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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 29, 2021 11:00pm-11:30pm BST

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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... alarm injapan — is home success at the tokyo olympics fuelling the continuing rise of covid cases? in the us, president biden is pulling no punches when it comes to vaccinations. federal employees must be jabbed, orface regular testing — but there is a cash incentive. today i'm calling on all states and local governments to use funding they have received including from they have received including from the american rescue plan to give $100 to anyone who gets fully
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vaccinated. an inquiry into the murder of a maltese anti—corruption journalist says the state must bear responsibility for her death. and re—living past glories — former asian olympians tell us what it feels like to taste sporting success. it's six in the morning in singapore, and the same time in tokyo, where there is increasing concern that enthusiasm for the olympics has contributed to a spike in coronavirus cases. for the first time, since the pandemic began, the number of new daily infections there has passed ten thousand. the japanese authorities say the dramatic rise will not affect the olympics, but experts are warning if something isn't done to control the spread,
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the city's healthcare system could soon be overwhelmed. from tokyo, rupert wingfield—hayes reports. this is tokyo in the middle of a state of emergency, in the middle of a pandemic. these bars are not supposed to be serving alcohol and should be closed by 8pm, but no one is taking any notice. "i'm not worried at all, this young man says. "i want to go drinking. "i want to go out drinking." "lots of people want to stay at home", his girlfriend said, "but we all have our limits". the japanese government says this behaviour is nothing to do with the games, but even its own advisers disagree. what we really need to have is the leadership by the governors or even the prime minister, and those people may have kind of mixed messages. now we have the olympics, so the people may not really be cautious to covid—19. cheering.
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critics call this the olympic effect. we saw it last week on the streets around the olympic stadium during the opening ceremony, and it's all happening in a country where most people under the age of 50 remain completely unvaccinated. to tell people that it's dangerous, you have — to tell people that it's dangerous, you have to stay home and watch her behaviour_ you have to stay home and watch her behaviour is — you have to stay home and watch her behaviour is just not credible. you have to stay home and watch her behaviour isjust not credible. it says— behaviour isjust not credible. it says if_ behaviour isjust not credible. it says if we — behaviour isjust not credible. it says if we have heavy smoking parents — says if we have heavy smoking parents are telling the children smoking — parents are telling the children smoking is dangerous. the japanese government is now telling young people to go out and get vaccinated as soon as possible, so how do you do that? first of all, this is all the paperwork you need. this is actually for my son. and then you go on one of the government websites and make a booking. now, most of the places that i've tried to make a booking today have been offering slots in mid—september, although i have managed to find one place which is offering a slot in mid—august, which means
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he could be fully vaccinated by the beginning of october. but others here say the olympics is going much better than expected and, despite record infections, there were just eight covid deaths in the whole of japan yesterday. is the threat being exaggerated? the mood must have been quite jolly before the titanic sank. there is a time lag between the hole in the ship and the actual sinking taking place. there is a time lag between the rise of infection and the rise of the seriously ill patients, inundating the hospitals and leading to the collapse of the medical system. at the current rate of increase, tokyo's covid wards could be full before the olympic closing ceremony happens at the end of next week. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in tokyo. i'm joined now by mariko oi who is in tokyo for us.
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as we saw and they report it is extremely difficult for people to get a vaccination appointment. goverment calling on younger people in particular to get vaccinated — how effective has a vaccination strategy in japan how effective has a vaccination strategy injapan ben? it’s how effective has a vaccination strategy in japan ben?- strategy in japan ben? it's not bein: strategy in japan ben? it's not being very — strategy in japan ben? it's not being very effective _ strategy in japan ben? it's not being very effective is - strategy in japan ben? it's not being very effective is the - strategy in japan ben? it's not. being very effective is the short answer. it does feel a little unfair that there is not enough jobs to go around and yet young people are encouraged to get vaccinated. that's primarily the reaction among young people. if you want us to get vaccinated, make them available. as for people not obliging to the governments request to stay at home and going out, i don't think that's just young people either. we've been reporting outside every day and i've seen every age group from the young to the old. and that's mainly because of what we've been talking about, this is the fourth date of emergency, people are fed up and
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there is no urgency about it any more. in the very fact that the tokyo olympics are taking place in the city, that's just sending the wrong message to the japanese public that maybe they can just carry on as usual. that maybe they can 'ust carry on as usual. . , that maybe they can 'ust carry on as usual. ., , ., ._ , ., that maybe they can 'ust carry on as usual. ., , ., .,y , ., ., that maybe they can 'ust carry on as usual. ., , ., ._ , ., ., , usual. there was always going to be criticised sunak _ usual. there was always going to be criticised sunak criticism _ usual. there was always going to be criticised sunak criticism that - usual. there was always going to be criticised sunak criticism that the . criticised sunak criticism that the olympics were potentially a super spreader event. how is the prime minister dealing with this criticism and how was he defending himself? it's been interesting to see his twitter account because he's been tweeting to congratulate every japanese athlete who won a gold medal. which is obviously a very nice thing to do but we haven't actually seen him sweet ones about this current search in covid cases. that's getting a lot of criticism because if he wants to reach that young people, we know that they don't watch television which he has been speaking to you by holding a press conference and so on, those young people don't watch tv as much as the older generation. i vividly remember this interview that nhk had
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of doctor only the top medical adviser to the government and a popular singer among young people and the singer actually told the doctor that some young people don't even know that the city is under a state of emergency. the shack that the doctor had in his face. that's the doctor had in his face. that's the reality. people arejust the doctor had in his face. that's the reality. people are just not getting the message. of course prime minister has to hold an election by this autumn, he was hoping that this gold rush that we are seeing among japanese athletes may shape the public opinion. we haven't really seen that, his popularity rating hasn't really gone up. we will see whether that will change but so far people are still not happy with how things are going. we understand that a little later today perhaps will get some division from the japanese government as to whether emergency measures will be extended. we will be sure to give you that information when we get it. we will be sure to give you that information when we get it.
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we'll have all the latest on the sporting action in tokyo a little later in the programme — we'll hear from our sports presenter sarah mulkerrins. and a reminder that you can find much more about tokyo olympics on our website, including this day—by—day guide to all the key events. just go to bbc.com/news and follow the links. let's take a look at some of the stories in the headlines in the uk. international charities say they're disappointed that a pledge by world leaders to provide five billion dollars to boost global education has come up short. britain and kenya, joint hosts of this week's education summit in london, say the figure is currently just over $4 billion. nobel prize—winner malala yousafzai told the summit girls in particular faced an "education crisis". if we want a stronger, fairer world, we must keep girls learning. girls' education improves public health, mitigates climate change, improves peace and promotes economic growth.
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strong education financing is key to achieving this goal. england's deputy chief medical officer says he hopes the worst of the coronavirus pandemic is over but he warned there could be "one or two bumpy periods" ahead as autumn approaches. he has urged people who've not yet been vaccinated to come forward. the latest data suggests that covid vaccines have prevented an estimated 22 million infections and 60,000 deaths in england alone. a 55—year—old man who suffered life—changing injuries after he was crushed in the crowd at hillsborough stadium in 1989 has died, making him the 97th victim of the tragedy. andrew devine was 22 when he went to watch liverpool in the fa cup semifinal against nottingham forest. he spent the rest of his life in a wheelchair. still to come a bit later in the programme,
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a maltese inquiry finds the state responsible for the murder of the anti—corru ption journalist. but first... president biden has ordered 2 million american government workers to get vaccinated or else face compulsory covid testing and restrictions. the administration is struggling with increasing infection rates, while around half the population is refusing a jab. and if the stick won't work, mr biden is also offering a carrot. today i'm calling on all states and local government to use funding they have received including from the american rescue plan to give $100 to anyone who gets fully vaccinated. i know the pain people who got vaccinated, might sound unfair to folks who had gotten vaccinated already. here's the deal, if incentives help us beat this virus i believe we should use them. live now to our north america correspondent david willis, he joins me from los angeles.
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great having on the programme david. president biden making that urgent plea again to people to get vaccinated — in his speech stressing there are enough vaccines — will this work? key question, of course 60% or so of the american population has had at least one jab. but there is a sector of the population that has stubbornly refused to get vaccinated. in the last hour so president biden expresses frustration over that, he said this is not a party political matter it was a matter of life and death. and as regards this uptick in cases here covid—19 the president called it a pandemic of the unvaccinated. he announced a series of measures designed to incentivise and dis— incentivise those who are reluctant or willing or whatever. these
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include putting pressure on federal government workers here to get 801. also he is talking about cash incentives for some in areas where there are low vaccination rates. also calling on the us defence department to consider adding the coronavirus vaccine to the required vaccinations that it gives to members of the us military. but to directly answer your question, will it work? we willjust have to wait and see. if it doesn't bend the president is going to have to come up president is going to have to come up with some perhaps stricter measures or incentives. paid time off, $100 measures or incentives. paid time off. $100 for _ measures or incentives. paid time off, $100 for every _ measures or incentives. paid time off, $100 for every vaccinated - off, $100 for every vaccinated person, that's what the us treasury department is offering. and yet there is hesitation. what is behind this vaccine hesitancy?— this vaccine hesitancy? president biden said tuesday _ this vaccine hesitancy? president biden said tuesday that - this vaccine hesitancy? president biden said tuesday that wonky i this vaccine hesitancy? president l biden said tuesday that wonky was this information, disinformation of course on social media. there have
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been suggestions for example that people who are vaccinated, having to wear a mask indoors somehow suggest that the vaccine doesn't work. indeed even republicans have railed against this different to eight disinformation on social media. the senate minority leader mitch mcconnell said today that a lot of people in this country have been subject to bad advice, as he put it. indeed president biden last week said that some of this disinformation was killing people. what can they do? the white house has set up a group to flag posts which put out disinformation on science such as facebook. but it's very much a game of whack a mole. they don't want mandatory measures to be introduced here, they are reluctant to do that. but they may have to if these new measures don't bear fruit. if you wanyt to get in touch with me i'm on twitter — @bbckarishma
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you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme, we'll have all the latest on the olympics, including the united states' newest gymnastics star after sunisa lee picks up gold in tokyo. the us space agency nasa has ordered an investigation after confirmation today that astronauts were cleared to fly while drunk. the last foot patrol once an everyday part of the soldiers lot, drudgery and danger, no more after almost four decades.
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if one is one's own home, a private house, not doing any harm to anyone i don't really see why all these people should wander in and say you were doing something wrong. six rare white lion . cubs are on the prowl at leicestershire park and already they've been met with a roar- of approval from visitors. they are lovely, yeah, really sweet, really cute. this is newsday on the bbc. in singapore, our headlines... there's been a spike of new covid infections in tokyo amid concern that the olympics could have contributed to the increase. there are warnings that the city's hospitals could soon be overwhelmed. president biden has told millions of american government workers to be vaccinated against coronavirus, or face compulsory testing and restrictions.
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a public inquiry into the murder of a maltese investigative journalist, daphne caruana galizia, has found that the state bore responsibility for her death, by creating a "culture of impunity". she died four years ago in a car bomb attack near her home. her revelations helped to trigger an early election by publishing allegations linking the prime minister, joseph muscat, to the panama papers scandal, which exposed the use of tax havens by the rich. i'm joined now by stephen grey, investigative journalist at reuters, who's been following this story closely for years. stephen, i know you've reported extensively on this — how significant is the conclusion by the inquiry that it is the state that is responsible for her death? i think it's an amazing development. this is done something incredible, very few states would be prepared to do something like this. they've dug
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into this assassination and they've turned this really, really precise i on all the institutions of their state and in particular the very top, the prime ministers office which they essentially hold responsible for that murder. i haven't seen anything like that. she was known as the one woman wikileaks, and on a good day her blog got 400,000 readers, more than the combined circulation of the country's newspapers. why was she so popular in malta, and what were some of her biggest investigative stories? for hundred thousand is actually the population of the island, she got that big of a readership on certain days. she was immensely influential. she was only through her pen, through what she wrote. she was absolutely tireless in exposing the depth of corruption in her society.
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it was a relentless thing she did from small story too large. all the ways in which political power, those at the top were able to influence every aspect of the state from how the police operated, how fines were issued, how regulations were passed. it was incredible. and above all to top people in government including the chief of staff, the prime minister have set up offshore companies for their wealthjust companies for their wealth just after entering power which companies for their wealthjust after entering power which she saw as a clear scheme for corruption. it was very wide ranging, what you came up was very wide ranging, what you came up with. 1 was very wide ranging, what you came u- with. ~ ., i. ., up with. i know you are speaking with her family _ up with. i know you are speaking with her family what _ up with. i know you are speaking with her family what is _ up with. i know you are speaking with her family what is a - up with. i know you are speaking| with her family what is a reaction from mayor?— with her family what is a reaction from ma or? , ., , , from mayor? they are 'ust digesting this re ort, from mayor? they are 'ust digesting this report. nah from mayor? they are 'ust digesting this report, it's over — from mayor? they are just digesting this report, it's over 550 _ from mayor? they are just digesting this report, it's over 550 pages - this report, its over 550 pages long in maltese. they, a tremendous relief, i've spoken to them from just days after deafeni was killed.
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they have been fighting, fighting, fighting. and at the inquiry they're still waiting for justice fighting. and at the inquiry they're still waiting forjustice in terms of the actual murder investigation. there were people in two accused of her murder including one of the islands riches businessmen. they are very relieved that this very clear verdict has come through although they are reading all the detail recommendations, etc. the fact that it actually recognises that the state wasn't just sort of, it actually recognises that the state wasn'tjust sort of, not shouldering its responsibility to protect her, as they clearly were not or were not acting to address the stories she came up with. but were deliberately making her position dangerous. they were active campaign walked two orchestrated, like an octopus the paper says in
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which herfinancial like an octopus the paper says in which her financial assets would like an octopus the paper says in which herfinancial assets would be in challenge, multiple lawsuits. fascinating stuff. so sorry to cut you off. we are out of time on this very important story. now let's return to tokyo and get an update on the olympics. it's day seven today, and with the athletics events set to begin, china is on top of the medal table. they are tied with japan on 15 gold medals, but china has more medals overall with 31. on day six, all eyes were on the women's gymnastics, and even without simone biles competing, it was a new us star who got the gold, 18—year—old sunisa lee taking home the gold medal, a fifth straight win in the event for the us. and this is the moment herfamily knew she had won the gold as they watched together back home in oakdale, minnesota. i'm joined from tokyo by our sports presenter sarah mulkerrins. sunisa lee, what a victory,
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and winning while her team—mate the and winning while her team—mate picture showing that the picture showing how exciting that moments been present what's the reactionary? it’s that moments been present what's the reactiona ? �* , , ., , that moments been present what's the reactiona ? �*, , ., , , reactionary? it's been lovely seeing all the families _ reactionary? it's been lovely seeing all the families reacting _ reactionary? it's been lovely seeing all the families reacting all- reactionary? it's been lovely seeing all the families reacting all over - all the families reacting all over the world. lots cannot be here in the world. lots cannot be here in the covid pandemic. wonderful to see herfamily being able the covid pandemic. wonderful to see her family being able to experience that moment and for her, what a week it has been. she said before the game she didn't think she would ever have a chance of winning the gold and the search of some mobiles. suddenly with her withdrawal it opened it opened it up for her. she said she was feeling the pressure going in and simone biles helped her. she had a chat with her, she got her the zone. and simone biles was cheering her all the way through. lee, brilliant performance for her. she wanted on the floor at the final piece of apparatus that she had to do and the tears flowed after her. the american dominance continuing in that event. so exciting- — continuing in that event. so exciting- i _ continuing in that event. so exciting. i was really struck by
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that. what about the upcoming events for day seven?— for day seven? we've got the track and field getting _ for day seven? we've got the track and field getting under— for day seven? we've got the track and field getting under way. - and field getting under way. swimming always takes place in the first week or so and then the attention moves to athletics. today were going to have the heats of the 100 metres, watch out forjamaica's prize, she is so fast. she is also bidding to become the first woman to win three spread gold medals in the olympics. one metal up for grabs today, men's 10,000 olympics. one metal up for grabs today, men's10,000 metres with ugandans perhaps the favourite in that one. thank you so much forjoining us. it's worth reminding you how historic these olympics are in many ways. it's the first games to be postponed since 19114, and that was because of world war ii. it's also the first olympics taking place during a global pandemic. we caught up with some former olympians in asia, and we asked them what's the biggest challenge athletes will face
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in the competition this year. music. i think that actually they will have to prepare themselves on this one because it would be a really, really different atmosphere. this time, there would be no spectators on the stadium. mostly, it would feel different, but i really believe that all the athletes are adjusting to it. as a competitor, of course it's not easy to play in this olympic games because, you know, during this pandemic, corona, everybody was very scared.
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we were married in 1997, so almost ten years we had been dating. of course, now, we are very happy, and we've got three children and all of them can play badminton. when you enter into the athletes' village, it's a lot of people in there, and you can lose your focus.
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you always remind yourself to really focus and not, you know, do a lot of stuff during that time. what a heart—warming tale. those two from inn dyskinesia, i met them before, they arejust from inn dyskinesia, i met them before, they are just as charming in real life. before, they are just as charming in real life. and before we go, a chubby baby indeed. meet the world's heaviest newborn captive panda, born ealier this week in china's wolong nature reserve. the newborn, weighing nearly 300 grams, is in healthy condition. giant pandas are notoriously difficult to breed both in the wild and in captivity. the mother, mei—xi, showed signs of pregnany injune and went
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into labor this monday. that's all for now. stay with bbc world news. hello. a stormy evening and night is ahead for the south west of england, whilst only thunderstorms further north in the uk will tend to fizzle out in the next few hours. but we have had some around again today. but this is a named storm we're talking about in the south west approaches. that's unusual at this time of year. of particular concern, those sleeping out under canvas 01’ in a caravan. it's this rapidly deepening area of low pressure bringing that stormy weather. notjust winds, but some more soaking rains as well, and those will affect many parts, actually, of england and wales as we go through the evening and overnight, as you can see. we could have 15—20 mm of rain as that weather front moves through. the winds escalating in south west
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approaches first of all, could see gusts in excess of 60 mph, as i say, enough to bring down potentially trees and power lines, it could cause some disruption. by morning, you can see that that rain is affecting many parts of england and wales, whilst the showers have eased in the north, it becomes a little drier. certainly not a cold night for anywhere, and it does look as if we will start with some drier weather in the north, just rather cloudy and cool across northern scotland. one or two showers here pepping up again and for northern ireland, but around our area of low pressure, our storm across southern areas will see heavier showers breaking out with thunder and lightning. again, some strong winds, even gale—force winds around coastal areas in southern and eastern parts as well. not as lively, we think, as those further west to start the day, but unusually strong for this time of year, and the winds should ease down a little bit in the south west as we get into the afternoon. but the feel of the day will be tempered somewhat compared with today because we've got more cloud around and those heavy downpours. now, those are all tied in, as i say, with that storm system
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which moves away for saturday. and then we open up to this northerly wind bringing showers southwards. so, northerly wind will make it feel cooler, and temperatures actually will be below average across the northern half of the country in particular. and still with those weather fronts close by for the north sea coast, the risk of some cloudy periods with some patchy rain. and still in southern areas, there's the energy there for some heavier showers to break out, so it's not as unsettled, but it's still not dry. and, as i say, in the north, it will feel quite cool. similar outlook for sunday, really. by the beginning of the week, things may start to calm down a little bit more. more detail on that amber warning online.
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this is bbc news. the headlines — covid cases injapan surge as local media report infections across the country have exceeded 10,000 cases for the first time and top medical advisers urge the government to issue stronger warnings about the virus. president biden has pleaded with more americans to have coronavirus jabs, setting out measures targeting millions of federal employees and contractors. it follows a rise in covid infections fuelled by the delta variant. a public inquiry into the murder of a maltese investigative journalist, daphne caruana galizia, has found that the state bore responsibility for her death. it found the government had failed to recognise risks to her life. tourists on turkey's aegean coast have been forced to flee from their hotels as the emergency services battled multiple wildfires for a second day. video shows hills near the resort of marmaris ablaze.

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