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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 29, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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across the country have exceeded 10,000 cases for the first time and top medical advisers urge the government to issue stronger warnings about the virus. president biden has pleaded with more americans to have coronavirus jabs, setting out measures targeting millions of federal employees and contractors. it follows a rise in covid infections fuelled by the delta variant. a public inquiry into the murder of a maltese investigative journalist, daphne caruana galizia, has found that the state bore responsibility for her death. it found the government had failed to recognise risks to her life. tourists on turkey's aegean coast have been forced to flee from their hotels as the emergency services battled multiple wildfires for a second day. video shows hills near the resort of marmaris ablaze.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are lucy fisher, the deputy political editor at the telegraph, and liam thorp, who's the political editor of the liverpool echo. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the metro reports that google is demanding its staff are fully vaccinated before returning to the office as ministers say they are "looking carefully" at whether new employment laws are needed. while the daily mail has foreign secretary dominic raab appearing to back the idea of workers having to prove their vaccination status. the i reports that a new "amber watchlist" would allow the government to switch popular destinations, such as spain, to the red list at short notice, requiring holiday—makers to go into mandatory hotel quarantine. the times says britain is facing a diplomatic backlash from france over what's been described as "excessive" quarantine restrictions. while according to the daily
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express, the eu is poised to start a vengeful "travel war" over the uk's tough stance on post—brexit trade. the daily telegraph says one in four patients classed as a "covid hospitalisation" is actually being treated for other reasons, prompting claims that the public has been misled. the daily mirror highlights comments to the bbc from england's deputy chief medical officer, jonathan van—tam, that the vaccine roll—out has saved an estimated 60,000 lives and prevented 22 million infections. according to the financial times, the conservative party has received £18 million from 154 donors with property interests since borisjohnson became prime minister two years ago. so, let's begin. liam can kick off this time with the daily mail. nojab, nojob. certainly, good evening. the daily mail taking quite a strong line on
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this. furious as vexing passports on the nhs are introduced by stealth. i'm not sure everybody would see it that way as the water story is there are very large companies particularly in the us that are making the demand that when people return to the offices or as we start to they must be double jab. i think pimlico plumbers was the first company to do this and we are now seeing it with netflix and google. and dominic raab has essentially said he thinks it's a smart move. and of the government in this country are desperate to get more people vaccinated. the numbers are pretty good but they are not high enough, particularly with young people. and we know that boris johnson floated the idea of government mandated vaccine passports. that has proved difficult particularly with his backbenchers, so a way around it i guess maybe that private companies are allowed to do that and of course they are welled with them their rights to do that. i welled with them their rights to do that. , , , ., , welled with them their rights to do that. , �*, ., ., that. i suppose it's going to raise aaain that. i suppose it's going to raise a . ain this that. i suppose it's going to raise again this concern _
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that. i suppose it's going to raise again this concern about - again this concern about disadvantage for your people who are so not in a position all of them to have been vaccinated. i so not in a position all of them to have been vaccinated.— so not in a position all of them to have been vaccinated. i think that's riuht. have been vaccinated. i think that's right- even — have been vaccinated. i think that's right. even some _ have been vaccinated. i think that's right. even some of— have been vaccinated. i think that's right. even some of the _ have been vaccinated. i think that's right. even some of the measures. have been vaccinated. i think that's l right. even some of the measures we have seen_ right. even some of the measures we have seen be — right. even some of the measures we have seen be planned to be brought in by the _ have seen be planned to be brought in by the government such as mandatory vaccine certification to enter _ mandatory vaccine certification to enter night clubs will be introduced until late _ enter night clubs will be introduced until late september. once there has been a _ until late september. once there has been a chance for all adults to have two covid—19 vaccinations was about think— two covid—19 vaccinations was about think there — two covid—19 vaccinations was about think there is very much that waiting — think there is very much that waiting until all adults about the opportunity to take up that offered. but i opportunity to take up that offered. but i think— opportunity to take up that offered. but i think this is still controversial. its medical information which traditionally has been treated as deeply personal, private _ been treated as deeply personal, private information. now it seems the government is as them and it robs— the government is as them and it robs us_ the government is as them and it robs us today encouraging firms to seek and _ robs us today encouraging firms to seek and learn medical information of their— seek and learn medical information of their employees. i also think beyond — of their employees. i also think beyond the privacy angle, they are obviously — beyond the privacy angle, they are obviously concerned about discrimination against you mentioned your people, people from communities
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that perhaps have been more hesitant with the _ that perhaps have been more hesitant with the uptake and other groups affected — with the uptake and other groups affected by illnesses that mean they cannot _ affected by illnesses that mean they cannot to _ affected by illnesses that mean they cannot to get the vaccine safely. and just — cannot to get the vaccine safely. and just on that, interesting a lot of these stories with consequences of these stories with consequences of covid and the reminder that this pandemic, even to the numbers don't ease, they will go and affect different aspects of our lives. relating to that point, lucy let's go on to the times. this is the decision of the british government to exclude france for the lifting of restrictions that are going to apply to european countries and indeed to visitors from the us from next week. yes, i think particularly interesting and eyebrow raising that dominit— interesting and eyebrow raising that dominic raab today revealed that the reason _ dominic raab today revealed that the reason we _ dominic raab today revealed that the reason we have seen france specifically placed on this special amber— specifically placed on this special amber plus list that means we will still have — amber plus list that means we will still have to isolate at home for
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ten days — still have to isolate at home for ten days after returning from france even if _ ten days after returning from france even if they— ten days after returning from france even if they have a double jab is because — even if they have a double jab is because there have been a high proportion of cases, he suggests, found _ proportion of cases, he suggests, found on— proportion of cases, he suggests, found on the island of reunion which is 6000 _ found on the island of reunion which is 6000 miles from paris. we see the likes of— is 6000 miles from paris. we see the likes of britney farias calling it madness — likes of britney farias calling it madness and suggesting it would be like blocking or treating brits as though— like blocking or treating brits as though they are on the mainland as though— though they are on the mainland as though they are on the mainland as though they have visited the falklands. and i think interestingly the diplomatic angle of this surprisingly as france is up in arms as being _ surprisingly as france is up in arms as being treated in this regular wav~ _ as being treated in this regular wav~ the — as being treated in this regular way. the europe minister of france has called — way. the europe minister of france has called the british stance discriminatory, not scientifically founded — discriminatory, not scientifically founded and excessive. what discriminatory, not scientifically founded and excessive. what do you make of that? _ founded and excessive. what do you make of that? reasonably _ founded and excessive. what do you make of that? reasonably britney i make of that? reasonably britney farias does not run to reunion islands they feel a bit miffed. 0ne islands they feel a bit miffed. one of the problems with the french but not a problem to france but in this kind of context is remote places that were once colonial dependencies
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and become part of france are treated as if they were departments of france and you can get for example a cheap flight from reunion to paris as though you are travelling within france. does that mean that think there are more visitors coming in they will infect frangible or brits will meet them on the street to paris bring the variant back was met quite a collocated chain to explain it. i’m collocated chain to explain it. i'm not totally _ collocated chain to explain it. i“n not totally certain that dominic raab did not think that reunion was part of mainland france. i'm not certain about that. when he talked on the radio, it was pointed out to him how far away this was and he seemed a bit nervous about it and then we have seen since science quoting here a senior source saying that he was mistaken and actually it was because of the rise of the beta variant and mail in france. you might recall dominic raab was very surprised at what an important role
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dover plate is important to so for a foreign secretary, i'm not sure his grasp of yourfee foreign secretary, i'm not sure his grasp of your fee is quite as good as it needs to be. i think the policy with france will be moved onto the amber list and you can actually those beta cases have started to fall. but it is a bit of a farce and i have to say i have real admiration for anyone who was trying to book a foreign holiday this summer because it is a completed situation and that's why i'm just going to go to north wales i'm just going to go to north wales i think. i'm just going to go to north wales ithink. i i'm just going to go to north wales i think. ., �* , ., i. i'm just going to go to north wales ithink. ., �* , ., i. ., i think. i don't blame you for that. it is a beautiful _ i think. i don't blame you for that. it is a beautiful part _ i think. i don't blame you for that. it is a beautiful part of— it is a beautiful part of the country, though i fear a large proportion of merseyside may make the same decision. we proportion of merseyside may make the same decision.— the same decision. we are all doing the same decision. we are all doing the same decision. we are all doing the same thing. _ the same decision. we are all doing the same thing. liverpool _ the same decision. we are all doing the same thing. liverpool by - the same decision. we are all doing the same thing. liverpool by the . the same decision. we are all doing | the same thing. liverpool by the sea or london by — the same thing. liverpool by the sea or london by the _ the same thing. liverpool by the sea or london by the sea _ the same thing. liverpool by the sea or london by the sea if— the same thing. liverpool by the sea or london by the sea if you - the same thing. liverpool by the sea or london by the sea if you are - the same thing. liverpool by the sea or london by the sea if you are in - or london by the sea if you are in brighton or everywhere else by the sea if you were in cornwall. do you want to carry on with the theme as it were? this is a telegraph taking a more sceptical view about the covid statistics.—
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a more sceptical view about the covid statistics. telegraph done a coule of covid statistics. telegraph done a couple of stories _ covid statistics. telegraph done a couple of stories along _ covid statistics. telegraph done a couple of stories along these - covid statistics. telegraph done a| couple of stories along these lines which sort of take the angle that people have been misled about the number of people in hospital with covid. what they are saying is that one in four patients who were classed as a covid hospitalisation are actually being treated for other reasons. what is about is this is official data and is about the primary reason that you are in hospital. and they are saying that that means there is the suggestion the public has been misled. i would disagree with that really. i would say that was a public has been misled about is the incredible pressure that the hospitals face and we recall the wave in particular reported very closely in liverpool, went into an ic unit to report from there. that was not misleading anyone. that was hospitals under pressure and they had really never seen that before. in a point i would make his even if you are in hospital
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for them in different but you don't get covid, which telegraph points out here, that can be pretty dangerous and pretty serious as well. so that's the way that they want to go with it. i would disagree with it and said the pressure hospitals have faced is the key metric. yes, covid but everything. if the overall pressure on staff and the services itself and that has not been misleading anyone in my opinion. been misleading anyone in my oinion. , been misleading anyone in my opinion- i _ been misleading anyone in my opinion.- i think- been misleading anyone in my opinion.- i think that's i been misleading anyone in my opinion. lucy. i think that's not uuite opinion. lucy. i think that's not quite right- _ opinion. lucy. i think that's not quite right. it's _ opinion. lucy. i think that's not quite right. it's the _ opinion. lucy. i think that's not quite right. it's the nhs - opinion. lucy. i think that's not quite right. it's the nhs here that has led _ quite right. it's the nhs here that has led the drive to improve its understanding of the statistics. it is the _ understanding of the statistics. it is the nhs that asked hospitals to report— is the nhs that asked hospitals to report the data in a different way because — report the data in a different way because they were concerned that it was not _ because they were concerned that it was not quite capturing what the government and the decision—makers and policymakers need to know when they are _ and policymakers need to know when they are looking at covid—19 data and deciding what restrictions and so forth— and deciding what restrictions and so forth are appropriate. came out today— so forth are appropriate. came out today and — so forth are appropriate. came out today and said there is an important station _ today and said there is an important station for— today and said there is an important
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station for people admitted with covid _ station for people admitted with covid and people admitted for covid. and it's _ covid and people admitted for covid. and it's not — covid and people admitted for covid. and it's not insignificant that 25% of those — and it's not insignificant that 25% of those people, 5000 people in hospital— of those people, 5000 people in hospital right now, have actually been _ hospital right now, have actually been admitted for different primary reasons— been admitted for different primary reasons was of the fact is that all patients— reasons was of the fact is that all patients who are admitted to hospital— patients who are admitted to hospital have to routinely automatically have a covid test, and in many— automatically have a covid test, and in many cases they may be suffering from any _ in many cases they may be suffering from any kind of ailment or any sort of injury— from any kind of ailment or any sort of injury like — from any kind of ailment or any sort of injury like a broken leg and may be symptom list. so i think it's not quite _ be symptom list. so i think it's not quite right— be symptom list. so i think it's not quite right either to a jump to assumptions and say that even though they did _ assumptions and say that even though they did not arrive in hospital with covid _ they did not arrive in hospital with covid and — they did not arrive in hospital with covid and yet still have it that they— covid and yet still have it that they could be putting pressure on they could be putting pressure on the nhs — they could be putting pressure on the nhs in covid terms. the story on the nhs in covid terms. the story on the front of— the nhs in covid terms. the story on the front of the _ the nhs in covid terms. the story on the front of the ftm _ the nhs in covid terms. the story on the front of the ftm we _ the nhs in covid terms. the story on the front of the ftm we only - the nhs in covid terms. the story on the front of the ftm we only have . the front of the ftm we only have part is there is more detail inside the news in brief section, the frustrations people who want to get tested and who can use a testing to lo celso carry on working as key
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workers, hopefully in this privilege group who will be allowed to go and work even if they have been close to somebody who has had covid. the figures that are not encouraging at the moment. he. figures that are not encouraging at the moment-— the moment. no, that's right. the government _ the moment. no, that's right. the government have _ the moment. no, that's right. the government have announced - the moment. no, that's right. the government have announced that| the moment. no, that's right. the - government have announced that 2000 testing _ government have announced that 2000 testing centres will be expedited to help critical workers in critical industries _ help critical workers in critical industries get tests daily instead of having — industries get tests daily instead of having to isolate because we have seen so _ of having to isolate because we have seen so much disruption to the economy— seen so much disruption to the economy and in many ways the functioning of the country through this ping _ functioning of the country through this ping pandemic as it has become known _ this ping pandemic as it has become known. another portmanteau for all of us _ known. another portmanteau for all of us to— known. another portmanteau for all of us to memorise. there are almost 60.000 _ of us to memorise. there are almost 60,000 people isolating after having been pinged and the government has exempted _ been pinged and the government has exempted a number of industries starting _ exempted a number of industries starting with cruise officers, the something in defence and the fish and communications and border
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officiais — and communications and border officials but that whole exemption boiicv _ officials but that whole exemption policy is _ officials but that whole exemption policy is based on the ability for the people to get tested so the news today that _ the people to get tested so the news today that only 253 out of the 2000 sites are _ today that only 253 out of the 2000 sites are open, just 13%, suggest a government is not managing to get these _ government is not managing to get these sites on the ground quick enough — these sites on the ground quick enou:h. ~ ., ., i. these sites on the ground quick enou:h. . ., ., ,, ., ,, these sites on the ground quick enou.h_ . ., ., a, ., ~' ., enough. what do you make of it, liam? allergy — enough. what do you make of it, liam? allergy with _ enough. what do you make of it, liam? allergy with what - enough. what do you make of it, liam? allergy with what lucy - enough. what do you make of it, i liam? allergy with what lucy said. we are seeing _ liam? allergy with what lucy said. we are seeing a — liam? allergy with what lucy said. we are seeing a record _ liam? allergy with what lucy said. we are seeing a record number - liam? allergy with what lucy said. we are seeing a record number of| we are seeing a record number of people being pinged and at the same time you are seeing a real lackluster approach to getting these vital centres open. this is a lot about people being safe but keeping the country moving and to be able to do that people need to be tested regularly. that's vital. initially depressing that when you think back to last summer and the massive problems we were having with people getting tested and we kind of thought we were passed that point and the testing process was really smooth now. so it is depressing to
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hear. 30% of the 2000 testing sites is not good enough and obviously as we head towards the 16th of august which is when the rules are going to change, things and to change really poorly before that or we could see certain areas grind to a hall or alternatively people potentially who are going back to work without being able to get tested which is particularly dangerous. it is particularly dangerous. it is indeed. let's _ particularly dangerous. it is indeed. let's move - particularly dangerous. it is indeed. let's move on - particularly dangerous. it is indeed. let's move on to the daily mail. it's a photo story i think is quite interesting here. and it's a reminder of some of these cases taking years before they come to any kind of fruition. and also the importance of regional media as well. this is the so—called suffolk strangler to people may recall was the man who was convicted of murders, steven wright, of prostitutes working in the ipswich area and now being quizzed over and murder. i mention it also because the local papers down and ipswich,
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the local papers down and ipswich, the star and also the east anglia papers, actually took the stories and really ran with them and did a lot about the problems in the sex industry in ipswich and actually across the region.— industry in ipswich and actually across the region. absolutely and i'm across the region. absolutely and m pleased _ across the region. absolutely and i'm pleased that _ across the region. absolutely and i'm pleased that you _ across the region. absolutely and i'm pleased that you mentioned l across the region. absolutely and i i'm pleased that you mentioned that because it's important recognise the work of regional media. this is not a slight on national media but sometimes when a major incident happens, we have had it in liverpool with some high—profile incidents like the murder of reesjones of course, the national press come into an area for a short period of time and then they leave because they have to go back to london or wherever it is and is a local papers and media that stay with the story and media that stay with the story and they really get to grips with it for so they really get to know those involved in the families we will like that and keep it going. and obviously the paper stent in east anglia have been doing that for a long time with both the cases of stephen wright and the murders he committed and the unsolved case of
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victoria hall. and what today's story is saying is those two things have now met in the middle and right has been arrested on suspicion of the murder of victoria hall, he was a 17—year—old girl who was tragically strangled and dumped in a ditch on her way back home from a nightclub in 1999.— nightclub in 1999. again the point as opposed _ nightclub in 1999. again the point as apposed to _ nightclub in 1999. again the point as opposed to echo _ nightclub in 1999. again the point as opposed to echo liam - nightclub in 1999. again the point as opposed to echo liam is - nightclub in 1999. again the point as opposed to echo liam is the i as opposed to echo liam is the national papers cannot stay with the story over a long pier but regional press can and often therefore they are a hugely important in terms of trying to get a resolution to cases like these unsolved murders he can take years. i like these unsolved murders he can take ears. ~ like these unsolved murders he can take ears. ,, ., �* , like these unsolved murders he can take years— take years. i think that's actually ri . ht. take years. i think that's actually right. oftentimes _ take years. i think that's actually right. oftentimes i _ take years. i think that's actually right. oftentimes i think - take years. i think that's actually right. oftentimes i think you - take years. i think that's actuallyl right. oftentimes i think you seek right. oftentimes i think you seek national— right. oftentimes i think you seek national media and regional media bounce _ national media and regional media bounce of— national media and regional media bounce of each other sometimes when through— bounce of each other sometimes when through channels in london and national— through channels in london and national media might get new lines
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on something and other times often following _ on something and other times often following up excellent scoops for regional— following up excellent scoops for regional media. so actually imperative especially in cases like this which— imperative especially in cases like this which are unspeakably grim but incredibly— this which are unspeakably grim but incredibly important, and if they have _ incredibly important, and if they have found the right person who is behind _ have found the right person who is behind the — have found the right person who is behind the murder of 17—year—old victoria _ behind the murder of 17—year—old victoria hall, then i hope that brings— victoria hall, then i hope that brings some element of closure to her family— brings some element of closure to her family after two decades. i mentioned ipswich but also should mentioned ipswich but also should mention the eastern daily press as well in the amount of coverage they gave to these terrible incidents in ipswich at the time. let's end with a lovely photograph of scarlett johansson, office of the star of black widow, but she may not be on walt disney's christmas card list for much longer.— walt disney's christmas card list for much longer. interesting. this marks the batch _ for much longer. interesting. this marks the batch last _ for much longer. interesting. this marks the batch last of _ for much longer. interesting. this marks the batch last of the - for much longer. interesting. this marks the batch last of the movie j marks the batch last of the movie stars _ marks the batch last of the movie stars against major production studios — stars against major production
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studios like disney wanting to bring things— studios like disney wanting to bring things out— studios like disney wanting to bring things out to streaming platforms immediately and concurrently with them _ immediately and concurrently with them appearing in cinemas. scarlett johansson— them appearing in cinemas. scarlett johansson is suing disney over that decision— johansson is suing disney over that decision because her pay packet was based _ decision because her pay packet was based on _ decision because her pay packet was based on box office receipts. she argues _ based on box office receipts. she argues that by allowing people to watch _ argues that by allowing people to watch it _ argues that by allowing people to watch it in their homes on their disney— watch it in their homes on their disney plus subscription, that will obviously— disney plus subscription, that will obviously hit the number of people having _ obviously hit the number of people having to _ obviously hit the number of people having to cinema to see it. interesting here between both but certainly— interesting here between both but certainly i can see the appeal of being _ certainly i can see the appeal of being able to get things immediately at home _ being able to get things immediately at home without having to make the trip out _ at home without having to make the trip out is _ at home without having to make the trip out is a — at home without having to make the trip out is a never been a big cinema girl. trip out is a never been a big cinema girl-— trip out is a never been a big cinema girl. i cinema girl. last brief thought. i would not _ cinema girl. last brief thought. i would not mess _ cinema girl. last brief thought. i would not mess with _ cinema girl. last brief thought. i would not mess with black- cinema girl. last brief thought. i l would not mess with black widow. cinema girl. last brief thought. i - would not mess with black widow. she is tough. i would watch out if i was those disney plus lawyers. but difficult. we have all been in our home for so long and are so used to streaming stuff but this is a really sort of big moment because one of biggest stars in the woods looking on a streaming service. interesting
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to see and — on a streaming service. interesting to see and if _ on a streaming service. interesting to see and if the _ on a streaming service. interesting to see and if the lawyers _ on a streaming service. interesting to see and if the lawyers don't - to see and if the lawyers don't work, she could always do on the costume and turn around to give them quite a scare turning up in the office is black widow. that is it for the papers this evening. my thanks to lucy and julian for their cooperation and good judgment in talking us through the stories. sport coming up next and whether and then newsday is back at midnight. for all of us, goodbye. good evening. day six in tokyo has ended with team gb sitting in sixth in the medals table. no golds today, but two more medals nonetheless take them to 18 in total. mallory franklin got a silver on her 0lympic debut in the women's canoe slalom, an event that was also appearing at the games for the first time. franklin went early in the final and posted a time that saw her lead the competition right until the final paddler. and a flawless display
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from australia'sjessica fox meant the brit had to settle for silver. franklin is a legacy of london 2012, as she's been training at the lee valley white water centre, built for those games. it was really cool. it was so stressful being sat up there on the start line, but ijust had a moment where i was like this is actually really cool. i wouldn't want to be anywhere else right now. the camera was panning around me, and i caught a glimpse and smiled in it. it reminded me of the environment and how crazy it all is, but it's just really cool. the other medal today came courtesy of matthew coward—holley, who won bronze in the men's trap shooting. he is the world and european champion, but paid the price for a slow start, missing three of his first ten targets. the brit recovered with 1a successive hits to climb onto the podium. elsewhere, america's sunisa lee has won the coveted women's all—around gymnastics title. her uneven bars was the feature of her competition,
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but the 18—year—old secured the gold with her fourth discipline on the floor, making her the fifth conescutive american woman to win the event. lee was supported throughout by simone biles, who watched on from the sidelines along her other american team—mates. she withdrew from the competition in tokyo to focus on her mental health. so, what can we look ahead to on day seven? joining me now from tokyo is our reporter sarah mulkerrins. sarah, what are the medal prospects for great britain on friday? good morning from tokyo, mimi. it's going to be all eyes on the pool. what an olympic games the british team are having. three gold medals so far in the pool, the first time since london in 1908 that that has happened and there could potentially be more today. it'll be all eyes on duncan scott. he's going for his possible third
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of four medals having won a gold and silver already in these games. he's going in the men's 200 metres individual medley, and he qualified as second—fastest in that. there will be other opportunities for other swimmers in the pool, but let's move across to the rowing because it's the final day of the medals being awarded there. vicky thornley is going in the women's singles sculls. she qualified third—fastest for that final, and the men's eight are also going looking to defend their gold from rio five years ago. however, they have to come through repachages system there, so we will see how they get on. not quite medals today for the women's football, but their tournament could be over if they don't manage to get through their quarterfinal meet with australia. and golf is also under way. it's going to be day two, so not quite medals there, but they have to keep themselves in contention. paul casey had a very good opening. he's on four—under. that's four off the lead.
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tommy fleetwood a further three shots back on one—under. and we're looking forward to the start of the athletics on day seven? absolutely. it's the big focal point. once we get through the swimming in the olympics, the next big event turns into the track and field, and that is going to get under way a little bit later. for british hopes, all eyes on dina asher—smith. what a phenomenal athlete she is. she is going to go in the 100 metres heats, the world's silver medallist as well from last year. however, there is jamaica's shelly—ann fraser—pryce, who is in great form this year. she is bidding to become the first ever woman to win three sprint olympic gold medals. there is only one medal on offer in the track and field a little bit later, and that's going to be in the men's 10,000 metres final. the ugandanjoshua cheptegei in that with britain's mo farah not at these games to compete in that.
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looking very much to them all of that. thank you so much, sarah. away from the olympics, the british and irish lions face south africa in the second test on saturday, but there's been an extraordinary outburst from the springboks' director of rugby, rassie erasmus. he posted an hour—long monologue on social media where he severely criticises the refereeing in last weekend's series opener, which the lions won by 22—17. he said he wanted to make sure his side got an "equal chance" in the next game. among his complaints, he said the referee didn't give the south africa players the same level of respect as the visitors. lions captain alun wyn jones doesn't agree. in the heat of the moment, it didn't really have any... felt we had any advantage, because a lot of times, we were standing next to the refs when he was speaking to them, so an outside perception, i can't really comment on.
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it's difficult for players at the speed of the games going, you know, the ball in play, and i think sometimes the referees have the hardestjob in the game being in the middle of all of that. catalans dragons recorded their 11th straight super league win with a 40—20 victory over wakefield trinity. dragons are still top of the table. also this evening, leeds rhinos improved their play—off hopes, beating hull fc 22—12. leeds ran in three tries, with cameron smith claiming the third. trent rockets maintained their 100% record in the men's hundred. they beat london spirit by seven runs in front of nearly 2a,000 fans at lords. rockets' total of 123—4 looked modest after they were put into bat. despite 69 from australian d'arcy short, london spirit collapsed to 93—8 and were always struggling to reach their target. trent rockets now have
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three wins out of three. earlier in the women's match, rachel priest was the mainstay of the rockets' total of 151—4, the highest in the women's competiton so far. she hit a rapid 76. in reply, london stuttered, and the turning point came when their star player deandra dottin was run out for 29. they eventually finished 19 runs short of their target. and that's all the sport for now, but we'll be back a little later. hello. a stormy evening and night is ahead for the south west of england, whilst only thunderstorms further north in the uk will tend to fizzle out in the next few hours. but we have had some around again today. but this is a named storm we're talking about in the south west approaches. that's unusual at this time of year. of particular concern, those sleeping out under canvas 01’ in a caravan.
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it's this rapidly deepening area of low pressure bringing that stormy weather. notjust winds, but some more soaking rains as well, and those will affect many parts, actually, of england and wales as we go through the evening and overnight, as you can see. we could have 15—20 mm of rain as that weather front moves through. the winds escalating in south west approaches first of all, could see gusts in excess of 60 mph, as i say, enough to bring down potentially trees and power lines, it could cause some disruption. by morning, you can see that that rain is affecting many parts of england and wales, whilst the showers have eased in the north, it becomes a little drier. certainly not a cold night for anywhere, and it does look as if we will start with some drier weather in the north, just rather cloudy and cool across northern scotland. one or two showers here pepping up again and for northern ireland, but around our area of low pressure,
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our storm across southern areas will see heavier showers breaking out with thunder and lightning. again, some strong winds, even gale—force winds around coastal areas in southern and eastern parts as well. not as lively, we think, as those further west to start the day, but unusually strong for this time of year, and the winds should ease down a little bit in the south west as we get into the afternoon. but the feel of the day will be tempered somewhat compared with today because we've got more cloud around and those heavy downpours. now, those are all tied in, as i say, with that storm system which moves away for saturday. and then we open up to this northerly wind bringing showers southwards. so, northerly wind will make it feel cooler, and temperatures actually will be below average across the northern half of the country in particular. and still with those weather fronts close by for the north sea coast, the risk of some cloudy periods with some patchy rain. and still in southern areas, there's the energy there for some heavier showers to break out, so it's not as unsettled, but it's still not dry. and, as i say, in the north, it will feel quite cool. similar outlook for sunday, really. by the beginning of the week, things may start to calm down a little bit more. more detail on that amber warning online.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... alarm injapan — is home success at the tokyo 0lympics fuelling the continuing rise of covid cases? there is between the rise of infection and the rise of the seriously ill patients inundating the hospitals and leading to the collapse of the medical system. leading to the collapse of the medical system. president biden tells millions of federal workers to get vaccinated or face regular testing — but there is a cash incentive. i know the pain of people who -ot i know the pain of people who got in — i know the pain of people who got in vaccinated mice and unfair— got in vaccinated mice and unfair to— got in vaccinated mice and unfair to people who have
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gotten _ unfair to people who have gotten vaccinated already. here's _ gotten vaccinated already. here's the deal,

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