Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 30, 2021 3:00am-3:31am BST

3:00 am
welcome to bbc news, i'm ben boulos. our top stories: alarm injapan — that home success at the tokyo olympics could be fuelling the continuing rise in covid cases. there is a time lag between the rise of infection and the rise of the seriously ill patients inundating the hospitals and leading to the collapse of the medical system. president biden tells millions of federal workers to get vaccinated or face regular testing, but there is a cash incentive. i know that paying people to get vaccinated might sound unfair to folks who've gotten vaccinated already, but here's the deal — if incentives help us beat the virus, i believe we should use them.
3:01 am
an inquiry into the murder of a maltese anti—corruption journalist says the state must bear responsibility for her death. it's day 7 at the tokyo olympics — where all eyes will turn to the track, as the women 100 metres heats begins the athletics programme. we start in tokyo, where there's increasing concern that enthusiasm for the olympics has contributed to a spike in coronavirus cases. for the first time since the pandemic began, the number of new daily infections there has passed ten thousand. the japanese authorities say the dramatic rise will not affect the olympic action, but experts are warning if something isn't done to control the spread, the city's healthcare system could soon be overwhelmed.
3:02 am
from tokyo, rupert wingfield—hayes reports. this is tokyo in the middle of a state of emergency, in the middle of a pandemic. these bars are not supposed to be serving alcohol and should be closed by 8pm, but no—one is taking any notice. "i'm not worried at all," this young man says. "i want to go drinking. "i want to go out drinking." "lots of people want to stay at home", his girlfriend said, "but we all have our limits". the japanese government says this behaviour is nothing to do with the games, but even its own advisers disagree. what we really need to have is the leadership by the governors or even the prime minister, and those people may have kind of mixed messages. now we have the olympics, so the people may not really be cautious to covid—19.
3:03 am
cheering. critics call this the olympic effect. we saw it last week on the streets around the olympic stadium during the opening ceremony, and it's all happening in a country where most people under the age of 50 remain completely unvaccinated. to tell people, ok, it is dangerous, you have to stay at home, you have to watch your behaviour is just not credible. it is as if heavily smoking parents tell their children, smoking is dangerous. the japanese government is now telling young people to go out and get vaccinated as soon as possible, so how do you do that? first of all, this is all the paperwork you need. this is actually for my son. and then you go on one of the government websites and make a booking. now, most of the places that i've tried to make a booking today have been offering slots in mid—september, although i have managed to find one place which is offering a slot in mid—august, which means he could be fully vaccinated by the
3:04 am
beginning of october. but others here say the olympics is going much better than expected and, despite record infections, there were just eight covid deaths in the whole of japan yesterday. is the threat being exaggerated? the mood must have been quite jolly before the titanic sank. there is a time lag between the hole in the ship and the actual sinking taking place. there is a time lag between the rise of infection and the rise of the seriously ill patients, inundating the hospitals and leading to the collapse of the medical system. at the current rate of increase, tokyo's covid wards could be full before the olympic closing ceremony happens at the end of next week. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news. our reporter, mariko oi is in tokyo. i asked her about japan's
3:05 am
vaccination strategy. it has been relatively slow, and it does feel a little unfair, doesn't it, as rupert said. ., , ., , unfair, doesn't it, as rupert said. ., , ., said. young people are encouraged _ said. young people are encouraged to - said. young people are encouraged to get - said. young people are - encouraged to get vaccinated even though there isn't enough to go around. young people have been somewhat blamed for not listening to the state of emergency and staying at home, although i have noticed every age group out and about, and thatis age group out and about, and that is because what we have been discussing. this is the fourth time of the state of emergency. people got fed up, got used to it. and the very fact the olympics are taking place in the city is sending the wrong message. you have touched on the point before — the japanese constitution not allowing any strict measures for lockdowns to be brought in, but they could extend emergency measures to make them more effective? that is the big question. the government has now proposed to
3:06 am
expand the state of emergency to the three surrounding prefectures including osaka and the extension has come into play for another koala. —— okinawa. what else can the government do? that is the bigger question. of course, while young people have been blamed for not listening, the very fact that the olympics are taking place and the fact that all of those athletes have been winning, and the prime minister has been congratulating them for winning gold medals, which is a nice thing to do, but he hasn't tweeted once about the most recent surge in covid cases. i rememberan most recent surge in covid cases. i remember an interview with one of the top medical advisors to the government, whether a popular singer, and he said, the single, a lot of
3:07 am
young people don't even know the state of emergency is in place. the shock he had on his face was something. of course, this is shocking news, but the reality is, young people don't watch television. they watch instagram and twitter, their newsfeeds. if the government wants to send a message to young people, they have to change the way they communicate with them. mariko oi in tokyo for us. president biden has ordered two million american government workers to get vaccinated, or else face compulsory covid testing and restrictions. the administration is struggling with increasing infection rates, while around half the population is refusing a jab. mr biden also offered incentives, including cash, for people who go to be vaccinated. our north america correspondent, david willis told me more. coronavirus cases have risen in all but one state over the last seven days. most of it fuelled by the spread of the delta
3:08 am
variant, yet barely 50% of the population here is fully vaccinated. that leaves about 90 million americans who are eligible for a vaccine but have so far chosen not to get one. today, president biden expressed a measure of frustration and desperation, saying this was not political issues, this was nothing political, and he blamed misinformation, social media and other platforms, for the reasons for a lot of people not getting theirjabs. as you mentioned, he announced new requirements for federal government workers to either get vaccinated or undergo regular testing, and he pushed, as well, for cash incentives to be made available to those in areas of the country where vaccination rates are low. that will incentivise them to get a jump. this is what he said about that.
3:09 am
today, i am calling on all states and local governments to use funding they have received, including from the american rescue plan, to give $100 to anyone who gets fully vaccinated. i know that paying people to get vaccinated might sound unfair to folks who've gotten vaccinated already but here's the deal — if incentives help us beat this virus, i believe we should use them. president biden also said he has been calling on the us defense department to consider making a coronavirus magazine one of the required vaccines that it gives two members of the military here. if that were to be the case, about another 1.5 million people would be vaccinated automatically. he is talking about reimbursing small and medium—sized businesses who give their staff paid time off
3:10 am
in order to get vaccinated. as to whether all of this will work, we will have to wait and see. if it doesn't, the next alternative is mandatory measures, and that is something that the biden administration is unwilling to deploy. i wonder whether there is a role for individual states to play in at this, david, and could we have a situation where we have a patchwork is two it is an interesting question. the biden administration, i think, is hopeful that some of the measures laid out today will provide a model for local governments, state governments, and so on, going forward, to put pressure on workers to get vaccinations were problematic — this sort of thing. they stopped short of a mandate, and thatis
3:11 am
stopped short of a mandate, and that is something that, as i mentioned, the biden administration is reluctant to deploy, for the simple reason that this is seen as very much a civil rights issue here, putting something and somebody�*s arm, mandating that is very much something that they think could, if forced upon people increase the push against vaccinations and could also lead to some sort of legal challenges as well. hundreds of troops are to be deployed in the australian city of sydney to help police ensure that residents observe stay—at—home restrictions as covid infections continue to rise. let's find out more from our correspondent shaimaa khalil. what more do you know? 300 troops will be deployed alongside the police force in sydney. they will take some training, undergo some training
3:12 am
this week and they will be ready to be on the streets with police from monday. this is in response to the spike in covid 19 locally acquired cases. 239 cases yesterday — an all—time high, notjust for the outbreak but high, not just for the outbreak but for high, notjust for the outbreak but for the whole of pandemic for new south wales. this really has health authorities, and authorities in general really nervous about the direction, the trajectory of the outbreak. there are eight hotspots in the inner west and south—west of sydney, in addition to the lockdown in the whole of the city being extended. there are stricter rules for those eight areas, meaning that masks will be mandatory everywhere they go, even outside, notjust inside areas. also, they are not allowed to leave beyond five kilometres of their homes, which are stricter than other places in the city. contact
3:13 am
tracers are finding that people in those areas, particularly close contact cases are still going to work. they are still moving around. they are in family homes and spreading the virus. police are increasing their presence on the streets and have asked for extra powers to be able to close businesses that breach those lockdowns in the areas, and they have also asked for army support with those extra troops. they will be alongside police in the streets but also going from house to house. we heard the new south wales police commissioner mick fuller saying today they have thousands of dollars to knock on today to make sure they are abiding by the stay—at—home rules. police are also running hotel quarantine, that scheme still going on, so the army will be supporting them in those areas. reaction has been mixed because while it has been reassuring the forces are on the street
3:14 am
trying to make sure people are abiding by the rules, there is an ease in those areas, especially because a lot of those populations are refugee and migrant communities in the west and south—west. there is an unease about an extra police presence, but authorities are saying this is because this is the epicentre of the outbreak. i think, generally, the epicentre of the outbreak. ithink, generally, people the epicentre of the outbreak. i think, generally, people feel a sense of nervousness in sydney and a general because there is a concern that the lockdown could extended even further, and the delta variant has been generally very challenging for health authorities here, especially because not enough people are vaccinated. thank you very much for that, our correspondent in sydney. plenty more still to come including — searching for a new time commitment lord. —— time
3:15 am
lord. cheering. the us space agency, nasa, has ordered an investigation after confirmation today that astronauts were cleared to fly while drunk. the last foot patrol in south armagh, once an everyday part of the soldier's lot, drudgery and danger. now no more, after almost four decades. if one is on one's own in a private house, not doing any harm to anyone, i don't see why all these people should wander in and say you're doing something wrong. six rare white lion . cubs are on the prowl at worcestershire park and they've been metl with a roar of approval from visitors. - they are lovely and sweet, yeah, cute.
3:16 am
this is bbc news, the latest headlines: a spike of covid infections in tokyo raises concern that the olympics are contributing to the surge, and the city's hospitals could soon be overwhelmed. president biden has told millions of federal workers to get vaccinated or face compulsory testing. he also announced a $100 cash incentive. a public inquiry into the murder of a maltese investigative journalist, daphne ca ruana galizia, has found that the state bore responsibility for her death, by creating a "culture of impunity". she died four years ago in a car bomb attack near her home. her revelations helped to trigger an early election by publishing allegations linking the then prime minister, joseph muscat, to the panama papers scandal, which exposed the use
3:17 am
of tax havens by the rich. our europe correspondent, nick beake, has more. for the last two years this independent enquiry has been hearing from dozens of different witnesses and trying to piece together what happened in the moments before her death and, really, the finding today is that the maltese state bears responsibility for the death of daphne caruana galizia. that is not to say that there was direct evidence that the government or members of the government or associates were directly involved in the assassination but it talks about a culture of impunity being created on the island and that allowed people who maybe wanted her dead to be able to act and believe that they could simply get away with it. it also paints a devastating picture, really of corruption and the tentacles that reach between the judiciary and the police and also parts of the government and, potentially, people involved in organised crime and corrupt networks. it is a strong message today
3:18 am
from this independent panel. it's day 7 of the olympics. there's more action in the pool and on the water, and the first heats are now underway in the athletics. here's the medal table as it stands — china leads at the moment, with japan and usa close behind. our sports presenter, sarah mulkerrins, is in tokyo and has been telling me about some of the highlights so far, starting with the rowing. it is raining here in tokyo bay on the rowing is not farfrom us but on the rowing is not farfrom us but they on the rowing is not farfrom us but they have on the rowing is not farfrom us but they have had on the rowing is not farfrom us but they have had better conditions. we didn't know how that happened. it is the final day of the rowing regatta and i can tell you that there have been a couple of great story so far because in the women's singles sculls, new zealand's emma twigg won gold. she is 3a years old. she came out of retirement to return to these olympics because in the last two olympic finals she finished in probably
3:19 am
the worst place to finish, fourth. she always wanted that olympic medal and gave it one last push and, boy, was it worth it for her. she led all the way from the start. she was not going to give that title up. victory there for emma twigg of new zealand. there was also a great story in the men's sculls because the gold—medallist, stefanos ntouskos, only started rowing in 2019 in this boat, he had an olympic record and that is the first—ever rowing gold medalfor greece. a wonderful story there. i can tell you that in the women's eights, canada have won and new zealand finished second. they are having a good meet and we are waiting on the result for the men's eights and then we will focus on the pool, because the action there will get under way shortly. tatjana schoenmaker from south africa has a silver medal already and she is going for gold in the 200 metres backstroke. so we will keep an eye out on her. great britain have had
3:20 am
a brilliant meet in the pool. the first time since 1908 that they have won three olympic gold medals and duncan scott is going to go in the 200 metres individual medley. he has won gold and silver already so can he add to his collection there? we will be looking out for that and there is also women's football, track and field getting under way. the rain may be pouring but it is not dampening our spirits. that is quite clear, sarah. you are conveying the enthusiasm quite well and i wonder, for those who are fans of athletics, we have not seen very much but that is where focus will now shift. absolutely. it is all about to change. everyone who loves the olympics knows that track and field athletics play such a big part of that. we always have the swimming and some of the other events early in the olympics and then the athletics takes over and it is hard to get a word in edgewise from the other sports. we will have some of the action this morning.
3:21 am
on the screen below me i can see that they are out in the olympic stadium in the centre of tokyo, that rainbow bridge leading to the centre where you will find them. a lot of action coming up in that. the one to look out for, the women's 100 metres event. we will have the heats today and there will be all eyes on the jamaican sprinter shelly—ann fraser—pryce. twice an olympic gold—medallist, going for her third here. if she were to get that, she would be the only woman to ever win three olympic sprint golds, however she will have difficult competition from her compatriot elaine thompson—herah who won gold in rio in 2016. great britain's dina asher—smith is also a silver world medallist from last year and she will be running. we will see how they fare in the heats and then there will be one medal up for grabs on day one of the athletics meet. a little later we will have the men's 10,000 metres with the ugandan runnerjoshua cheptegei going for gold.
3:22 am
he will also compete in the five kilometre race as well. so if he were to win gold in both those he would become the eighth man to do that. the bbc has confirmed that jodie whittaker will step down from her role as the current doctor who next year. she took over as the 13th doctor in 2017 — the first woman to play the famous time lord. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba talks about her legacy and who might be in the running to replace her. some will have liked her, some will have liked other particular doctors that have come in the past and for those of us who grew up in the 1990s, the fact that doctor who was still on air means that it has been a success and the programme going. when herfirst episode aired it got something like 11.5 million viewers. doctor who's biggest audience for almost a decade. there seems to be a groundswell of support, presumably because she was the first female doctor. people were fascinated and wanted her to succeed in the role.
3:23 am
it is fair to say that her first two series saw the ratings drop away to closer to what they were for the ratings of peter capaldi during his tenure. not as big as it was at the start. i'm joined now by bob brinkman from the doctor who fan club guardians of gallifrey in florida. my my goodness. i thought my studio was impressive but that is nothing compared to your tardis. give us your reaction to the announcement. did tardis. give us your reaction to the announcement.- to the announcement. did it come as _ to the announcement. did it come as a — to the announcement. did it come as a surprise? - to the announcement. did it come as a surprise? it - to the announcement. did it come as a surprise? it did. l come as a surprise? it did. after all the will she or isn't she leaving, to suddenly find out that she was leaving was disappointing. i out that she was leaving was disappointing-— disappointing. i take it you are a fan — disappointing. i take it you are a fan of— disappointing. i take it you are a fan of hers _ disappointing. i take it you are a fan of hers as - disappointing. i take it you are a fan of hers as the - disappointing. i take it you l are a fan of hers as the time lord? i are a fan of hers as the time lord? . . are a fan of hers as the time lord? ., ., ., ., ., ., lord? i am a fan of all of them but i think— lord? i am a fan of all of them but i think her— lord? i am a fan of all of them but i think her run _ lord? i am a fan of all of them but i think her run has - lord? i am a fan of all of them but i think her run has been i but i think her run has been really good. marked by some wonderful writing and i am sad to see that come to an end. what is it that singled her out as a good doctor? part
3:24 am
what is it that singled her out as a good doctor?— as a good doctor? part of any aood as a good doctor? part of any good doctor— as a good doctor? part of any good doctor is _ as a good doctor? part of any good doctor is the _ as a good doctor? part of any good doctor is the writing - as a good doctor? part of any| good doctor is the writing and she has had some good writing but she also brings an emotional depth to it that is new to the show. having a woman as the doctor has certainly been controversial in fandom but i think it has been wonderful and refreshing. in terms wonderfuland refreshing. in terms of the next barrier that a breakthrough, it was a big thing to have the first female doctor, what do you think the next barrier they could breakthrough maybe? in a next barrier they could breakthrough maybe? in a lot of wa si breakthrough maybe? in a lot of ways i think _ breakthrough maybe? in a lot of ways i think they _ breakthrough maybe? in a lot of ways i think they already - ways i think they already breakthrough when the fugitive doctor clayton showed up and that was a fairly big deal. other than perhaps casting someone who is openly gay, there is not a whole lot of barriers left unless they are coming to this side of the pond to cast and that will not happen. and when you look back on all the different doctors, who are the ones who stand out
3:25 am
for you? who are the ones who stand out for ou? ~ ., , who are the ones who stand out for ou? ., ,,, who are the ones who stand out for ou? ., ., ., for you? who is your favourite? my doctor— for you? who is your favourite? my doctor will— for you? who is your favourite? my doctor will always _ for you? who is your favourite? my doctor will always be - for you? who is your favourite? my doctor will always be tom . my doctor will always be tom baker. i began watching at the end ofjohn's run and i have always loved tom baker. peter davidson brought a warmth and charm to the show and chris ecclestone reviving the show, the show would not be where it is today without his doctor. 50 is today without his doctor. so who's tardis are you inside now? i who's tardis are you inside now? . . who's tardis are you inside now? ., ., ., . ., ., ., now? i am in a fan creation of a tardis- _ now? i am in a fan creation of a tardis. non-specific. - now? i am in a fan creation ofj a tardis. non-specific. maybe a tardis. non—specific. maybe it will be the tardis for the next doctor.— it will be the tardis for the next doctor. �* , , , next doctor. and, briefly, why do ou next doctor. and, briefly, why do you think _ next doctor. and, briefly, why do you think it _ next doctor. and, briefly, why do you think it is _ next doctor. and, briefly, why do you think it is so _ next doctor. and, briefly, why do you think it is so popular. do you think it is so popular where you are in the us? it is interesting — where you are in the us? it is interesting that _ where you are in the us? it 3 interesting that fandom used to be fairly small but rabid and now i think that production values for the show have come up values for the show have come up and the writing quality has come up on the show, it is as good as anything that we will find on television here in the
3:26 am
states and oftentimes it is better. ~ , ., better. we must leave it there. bob brinkmann _ better. we must leave it there. bob brinkmann from _ better. we must leave it there. bob brinkmann from guardians| better. we must leave it there. i bob brinkmann from guardians of geller frey in florida. thank you and we will see you hello there. storm evert is bringing a quite exceptionally windy spell of weather for this time of year across the south of the uk, with a met office amber warning issued for a good part of cornwall and the isles of scilly. it's all because of this area of low pressure, quite a small low, but quite a powerful one tracking its way eastwards, with the strongest winds on the southern flank. you can see the amber warning area here across cornwall into the isles of scilly. those are the wind gusts in the black circles. but the winds also really quite brisk across a good part of devon, dorset, into hampshire, up the bristol channel and across the south coast of wales as well. so, some damage and disruption quite possible as we start the day, and with this curl of wet weather as well, some heavy and potentially thundery bursts of rain at times. our storm tracks its way
3:27 am
eastwards across england and wales through the day. for northern ireland and scotland, calmer weather, quite a lot of cloud and some showers, some of which could be heavy, but a few sunny spells breaking through as well. stays windy for a good part of the day down towards the south, but those winds will slowly be easing as we head towards the end of the afternoon. temperatures, well, a bit disappointing, really, for this time of year, 17—20 degrees. now, you can see our swirl of low pressure clearing away eastwards as we head through friday night. into the early hours of saturday, fairly large areas of cloud, one or two showers and some clear spells. temperatures between 12—15 degrees as we begin the weekend. so, the remnants of storm evert clearing away eastwards. high pressure trying to build in from the west, but not having much luck. stranded between low pressure and high pressure, we will have a northerly wind through the weekend, and that means it will, generally speaking, be rather cool for the time of year. we will see some
3:28 am
spells of sunshine, but also some showers, some of which could be quite heavy. quite a lot of cloud, i think, as we start saturday morning. some outbreaks of patchy rain here and there. some sunny spells developing, but some pretty sharp showers, especially down towards the south. could be the odd flash of lightning, the odd rumble of thunder. in the sunniest spots, up to 21—22 degrees. and then as we look ahead to sunday, again quite a lot of cloud, some showers or potentially longer spells of rain, the odd thunderstorm down towards the south later on. we will see some sunny spells, but temperatures quite disappointing, especially in northern scotland. here, just 111—15 degrees.
3:29 am
3:30 am
this is bbc news, the headlines; there's been a spike of new covid infections in tokyo, amid concern that the olympics has contributed to the surge. the japanese authorities say the surge will not affect the games but doctors are warning if something isn't done to control the spread, the city's healthcare system could be overwhelmed. president biden has told millions of american government workers and contractors to get vaccinated against coronavirus, or face compulsory testing and restrictions. mr biden is also offering a $100 payment for the newly innoculated. the initiative follows a sharp rise in covid infections, fuelled by the delta variant. day 7 is underway at the tokyo olympics with the sporting world hailing the united states' newest gold medal—winning gymnastics star, 18—year—old sunisa lee. later, all eyes will turn to the track, as the women's 100m heats starts the athletics programme.
3:31 am
england's deputy chief medical officer,

41 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on