—based information that women are hearing. thank you very much. wales is to become the first nation in the uk where people who are fully vaccinated will no longer have to self—isolate if they're a close contact of a covid case. first minister mark drakeford confirmed last night that the change will come into effect on the 7th of august, nine days earlier than england, while scotland plans to do the same on the 9th. labour is calling on the government to bring forward the date on which double—jabbed people will no longer be told to self—isolate in england. it's currently set for august the 16th. our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. clearly things being done differently in different parts of the country, but with wales choosing
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august the 7th all of these different dates, what is the logic behind the different decisions? well, certainly the welsh government say that is what the data supports, but they are changing a whole range of things, quite a big change for people in wales from august the 7th. they plan, as long as the infections are still kept in check, they plan to open up nightclubs, for example, to open up nightclubs, for example, to end a social distancing rules, these sorts of things that happened on july the these sorts of things that happened onjuly the 19th in england, although they will still make facemasks mandatory in some settings. they are bringing in changes to self—isolation at the same time, and equally scotland is planning to move, they say, to do much the same as the government did in england onjuly the 19th, on august the 9th. at the moment there, they are at level 0 in their own road map, so they will be doing that earlier. what the government here as in at westminster is that august the
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16th is a deal which borisjohnson himself said is nailed on, but they say that it gives people more chance to be double vaccinated, so more people will benefit from self—isolation changes from that date. they also say, crucially, that they have this scheme from critical workers and they can get exemption from self—isolation but at the moment, as far only 300 testing sites for critical workers are up and running out of the 2000 promised, so keir starmer�*s argument is that the economy at the moment is being crippled and the august the 16th date needs to be brought forward. i'm not quite sure what the logic is for august the 7th, apart from the fact that it would be in line with wales, with the decision taken by the welsh government, which is of course labour run. what labour say is, look, there are other reasons for this, we think people who are double jab should be
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rewarded for that, they should see some benefits from that, and they also say that nearly 700,000 people as of last week were being told to self—isolate, so a substantial number. what the scientific basis for august the 7th as opposed to the 16th isn't entirely clear, i have to say, but the political rather than medical reasons are this — they know borisjohnson is under pressure from many of his own mps, notjust people who are lockdown sceptics, but others too, including former health secretaryjeremy hunt. they know he is under pressure to move that august the 16th date, and they are piling political pressure on the prime minister.— piling political pressure on the prime minister. thanks for that, iain prime minister. thanks for that, iain watson _ prime minister. thanks for that, iain watson at _ prime minister. thanks for that, iain watson at westminster. i the headlines on bbc news. day 7 of the olympics and more medals for team gb — as bethany shriever wins the women's bmx racing final. just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain's first olympic medal in the men's event. it comes as tokyo extends it's state of emergency, after record—breaking numbers
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of covid infections across japan. drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row. more than 1,300 people died last year. pregnant women are urged to get vaccinated as estimates from england suggest about nine out of ten have not had the jab. nine years in prison for incitement to secession and terrorist activities. pro—democracy activist tong ying kit is the first person to be convicted under hong kong's new security law. and it's an epic battle between a star and her studio as scarlettjohansson sues disney for streaming her latest movie. coventry is the uk's city of culture — with the english city hosting a year—long programme of events. as we slowly come out of lockdown,
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there's been an unlocking of talent across the city. let's go to coventry now, where our corrrespondent trish adudu has been keeping across what the city has to offer. yes, when people think about the city of culture, they think about everything being focused around the city centre and the heart of coventry but that's simply not the case. i'm around three miles outside of the city centre, north—west and this is one of many areas taking part in a month long citywide cultural celebration called generate festival and the man who has to negotiate a thousand people over the next four weeks is you kevin shaw. how hard is it then? hat next four weeks is you kevin shaw. how hard is it then?— next four weeks is you kevin shaw. how hard is it then? not without its challen . es how hard is it then? not without its challenges but _ how hard is it then? not without its challenges but the _ how hard is it then? not without its challenges but the groups - how hard is it then? not without its challenges but the groups have i how hard is it then? not without its| challenges but the groups have been fantastic— challenges but the groups have been fantastic and really accommodating and just— fantastic and really accommodating and just willing to get on with it. we have —
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and just willing to get on with it. we have about 50 different community performance groups taking part. anything — performance groups taking part. anything from steel bands to choirs, to bollywood dancers, it will be amazing — to bollywood dancers, it will be amazind. �* ., ., , to bollywood dancers, it will be amazin, �* ., ., , amazing. are we going to see you dancin: ? amazing. are we going to see you dancing? only _ amazing. are we going to see you dancing? only in _ amazing. are we going to see you dancing? only in the _ amazing. are we going to see you dancing? only in the background. | amazing. are we going to see you i dancing? only in the background. the weather may — dancing? only in the background. the weather may not _ dancing? only in the background. the weather may not be _ dancing? only in the background. the weather may not be fantastic- dancing? only in the background. the weather may not be fantastic but i dancing? only in the background. the weather may not be fantastic but we i weather may not be fantastic but we have a bit of a caribbean feel feel in commentary via the steel pan. rehearsals and things have got in the way because of lockdown, so how has it been question mark it's been tough as an artist and musician to the next 15 months but be together with the group is wonderful. what is the connection with commentary on the connection with commentary on the steel pan? it the connection with commentary on the steel pan?— the steel pan? it actually first came to the _ the steel pan? it actually first came to the uk _ the steel pan? it actually first came to the uk 70 _ the steel pan? it actually first came to the uk 70 years i the steel pan? it actually first came to the uk 70 years ago | the steel pan? it actually first i came to the uk 70 years ago this week. _ came to the uk 70 years ago this week. so— came to the uk 70 years ago this week. so to _ came to the uk 70 years ago this week, so to celebrate _ came to the uk 70 years ago this week, so to celebrate that - came to the uk 70 years ago this week, so to celebrate that 70 i came to the uk 70 years ago this i week, so to celebrate that 70 years later it _ week, so to celebrate that 70 years later it is _ week, so to celebrate that 70 years later it is in — week, so to celebrate that 70 years later it is in all— week, so to celebrate that 70 years later it is in all schools _ week, so to celebrate that 70 years later it is in all schools and - week, so to celebrate that 70 years later it is in all schools and i- week, so to celebrate that 70 years later it is in all schools and i am i later it is in all schools and i am a coventry— later it is in all schools and i am a coventry born _ later it is in all schools and i am a coventry born lad _ later it is in all schools and i am a coventry born lad and - later it is in all schools and i am a coventry born lad and i- later it is in all schools and i ami a coventry born lad and i studied steel pans — a coventry born lad and i studied steel pans as _ a coventry born lad and i studied steel pans as a _ a coventry born lad and i studied steel pans as a six—year—old, i steel pans as a six—year—old, so it's all— steel pans as a six—year—old, so it's all over~ _ steel pans as a six-year-old, so it's all over-— it's all over. let's hear a bit of it. it's all over. let's hear a bit of it- lets _ it's all over. let's hear a bit of it- lets get — it's all over. let's hear a bit of it- lets get a _ it's all over. let's hear a bit of it. let's get a bit _ it's all over. let's hear a bit of it. let's get a bit of _ it's all over. let's hear a bit of it. let's get a bit of the i it's all over. let's hear a bit of it. let's get a bit of the old i it. let's get a bit of the old caribbean this way.
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music of course, we might be having a bit of soulful music there from the caribbean and heading our way for the city of culture of the let's talk to one of the oldest soulful groups, angela, what's it like to sing again with friends? it’s sing again with friends? it's amazing. — sing again with friends? it's amazing, being able to meet and hear the harmonies again it in the beautiful— the harmonies again it in the beautiful voices, the harmonies again it in the beautifulvoices, it's the harmonies again it in the beautiful voices, it's great. the harmonies again it in the beautifulvoices, it's great. has the harmonies again it in the beautiful voices, it's great. beautifulvoices, it's great. has it been very difficult _ beautifulvoices, it's great. has it been very difficult trying - been very difficult trying to practice during lockdown? yes. practice during lockdown? yes, because when _ practice during lockdown? yes, because when you _ practice during lockdown? yes, because when you do _ practice during lockdown? yes, because when you do zoom, i practice during lockdown? yes, because when you do zoom, there is a delay— because when you do zoom, there is a delay so— because when you do zoom, there is a delay so it's _ because when you do zoom, there is a delay so it's nice to meet them again— delay so it's nice to meet them again in— delay so it's nice to meet them again in small groups. how important is the city of — again in small groups. how important is the city of culture _ again in small groups. how important is the city of culture for _ again in small groups. how important is the city of culture for coventry? i is the city of culture for coventry? it's massively important because it is full— it's massively important because it is full of— it's massively important because it is full of culture and its about time — is full of culture and its about time we — is full of culture and its about time we got represented. gk, is full of culture and its about time we got represented. ok, you are representing — time we got represented. ok, you are representing the _ time we got represented. ok, you are representing the city _ time we got represented. ok, you are representing the city this _ time we got represented. ok, you are representing the city this weekend. i representing the city this weekend. and it is one of those things where loads of people are trying to come
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out and we all know about social distancing and all of the groups are making sure they are covid say. —— safe. singing
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we will leave the music making in coventry but thank you to everyone involved. that was terrific, and to trish as well. thanks. the uk's biggest dairy company, arla, has told the bbc that it failed to make 25% of its deliveries to supermarkets last weekend because it didn't have enough drivers. a combination of brexit and the pandemic has exacerbated a national shortage of heavy goods vehicle drivers. arla boss ash amirahmadi says bold action is now needed to avoid a summer of disruption. he's been talking to our business correspondent emma simpson. this is the world's largest fresh milk dairy. we process over a billion litres of milk from our cooperative farmers owners a year.
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so this is a vast operation. in fact, one in every five bottles of milk sold in the uk is made here. since the beginning of april, we have experienced driver shortages. so being able to take the products from a factory, like here at aylesbury, to the supermarkets. that has now increased to such a level where we are now not able to deliver milk to every store that we would like to. can you quantify this? normally, we deliver milk to 2a00 stores daily. so we are a very big milkman. unfortunately, at the moment there about a 10% of the stores every day that we can't deliver to. and at the weekend, it is worse. last saturday, there were 600 stores that we couldn't deliver milk too. that's a lot of milk. that's a lot of milk, and it's very worrying for customers
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when they go to shop, and it's notjust milk. it is an industry issue. it's very worrying to customers when they go into shops and find that the shelves empty. what do you want to see happen? it is a structural issue of a shortage of drivers in the uk, and it needs a structural solution. however, going into the summer, with lots more holidays coming up, there is a short—term crisis we need to make sure we don't have food shortages in the summer, and therefore we would like to work with the government to recognise it's a crisis. secondly, there is a backlog of tests for hgv drivers. we predict about 30,000 drivers are waiting to be tested. we want the government to work with us to accelerate that. and, secondly, we believe that driving should be recognised as a skilled shortage, and therefore open up temporary visas for the industry to bring european drivers back into the country. the number of drug deaths in scotland has risen to a record level for the seventh year in a row. the total number of drug—related fatalities in 2020 was 1,339.
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it is 5% higher than the year before when it was the highest rate in europe. earlier this year the scottish government announced that it was investing a quarter of a billion pounds over five years to deal with what's been described as a public health emergency. let's get more on this with james shaw our scotland correspondent. these figures make grim reading, again. these figures make grim reading, aaain. .. �* . these figures make grim reading, aaain. . �* . , again. that's right. these are shockina again. that's right. these are shocking figures, _ again. that's right. these are shocking figures, even i again. that's right. these are | shocking figures, even though we have seen these record increases in drug deaths in scotland a year on yearfor drug deaths in scotland a year on year for the last seven years and despite continued scottish government efforts to handle it, and to put it into context, as you've mentioned, this is the worst drug—related death rate in the whole of europe. it's more than three times higherfor the uk as of europe. it's more than three times higher for the uk as a whole and is affecting particular parts of
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society, so in the most deprived parts of scotland you are more likely, you are much more likely to see drug—related deaths than in the least deprived, and that gap has actually been widening. men are more likely, 2.7 times more likely, to suffer a drug—related death than women down the average age of someone dying as a result of drugs has gone up from 32 up to a3. the scottish government says it is investing a huge amount of money, £250 million over the next five years to deal with this, and that will be about getting support and treatment and rehabilitation for people much more quickly as soon as they say they have a drug problem and also emergency treatment will be improved with a new drug which can be used when people have overdoses,
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but the opposition, the political opposition in scotland is saying that there needs to be more than this and there needs to be legislation which effectively gives a guarantee that if people have drug problems than those problems will be dealt with quickly and effectively. earlier i spoke to doctorjohn budd who's a gp in edinburgh caring for the homeless and a board member of the scottish drugs forum, and he explained some of the factors that have contributed to those figures in scotland. the problem of drugs is multifactorial and will be a complex set of circumstances leading to the situation we are in but it goes right back to the late 1970s, the 1980s and the economic recession. it is thought that scotland was hit particularly badly by deindustrialisation after the war, worse than other parts of the country and we have had probably a bit of a disastrous housing policy
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since that time which has broken up communities and because housing schemes to deteriorate in terms of living circumstances for people and over the last ten years we have seen rising levels of poverty as a result of the economic downturn in 2007, and ten years of austerity from the uk conservative led governments which has undermined public services and made treatment services far less available to people so it's a combination of those factors. a combination of social and economic factors. the scottish government has announced quarter of £1 billion to be invested over five years. there's clearly no one single answer to this, but what sort of things might help improve the situation? that reinvestment in treatment services
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and support services is really welcome. and there is also money going in to support individuals and families affected by drug use. there is money going into support people with lived and living experience of drug use to raise the voice of those people in terms of shaping policy and hopefully shaping services and the delivery of services, so those things are really positive and to be welcomed. i think we need to have an understanding, as i said that drug dependency is a long—term problem and needs long—term solutions and decriminalisation is of drug use for personal use would be a hugely positive step forward, so rather than punishing people for a long—term health condition
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we would help reduce the stigma and encourage people into treatment and support. that investment with treatment and support services needs to take a harm reduction approach to meet people where they are and provide compassionate, humane care and we need to be accessible and going out to where people are for those that struggle to access services centrally and we need a full range of treatment options which includes human remains found in the pyrenees have been confirmed as those of esther dingley following a search. the 37—year—old had been working solo on the mountains near the spanish and french border and was last seen on november the 22nd. her partner, daniel colgate, has released a joint statement with her mother saying we are distraught. it is devastating the odd words. of contract after it
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streamed her superhero film black widow on it's television channel at the same time as its cinema release. the film set a box office record for the covid—19 pandemic, making more than $200 million dollars in its first weekend. but box office receipts then fell sharply and ms johansson argues she was deprived of potential earnings. in response, disney said it had "fully complied" with her contract and that her case had "no merit whatsoever". let's speak now to the entertainment journalist caroline frost. good to have you with us, and worth remembering that scarlettjohansson remembering that scarlett joha nsson is remembering that scarlettjohansson is the highest—paid actress in hollywood, so this is significant. tell us a little bit more about why she has launched this case? this is a kind of only _ she has launched this case? this is a kind of only in _ she has launched this case? this is a kind of only in a _ she has launched this case? this is a kind of only in a hollywood i she has launched this case? this isi a kind of only in a hollywood battle for the millions. what happened was the long—awaited solo outing for her
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character in the marvel franchise finally made it to theatres injuly, but, of course, it was compromised in its theatrical release by the pandemic which meant that disney, who have the upper option of the streaming platform, made it a simultaneous release and it was good for the shareholders on the rental platform and brought in so many new viewers but it did leave a dent in theatrical tickets being sold which is why scarlett jansen is now saying that she isn't getting enough of the pie that she thought she was owed. she is taking it to the man. her lawyers are very much saying that they are in breach of contract, meanwhile disney have played the covid card saying she is showing a callous disregard for the effects on the world, that is what they are leading to us, and she has a lot of money and she has nothing to complain about. i money and she has nothing to complain about.— money and she has nothing to complain about. i remember going back in time _ complain about. i remember going back in time when _ complain about. i remember going back in time when alec— complain about. i remember going back in time when alec guinness i back in time when alec guinness negotiated a share of the profits
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and a very small upfront fee for star wars and look how that worked out. i wonder how typical is the kind of contract that she negotiated to get a percentage of the profits in this way. the to get a percentage of the profits in this way-— to get a percentage of the profits in this wa . . . . ,. in this way. the bigger the star you are, the in this way. the bigger the star you are. the bigger _ in this way. the bigger the star you are, the bigger power _ in this way. the bigger the star you are, the bigger power you - in this way. the bigger the star you are, the bigger power you will- in this way. the bigger the star you are, the bigger power you will be i are, the bigger power you will be wielding at the back end, so when you get to alec guinness, that was a surprise and it woke everyone up in the industry to the fact that if you are in the game and on the poster, your contribution is essential to people going to the cinema and then the percentage becomes bigger accordingly into will smith and tom cruise proportions, but what has happened and this film is interesting, because the ticket sales were so low in comparison with other marvel films that it does mean that there is money to pay for it and it didn't hit the points at which scarlettjohansson's bonuses should have kicked in in normal circumstances and that is what she is arguing about, saying because it went to the streaming platform, that
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is why she hasn't got the money she thinks she was owed and she thinks disney have been very disingenuous to boost their streaming platform at the expense of her film. i to boost their streaming platform at the expense of her film.— the expense of her film. i wonder what the reaction _ the expense of her film. i wonder what the reaction of _ the expense of her film. i wonder what the reaction of her - the expense of her film. i wonder what the reaction of her fans i what the reaction of her fans will be. what do you think? it's interesting. _ be. what do you think? it's interesting. on _ be. what do you think? it�*s interesting. on the one hand this is a long—awaited female blockbuster superhero and we've seen a few of them turn up in recent years because of public demand and now her fans might see this as one more battle that the black widow must take on, but in this time of the pandemic and chaos and so much suffering and uncertainty, this might look like she agreed, first world problems. in hollywood it comes down to the money in hollywood, as we know. idole in hollywood, as we know. we must leave it there. _ in hollywood, as we know. we must leave it there. good _ in hollywood, as we know. we must leave it there. good to _ in hollywood, as we know. we must leave it there. good to hear- in hollywood, as we know. we must leave it there. good to hear your i leave it there. good to hear your thoughts. let's return to team gb's gold medal performance and some tremendous bmx racing at the olympics in tokyo. 22 year—old beth shriever won the women's final and kye white took silver in the men's event. there was also a bronze medal for bryony page in trampolining.
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let's talk to her mum and dad, sarah and steve page. many congratulations both to briony, but to you as well, and i'm sure you have played your part. steve, first of all, tell us a little bit about what it was like watching the event. based on the success of rio, i'm sure there was a lot of expectation on her and we did not really have any, we wanted her to perform to her best and enjoy what she could, so we were kind of nervous wrecks, just wanting her to get the that she wanted to and she certainly did that. we expected her to be well and getting to the final was great and once you are in the final, anything can happen and to come behind two very good chinese competitors to win the bronze was exceptional. idrul’hat very good chinese competitors to win the bronze was exceptional. what was it like for you. — the bronze was exceptional. what was it like for you, and _ the bronze was exceptional. what was it like for you, and have _ the bronze was exceptional. what was it like for you, and have you _
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the bronze was exceptional. what was it like for you, and have you spoken i it like for you, and have you spoken to your daughter? idole it like for you, and have you spoken to your daughter?— it like for you, and have you spoken to your daughter? we haven't spoken to your daughter? we haven't spoken to her et. to your daughter? we haven't spoken to her yet- we _ to your daughter? we haven't spoken to her yet. we are _ to your daughter? we haven't spoken to her yet. we are assuming - to your daughter? we haven't spoken to her yet. we are assuming that i to your daughter? we haven't spoken to her yet. we are assuming that she| to her yet. we are assuming that she is in a debrief mode at the moment but we are hoping to speak to her soon, and for me, the experience, i was a nervous wreck. i soon, and for me, the experience, i was a nervous wreck.— was a nervous wreck. i was having the heart beating _ was a nervous wreck. i was having the heart beating through - was a nervous wreck. i was having the heart beating through my - was a nervous wreck. i was having l the heart beating through my chest and once _ the heart beating through my chest and once we knew she had made the final, _ and once we knew she had made the final, i_ and once we knew she had made the final, i calmed down a bit because as steve _ final, i calmed down a bit because as steve says, once they are in the final, _ as steve says, once they are in the final, they— as steve says, once they are in the final, they have got to where they want _ final, they have got to where they want to _ final, they have got to where they want to be — final, they have got to where they want to be and then it isjust go out there — want to be and then it isjust go out there and show what you can do. am i_ out there and show what you can do. am i right, _ out there and show what you can do. am i right, or— out there and show what you can do. am i right, or have i got the wrong end of the stick, that she has had an ankle injury which makes the medal even more remarkable? there are two things _ medal even more remarkable? there are two things to _ medal even more remarkable? there are two things to say _ medal even more remarkable? there are two things to say about _ medal even more remarkable? there are two things to say about that. - are two things to say about that. you are correct. first of all, winning silver at rio, she went into the games with a slight injury and managed it very well. coming out of rio, she was hoping to go straight backin rio, she was hoping to go straight back in the gym and start the
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trampolining all over again because she loves it so much but unfortunately she was starting to get more chronic pain around her ankle and the doctors started to look at it and all credit to the team around her to spot it and get her in to see a specialist, but it meant that she had to go under the knife with surgery, one time, then she recovered, went back onto the trampoline and unfortunately the pain had not seemed to have subsided so they had to have her go under the knife again, and this time everything was corrected perfectly. it was phenomenal what they actually managed to achieve, but it meant she had a year out of not doing very much on the trampolining or whatever she was trying to do to keep fit. in reality she's come back extremely well from a difficult situation and well from a difficult situation and we are extremely proud that she fought through all that. absolutely. it makes the _
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fought through all that. absolutely. it makes the achievement - fought through all that. absolutely. it makes the achievement even - it makes the achievement even more phenomenal. sarah, can you give us a sense of all of the hard work that has gone into the medal? the stuff we never see. she has gone into the medal? the stuff we never see-— has gone into the medal? the stuff we never see. she 'ust manages her time down to — we never see. she 'ust manages her time down to the — we never see. she just manages her time down to the last _ we never see. she just manages her time down to the last minute - we never see. she just manages her time down to the last minute as - we never see. she just manages her time down to the last minute as to l time down to the last minute as to whether— time down to the last minute as to whether she is on the trampoline or strengthening and conditioning, or speaking _ strengthening and conditioning, or speaking with psychologists. just everv _ speaking with psychologists. just every minute of her day is accounted for. every minute of her day is accounted for she _ every minute of her day is accounted for she has — every minute of her day is accounted for. she has to watch what she eats. she is _ for. she has to watch what she eats. she is so _ for. she has to watch what she eats. she is so dedicated to make everything as good as it possibly can he — everything as good as it possibly can be. we everything as good as it possibly can be. ~ ., ., ., ., can be. we have got to leave it there, can be. we have got to leave it there. but _ can be. we have got to leave it there, but sarah _ can be. we have got to leave it there, but sarah and _ can be. we have got to leave it there, but sarah and steve, . can be. we have got to leave it i there, but sarah and steve, great can be. we have got to leave it - there, but sarah and steve, great to talk to you and many congratulations to you and all of the family. my pleasure- _ to you and all of the family. m pleasure. thanks for to you and all of the family. m1: pleasure. thanks for having to you and all of the family. m1 pleasure. thanks for having us. thanks. us presidentjoe biden as called for
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states to offer £100 —— $100 to incentivise people to take up the covid jab. incentivise people to take up the covidjab. he incentivise people to take up the covid jab. he also issued a strict new vaccine requirement for us federal workers. the administration is struggling with increasing infection rates, while around half the population is refusing a jab. 0ur north america correspondent, david willis told us more. coronavirus cases have risen in all but one state over the course of the last seven days, most of it fuelled, of course, by the spread of the delta variant, yet barely 50% of the population here is fully vaccinated. and that leaves about 19 million americans who are eligible for a vaccine but have so far chosen not to get one. and today, president biden
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expressed a measure of frustration, a measure of desperation. he said this was not a political issue — there was nothing political about this — and he blamed misinformation, social media and other platforms, for the reasons for a lot of people not getting theirjabs. he announced new requirements for federal government workers to either get vaccinated or undergo regular testing, and he pushed, as well, for cash incentives to be made available to those who are in areas of the country where vaccination rates are low. to sort of incentivise them to get a jab. this is what he said about that. today i am calling on all states and local governments to use funding they have received, including from the american rescue plan, to give $100 to anyone who gets fully vaccinated. i know that paying people to get vaccinated may sound unfair to folks who have gotten vaccinated already but here's the deal — if incentives help us beat this virus, i believe we should use them.
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president biden also said that he is been calling on the us defense department to consider making a coronavirus vaccine one of the required vaccinations that it gives to members of the military here. were that to be the case, about another 1.5 million people would be vaccinated automatically. and he has talked of reimbursing small and medium—sized businesses who give their staff paid time off in order to go and get vaccinated. as to whether all of this will work, we willjust have to wait and see. if it doesn't, the next alternative, really, is some sort of mandatory measures, and that is something that the biden administration is unwilling to deploy. new changes to the road regulations for england,
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scotland and wales will give greater priority to cyclists and pedestrians. it's part of a government plan to sustain the increase in walking and cycling seen during the pandemic. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. hello. not the ideal weather day for those on holiday in the uk at the moment. for latejuly it is cool and rather blustery for some and for others quite wet. the storm reached our shores in the night and under the curl of cloud across the far south—west, the area of low pressure pushing east and the strongest winds remain through the southern counties of england and wales, a0 or 50 miles an hour possible around the english channel but further north the wind is much lighter and for england and wales it is a story of the rain being on and off through the day, some heavy and thundery bursts and
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spirals of rain pushing eastward but sunshine in between and staying cloudy for northern england this afternoon and damp in the north—east and the driest and brightest in scotland and northern ireland but even here one or two showers. the winds are also light so in the sunny moments you won't feel bad but overall for late july temperatures way down on where you want to be, the high teens and the low 20s at the highest. the area of low pressure tracks towards denmark through the night taking most of the showers with it but some will continue around the coast and a weak weather front will push with cloud across the east of scotland into north—east england later. temperatures should not drop away too much, around ten or 15 degrees but the weather front pushing southwards introduces slightly chillier air. we have an area of low pressure across scandinavia to start the weekend which is the remnants of the storm, and this is what we will see, a northerly air flow across the country meaning things stay on the cool side with temperatures lower than where we would expect for late july. there will be dry and sunny weather, far from a wash—out, but when we see the showers, particular saturday, they could be heavy and thundery and it's across parts of
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england and wales, the southernmost counties will develop in the afternoon and they could align into a band and the same across yorkshire and lincolnshire. fairly cloudy across the north—east of england with further spots of rain and heavy showers here and there elsewhere but a bit of sunshine between. not going to do a massive amount of the temperature, between 1a and 21 celsius at its highest. into sunday the cool conditions continue. weak weather fronts pushing south could bring outbreaks of rain to northern england then the midlands. heavy, maybe thundery showers in the southernmost counties but some of the cloud will break up and we will see sunny spells but a bit of a struggle to lift temperatures above 20 degrees. that's how it's looking. see you soon.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: day 7 of the olympics and another gold for team gb as bethany shriever wins the women's bmx racing final, just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain's first olympic medal in the men's event. and there's been more medals in the pool this morning with a silver and a bronze, but also a bronze in rowing for the men's team, and a bronze in the women's trampoline. in other news, pregnant women are urged to get vaccinated, as estimates from england suggest about nine out of ten have not had the jab. wales is set to become the first uk nation where fullyjabbed will no longer have to self—isolate, if they're a close contact of a covid case. drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row.
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more than 1,300 people died last year. nine years in prison for incitement to secession and terrorist activities. prodemocracy activist tong ying kit is the first person to be convicted under hong kong's new security law. and the bbc proms get underway tonight with a full audience at the royal albert hall — although with some restrictions to make them as covid—secure as possible.
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good morning and welcome to bbc news. we will be catching up with great britain's medal haul shortly. at first... the chief midwife for england, jacqueline dunkley—bent, has written to gp practices, obstetricians and midwives, stressing the need to encourage pregnant women to be vaccinated against coronavirus. estimates suggest that about nine out of ten have not had the jab, as ellie price reports. it is a message that could not be clearer. expectant mothers should take action to protect themselves and their babies by getting the covid vaccine. any midwife not encouraging pregnant women to do so will now be going against official advice. at the antenatal clinic at the chelsea and westminster hospital, most of the pregnant women we spoke to had beenjabbed. it is just for their safety. i think i started getting worried, especially in my third trimester. luckily i haven't had covid at all, i've been very lucky that way. i thought it important to have it to protect me and the baby now as well,
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so i decided to do it. i was really nervous before i had it done. i did some reading and thought, "this is perfect." having it done, i feel much safer, happier and much freer to go out and about now. i decided it was kind of better —j i was in a better position having i the vaccine than i was potentiallyl being exposed to the risk of covid. but it has not been a straightforward decision for everyone. if it had been going for five years or something like that, like whooping cough, i would feel more confident to get it done. because it's so new, that's why am still hesitating. i think that is what is keeping me from getting vaccinated. new data from the uk obstetrics surveillance system shows of the 742 pregnant women admitted to hospital with covid since the start of february, only four had received a single dose of vaccine and none had received both doses. the data also suggests that delta variant had increased the likelihood of pregnant patients having
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more severe symptoms. at the kensington and chelsea, they outlined other risks too. if you are umming and ahhing about having the covid vaccination, it's really important to remember that in pregnancy, if you aren't vaccinated, you are more likely to end up needing respiratory support. unfortunately, it can lead to early miscarriages or preterm births, which you can imagine has a detrimental impact on your baby's health. it is thought more than 51,000 pregnant women in england have had their firstjab and nearly 21,000 have had their second. that means hundreds of thousands remain unvaccinated. medical experts insist there have been no safety concerns for pregnant women who have taken the jab already and it is safe. ellie price, bbc news. with me now is marian knight.
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she is professor of maternal and child population health at the nuffield department of population health at the university of oxford. professor knight, thank you very much forjoining us. how concerned are you by these figures? timer;r much forjoining us. how concerned are you by these figures?— are you by these figures? they are very concerning. _ are you by these figures? they are very concerning. i— are you by these figures? they are very concerning. i have _ are you by these figures? they are very concerning. i have been - very concerning. i have been collecting information on all pregnant women admitted to hospital with covid—19 since the start of the pandemic, and there's no doubt we are seeing increasing numbers of women being admitted to hospital with symptoms now, and as you here just then, with the delta variant, we are seeing more women who have more severe illness. so of the women who are being admitted with symptoms now, about one in seven are needing intensive care, and that compares to about one in ten in the last wave we had over the winter.— had over the winter. apart from actually the _ had over the winter. apart from actually the fact _ had over the winter. apart from actually the fact that _ had over the winter. apart from actually the fact that suffering l actually the fact that suffering
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covid and the potential for long covid and the potential for long covid is bad enough, what are the other consequences for a pregnant woman and her baby? that is a very important point, because we also know that of women who were admitted to hospital with symptoms, they have about a one in five chance of having about a one in five chance of having a premature birth, and we know that being born preterm can have long held consequences —— long—term health consequences in terms of neurodevelopmental disability and learning problems at school. so we want to avoid babies being born unnecessarily prematurely. the good news from this study is that real—world evidence shows the protective effect of the vaccine, because we know that so few women, only 2% of women admitted to hospital in their last two months, have had a vaccine, and only one dose, so we know that that means that of the more than 50,000, that's
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a very good evidence of protection that women are getting from the vaccine. i'd like to come back to that in a moment, but we were previously talking about the consequences for the unborn child. how do you know those developmental problems are connected with the mother experiencing covid, given that it has only been known to us is covid—19 for the last two years ok so, tiers out, babies have been born prematurely for some time, and those effects are the effects of being born prematurely. the reason those babies are being born prematurely is because of the mother's covid, so by and large, those babies are being born prematurely usually by cesarean to help with the mother's breathing problems because we know that if you have got a baby on board and you have got a baby on board and you have got a baby on board and you have got breathing problems, it actually makes it harder, and we know, for example, that if you've
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got severe covid, it helps if you are nursed on your tummy. you can't do that when you are still in the later stages of pregnancy, so those babies are being born prematurely, and it's the effects of being born prematurely because of your mother's covid rather than the effects of covid rather than the effects of covid itself that is likely to lead to the long—term consequences. covid itself that is likely to lead to the long-term consequences. thank ou for to the long-term consequences. thank you for exnlaining- _ to the long-term consequences. thank you for explaining. the _ to the long-term consequences. thank you for explaining. the initial- you for explaining. the initial trials did not include pregnant women, so i suppose that includes for some of that hesitancy in women not taking up the offer of the vaccine. but how safe is it? you've explained the protection. but how safe is the vaccine?— safe is the vaccine? that's exactly ri . ht. safe is the vaccine? that's exactly right- women _ safe is the vaccine? that's exactly right. women would _ safe is the vaccine? that's exactly right. women would naturally - safe is the vaccine? that's exactly right. women would naturally be. right. women would naturally be hesitant, because we simply had no information. we do now have some very good information. we know that more than 200,000 pregnant women in the uk and us alone have received
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either the adviser vaccine or the moderna vaccine, we have seen no concerning safety symptoms amongst those women. 50 concerning safety symptoms amongst those women-— those women. so finally, what is absolutely _ those women. so finally, what is absolutely the _ those women. so finally, what is absolutely the clear _ those women. so finally, what is absolutely the clear message - those women. so finally, what is l absolutely the clear message from you and doctorswhat is this message —— how well this message he —— how well this message be conveyed, that you want more women to take up the vaccine, because it is worryingly low at the moment? absolutely. there is no doubt in my mind that the benefits from the vaccine strongly outweigh any concerns over potential risks. we have got to think about the benefits to the mum in terms of preventing covid itself, but also those benefits to the baby in terms of preventing the baby being born preterm. so i would strongly advocate that women have the conversation with their doctor or their midwife so that they can get all of the individual facts,
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specifically as they apply to them, so they can take up the offer of the vaccine. ., , ,., so they can take up the offer of the vaccine. ., ,,., a, ., ., vaccine. professor marion night from the university _ vaccine. professor marion night from the university of— vaccine. professor marion night from the university of oxford, _ vaccine. professor marion night from the university of oxford, thank - vaccine. professor marion night from the university of oxford, thank you | the university of oxford, thank you very much for talking to us.- very much for talking to us. thank ou. wales is to become the first nation in the uk where people who are fully vaccinated will no longer have to self—isolate, if they're a close contact of a covid case. first minister mark drakeford confirmed last night that the change will come into effect on the 7th of august — nine days earlier than england — while scotland plans to do the same on the 9th. labour is calling on the government to bring forward the date on which double jabbed people will no longer be told to self—isolate in england. it's currently set for august the 16th. our political correspondent iain watson explains why wales has opted for a earlier date. the welsh government is very much looking out the underlying data in wales, but also, this is the next stage, if you like, of their road map, they are opening up, so if you like, what they are doing is england'sjuly the 19th and august
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16 combined. so there will be at least a plan to change social distancing rules, for example, to reopen nightclubs and so on which our still closed in wales, in august to seventh, and at the same time, also get rid of the requirement to self—isolate if you have been double jab, and of course, if you test negative, if you test positive, of course, you would be expected to self—isolate for ten days. also interestingly, i think, self—isolate for ten days. also interestingly, ithink, we self—isolate for ten days. also interestingly, i think, we were seeing eight days in a row appalling case numbers in wales, and of course, case numbers in england are beginning to edge up again. they were still down week on week. when it comes to the logic of this, it's quite difficult to interpret, because the government say, boris johnson himself says august to 16th is nailed down keir starmer now says that the whole uk should change the rules at the same time as wales in august to seven. i have been asking labour what is the particular logic for the rest of the uk, for example,
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to go with over seven, they seem to be saying to things, that people who have been double jab should be rewarded and also that quite simply at the moment, with almost 700,000 people asked to self—isolate last week as close contacts, the economy is being crippled. but then, why not do it now? that's certainly the view, for example, a former labour cabinet minister ben bradshaw. so i'm still not entirely clear by august the 7th is being asked for particularly, but i think politically i can see why keir starmer is doing this, because he knows there is a lot of pressure on borisjohnson from knows there is a lot of pressure on boris johnson from some knows there is a lot of pressure on borisjohnson from some of his own backbench mps notjust the so called lockdown sceptics but people such as the former health secretaryjeremy hunt, calling for this date to be moved forward, businesses as well, so certainly saying that there should be an earlier date is something which i think is designed to make borisjohnson feel uncomfortable. the number of drug deaths in scotland has risen to a record
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level for the seventh year in a row. the total number of drug—related fatalities in 2020 was 1,339. it is 5% higher than the year before when it was the highest rate in europe. earlier this year, the scottish government announced that it was investing a quarter of a billion pounds over five years to deal with what's been described as a public health emergency. let's get more on this with annemarie ward, ceo of faces and voices of recovery uk, which is a national addiction charity made up of individuals in recovery, their friends, families and community recovery organisations. thank you very much forjoining us. why has there been this catastrophic increase, because it is a catastrophe for all those involved. absolutely. may all the lost souls rest in peace, martin. the scottish government has admitted they have taken their eye off the ball, and to a certain extent, they are doing all they can to kick with the right foot
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with this massive funding injection. however, where they will always be hamstrung is that there is zero accountability in how this new money is spent, and it is the same organisations who are in charge of this money who have failed for the last ten years. they have given the money to them and they will continue to fail, and unless we change the law, which is a bill that myself and other people in long—term recovery have written, unless we change the law on this issue, people will continue to not receive addiction treatment, and unfortunately, people will continue to die until we start actually helping people get off drugs, get off alcohol, and get well again. drugs, get off alcohol, and get well aaain. ., . ., , , ., ., again. how much of this is down to ublic again. how much of this is down to public sunport _ again. how much of this is down to public support for _ again. how much of this is down to public support for money _ again. how much of this is down to public support for money to - again. how much of this is down to public support for money to be - again. how much of this is down to l public support for money to be spent on these sorts of services, because there can be this prevailing view that people who are addicts, well, it is their own fault, they have got a choice. but it is more complicated than
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that, isn't it? of course it is. there is tremendous stigma around addiction and people who are suffering from that. excuse me. i think the general public, certainly in glasgow and scotland, it would be rare to find a family who are not affected by this issue in one way or another, sol who are not affected by this issue in one way or another, so i think we have reached a tipping point as far as stigma is concerned, and as for it being a choice or a lifestyle choice, that, the logic of that is completely insane. no one grows up choosing to be wanting to be an alcoholic or wanting to be an addict, and the research tells us that the majority of people who end “p that the majority of people who end up overwhelmed with any substance or addictive behaviour, they are usually using it as a maladaptive coping mechanism for trauma. so, you know, these people are incredibly vulnerable, incredibly ill, they're really sick. they are not bad
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people, making bad choices. they are unwell people trying to get well. you talked about accountability, you have talked about a need for a change in the law. but what about the approach that is taken in trying to help people get off drugs and stay off drugs, notjust be on some kind of drug substitute like methadone for heroin ooh are we getting that right? are there things we should be doing we are not? certainly in scotland, the majority of the drug treatment system sits within the nhs, and the nhs offer medical solutions, within the nhs, and the nhs offer medicalsolutions, of within the nhs, and the nhs offer medical solutions, of course, that is what the nhs does, and addiction is what the nhs does, and addiction is what the nhs does, and addiction is what we call a biopsychosocial condition, so there three elements to it, and the nhs deals with the bio part, the medical part. other parts of the uk, the third sector that i commissioned to treat addiction, there are almost four times less death. that's right. the
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same laws in south london and england and wales, but a vastly different approach to how we treat addiction in scotland. so if this was the private third sector, contracts would not be renewed, commissioners would be re—tended elsewhere, and people would lose theirjobs, and there are none of those consequences currently in scotland's addiction treatment system, hence why we've got one of the most significant reasons. that is one of the most significant reasons that we continue to see scotland rank highest in these drug death charts of the world. and just before you go, we should say you are holding a memorial event at 1pm in glasgow today to remember those who have died. anne marie ward, ceo of faces and voices of recovery uk. good speak to you.
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she had to raise £50,000 pounds by crowd funding by crowd funding to keep her olympic dream on track, while also working as a teaching assistant. well, every penny has been worth it for bethany shreever, who struck gold earlier today, in the bmx finals. this followed team gb's first ever olympic medal in this sport, a silver for kye white, who had battled back from serious injury to get to tokyo. just two reasons why this has become a fabulous friday for british athletes, and theres more, as adam wild reports. a silver and gold and bmx racing. for team gb, history and the course of a few frantic minutes. bethany shreve and kye white became olympic heroes. few sports in the games are more spectacular than bmx, an extraordinary spectacle made all the more so by the british brilliance. white's moment came first, powering his way round he takes over. yes. his way round he takes over. yes, it's a silver— his way round he takes over. yes, it's a silver for _ his way round he takes over. yes, it's a silver for kye _ his way round he takes over. yes, it's a silver for kye white! - his way round he takes over. yes, it's a silver for kye white! the - it's a silver for kye white! the first time of asking!— it's a silver for kye white! the first time of asking! gbwere still
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celebrating _ first time of asking! gbwere still celebrating as _ first time of asking! gbwere still celebrating as shreve's - first time of asking! gbwere still celebrating as shreve's chance l celebrating as shreve's chance arrived. that celebrating as shreve's chance arrived. �* . celebrating as shreve's chance arrived. . . ._ celebrating as shreve's chance arrived. . . ., arrived. at all the way, all the wa , all arrived. at all the way, all the way. all the — arrived. at all the way, all the way, all the way! _ arrived. at all the way, all the way, all the way! that - arrived. at all the way, all the way, all the way! that is - arrived. at all the way, all the - way, all the way! that is absolutely phenomenal- _ way, all the way! that is absolutely phenomenal. good _ way, all the way! that is absolutely phenomenal. good work, _ way, all the way! that is absolutely phenomenal. good work, beth. - way, all the way! that is absolutely - phenomenal. good work, beth. waiting at the _ phenomenal. good work, beth. waiting at the finish _ phenomenal. good work, beth. waiting at the finish is her legs gave way, her team— mate sharing team—mate sharing astonishing scenes ofiov _ team—mate sharing astonishing scenes ofjoy. honestly, a dream come true and just— ofjoy. honestly, a dream come true and just compete, even more. | and just compete, even more. cannot put and just compete, even more. i cannot put it into words. this is every athlete's dream, and i've just done it, and it's actually crazy. it's crazy. over in the pool, gb continue to excel, no more than duncan scott. a goal than the silver already at this case. here it came down to the last few metres. agonisingly, behind wang of china. a closer look, he could barely look closer. this is a team where success inspires success. this was luke greenbank�*s pep talk before his 200 metre backstroke final. whatever was said, it was enough, as he powered through for a bronze. what
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said, it was enough, as he powered through for a bronze.— through for a bronze. what a wonderful— through for a bronze. what a wonderful swim _ through for a bronze. what a wonderful swim that - through for a bronze. what a wonderful swim that is! - through for a bronze. what a wonderful swim that is! a . through for a bronze. what a i wonderful swim that is! a week through for a bronze. what a - wonderful swim that is! a week ago, most be he — wonderful swim that is! a week ago, most be he was _ wonderful swim that is! a week ago, most be he was carrying _ wonderful swim that is! a week ago, most be he was carrying the - wonderful swim that is! a week ago, most be he was carrying the flag - wonderful swim that is! a week ago, most be he was carrying the flag for| most be he was carrying the flag for team gb at the opening ceremony. here he was carrying the final british hopes of gold at the rowing regatta. the men's eight, their last chance. in the closing stages, they were still in it, but onlyjust. a bronze was how the rowers and their games. and that's what bryony paige too takes on. her trampolining routine for a few minutes at least was enough to see her into the lead. in the end, she finished third, as the medals keep coming for team gb in tokyo. as we've been hearing, wales is to become the first nation in the uk where people who are fully vaccinated will no longer have to self—isolate, if they�* re a close contact of a covid case. labour is calling on the government in westminster to bring forward the date on which double jabbed people will no longer be told to self—isolate in england. it's currently set for august the 16th. i'm joined now by richard holden, the conservative mp for north west durham.
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welcome. why on earth is england lagging behind wales when it comes to loosening these restrictions? well, what i find quite astonishing actually, today, isjust four days ago, keir starmerwas actually, today, isjust four days ago, keir starmer was saying he wouldn't take part in any scheme personally which allowed this to happen. he wasn't supportive of any scheme or the pilot schemes which we've heard so much about over the last few weeks, and now he has done a complete about turn. frankly, i don't know where the leader of the opposition is coming from undiscovered policy and labour's covered policy. it seems all over the place. it seems quite clear the 16th of august is where we have got the line at the moment, that's because we want to get plenty of time for everyone who has not yet had their vaccine, particularly in that younger age category, to get their vaccine, that younger age category, to get theirvaccine, because that younger age category, to get their vaccine, because a third of people who come into contact with someone with coronavirus will get it if they haven't vaccinated. i someone with coronavirus will get it if they haven't vaccinated.— if they haven't vaccinated. i think a lot of people — if they haven't vaccinated. i think a lot of people will _ if they haven't vaccinated. i think a lot of people will say _ if they haven't vaccinated. i think a lot of people will say that - if they haven't vaccinated. i think a lot of people will say that the l a lot of people will say that the government's on covid strategy has
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been confused a lot of the time over the last 18 months. even your own party seems to be split on whether these restrictions should have been in place for as long as possible, so this is notjust to do with labour, it's to do with disarray in the conservative party as well. i don't think so. conservative party as well. i don't think so- it _ conservative party as well. i don't think so. it is — conservative party as well. i don't think so. it is quite _ conservative party as well. i don't think so. it is quite clear- conservative party as well. i don't think so. it is quite clear where i conservative party as well. i don't| think so. it is quite clear where we are going at the moment. we have had the clear road map that the prime minister set out in four stages, the last of which ended just a couple of weeks' time, but the fact that the leader of the opposition has flip—flopped constantly throughout this pandemic in an attempt to chase newspaper headlines at every opportunity. just a couple of weeks ago, he literally said, i personally wouldn't put myself into a scheme like that. the scheme which allows you to have that testing rather than having to isolate. and today, his recommending it to the whole country. on lbc, four days ago, now he has changed his position. i'm really concerned about the way that the opposition are now trying to
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play political games with what is a really difficult recovery from a very difficult pandemic.- really difficult recovery from a very difficult pandemic. well, i think a lot _ very difficult pandemic. well, i think a lot of _ very difficult pandemic. well, i think a lot of people _ very difficult pandemic. well, i think a lot of people watching l think a lot of people watching this... ., ., ., this... leader of the opposition would have _ this... leader of the opposition would have changed... - this... leader of the opposition would have changed... made i this... leader of the opposition would have changed... made a | would have changed... made a different decision. we have seen this wine throughout the entire pandemic. i this wine throughout the entire andemic. ., ., , this wine throughout the entire pandemic-— this wine throughout the entire andemic. ., ., , ., , , ., ,, pandemic. i apologise for speaking across you- — pandemic. i apologise for speaking across you- a _ pandemic. i apologise for speaking across you. a lot _ pandemic. i apologise for speaking across you. a lot of _ pandemic. i apologise for speaking across you. a lot of people - pandemic. i apologise for speaking across you. a lot of people will. pandemic. i apologise for speaking across you. a lot of people will say the government strategy has not been the government strategy has not been the right one anyway. we have got one of the highest death rates in the world, and the government is relying on the vaccine are to cover that up. i relying on the vaccine are to cover that u -. ., relying on the vaccine are to cover that u. . ., �* relying on the vaccine are to cover that u -. . ., �* ., ., that up. i mean, we don't have one ofthe that up. i mean, we don't have one of the highest _ that up. i mean, we don't have one of the highest death _ that up. i mean, we don't have one of the highest death rates - that up. i mean, we don't have one of the highest death rates in - that up. i mean, we don't have one of the highest death rates in the i of the highest death rates in the world. we don't even have one of the highest death rates in europe if you look at the latest statistics. and quite frankly, the idea that the government should try and... would be doing that is just quite absurd. we are seeing from the leader of the opposition is, four days ago, saying that we should be pursuing this policy... that we should be pursuing this oli , , ., that we should be pursuing this oli , y., ., that we should be pursuing this oli , ., ., policy... yes, you have said that twice. policy... yes, you have said that twice- you _ policy... yes, you have said that twice. you have _ policy... yes, you have said that twice. you have said _ policy... yes, you have said that twice. you have said that - policy... yes, you have said that twice. you have said that twice. | policy... yes, you have said that - twice. you have said that twice. the thing is, people change their minds,
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don't they? politicians change their minds. they look at the evidence and what other parts of the country are doing. wales have been more cautious throughout the pandemic most of the time than england. and we have got the situation now where people in wales who are double vaccinated will be able to avoid isolation and then travelling to england, and will be able to travel from england into wales. so it would make more sense to have those restrictions in tandem, wouldn't it?- to have those restrictions in tandem, wouldn't it? well, i quite auree tandem, wouldn't it? well, i quite aaree that tandem, wouldn't it? well, i quite agree that it _ tandem, wouldn't it? well, i quite agree that it would _ tandem, wouldn't it? well, i quite agree that it would be _ tandem, wouldn't it? well, i quite agree that it would be the - tandem, wouldn't it? well, i quite agree that it would be the best i agree that it would be the best situation if all four parts of the uk came together on all of these restrictions, butjust a few days ago, we heard when the travel restrictions were lifted for vaccinated people going abroad, the welsh first minister was seen to be quite equivocal over what he was going to do on that, so, yes, i100% agree it would be best. we saw the chaos and confusion from the scottish governmentjust chaos and confusion from the scottish government just a chaos and confusion from the scottish governmentjust a few chaos and confusion from the scottish government just a few weeks ago when, after allowing all of the scotland fans dancing in, they then
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tried to ban people from the north west of england visiting scotland, they had to reverse position on that, so... they had to reverse position on that. so. - -_ they had to reverse position on that, so... the very start of the pandemic. _ that, so... the very start of the pandemic. it — that, so... the very start of the pandemic, it was _ that, so... the very start of the pandemic, it was questioned i that, so... the very start of the i pandemic, it was questioned why that, so... the very start of the - pandemic, it was questioned why the government, borisjohnson, allow the cheltenham racing festival to go ahead when we knew that coronavirus was already here, so there are lots of examples we can choose. you have just said it makes more sense for all four nations to be in tandem, so therefore, it would make sense to bring forward the england's lifting of restrictions from the 16th to be in line with wales, according to what you have just said. that would be logical? i don't think that is what i said at all. i be logical? i don't think that is what i said at all.— be logical? i don't think that is what i said at all. i said it would be better to _ what i said at all. i said it would be better to work _ what i said at all. i said it would be better to work in _ what i said at all. i said it would be better to work in tandem. i what i said at all. i said it would l be better to work in tandem. that would mean _ be better to work in tandem. that would mean bringing the date forward. mi would mean bringing the date forward. �* ., would mean bringing the date forward. . ., , would mean bringing the date forward. . . , ., forward. all the date being at the same time _ forward. all the date being at the same time for _ forward. all the date being at the same time for both. _ forward. all the date being at the same time for both. what - forward. all the date being at the same time for both. what i - forward. all the date being at the same time for both. what i don't| same time for both. what i don't think is sensible. —— is the leader of the opposition saying he doesn't support the welsh government's position four days ago and now he says not only does he support it, but he wanted go further. you know, it seems that he is very happy to play political games with wales and
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with england, and actually, the truth is that the government should be leaving for the whole country, like the prime minister has done, with a uk wide vaccination programme throughout the pandemic, ensuring that all parts of the country get it. ithink that all parts of the country get it. i think at times like this, it's deeply irresponsible to say one thing on one day and that totally different, a comprehensively different, a comprehensively different policy if you days later when he specifically said he personally wouldn't back the scheme, and now he is asking it to be rolled out nationally. figs and now he is asking it to be rolled out nationally.— and now he is asking it to be rolled out nationally. as we know, though, health is a devolved _ out nationally. as we know, though, health is a devolved matter, - out nationally. as we know, though, health is a devolved matter, which l health is a devolved matter, which is why the four nations have acted at different times in different ways. richard holden, mp, thank you very much. australia's prime minister scott morrison has said that almost all of the country's adult population would have to be vaccinated against covid—19 before the country can start reopening its borders to selected countries. last week, the country closed a travel 'corridor�* to new zealand amid growing infections. troops have been deployed in sydney to enforce a lockdown as cases there continue to rise. our correspondent in sydney,
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shaimaa khalil, says australia's low vaccination rate is an issue. it is the availability of the vaccine, the fact that there has been so much mixed messaging around astrazeneca that many people have gone forward for weeks. that not many people have gone for it for weeks. also remember, this is a country where for the longest time, life had gone back to near normal. as recently as may. there was not that push in the beginning to get people to get vaccinated because people felt there wasn't an urgency. now of course with the situation in new south wales going from bad to worse, there is a big push from the government to get people vaccinated but numbers are nowhere near when they need to be, only 17% of the population is vaccinated. here in new south wales, we have seen the biggest spike yesterday, 239 cases in one day. that is the biggest not just in this outbreak, but since beginning of the pandemic for new south wales. today it is about 170 but this is after five weeks of lockdown, which has been extended
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to another four weeks. on top of that, there are eight areas in the west and south—west of sydney that have been identified as hotspots. this is going to be where the police and the army presence, the heavy army presence, where we will find it concentrating most. they are going to be on the streets but also knocking on doors to make sure people stay at home. there has been criticism that has been heavy—handed. authorities are saying this is one of the crucial ways to make sure people abide by the rules and abide by the lockdown. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. storm evert brought 50—70 mph gusts across the south—west of england through the night, not quite as windy as that through the rest of the day, but through the english channel and the southern edge of our low system we could see winds touch 40—50 mph. north of it, though, winds much lighter, but bands of rain spiralling around that area of low pressure, so rain on and off
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for england and wales, some of it heavy and thundery. sunshine in between, the dampest conditions with the cloud remaining in place for much of the day for parts of northern england. scotland, northern ireland, winds much, much lighter here. a few heavy showers, particularly towards fermanagh and across the south—east of scotland. but if you get some sunshine in those light winds, not too bad. but overall, a rather cool day for the stage injuly. area of low pressure, then, push us off towards denmark tonight, taking most of the showers with it. there will be a few continuing through the night, so temperatures no lower than around 10—15 degrees for many. but as we go into the weekend and beyond, we stay with the rather cool theme, temperatures down where they should be, sunshine and showers this weekend, a little bit drier for the start of next week.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... day 7 of the olympics and another gold for team gb as bethany shriever wins the women's bmx racing final just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain's first olympic medal in the men's event. and there's been more medals in the pool this morning with a silver and a bronze, but also a bronze in rowing for the men's team, and a bronze in the women's trampoline. in other news — pregnant women are urged to get vaccinated as estimates from england suggest about nine out of ten have not had the jab. wales is set to become the first uk nation where the fullyjabbed will no longer have to self—isolate if they're a close contact of a covid case.
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drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row. more than 1,300 people died last year. and the bbc proms get under way tonight with a full audience at the royal albert hall — although with some restrictions to make them as covid—secure as possible. coventry is the uk's city of culture, with the city hosting a year—long programme of events. as the country slowly comes out of lockdown, there's been an unlocking of talent across the city. let's go to coventry now, where our corrrespondent trish adudu has been keeping across what the city has to offer. a place i know well and it has tonnes to offer. you are from coventry, we are very proud of you.
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everywhere you look in coventry there is creativity, not a steel pan, the generate festival. we are in front of a huge tent, part of a george eliot work reimagined, we have the actors here. tell us about the story and have it has been readopted. it the story and have it has been readopted-_ the story and have it has been readoted. , ., ., , ., readopted. it is the original george eliot book which _ readopted. it is the original george eliot book which has _ readopted. it is the original george eliot book which has been - readopted. it is the original george eliot book which has been adapted | readopted. it is the original george i eliot book which has been adapted by a local coventry man alan pollock and 20 read this book of sales manner he put two and two together and thought this is an coventry and when you go into the rainbow pub you'll see how it is described in the book the same today. and the book the same today. and brintain the book the same today. and bringing it _ the book the same today. and bringing it up _ the book the same today. and bringing it up to _ the book the same today. and bringing it up to a _
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the book the same today. and bringing it up to a contemporary issue because the lead character as a refugee that is not really understood in the same way as when it was originally written. it is automatable _ it was originally written. it is automatable to _ it was originally written. it 3 automatable to modern—day, the study of a refugee who has been accused of something and fled to seek refuge in this new tone and keeping himself to himself and peoplejudging him. this new tone and keeping himself to himselfand peoplejudging him. i’m himselfand peoplejudging him. i'm quite i'm notjudging you because you are holding a horses head. all these props are been made by local people. these props are been made by local --eole. . ., these props are been made by local eo le, , ., ., , these props are been made by local --eole. ,. . , ., people. yes and all the set and stuff as designed _ people. yes and all the set and stuff as designed by _ people. yes and all the set and stuff as designed by a - people. yes and all the set and stuff as designed by a local - stuff as designed by a local designer so everything has come from the heart of the city and it is nice to get everyone involved. this the heart of the city and it is nice to get everyone involved.- to get everyone involved. this is art of to get everyone involved. this is part of the _ to get everyone involved. this is part of the production _ to get everyone involved. this is part of the production but - to get everyone involved. this is part of the production but what l to get everyone involved. this is| part of the production but what is like performing in of audiences. it is fantastic after such a long
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break. — is fantastic after such a long break. it— is fantastic after such a long break, it shows the coventry spirit of rising _ break, it shows the coventry spirit of rising from adversity. what reaction — of rising from adversity. what reaction are you getting? it is fantastic— reaction are you getting? it is fantastic to see this overwhelming response. — fantastic to see this overwhelming response, especially and everyone has a _ response, especially and everyone has a ntask— response, especially and everyone has a mask on, it is hard to tell but we — has a mask on, it is hard to tell but we have _ has a mask on, it is hard to tell but we have got good response so far. but we have got good response so far it _ but we have got good response so far. . . , ., . but we have got good response so far. , . , ., . ., far. it is city of culture, what does this _ far. it is city of culture, what does this mean _ far. it is city of culture, what does this mean as _ far. it is city of culture, what does this mean as actors? . far. it is city of culture, what. does this mean as actors? after far. it is city of culture, what - does this mean as actors? after the ast 18 does this mean as actors? after the past 18 months _ does this mean as actors? after the past 18 months telling _ does this mean as actors? after the past 18 months telling your - does this mean as actors? after the past 18 months telling your hair - past 18 months telling your hair out, when will the work come and having an opportunity given to us you have to snatch at it and it has been a pleasure to be part of something like this. and been a pleasure to be part of something like this. and audiences as well. something like this. and audiences as well- the _ something like this. and audiences as well. the show _ something like this. and audiences as well. the show as _ something like this. and audiences as well. the show as sunday - something like this. and audiences as well. the show as sunday but i as well. the show as sunday but there are a _ as well. the show as sunday but there are a couple _ as well. the show as sunday but there are a couple of _ as well. the show as sunday but there are a couple of tickets - as well. the show as sunday but there are a couple of tickets for| there are a couple of tickets for saturday. irate there are a couple of tickets for saturda . ~ ~ . there are a couple of tickets for saturda . ~ ,, , .,, saturday. we will keep those reserved for _ saturday. we will keep those reserved for you, _ saturday. we will keep those reserved for you, martin. - saturday. we will keep those reserved for you, martin. i i saturday. we will keep those l reserved for you, martin. i did audition to be endless play but i was refused so i am not happy at all. best of luck, guys, iam
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was refused so i am not happy at all. best of luck, guys, i am sure you will do coventry proud. don't tell leicestershire because they will get very upset. not appointing you they really missed a trick. lovely to see you. it's day 7 in tokyo,the midway point of the olympic games. it's a day where we've seen a former teaching assistant who partly crowd—funded herjourney to the olympics, become team gb's first female gold medal winner in the bmx. beth shriever followed up team—mate kye whyte's stunning silver medal in the men's race to become the first british medalists in the sport since it was made an olympic event back in 2008. in the pool, duncan scott won silver in the men's 200m final to keep alive his hopes of a historic haul of four medals at a single games. no british athlete has won four medals at any one games. new zealand have claimed two more rowing golds, with emma twigg powering to victory
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in the single sculls and the men's eight upsetting the odds to beat much more fancied rivals. the men's eight only scraped into the final and were not expected to reach the podium, let alone win. in what's considered the biggest draw of these games, the women's 100m, dina asher—smith failed to find her best form in the heats at the olympic stadium. britain's athletics team captain seemed to run within herself as she finished second to america's teahna daniels. an—san kept south korea's olympic flag flying in women's archery as she took the individual title to become the first archer to win three golds at a single games. brushing off some online trolling about her hairstyle of all things, the 20—year—old added to her golds in the women's and mixed team events. let's return to bethany shreever�*s stunning performance in the women's bmx finals. the 22—year—old used crowd funding to raise £50,000 to keep her olympic dream on track,
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and it paid off with a gold. i'm joined now by bethany�*s family, dad paul, mum kate, and brothers noah and luke. they are here in quite a big crowd, hello. who else is with you? irate they are here in quite a big crowd, hello. who else is with you? we have luke my son. — hello. who else is with you? we have luke my son, rose _ hello. who else is with you? we have luke my son, rose and _ hello. who else is with you? we have luke my son, rose and rebecca - hello. who else is with you? we have luke my son, rose and rebecca and| luke my son, rose and rebecca and kate. i luke my son, rose and rebecca and kate. ., ., ., ,, ., kate. i love to get to know everybody- _ kate. i love to get to know everybody- i— kate. i love to get to know everybody. i was _ kate. i love to get to know everybody. i was watching | kate. i love to get to know - everybody. i was watching this and this morning and your daughter must be made of something different from me because it is terrifying to watch shankill road that track. when did you first know she was something special —— terrifying to watch her go around that track. i
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special -- terrifying to watch her go around that track.— go around that track. i saw something _ go around that track. i saw something from _ go around that track. i saw something from an - go around that track. i saw something from an early i go around that track. i saw i something from an early age. go around that track. i saw - something from an early age. we go around that track. i s—�*i-h" something from an early age. we have all written a bmx sense the children could and beth immediately took to it and was very good and got more and more adventurous and pushed it. early on. has and more adventurous and pushed it. earl on. �* . and more adventurous and pushed it. earl on. . , ., , ., early on. as her mum, what is going throuth early on. as her mum, what is going through your — early on. as her mum, what is going through your head? _ early on. as her mum, what is going through your head? you _ early on. as her mum, what is going through your head? you must - early on. as her mum, what is going through your head? you must be - early on. as her mum, what is going through your head? you must be so| through your head? you must be so proud and anxious.— proud and anxious. anxious comes first. proud and anxious. anxious comes first- because _ proud and anxious. anxious comes first. because it _ proud and anxious. anxious comes first. because it is _ proud and anxious. anxious comes first. because it is a _ proud and anxious. anxious comes first. because it is a really - first. because it is a really dangerous sport and as a mum i worry all the _ dangerous sport and as a mum i worry all the time _ dangerous sport and as a mum i worry all the time. once she gets going and is _ all the time. once she gets going and is out — all the time. once she gets going and is out the gate as with the races — and is out the gate as with the races she _ and is out the gate as with the races she did in the early hours being _ races she did in the early hours being out— races she did in the early hours being out front and looking comfortable, i am just so proud she did it _ comfortable, i am just so proud she did it and _ comfortable, i am just so proud she did it and it— comfortable, i am just so proud she did it and it is amazing. at comfortable, i am just so proud she did it and it is amazing. fit is comfortable, i am just so proud she did it and it is amazing.— did it and it is amazing. at is a real testament _ did it and it is amazing. at is a real testament to _ did it and it is amazing. at is a real testament to your - did it and it is amazing. at is a real testament to your sister'sj real testament to your sister's determination, she has had to work
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part—time and crowdfund because the funding initially was not forthcoming from the sport. she has worked really _ forthcoming from the sport. she has worked really hard _ forthcoming from the sport. she has worked really hard over— forthcoming from the sport. she has worked really hard over the - forthcoming from the sport. she has worked really hard over the years i worked really hard over the years and we _ worked really hard over the years and we are — worked really hard over the years and we are all— worked really hard over the years and we are all really— worked really hard over the years and we are all really proud - worked really hard over the years and we are all really proud of- worked really hard over the yearsl and we are all really proud of what she has— and we are all really proud of what she has achieved. _ and we are all really proud of what she has achieved. it _ and we are all really proud of what she has achieved. it could - and we are all really proud of what she has achieved. it could not- and we are all really proud of what| she has achieved. it could not have gone _ she has achieved. it could not have gone to— she has achieved. it could not have gone to a _ she has achieved. it could not have gone to a better— she has achieved. it could not have gone to a better person, _ she has achieved. it could not have gone to a better person, we - she has achieved. it could not have gone to a better person, we all- she has achieved. it could not havei gone to a better person, we all love had very— gone to a better person, we all love had very much — gone to a better person, we all love had very much and _ gone to a better person, we all love had very much and she _ gone to a better person, we all love had very much and she has - gone to a better person, we all love had very much and she has worked i had very much and she has worked really— had very much and she has worked really hard — had very much and she has worked really hard to — had very much and she has worked really hard to wear— had very much and she has worked really hard to wear she _ had very much and she has worked really hard to wear she has - had very much and she has worked really hard to wear she has got - had very much and she has worked really hard to wear she has got to. really hard to wear she has got to today's _ really hard to wear she has got to today's recruitment _ really hard to wear she has got to today's recruitment be _ really hard to wear she has got to today's recruitment be happier. l really hard to wear she has got to i today's recruitment be happier. very emotional— today's recruitment be happier. very emotional this — today's recruitment be happier. very emotional this morning. _ today's recruitment be happier. very emotional this morning. she- today's recruitment be happier. very emotional this morning.— emotionalthis morning. she makes ou aet u- emotionalthis morning. she makes you get up in _ emotionalthis morning. she makes you get up in the — emotionalthis morning. she makes you get up in the middle _ emotionalthis morning. she makes you get up in the middle of- emotionalthis morning. she makes you get up in the middle of the - you get up in the middle of the night to watch. how do you think this will inspire other people, other women and particular because in the past it has been a very male dominated sport but when you see women are like your sister succeeding hopefully more will come forward. i succeeding hopefully more will come forward. ~ . . forward. i think it will inspire loads of people, _ forward. i think it will inspire loads of people, she - forward. i think it will inspire loads of people, she has - forward. i think it will inspire l loads of people, she has done forward. i think it will inspire - loads of people, she has done so much and sport for women, people
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will pick up a bike and go down to the local track, just amazing. horse the localtrack, 'ust amazing. how hot is it the localtrack, 'ust amazing. how not is it been — the local track, just amazing. how hot is it been for— the local track, just amazing. how hot is it been for her? _ the local track, just amazing. how hot is it been for her? do you think the funding might improve because it is often based on success and beth has shown what she is capable of without the backing she might have had. to without the backing she might have had. ., , ., , ., ., ., had. to be honest we are fortunate we both have _ had. to be honest we are fortunate we both have jobs _ had. to be honest we are fortunate we both have jobs and _ had. to be honest we are fortunate we both have jobs and unable - we both have jobs and unable to support beth to a certain level. it would have been more beneficial if she had had proper backing at certain times along the way but we did it unconditionally and would continue to do that and they would not have done it any other way. we wanted it for her, she was as always been driven and focused and wanted to do the best you possibly could and itjust kind of clicked over the past few days and leading up to this she has got more and more focused
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and it has ended the way it has which is mind—boggling.1�*0u and it has ended the way it has which is mind-boggling. you could not ask for— which is mind-boggling. you could not ask for more. _ which is mind-boggling. you could not ask for more. she _ which is mind-boggling. you could not ask for more. she seems - which is mind-boggling. you could not ask for more. she seems so i not ask for more. she seems so matter of fact about it when she was interviewed and there was i not even knowing how and i shed a tear never be when anything. i knowing how and i shed a tear never be when anything-— be when anything. i think her main dream was — be when anything. i think her main dream was to _ be when anything. i think her main dream was to get _ be when anything. i think her main dream was to get to _ be when anything. i think her main dream was to get to the _ be when anything. i think her main dream was to get to the olympicsl be when anything. i think her main i dream was to get to the olympics and once she _ dream was to get to the olympics and once she was there the next goal from _ once she was there the next goal from that— once she was there the next goal from that was to make a semi and when _ from that was to make a semi and when she — from that was to make a semi and when she got to the semi all she was thinking _ when she got to the semi all she was thinking about was to get to her ultimate — thinking about was to get to her ultimate goal and she was pretty shocked — ultimate goal and she was pretty shocked with getting out front and doing _ shocked with getting out front and doing it _ shocked with getting out front and doing it but she has not dropped a lap atl— doing it but she has not dropped a lap all day— doing it but she has not dropped a lap all day so she was obviously confident. — lap all day so she was obviously confident, she hasn't raced that munch— confident, she hasn't raced that munch on— confident, she hasn't raced that munch on the asked 18 months but the ice to— munch on the asked 18 months but the ice to this _ munch on the asked 18 months but the ice to this is _ munch on the asked 18 months but the ice to this is with the girls she was _ ice to this is with the girls she was at — ice to this is with the girls she was at the _ ice to this is with the girls she was at the olympics with an she is
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good _ was at the olympics with an she is good friends with them and at was 'ust good friends with them and at was just an _ good friends with them and at was just an amazing achievement. she is not one _ just an amazing achievement. she is not one of— just an amazing achievement. she is not one of these people that brags, she is— not one of these people that brags, she is quite — not one of these people that brags, she is quite low—key not one of these people that brags, she is quite low— key but also driven and she _ she is quite low— key but also driven and she loves sharing the news and promoting — and she loves sharing the news and promoting the sport for girls. has she ever taken _ promoting the sport for girls. has she ever taken you out on a bike, rebecca and rose?— she ever taken you out on a bike, rebecca and rose? definitely not but ma be now rebecca and rose? definitely not but maybe now we _ rebecca and rose? definitely not but maybe now we can — rebecca and rose? definitely not but maybe now we can have _ rebecca and rose? definitely not but maybe now we can have a _ rebecca and rose? definitely not but maybe now we can have a go. - rebecca and rose? definitely not but maybe now we can have a go. i - rebecca and rose? definitely not but maybe now we can have a go. i think| maybe now we can have a go. i think i am a bit long _ maybe now we can have a go. i think i am a bit long in _ maybe now we can have a go. i think i am a bit long in the _ maybe now we can have a go. i think i am a bit long in the tooth _ maybe now we can have a go. i think i am a bit long in the tooth but - maybe now we can have a go. i think i am a bit long in the tooth but you l i am a bit long in the tooth but you can give it a try. it i am a bit long in the tooth but you can give it a try-— can give it a try. it does look tuite can give it a try. it does look quite scary- _ can give it a try. it does look quite scary- as— can give it a try. it does look quite scary. as a _ can give it a try. it does look quite scary. as a young - can give it a try. it does look i quite scary. as a young woman ourself quite scary. as a young woman yourself at — quite scary. as a young woman yourself at is — quite scary. as a young woman yourself at is great _ quite scary. as a young woman yourself at is great to - quite scary. as a young woman yourself at is great to see - quite scary. as a young woman - yourself at is great to see somebody like beth achieving like this.- like beth achieving like this. 10096, at is amazing- _ like beth achieving like this. 10096, at is amazing. she _ like beth achieving like this. 10096, at is amazing. she has _ like beth achieving like this. 10096, at is amazing. she has done - like beth achieving like this. 10096, at is amazing. she has done so - like beth achieving like this. 10096, | at is amazing. she has done so well for the sport. _ at is amazing. she has done so well for the sport, make _ at is amazing. she has done so well for the sport, make people - at is amazing. she has done so well for the sport, make people open i at is amazing. she has done so well for the sport, make people open up to it and _ for the sport, make people open up to it and realise _ for the sport, make people open up to it and realise women _ for the sport, make people open up
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to it and realise women can- for the sport, make people open up to it and realise women can do- for the sport, make people open up| to it and realise women can do this, we are _ to it and realise women can do this, we are so— to it and realise women can do this, we are so proud _ to it and realise women can do this, we are so proud. [i— to it and realise women can do this, we are so proud. [i is _ to it and realise women can do this, we are so proud-— we are so proud. it is lovely to see ou or we are so proud. it is lovely to see you or with — we are so proud. it is lovely to see you or with those _ we are so proud. it is lovely to see you or with those huge _ we are so proud. it is lovely to see you or with those huge smiles, - you or with those huge smiles, absolutely wonderful, so please for you all and especially beth. thank you all and especially beth. thank you so much forjoining us and i am sure you will enjoy celebrating the day. thank you. that is what it is all about. staying with the olympics, when a country holds the games, there's often a big effort to clean up and redevelop parts of the host city. in tokyo, this has meant moving hundreds of homeless people from near the main stadium, as sofia bettiza reports. the tokyo olympics have begun, but this is what you don't see. hundreds of homeless people in central tokyo being forced to hide from sight. translation: they want us to be invisible. - since japan won the bid to host the games in 2013, the authorities have taken a tough approach. parks were locked and lit up at night, street tents around train stations and olympic venues removed.
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64—year—old yamada used to live here. you can see the olympic stadium behind him. one day, he found these eviction notices plastered all over his belongings. these people have been trying to help yamada. "we have to build a fence," he says, "to prevent people from entering this area during the olympics." he's been evicted three times. chanting. ogawa has been homeless for nearly 20 years. he hates how his community has been treated because of the olympics. translation: if you're homeless, a tent is all you have got. -
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it's like losing your home. they suddenly come and take your property away. it's the biggest struggle. have homeless people in tokyo being pressured to disappear ahead of the olympics. well, the authorities try to hide the poorest of the poor because they want to show the clean city to the foreign medias, or also the athletes. actually, some of the officials who try to kick them out very clearly say that. "please just hide yourself during the olympic games." we contacted the japanese government and the international olympics committee, but nobody replied to us. the government has said in the past that they're trying to get homeless people off the streets and into shelters. they deny forcing them out because of the olympics. but those shelters cram three to four bunk beds in very small rooms.
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most homeless people injapan are elderly and unvaccinated and think it's safer to sleep on the streets. yamada has found shelterfor the night. it's raining heavily, so he's taken refuge under a bridge near the olympic stadium. if they lose any public places they can stay at night, then they cannot survive. it is unfair and inhumane. but, in the morning, he will get evicted once again. sofia bettiza, bbc news, tokyo. the headlines on bbc news... day 7 of the olympics and another gold for team gb as bethany shriever wins the women's bmx racing final just moments after team—mate kye whyte claimed britain's first olympic medal in the men's event. wales is set to become the first uk nation where fullyjabbed will no
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longer have to self—isolate, if they're a close contact of a covid case. drug deaths in scotland reach a new record level for the seventh year in a row. more than 1,300 people died last year. the bbc proms gets under way this evening with a full audience, although there are some restrictions to make the event as covid secure as possible. audience members are being "strongly encouraged" to wear masks and they're required to provide proof of a negative covid test, natural immunity or double vaccination. last year there was a reduced orchestra, playing to an empty royal albert hall. let's speak now to david pickard, director of the bbc proms... something rather sad about the idea of an empty royal albert hall when it should be filled with music so how excited are you about this year?
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incredibly excited, i was at rehearsals yesterday and you could cut the emotion with a knife, it was also the players on the stage who thrive off the energy of an audience and they know how much they are looking forward to that. six. and they know how much they are looking forward to that. six weeks of concerts. _ looking forward to that. six weeks of concerts, 2000 _ looking forward to that. six weeks of concerts, 2000 musicians. - looking forward to that. six weeks of concerts, 2000 musicians. at l looking forward to that. six weeks | of concerts, 2000 musicians. at is looking forward to that. six weeks i of concerts, 2000 musicians. at is a very ambitious _ of concerts, 2000 musicians. at is a very ambitious season _ of concerts, 2000 musicians. at is a very ambitious season which - of concerts, 2000 musicians. at is a very ambitious season which we - of concerts, 2000 musicians. at is a | very ambitious season which we have had to put together and the last few months, a balance of ambition and caution but ethic we have something exciting ahead of us and one of the things i am most proud of as we are celebrating british musicians because they have been through a really tough time and the pandemic and this is an international festival and what it has reminded us as artists like simon russell and nicola benedetti, the international
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artists throughout here on our shores. ~ ., artists throughout here on our shores. e . ., , ., , shores. what will that be that is new? we will — shores. what will that be that is new? we will have _ shores. what will that be that is new? we will have a _ shores. what will that be that is new? we will have a bigger- shores. what will that be that is | new? we will have a bigger stage than normal _ new? we will have a bigger stage than normal because _ new? we will have a bigger stage than normal because orchestras l new? we will have a bigger stage i than normal because orchestras are still working with a level of distancing so that will be slightly different. there will be various proofs of either double jab or negative lateral flow test and it will be rather more limited roms but it was still a great tradition and you can still get into any concert. it remains the case that classical music can be a bit off—putting, people don't find it particularly accessible. if you fancy engaging with the proms for the first time when would you start. i with the proms for the first time when would you start.— with the proms for the first time when would you start. i would say start with a _ when would you start. i would say start with a really _ when would you start. i would say start with a really famous - when would you start. i would say start with a really famous piece i start with a really famous piece they might know, for instance next
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week we have the new world symphony by dvorak, even the people think they have not heard it before they will recognise it from the bread advert. , ., will recognise it from the bread advert. ., , , advert. the boy on the cobbled street. advert. the boy on the cobbled street- and _ advert. the boy on the cobbled street. and then _ advert. the boy on the cobbled street. and then there - advert. the boy on the cobbled street. and then there is - advert. the boy on the cobbled | street. and then there is pieces like vivaldi's _ street. and then there is pieces like vivaldi's four _ street. and then there is pieces like vivaldi's four season - street. and then there is pieces like vivaldi's four season switch j street. and then there is pieces i like vivaldi's four season switch we are doing later on withjoshua bell, we have dispersed that with tangle also based on the same pieces so a mixture of very caught classical and slightly off the wall and that is very much a proms thing. bind slightly off the wall and that is very much a proms thing. and you make an effort _ very much a proms thing. and you make an effort to _ very much a proms thing. and you make an effort to draw— very much a proms thing. and you make an effort to draw in - very much a proms thing. and you | make an effort to draw in children. yes, children and families are incredibly important to us and we have a lovely concert over the bank
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holiday weekend playing carnival of the animals which is one of the pieces i listen to when i was younger and i hope a new generation will be excited by classical music and healing that concert. litre will be excited by classical music and healing that concert. live music was something _ and healing that concert. live music was something so _ and healing that concert. live music was something so many _ and healing that concert. live music was something so many people - and healing that concert. live music was something so many people said they missed during restrictions so i know a lot of people will be looking forward to tonight. thank you for talking to us. a group of mps has called for more support to help disabled people find jobs and stay in work. the commons work and pensions committee said disabled people still face "unacceptable barriers" to finding and progressing in work. a government spokesman said the "plan forjobs" scheme had helped to narrow the disability employment gap — and that ministers remained committed to reducing it further. we need to have an employment system that supports disabled people
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in a personalised way, that is people are given employment support based on need, rather than something that is generic. secondly, we need action to keep disabled people in work. we know many disabled people do get jobs and can getjobs but often fall out of the workplace for many different reasons. new changes to the highway code will give greater priority to cyclists and pedestrians. it's part of a government plan to sustain the increase in walking and cycling seen during the pandemic. more than £300 million will be used for new infrastructure such as bike lanes and pedestrian zones. the changes, which will affect england, scotland and wales, will be published in the autumn. the star of the marvel superhero film 'black widow�*, scarlettjohansson, is suing the walt disney company over its simultaneous release of the movie in cinemas and on its streaming service. msjohannson alleges the action cost her millions of dollars.
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she said the way the film was distributed breached her contract. disney says the lawsuit has "no merit". entertainmentjournalist caroline frost said the amount that actors make from ticket sales varies on their star power. if you're in the game and you are very much on the poster, your entire contribution is essential to people going to the cinema, then the percentage becomes bigger accordingly, into will smith, tom cruise proportions. but i think what's happened with this film is really interesting, because theatrical tickets were so low in comparison with other marvel films that it does mean that there's money to play for. it didn't hit the points at which scarlettjohansson's bonuses should have naturally kicked in in normal circumstances, and that's what she's arguing about. she's saying because it went to the streaming platform, that's why she hasn't got the money she thinks she was owed, and she thinks disney have been very disingenuous in doing that, to, as i say, boost their streaming platform at the expense of her film. this is a long—awaited female blockbusting superhero. we've seen a few of them turning up in recent years
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because of public demand. now, fans may see this as one more battle that the black widow must take on. however, i think in this time of pandemic and an absolute chaos and so much suffering and uncertainty, this may look like sheer greed, first—world problems. as we know, in hollywood, it comes down to the money. one of george eliot most famous novels as premiering in coventry. at, novels as premiering in coventry. claret and blue big top on a school field and coventry is not the usual
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interpretation but this weekend sees the launch of a musical version of silas marner. it the launch of a musical version of silas marner-_ silas marner. it seemed like a fantastic idea _ silas marner. it seemed like a fantastic idea to _ silas marner. it seemed like a fantastic idea to set _ silas marner. it seemed like a fantastic idea to set that - silas marner. it seemed like a fantastic idea to set that story silas marner. it seemed like a - fantastic idea to set that story and the place — fantastic idea to set that story and the place but it is set and make it with people who live here like the descendants of the people in the study _ at technical rehearsals a pub scene is recreated that is reputed to have been inspired by the 17th—century rainbow in nearby. at a community cast members to flex their acting ability. it cast members to flex their acting abili . , , ., ., . ability. it is the year of culture and coventry. _ ability. it is the year of culture and coventry, to _ ability. it is the year of culture and coventry, to be _ ability. it is the year of culture and coventry, to be mad - ability. it is the year of culture and coventry, to be mad not i ability. it is the year of culture | and coventry, to be mad not to ability. it is the year of culture - and coventry, to be mad not to get involved. it and coventry, to be mad not to get involved. . . and coventry, to be mad not to get involved. , , .., , involved. it brings the community closer. it involved. it brings the community closer- it is _ involved. it brings the community closer. it is all—
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involved. it brings the community closer. it is all about _ involved. it brings the community closer. it is all about home - involved. it brings the community closer. it is all about home and i closer. it is all about home and beine at closer. it is all about home and being at peace _ closer. it is all about home and being at peace with _ closer. it is all about home and being at peace with who - closer. it is all about home and being at peace with who you i closer. it is all about home and i being at peace with who you are. people _ being at peace with who you are. people can— being at peace with who you are. people can relate _ being at peace with who you are. people can relate to _ being at peace with who you are. people can relate to that - being at peace with who you are. people can relate to that quite i being at peace with who you are. people can relate to that quite a| people can relate to that quite a lot today~ — people can relate to that quite a lot toda . ,., ., _ ., people can relate to that quite a lot toda . ., _ ., ., people can relate to that quite a lottoda. ., _ ., ., , .,, lot today. the poignancy of a story of an out say _ lot today. the poignancy of a story of an out say that _ lot today. the poignancy of a story of an out say that being _ lot today. the poignancy of a story of an out say that being integrated into a community is not missed by a member of the cast but also a new arrival and coventry. more? member of the cast but also a new arrival and coventry.— arrival and coventry. now and another country _ arrival and coventry. now and another country in _ arrival and coventry. now and another country in the - arrival and coventry. now and another country in the middle j arrival and coventry. now and i another country in the middle of culture i am in, that is really crazy, it has helped me to know more about the culture and people and everything. i about the culture and people and eve hint. ., about the culture and people and everything-— about the culture and people and eve hint. ., ., ., , everything. i want to do everything as can be done _ everything. i want to do everything as can be done for _ everything. i want to do everything as can be done for the _ everything. i want to do everything as can be done for the child - everything. i want to do everything as can be done for the child but - as can be done for the child but what _ as can be done for the child but what can— as can be done for the child but what can we do without she being christened. what can we do without she being christened-— christened. silas is played by a professional _ christened. silas is played by a professional actor _ christened. silas is played by a professional actor who - christened. silas is played by a professional actor who says i christened. silas is played by a professional actor who says it | professional actor who says it enhances the experience for everyone including the audience. the enhances the experience for everyone including the audience.—
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including the audience. the fact the outside and — including the audience. the fact the outside and coarser— including the audience. the fact the outside and coarser to _ including the audience. the fact the outside and coarser to the - outside and coarser to the environment in which we would be in reality. _ environment in which we would be in reality. we _ environment in which we would be in reality, we can feel how cold it is, we can— reality, we can feel how cold it is, we can hear— reality, we can feel how cold it is, we can hear the rain. effort gets too hot — we can hear the rain. effort gets too hot they will be sweaty and so will is _ too hot they will be sweaty and so will is like — too hot they will be sweaty and so will is like a shared experience for us alt _ will is like a shared experience for us all. . will is like a shared experience for us all. , ., us all. there is debate over the fictional village _ us all. there is debate over the fictional village as, _ us all. there is debate over the fictional village as, some - us all. there is debate over the fictional village as, some say i us all. there is debate over the j fictional village as, some say in nuneaton about the cast of silas marner is determined at is based here and are determined that silas marner will put coventry on the map. goodbye to viewers on bbc two. hello. storm evert brought 50—70 mph gusts across the south—west of england through the night, not quite as windy as that through the rest of the day, but through the english channel and the southern edge
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of our low system we could see winds touch 40—50 mph. north of it, though, winds much lighter, but bands of rain spiralling around that area of low pressure, so rain on and off for england and wales, some of it heavy and thundery. sunshine in between, the dampest conditions with the cloud remaining in place for much of the day for parts of northern england. scotland, northern ireland, winds much, much lighter here. a few heavy showers, particularly towards fermanagh and across the south—east of scotland. but if you get some sunshine in those light winds, not too bad. but overall, a rather cool day for the stage injuly. area of low pressure, then, push us off towards denmark tonight, taking most of the showers with it. there will be a few continuing through the night, so temperatures no lower than around 10—15 degrees for many. but as we go into the weekend and beyond, we stay with the rather cool theme, temperatures down where they should be, sunshine and showers this weekend, a little bit drier for the start of next week.
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a historic day for britain's bmx riders as they pick up first a silver and then a gold in tokyo — team gb's first ever olympic medals in the event. he yes, it's a silver! kye whyte took silver in the men's race, minutes before bethany shriever, in her olympic debut, scooped the gold in her event. the two medal winners, both from london, celebrated together — beth shriever said she was stunned by her achievement. you're an olympic champion! honestly, i'm in shock. like, to even be here is an achievement in itself. to make a final is another achievement in itself.
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to come home with a medal, let alone a gold medal, honestly,

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